sponsored links
TED2010

Michael Shermer: The pattern behind self-deception

マイケル・シャーマー「自己欺瞞の背後にあるパターン」

February 10, 2010

宇宙人による誘拐やダウジング棒などの奇妙な事柄が信じられてしまう理由を、脳の最も基本的な2つの生存本能によって説明できるとマイケル・シャーマーは述べます。その正体は何で、我々はいかに騙されてしまうのでしょうか。

Michael Shermer - Skeptic
Michael Shermer debunks myths, superstitions and urban legends -- and explains why we believe them. Along with publishing Skeptic Magazine, he's author of Why People Believe Weird Things and The Mind of the Market. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So since I was here last in '06,
前回 2006年に TED でお話しした後
00:16
we discovered that global climate change
地球温暖化はかなり深刻なことが
00:19
is turning out to be a pretty serious issue,
明らかになってきました
00:21
so we covered that fairly extensively
そこで雑誌スケプティックでは
00:23
in Skeptic magazine.
大々的にこの問題を取り上げました
00:25
We investigate all kinds
この雑誌は 科学から疑似科学まで
00:27
of scientific and quasi-scientific controversies,
あらゆる論争を取り上げるのです
00:29
but it turns out we don't have to worry about any of this
でも こんな心配も不要です
00:32
because the world's going to end in 2012.
2012年に終末が来るからです
00:34
Another update:
最新情報をもう一つ
00:36
You will recall I introduced you guys
「クワドロ・トラッカー」を
00:38
to the Quadro Tracker.
ご紹介しておきます
00:40
It's like a water dowsing device.
ダウジング棒のような物です
00:42
It's just a hollow piece of plastic with an antenna that swivels around.
首振りするアンテナが付いたプラスチックケースで
00:44
And you walk around, and it points to things.
持って歩くと 物のありかを示すのです
00:47
Like if you're looking for marijuana in students' lockers,
例えばロッカーに隠したマリファナを
00:49
it'll point right to somebody.
指し示すのです
00:52
Oh, sorry. (Laughter)
おっと失礼 (笑)
00:54
This particular one that was given to me
私が入手したこの装置は
00:56
finds golf balls,
ゴルフボールを見つけます
00:58
especially if you're at a golf course
特にゴルフコースでラフの辺りを
01:00
and you check under enough bushes.
丁寧に探ると効果的です
01:02
Well, under the category of "What's the harm of silly stuff like this?"
さて この手のガラクタの実害について見てみましょう
01:05
this device, the ADE 651,
こちらは ADE651
01:08
was sold to the Iraqi government
これはイラク政府に
01:11
for 40,000 dollars apiece.
1台4万ドルで売られたものです
01:14
It's just like this one, completely worthless,
この装置も全く役に立たないのですが
01:16
in which it allegedly worked by "electrostatic
静電気磁性イオン吸着の原理で
01:18
magnetic ion attraction,"
動作するとされています
01:20
which translates to
言い換えれば
01:24
"pseudoscientific baloney" -- would be the nice word --
疑似科学的なデタラメ と言えます
01:26
in which you string together a bunch of words that sound good,
それらしい単語を並べても
01:29
but it does absolutely nothing.
全く何の役にも立ちません
01:31
In this case, at trespass points,
この場合 検問所において
01:33
allowing people to go through
この小さな探知機の信号を頼りに
01:36
because your little tracker device said they were okay,
人々を通過させることは
01:38
actually cost lives.
実際 命に関わる問題です
01:41
So there is a danger to pseudoscience,
疑似科学による製品を信じると
01:44
in believing in this sort of thing.
危険が伴うのです
01:46
So what I want to talk about today is belief.
そこで今日は 信じるということをお話しします
01:49
I want to believe,
私は信じたいのです
01:52
and you do too.
皆さんも信じたいのです
01:54
And in fact, I think my thesis here is that
実際 今から説明する定理は
01:56
belief is the natural state of things.
信じることが自然な状態だと示すものです
01:58
It is the default option. We just believe.
もともとそれを選んで 信じるのです
02:00
We believe all sorts of things.
あらゆる物事を信じます
02:02
Belief is natural;
信じることが普通なのです
02:04
disbelief, skepticism, science, is not natural.
不信 疑念 科学などは自然ではなく
02:06
It's more difficult.
これらはより複雑なものです
02:08
It's uncomfortable to not believe things.
何かを信用しないと落ち着かないので
02:10
So like Fox Mulder on "X-Files,"
「Xファイル」のフォックス・モルダーのように
02:12
who wants to believe in UFOs? Well, we all do,
UFOの存在を信じたい人もいます 誰もが信じる—
02:15
and the reason for that is because
そのわけは 脳の中には
02:18
we have a belief engine in our brains.
信用する仕組みがあるからです
02:20
Essentially, we are pattern-seeking primates.
本質的に 私たちはパターンを探す霊長類です
02:23
We connect the dots: A is connected to B; B is connected to C.
AとB BとCをつなげます
02:26
And sometimes A really is connected to B,
ときには AとBとが実際に関連しているのです
02:29
and that's called association learning.
これは関連付け学習と呼ばれています
02:32
We find patterns, we make those connections,
私たちはパターンや関係を見い出します
02:34
whether it's Pavlov's dog here
パブロフの犬が
02:37
associating the sound of the bell with the food,
鈴の音と食べ物を関連付けて
02:39
and then he salivates to the sound of the bell,
鈴を聞いて反射的によだれを垂らすとか
02:42
or whether it's a Skinnerian rat,
スキナー理論でラットが
02:44
in which he's having an association
自身の行動と報酬を関連付ける事で
02:46
between his behavior and a reward for it,
同じ行動を繰り返すようになるとか
02:48
and therefore he repeats the behavior.
それらと同じ事なのです
02:50
In fact, what Skinner discovered
スキナーはこんなことも発見しました
02:52
is that, if you put a pigeon in a box like this,
このような箱に鳩を入れて
02:54
and he has to press one of these two keys,
どちらかのボタンを選んで押すときに
02:57
and he tries to figure out what the pattern is,
鳩はパターンを見いだそうとするのです
02:59
and you give him a little reward in the hopper box there --
この鳩に与える小さな報酬が
03:01
if you just randomly assign rewards
ランダムに割り当てられて
03:03
such that there is no pattern,
そこにパターンがないようにします
03:06
they will figure out any kind of pattern.
鳩は何らかのパターンを見出そうとして
03:08
And whatever they were doing just before they got the reward,
報酬を受け取った直前の行動が何であっても
03:10
they repeat that particular pattern.
その行動パターンを繰り返すのです
03:12
Sometimes it was even spinning around twice counterclockwise,
反時計回りに2回転したら
03:14
once clockwise and peck the key twice.
時計回りに回って2度つつくとか そんなことまでします
03:17
And that's called superstition,
迷信と呼ばれる行動です
03:20
and that, I'm afraid,
しかも 残念ながら我々は
03:22
we will always have with us.
常に迷信と共に生きています
03:24
I call this process "patternicity" --
この作用を「パターン性」と呼びます
03:26
that is, the tendency to find meaningful patterns
意味のあるなしに関わらず 与えられた情報から
03:28
in both meaningful and meaningless noise.
何かパターンを見つけだそうとする傾向のことです
03:30
When we do this process, we make two types of errors.
この作用がはたらくときに 2種類の間違いが起きます
03:33
A Type I error, or false positive,
タイプⅠのミスは偽陽性です
03:36
is believing a pattern is real
パターンが存在しないのに
03:38
when it's not.
存在すると信じ込む事です
03:40
Our second type of error is a false negative.
タイプⅡのミスは偽陰性です
03:42
A Type II error is not believing
パターンが存在するのに
03:44
a pattern is real when it is.
存在しないと信じる事です
03:46
So let's do a thought experiment.
ではここで 思考実験をしてみます
03:49
You are a hominid three million years ago
原始人のあなたは3百万年前の
03:51
walking on the plains of Africa.
アフリカの平原を歩いています
03:53
Your name is Lucy, okay?
お名前はルーシーです いいですね?
03:56
And you hear a rustle in the grass.
草むらの中でカサカサいう音が聞こえます
03:58
Is it a dangerous predator,
危険な肉食動物でしょうか?
04:00
or is it just the wind?
それともただの風でしょうか?
04:02
Your next decision could be the most important one of your life.
これから人生で最も重要な決断を下すことになるかもしれません
04:04
Well, if you think that the rustle in the grass is a dangerous predator
草むらの音が肉食動物だと考えて
04:07
and it turns out it's just the wind,
実際はただの風だったら
04:10
you've made an error in cognition,
認識は間違っていて
04:12
made a Type I error, false positive.
タイプⅠの偽陽性になります
04:14
But no harm. You just move away.
実害はなく ただ逃げるだけです
04:16
You're more cautious. You're more vigilant.
用心深くて 慎重だったのです
04:18
On the other hand, if you believe that the rustle in the grass is just the wind,
しかしただの風だと思ったのに
04:20
and it turns out it's a dangerous predator,
実は危険な肉食動物だったら
04:22
you're lunch.
あなたは昼メシにされます
04:25
You've just won a Darwin award.
ダーウィン的淘汰によって
04:27
You've been taken out of the gene pool.
遺伝子プールから抹消されます
04:29
Now the problem here is that
要するに
04:31
patternicities will occur whenever the cost
タイプⅠのミスのコストが
04:33
of making a Type I error
タイプⅡのミスよりも小さければ
04:35
is less than the cost of making a Type II error.
パターン性が生まれるのです
04:37
This is the only equation in the talk by the way.
さて今日の数式はこれだけです
04:39
We have a pattern detection problem
パターンを察知する上で
04:41
that is assessing the difference between a Type I and a Type II error
タイプⅠとタイプⅡの差を評価することは
04:43
is highly problematic,
非常にやっかいな問題です
04:46
especially in split-second, life-and-death situations.
生死を賭けた一瞬においては特に難しいので
04:48
So the default position
私たちはもともと
04:51
is just: Believe all patterns are real --
全てのパターンはあるものとします
04:53
All rustles in the grass are dangerous predators
草むらの音は全て肉食動物であり
04:55
and not just the wind.
風ではないとします
04:58
And so I think that we evolved ...
人類の進化において
05:00
there was a natural selection for the propensity for our belief engines,
物事を信じるエンジンやパターンを探す—
05:02
our pattern-seeking brain processes,
脳の作用が自然淘汰で残ったのでしょう
05:05
to always find meaningful patterns
見出されたパターンはいつも
05:07
and infuse them with these sort of
捕食者や悪意ある存在などを示唆するのです
05:09
predatory or intentional agencies that I'll come back to.
この点はまた後で触れます
05:11
So for example, what do you see here?
例えば この写真は何に見えますか?
05:14
It's a horse head, that's right.
そうです これは馬の頭です
05:16
It looks like a horse. It must be a horse.
馬のように見えます 間違いなく
05:18
That's a pattern.
それこそがパターンです
05:20
And is it really a horse?
さて本当に馬でしょうか?
05:22
Or is it more like a frog?
カエルみたいではありませんか?
05:24
See, our pattern detection device,
さてパターン検出は
05:27
which appears to be located in the anterior cingulate cortex --
脳の前帯状皮質の機能と考えられています
05:29
it's our little detection device there --
我々の小さな検出器は
05:32
can be easily fooled, and this is the problem.
騙されやすく それが問題です
05:35
For example, what do you see here?
例えば 何が見えますか?
05:37
Yes, of course, it's a cow.
そうです 牛ですね
05:39
Once I prime the brain -- it's called cognitive priming --
一度情報を与えると ー認知プライミングといいますー
05:42
once I prime the brain to see it,
一度 写真の中に牛がいると教えると
05:45
it pops back out again even without the pattern that I've imposed on it.
今の補助線さえ無くても もう見えてきます
05:47
And what do you see here?
こちらは 何が見えますか?
05:50
Some people see a Dalmatian dog.
ダルメシアンが見える人はいますか
05:52
Yes, there it is. And there's the prime.
実際にいます これもプライミングです
05:54
So when I go back without the prime,
さてプライミング無しで絵に戻っても
05:56
your brain already has the model
皆さんの脳には既にモデルが記憶され
05:58
so you can see it again.
同じように見えるのです
06:00
What do you see here?
これは 何が見えますか?
06:02
Planet Saturn. Yes, that's good.
土星です いいですね
06:05
How about here?
こちらはどうでしょうか?
06:07
Just shout out anything you see.
何か見えたら叫んでください
06:10
That's a good audience, Chris.
みんなすごいですね クリス
06:14
Because there's nothing in this. Well, allegedly there's nothing.
だって何も無い絵です 何も無いはずです
06:16
This is an experiment done by Jennifer Whitson
これはテキサス大学オースティン校の
06:19
at U.T. Austin
ジェニファー・ウィットソンが
06:22
on corporate environments
職場環境で行った実験で
06:24
and whether feelings of uncertainty and out of control
はっきりしないとか手に負えないと感じるときに
06:26
makes people see illusory patterns.
ないはずのパターンを見出します
06:29
That is, almost everybody sees the planet Saturn.
つまり ほぼ全員が土星を見ました
06:31
People that are put in a condition of feeling out of control
自分の手に負えないと感じたとき
06:34
are more likely to see something in this,
何もパターンのないこの絵にも
06:37
which is allegedly patternless.
何かを見出だすのです
06:39
In other words, the propensity to find these patterns
言い換えれば パターンを見つける確率は
06:42
goes up when there's a lack of control.
コントロールできない状況下で上がります
06:45
For example, baseball players are notoriously superstitious
例えば野球選手はバッターボックスに立つときに
06:48
when they're batting,
縁起を担ぐことで有名ですが
06:51
but not so much when they're fielding.
守備の時はそうでもありません
06:53
Because fielders are successful
守備は90%から95%の確率で
06:55
90 to 95 percent of the time.
成功するからです
06:57
The best batters fail seven out of 10 times.
最高のバッターでも10打席に7回は凡退します
06:59
So their superstitions, their patternicities,
つまり縁起担ぎやまじないは全て
07:02
are all associated with feelings of lack of control
コントロールが効かないという感覚に
07:04
and so forth.
関連しているのです
07:07
What do you see in this particular one here, in this field?
ではこの絵の この部分には何が見えますか?
07:10
Anybody see an object there?
だれかわかる人は?
07:13
There actually is something here,
ここには実際に何かがあります
07:15
but it's degraded.
少し見にくくしてあります
07:17
While you're thinking about that,
考えながら聴いて下さい
07:19
this was an experiment done by Susan Blackmore,
これはイギリスの心理学者である
07:21
a psychologist in England,
スーザン・ブラックモアの実験です
07:23
who showed subjects this degraded image
この見にくい絵を見たときのスコアと
07:25
and then ran a correlation between
超能力のテストの成績や
07:27
their scores on an ESP test:
超常現象や超自然現象や天使を
07:29
How much did they believe in the paranormal,
信じている度合いとの
07:31
supernatural, angels and so forth.
相関を調べました
07:33
And those who scored high on the ESP scale,
超能力のテストが高得点だった被験者は
07:36
tended to not only see
見にくい絵からより多くのパターンを
07:39
more patterns in the degraded images
見つけるだけでなく存在しないパターンも
07:41
but incorrect patterns.
見いだす傾向がありました
07:43
Here is what you show subjects.
こんな絵を見せたのです
07:45
The fish is degraded 20 percent, 50 percent
この魚の絵は20% 50%
07:47
and then the one I showed you,
そして皆さんにお見せした70%まで
07:50
70 percent.
異なるレベルで見にくくしてありました
07:52
A similar experiment was done by another [Swiss] psychologist
似たような実験を ピーター・ブルッガーという
07:54
named Peter Brugger,
心理学者も行っています
07:56
who found significantly more meaningful patterns
意味あるパターンの知覚は
07:58
were perceived on the right hemisphere,
左側の視野から入って右脳半球が行うことが
08:01
via the left visual field, than the left hemisphere.
有意に多いことを発見しました
08:03
So if you present subjects the images such
左脳ではなく右脳が知覚するような
08:06
that it's going to end up on the right hemisphere instead of the left,
絵を見せれば
08:08
then they're more likely to see patterns
左脳で知覚する絵を見せられた時よりも
08:11
than if you put it on the left hemisphere.
パターンを見つけやすいのです
08:13
Our right hemisphere appears to be
「パターン性」現象の多くは
08:15
where a lot of this patternicity occurs.
右脳で起こると考えられます
08:17
So what we're trying to do is bore into the brain
次には脳のどこでそれが起きるか
08:19
to see where all this happens.
見てみましょう
08:21
Brugger and his colleague, Christine Mohr,
ブルッガーと共同研究者のクリスティン・モアーは
08:23
gave subjects L-DOPA.
被験者にL-ドーパを与えました
08:26
L-DOPA's a drug, as you know, given for treating Parkinson's disease,
L−ドーパはパーキンソン病の治療薬です
08:28
which is related to a decrease in dopamine.
この病気はドーパミンの減少に関係しており
08:31
L-DOPA increases dopamine.
L-ドーパはドーパミンの量を増やします
08:34
An increase of dopamine caused
そしてドーパミンが増加すると
08:36
subjects to see more patterns
ドーパミンを摂取しなかったグループより
08:38
than those that did not receive the dopamine.
多くのパターンを見出します
08:40
So dopamine appears to be the drug
つまりドーパミンは どうやら
08:42
associated with patternicity.
「パターン性」に関係した薬のようです
08:44
In fact, neuroleptic drugs
実際 神経弛緩薬が処方される
08:46
that are used to eliminate psychotic behavior,
偏執症や妄想
08:48
things like paranoia, delusions
幻覚などといった
08:50
and hallucinations,
異常行動は
08:52
these are patternicities.
全て「パターン性」の問題で
08:54
They're incorrect patterns. They're false positives. They're Type I errors.
間違ったパターンです 偽陽性でタイプⅠの誤りです
08:56
And if you give them drugs
ドーパミンを抑制する薬を
08:59
that are dopamine antagonists,
投与することで
09:01
they go away.
問題は解消します
09:03
That is, you decrease the amount of dopamine,
ドーパミンの量を減らす事で
09:05
and their tendency to see
病的なパターンを見る傾向を
09:07
patterns like that decreases.
抑制できます
09:09
On the other hand, amphetamines like cocaine
一方 コカインのようなアンフェタミンは
09:11
are dopamine agonists.
ドーパミン作動薬で
09:14
They increase the amount of dopamine.
ドーパミンの量を増やします
09:16
So you're more likely to feel in a euphoric state,
つまり 陶酔感や創造力を豊かに感じ
09:18
creativity, find more patterns.
パターンを見つけやすくなります
09:21
In fact, I saw Robin Williams recently
実際 最近ロビン・ウィリアムズが
09:23
talk about how he thought he was much funnier
コカインを使っていた頃のほうが
09:25
when he was doing cocaine, when he had that issue, than now.
ずっとウケたと話していました
09:27
So perhaps more dopamine
ドーパミンが多いほど
09:30
is related to more creativity.
創造力は高まるのかもしれません
09:32
Dopamine, I think, changes
ドーパミンは信号と
09:34
our signal-to-noise ratio.
ノイズの比率を変えるようです
09:36
That is, how accurate we are
すなわち どれだけ正確に
09:38
in finding patterns.
パターンを見つけるか ということです
09:40
If it's too low, you're more likely to make too many Type II errors.
感度が低すぎるとタイプⅡのミスが起きやすくなります
09:42
You miss the real patterns. You don't want to be too skeptical.
実存するパターンを見逃します また—
09:45
If you're too skeptical, you'll miss the really interesting good ideas.
疑い深いと 斬新なアイデアを見逃します
09:47
Just right, you're creative, and yet you don't fall for too much baloney.
適度なら創造的だしばかな話にひっかかりません
09:51
Too high and maybe you see patterns everywhere.
感度が高すぎるとパターンを見いだしすぎて
09:54
Every time somebody looks at you, you think people are staring at you.
誰かと眼が合うだけで見つめられたと感じたり
09:57
You think people are talking about you.
話題にされていると感じたりします
10:00
And if you go too far on that, that's just simply
それが行き過ぎると
10:02
labeled as madness.
しまいには狂気と呼ばれます
10:04
It's a distinction perhaps we might make
ファインマンとジョン・ナッシュという
10:06
between two Nobel laureates, Richard Feynman
2人のノーベル賞受賞者の間の
10:08
and John Nash.
違いと言えるかもしれません
10:10
One sees maybe just the right number
一人はノーベル賞を取るのに必要な
10:12
of patterns to win a Nobel Prize.
程度のパターンを見たのです
10:14
The other one also, but maybe too many patterns.
もう一人は過剰なまでのパターンを見いだし
10:16
And we then call that schizophrenia.
統合失調症になってしまいました
10:18
So the signal-to-noise ratio then presents us with a pattern-detection problem.
信号と雑音の比からパターン検知上の問題がわかります
10:21
And of course you all know exactly
皆さんもこれが一体何だか
10:24
what this is, right?
おわかりですよね?
10:26
And what pattern do you see here?
どんなパターンが見えますか?
10:28
Again, I'm putting your anterior cingulate cortex to the test here,
繰り返しますが 前帯状皮質への課題として
10:30
causing you conflicting pattern detections.
パターン認識の矛盾をついているのです
10:33
You know, of course, this is Via Uno shoes.
これはヴィア・ウーノの靴です
10:36
These are sandals.
サンダルです
10:38
Pretty sexy feet, I must say.
なかなかセクシーな足なのですが
10:41
Maybe a little Photoshopped.
加工されている可能性もあります
10:44
And of course, the ambiguous figures
この曖昧な形状のおかげで
10:46
that seem to flip-flop back and forth.
見方はコロコロ変わり
10:48
It turns out what you're thinking about a lot
皆さんがよく考えていることが
10:50
influences what you
実際に皆さんが見る物に
10:52
tend to see.
影響するのです
10:54
And you see the lamp here, I know.
これはランプです そうです
10:56
Because the lights on here.
電気が付いていますからね
10:58
Of course, thanks to the environmentalist movement
環境保護のムーブメントがあるから
11:01
we're all sensitive to the plight of marine mammals.
海の生物の窮状について誰もが敏感です
11:03
So what you see in this particular ambiguous figure
このとりわけ曖昧な絵は
11:06
is, of course, the dolphins, right?
もちろんイルカです そのとおり
11:09
You see a dolphin here,
ここに一頭
11:11
and there's a dolphin,
こちらにも一頭
11:13
and there's a dolphin.
ここにもいます
11:15
That's a dolphin tail there, guys.
皆さん あれはイルカの尾ビレですよ
11:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:20
If we can give you conflicting data, again,
繰り返します 矛盾するデータを示すと
11:25
your ACC is going to be going into hyperdrive.
前帯状皮質はあさっての方に飛んで行きます
11:28
If you look down here, it's fine. If you look up here, then you get conflicting data.
こちらをみれば平気ですが こちらを見ると変です
11:31
And then we have to flip the image
この絵を回転させると
11:34
for you to see that it's a set up.
からくりがわかりますね
11:36
The impossible crate illusion.
「不可能な木箱」の錯視です
11:40
It's easy to fool the brain in 2D.
平面写真では脳をだますのは簡単です
11:42
So you say, "Aw, come on Shermer, anybody can do that
「なんだよそんな錯視は心理学入門の本に載ってる
11:44
in a Psych 101 text with an illusion like that."
誰もが知ってるよ」と言うなら
11:46
Well here's the late, great Jerry Andrus'
これは故ジェリー・アンドラスが作った
11:48
"impossible crate" illusion in 3D,
「不可能な木箱」の三次元版です
11:50
in which Jerry is standing inside
ジェリー自身が
11:53
the impossible crate.
木箱の内側に立っています
11:55
And he was kind enough to post this
彼は親切にも この写真で
11:57
and give us the reveal.
仕掛けを見せてくれました
11:59
Of course, camera angle is everything. The photographer is over there,
カメラアングルがすべてです 向こうから撮ったのです
12:01
and this board appears to overlap with this one, and this one with that one, and so on.
この板がこちらと重なって こちらも同様に…
12:04
But even when I take it away,
でもこの写真を隠してしまえば
12:07
the illusion is so powerful because of how are brains are wired
この強力な錯視に騙された脳は
12:09
to find those certain kinds of patterns.
もとのパターンから離れられないのです
12:11
This is a fairly new one
これはかなり新しい錯視で
12:14
that throws us off because of the conflicting patterns
二つの写真の角度を比べるときに
12:16
of comparing this angle with that angle.
騙されてしまうのです
12:18
In fact, it's the exact same picture side by side.
実際は 同じ写真を並べただけなのです
12:21
So what you're doing is comparing that angle
みなさんがこちらではなく
12:24
instead of with this one, but with that one.
あちらの角度と比べると
12:26
And so your brain is fooled.
脳は騙されてしまうのです
12:28
Yet again, your pattern detection devices are fooled.
またもや パターン認識機能は騙されます
12:30
Faces are easy to see
顔の認識が容易なのは
12:32
because we have an additional evolved
顔を認識する
12:34
facial recognition software
特別に進化したソフトウェアが
12:36
in our temporal lobes.
側頭葉にあるからです
12:38
Here's some faces on the side of a rock.
岩の表面にいくつかの顔があります
12:41
I'm actually not even sure if this is -- this might be Photoshopped.
写真に細工されているかもしれませんが—
12:44
But anyway, the point is still made.
とにかく顔は気づきやすいのです
12:47
Now which one of these looks odd to you?
さて どちらの顔が奇妙に見えますか?
12:49
In a quick reaction, which one looks odd?
ぱっと見て変なのはどちらでしょう?
12:51
The one on the left. Okay. So I'll rotate it
左ですね これが右側にくるように
12:53
so it'll be the one on the right.
回してみましょう
12:55
And you are correct.
そうです 皆さん正解です
12:57
A fairly famous illusion -- it was first done with Margaret Thatcher.
この錯視は最初はマーガレット・サッチャーで作られました
12:59
Now, they trade up the politicians every time.
新しい政治家が登場する度に作られます
13:02
Well, why is this happening?
何故こんな事が起こるのでしょうか?
13:04
Well, we know exactly where it happens,
どこで起こることか 正確にわかっています
13:06
in the temporal lobe, right across, sort of above your ear there,
側頭葉のこの辺 耳の上の辺りです
13:08
in a little structure called the fusiform gyrus.
「紡錘状回」と呼ばれる小さな組織があり
13:11
And there's two types of cells that do this,
二種類の細胞が働いていて全体的な—
13:14
that record facial features either globally,
顔の特徴や一部を捉えます
13:16
or specifically these large, rapid-firing cells,
この大きくて反応の速い細胞が
13:19
first look at the general face.
まず顔の全体を捉えます
13:21
So you recognize Obama immediately.
こうしてオバマだとすぐにわかります
13:23
And then you notice something quite
その後で ほんの少しだけ
13:25
a little bit odd about the eyes and the mouth.
目と口が奇妙だと気づきます
13:27
Especially when they're upside down,
とりわけ上下反転の写真では
13:29
you're engaging that general facial recognition software there.
まず一般的な顔認識ソフトウェアが機能します
13:31
Now I said back in our little thought experiment,
さて我々のちょっとした思考実験に戻り
13:34
you're a hominid walking on the plains of Africa.
自分がアフリカの平原の原人と思って下さい
13:37
Is it just the wind or a dangerous predator?
今のは 風でしたか それとも 危険な捕食者ですか
13:39
What's the difference between those?
これらの違いは何か
13:42
Well, the wind is inanimate;
風は生物ではありませんが
13:44
the dangerous predator is an intentional agent.
危険な捕食者は意図をもって動き回ります
13:46
And I call this process agenticity.
この過程を エージェント性と呼びます
13:48
That is the tendency to infuse patterns
パターンに意味や意図
13:50
with meaning, intention and agency,
主体性を持たせることです
13:52
often invisible beings from the top down.
しばしば上位の見えない存在が想定されます
13:54
This is an idea that we got
このアイデアはTED仲間の—
13:57
from a fellow TEDster here, Dan Dennett,
ダン・デネットに教わりました
13:59
who talked about taking the intentional stance.
全てに意図があるという立場の話でした
14:01
So it's a type of that expanded to explain, I think, a lot of different things:
ここから多くのことを説明できると思います
14:03
souls, spirits, ghosts, gods, demons, angels,
魂 霊魂 幽霊 神 悪霊そして天使
14:06
aliens, intelligent designers,
宇宙人やインテリジェント•デザインなど
14:09
government conspiracists
政府の陰謀や
14:11
and all manner of invisible agents
力と意図を持って世界中を脅かし
14:13
with power and intention, are believed
我々の生活を支配していると信じられている
14:15
to haunt our world and control our lives.
様々な見えない存在のことも
14:17
I think it's the basis of animism
これがアニミズムや
14:19
and polytheism and monotheism.
多神教や一神教の根源でしょう
14:21
It's the belief that aliens are somehow
宇宙人はなぜか
14:24
more advanced than us, more moral than us,
人類よりも進んでいて高潔で
14:26
and the narratives always are
我々を救うために地球に来る
14:28
that they're coming here to save us and rescue us from on high.
という話になっています
14:30
The intelligent designer's always portrayed
インテリジェント・デザインの話は
14:33
as this super intelligent, moral being
超越した知的で道徳的な存在が
14:35
that comes down to design life.
生命を作るために降臨したという話
14:38
Even the idea that government can rescue us --
政府ですら我々を救うことができるかもしれません
14:40
that's no longer the wave of the future,
こんな話はもはや未来へ向けた潮流ではありません
14:42
but that is, I think, a type of agenticity:
一種のエージェント性にすぎません
14:44
projecting somebody up there,
上位で全てを見通している誰か
14:46
big and powerful, will come rescue us.
偉大で強力な存在が助けに来てくれるのです
14:48
And this is also, I think, the basis of conspiracy theories.
これはまた陰謀論の根源でもあります
14:50
There's somebody hiding behind there pulling the strings,
だれか背後で糸を引いていた存在が居て
14:52
whether it's the Illuminati
イルミナティだとか
14:55
or the Bilderbergers.
ビルダーバーグなのです
14:57
But this is a pattern detection problem, isn't it?
これはパターン認識の問題でしょう
14:59
Some patterns are real and some are not.
真実のパターンもあり そうでないものもあります
15:01
Was JFK assassinated by a conspiracy or by a lone assassin?
JFK の暗殺は陰謀か単独犯か?
15:03
Well, if you go there -- there's people there on any given day --
いつ現場を訪れても 誰かいて
15:06
like when I went there, here -- showing me where the different shooters were.
別の狙撃者が居た場所をガイドしてくれます
15:09
My favorite one was he was in the manhole.
マンホールに隠れていたというすごい話もあります
15:12
And he popped out at the last second, took that shot.
直前に飛び出して 狙撃したというのです
15:15
But of course, Lincoln was assassinated by a conspiracy.
しかしリンカーンの暗殺は陰謀でした
15:18
So we can't just uniformly dismiss
全てのパターンを一律に
15:20
all patterns like that.
却下することもできないのです
15:22
Because, let's face it, some patterns are real.
真実のパターンもあるのです
15:24
Some conspiracies really are true.
陰謀の中には真実もあります
15:26
Explains a lot, maybe.
だいたいこれで説明できます
15:30
And 9/11 has a conspiracy theory. It is a conspiracy.
9.11 事件にも謀略説はあります 陰謀なのです
15:32
We did a whole issue on it.
特集号も出しています
15:35
Nineteen members of Al Queda plotting to fly planes into buildings
アルカイダの 19 名が飛行機をビルに
15:37
constitutes a conspiracy.
突っ込ませた陰謀なのです
15:39
But that's not what the "9/11 truthers" think.
謀略説の人は こう考えないで
15:41
They think it was an inside job by the Bush administration.
ブッシュ政権が企てた謀略だというのです
15:43
Well, that's a whole other lecture.
まったく違う話ですね
15:46
You know how we know that 9/11
ではブッシュ政権が 9.11 事件を
15:48
was not orchestrated by the Bush administration?
企てたのではないとする理由は?
15:50
Because it worked.
それは 成功したからです
15:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:57
So we are natural-born dualists.
我々は生まれついての二元論者で
16:00
Our agenticity process comes from
エージェント性が作用しているので
16:02
the fact that we can enjoy movies like these.
こんな映画が面白いのです
16:04
Because we can imagine, in essence,
要するに 状況が想像ができるので
16:06
continuing on.
楽しめるのです
16:08
We know that if you stimulate the temporal lobe,
側頭葉を刺激すれば
16:10
you can produce a feeling of out-of-body experiences,
幽体分離の感覚や臨死の体験を
16:12
near-death experiences,
作り出せます
16:14
which you can do by just touching an electrode to the temporal lobe there.
側頭葉に電極を差し込んで触れるだけです
16:16
Or you can do it through loss of consciousness,
あるいは遠心加速器で
16:19
by accelerating in a centrifuge.
意識を失うときにも体験します
16:21
You get a hypoxia, or a lower oxygen.
ハイポキシアといわれる低酸素症のとき
16:23
And the brain then senses
脳は幽体分離の感覚を
16:26
that there's an out-of-body experience.
覚えるのです
16:28
You can use -- which I did, went out and did --
それから私も試しに行ったのですが
16:30
Michael Persinger's God Helmet,
マイケル・パーシンジャーの神のヘルメットは
16:32
that bombards your temporal lobes with electromagnetic waves.
側頭葉に電磁波を照射して刺激します
16:34
And you get a sense of out-of-body experience.
すると幽体分離の感覚を味わうのです
16:36
So I'm going to end here with a short video clip
では最後に短いビデオをお見せします
16:39
that sort of brings all this together.
お話した内容全てが盛り込まれています
16:41
It's just a minute and a half.
1分半のビデオです
16:43
It ties together all this into the power of expectation and the power of belief.
期待の力と信念の力が結びつくと
16:45
Go ahead and roll it.
何が起きるのかご覧下さい
16:48
Narrator: This is the venue they chose for their fake auditions
リップクリームのニセ広告の
16:50
for an advert for lip balm.
オーディションの会場です
16:53
Woman: We're hoping we can use part of this
全国放送のコマーシャルに
16:55
in a national commercial, right?
使おうと思っています いい?
16:57
And this is test on some lip balms
こちらで用意したリップクリームの
16:59
that we have over here.
テストをさせてください
17:01
And these are our models who are going to help us,
この二人のモデルが手伝ってくれます
17:03
Roger and Matt.
ロジャーとマットです
17:05
And we have our own lip balm,
独自のリップクリームを用意しました
17:07
and we have a leading brand.
これは高級ブランド品です
17:09
Would you have any problem
テストのためにモデルとキスしてもらって
17:11
kissing our models to test it?
大丈夫ですか
17:13
Girl: No.
いいわ
17:15
Woman: You wouldn't? (Girl: No.) Woman: You'd think that was fine.
平気?/ええ/それでいいですか?
17:17
Girl: That would be fine. (Woman: Okay.)
それでいいです/結構です
17:19
So this is a blind test.
これは目隠しテストです
17:21
I'm going to ask you to go ahead
合図をしたら始めますから
17:24
and put a blindfold on.
目隠しを付けてください
17:26
Kay, now can you see anything? (Girl: No.)
いいわ 何も見えないわね?/何も
17:29
Pull it so you can't even see down. (Girl: Okay.)
下からも見えないように引っ張って下さい/いいわ
17:32
Woman: It's completely blind now, right?
もう何も見えないですね?
17:34
Girl: Yes. (Woman: Okay.)
はい/いいわ
17:36
Now, what I'm going to be looking for in this test
このテストで見たいことは
17:38
is how it protects your lips,
クリームが唇の感触を
17:41
the texture, right,
どう保護するかということなの
17:44
and maybe if you can discern any flavor or not.
何かの香りがするかもしれません
17:46
Girl: Okay. (Woman: Have you ever done a kissing test before?)
はい/キスのテストは初めて?
17:49
Girl: No.
ええ
17:52
Woman: Take a step here.
こちらに来て
17:54
Okay, now I'm going to ask you to pucker up.
さぁ 唇を丸めて
17:56
Pucker up big and lean in just a little bit, okay?
唇を丸めたら少し前に いいわ
17:58
(Music)
(音楽)
18:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:19
Woman: Okay.
いいわ
18:30
And, Jennifer, how did that feel?
ジェニファー どんな感じ?
18:32
Jennifer: Good.
すてき
18:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:36
Girl: Oh my God!
いやだ
18:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:45
Michael Shermer: Thank you very much. Thank you. Thanks.
ありがとうございました ありがとう
18:50
Translator:Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewer:RINAKO UENISHI

sponsored links

Michael Shermer - Skeptic
Michael Shermer debunks myths, superstitions and urban legends -- and explains why we believe them. Along with publishing Skeptic Magazine, he's author of Why People Believe Weird Things and The Mind of the Market.

Why you should listen

As founder and publisher of Skeptic Magazine, Michael Shermer has exposed fallacies behind intelligent design, 9/11 conspiracies, the low-carb craze, alien sightings and other popular beliefs and paranoias. But it's not about debunking for debunking's sake. Shermer defends the notion that we can understand our world better only by matching good theory with good science.

Shermer's work offers cognitive context for our often misguided beliefs: In the absence of sound science, incomplete information can powerfully combine with the power of suggestion (helping us hear Satanic lyrics when "Stairway to Heaven" plays backwards, for example). In fact, a common thread that runs through beliefs of all sorts, he says, is our tendency to convince ourselves: We overvalue the shreds of evidence that support our preferred outcome, and ignore the facts we aren't looking for.

He writes a monthly column for Scientific American, and is an adjunct at Claremont Graduate University and Chapman University. His latest book is The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies—How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths. He is also the author of The Mind of the Market, on evolutionary economics, Why Darwin Matters: Evolution and the Case Against Intelligent Design, and The Science of Good and Evil. And his next book is titled The Moral Arc of Science.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.