sponsored links
Mission Blue Voyage

Peter Tyack: The intriguing sound of marine mammals

ピーター・タイヤック: 海洋哺乳類の興味深い鳴き声

April 15, 2010

ウッズホール海洋研究所のピーター・タイヤック氏が海に隠された秘密「海中の音」について語ります。何百マイルも離れた仲間との交信に、クジラは音や鳴き声をどのように用いているのか?その驚くべき方法を、ミッション・ブルーのステージ上で説明します。

Peter Tyack - Behavioral ecologist
Peter Tyack studies the social behavior and acoustic communication in whales and dolphins, learning how these animals use sound to perform critical activities, such as mating and locating food. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Thank you so much. I'm going to try to take you
ありがとう 今日は皆さんを
00:15
on a journey of the underwater acoustic world
クジラとイルカが奏でる水中音楽の世界へ
00:18
of whales and dolphins.
お連れしましょう
00:21
Since we are such a visual species,
私たち視覚に頼る種族には
00:23
it's hard for us to really understand this,
理解の難しい世界です
00:25
so I'll use a mixture of figures and sounds
そこで 理解の助けになればと
00:27
and hope this can communicate it.
図と音を用意しました
00:29
But let's also think, as a visual species,
視覚的な種として私たちが
00:31
what it's like when we go snorkeling or diving
シュノーケリングやダイビングで
00:34
and try to look underwater.
見る海の中は どんな感じでしょう
00:36
We really can't see very far.
遠くまで良く見えませんね
00:38
Our vision, which works so well in air,
人の目は 空気中では機能しますが
00:40
all of a sudden is very restricted and claustrophobic.
水中では制限され 視界が狭くなってしまいます
00:42
And what marine mammals have evolved
海洋哺乳類は
00:45
over the last tens of millions of years
水中世界の探索や仲間との交信に
00:47
is ways to depend on sound
音を使う方法を
00:50
to both explore their world
数千万年の歳月をかけて
00:52
and also to stay in touch with one another.
進化させてきました
00:54
Dolphins and toothed whales use echolocation.
イルカやハクジラは エコロケーションを使い
00:56
They can produce loud clicks
大きなクリック音を出して
00:58
and listen for echoes from the sea floor in order to orient.
海底からはね返る音を聞いて 泳ぐ方向を定めます
01:00
They can listen for echoes from prey
また獲物からの反響を聞き
01:03
in order to decide where food is
食料の位置を確かめ
01:05
and to decide which one they want to eat.
ターゲットとなる獲物を選んでいます
01:07
All marine mammals use sound for communication to stay in touch.
海中哺乳類はみんな音で交信します
01:10
So the large baleen whales
大きなヒゲクジラは
01:12
will produce long, beautiful songs,
長く美しい歌を
01:14
which are used in reproductive advertisement
繁殖活動の際に用い
01:17
for male and females, both to find one another
異性を探し
01:19
and to select a mate.
パートナーを選びます
01:21
And mother and young and closely bonded animals
母子や 互いに関係の深い個体は
01:23
use calls to stay in touch with one another,
鳴き声で互いの所在を確認します
01:25
so sound is really critical for their lives.
生きる上で 音が非常に重要です
01:28
The first thing that got me interested in the sounds
私にとっては未知の世界とも言える
01:30
of these underwater animals,
海の動物達の発する音に興味を
01:32
whose world was so foreign to me,
持ったのは ある飼育されている
01:34
was evidence from captive dolphins
イルカのデータがきっかけでした
01:36
that captive dolphins could imitate human sounds.
イルカが人の出す音を真似ていたのです
01:38
And I mentioned I'll use
先ほど 音を視覚的に表現した図を
01:41
some visual representations of sounds.
使用すると言いましたが
01:43
Here's the first example.
これが最初の例です
01:45
This is a plot of frequency against time --
時間に対する周波数のグラフで
01:47
sort of like musical notation,
楽譜みたいなものです
01:49
where the higher notes are up higher and the lower notes are lower,
高音は上方に 低音は下方に書かれ
01:51
and time goes this way.
時間の流れは右向きです
01:54
This is a picture of a trainer's whistle,
これはトレーナーの笛の音で
01:56
a whistle a trainer will blow to tell a dolphin
イルカが芸をちゃんとできたときに
01:58
it's done the right thing and can come get a fish.
これを鳴らし ご褒美の魚を与えます
02:00
It sounds sort of like "tweeeeeet." Like that.
「トゥイーーー」という感じの音です
02:02
This is a calf in captivity
そして こちらが
02:05
making an imitation
飼育されている子イルカが
02:07
of that trainer's whistle.
その笛を真似た音です
02:09
If you hummed this tune to your dog or cat
この音を鼻歌で聞かせた犬や猫が
02:11
and it hummed it back to you,
それを真似て応えたとしたら
02:13
you ought to be pretty surprised.
とても驚くことでしょう
02:15
Very few nonhuman mammals
人間以外で音真似の出来る哺乳類は
02:17
can imitate sounds.
稀です この能力は人間社会では
02:19
It's really important for our music and our language.
音楽や言語の発展に重要ですが
02:21
So it's a puzzle: The few other mammal groups that do this,
人間以外の哺乳類がどうして
02:23
why do they do it?
そんなことをするのか 不思議です
02:26
A lot of my career has been devoted
私は研究生活の殆どを費やし
02:28
to trying to understand
海洋哺乳類が 情報伝達において
02:30
how these animals use their learning,
どのように学習を活用し
02:32
use the ability to change what you say
聞いたことに基づいて応答の仕方を
02:34
based on what you hear
どう変えているのか
02:36
in their own communication systems.
研究してきました
02:38
So let's start with calls of a nonhuman primate.
人間以外の霊長類の鳴き声を聴いてみましょう
02:40
Many mammals have to produce contact calls
哺乳類の多くは「コンタクトコール」を持ち
02:43
when, say, a mother and calf are apart.
母子がはぐれた時などに使っています
02:45
This is an example of a call produced by squirrel monkeys
これは リスザルの母子がはぐれた時に用いる
02:48
when they're isolated from another one.
コンタクトコールの例です
02:51
And you can see, there's not much
お分かりのように
02:53
variability in these calls.
個体差がほとんどありません
02:55
By contrast, the signature whistle
対照的に イルカが交信に用いる
02:57
which dolphins use to stay in touch,
「シグネチャーホイッスル」は
02:59
each individual here has a radically different call.
個体ごとに大きく異なっています
03:01
They can use this ability to learn calls
イルカは鳴き声を学ぶ能力によって
03:04
in order to develop more complicated and more distinctive calls
より複雑で特徴的な鳴き声を発展させ
03:07
to identify individuals.
個体を見分けているのです
03:10
How about the setting in which animals need to use this call?
どんな状況でイルカはこの鳴き声を使うのでしょう
03:13
Well let's look at mothers and calves.
母親と子供の生活を見てみましょう
03:16
In normal life for mother and calf dolphin,
日常生活の中で
03:18
they'll often drift apart or swim apart if Mom is chasing a fish,
母親が魚を追いかけるのに夢中になり
03:20
and when they separate
はぐれてしまうことも少なくありません
03:23
they have to get back together again.
はぐれたら 合流しないといけません
03:25
What this figure shows is the percentage of the separations
この図は イルカの間の最大距離に対して
03:27
in which dolphins whistle,
シグネチャーホイッスルが使われる
03:30
against the maximum distance.
割合を示しています
03:32
So when dolphins are separating by less than 20 meters,
距離が20メートル以下では
03:34
less than half the time they need to use whistles.
鳴き声を使う頻度は半分以下です
03:36
Most of the time they can just find each other
殆どの場合 泳ぎ回っているうちに
03:38
just by swimming around.
互いを見つけます
03:40
But all of the time when they separate by more than 100 meters,
ところが 100メートル以上離れると
03:42
they need to use these individually distinctive whistles
例外なしに全ての母子が
03:45
to come back together again.
互いを探すのに固有の鳴き声を用いています
03:48
Most of these distinctive signature whistles
この特徴的なシグネチャーホイッスルは
03:51
are quite stereotyped and stable
殆どの場合 イルカの一生を通じ
03:53
through the life of a dolphin.
ワンパターンで安定しています
03:55
But there are some exceptions.
しかし 例外もいくつかあります
03:57
When a male dolphin leaves Mom,
母親から巣立った雄イルカは
03:59
it will often join up with another male
他の雄イルカと合流することがあり
04:01
and form an alliance, which may last for decades.
その協力関係が 何十年と続くこともあります
04:03
As these two animals form a social bond,
そして社会的な「絆」を築いたイルカたちの
04:06
their distinctive whistles actually converge
固有の鳴き声は収斂していき
04:09
and become very similar.
大変似通ったものになります
04:11
This plot shows two members of a pair.
この図は組になった2匹の鳴き声を表しています
04:13
As you can see at the top here,
上の図では 2匹は
04:16
they share an up-sweep, like "woop, woop, woop."
「ウープ ウープ ウープ」という
04:18
They both have that kind of up-sweep.
上向きの鳴き声を共有しています
04:20
Whereas these members of a pair go "wo-ot, wo-ot, wo-ot."
一方 下図では「ウーウッ ウーウッ ウーウッ」という鳴き声です
04:22
And what's happened is
何が起こっているのでしょう?
04:25
they've used this learning process
イルカは学習プロセスを用いて
04:27
to develop a new sign that identifies this new social group.
新しい社会グループを識別する合図を 発展させているのです
04:29
It's a very interesting way that they can
新しい社会的グループのための
04:32
form a new identifier
新しい識別子を形成する
04:34
for the new social group that they've had.
とても面白いやり方です
04:36
Let's now take a step back
少し視点を広げて イルカを
04:38
and see what this message can tell us
人間の干渉から保護するために
04:40
about protecting dolphins
この情報から学べることを
04:42
from human disturbance.
探ってみましょう
04:44
Anybody looking at this picture
この写真を見て下さい
04:46
will know this dolphin is surrounded,
イルカが船に囲まれ その行動が
04:48
and clearly his behavior is being disrupted.
阻害されているのがお分かりになるでしょう
04:50
This is a bad situation.
まずい状況です
04:53
But it turns out that when just a single boat
しかし イルカの群れに近づく船が
04:55
is approaching a group of dolphins
1隻だけの場合であっても
04:57
at a couple hundred meters away,
船が2、3百メートルまで近付くと
04:59
the dolphins will start whistling,
イルカは鳴き声を挙げ始め
05:01
they'll change what they're doing, they'll have a more cohesive group,
していたことをやめて 寄り添い
05:03
wait for the boat to go by,
船が通り過ぎるのをじっと待つのです
05:05
and then they'll get back to normal business.
いなくなったら元の行動に戻ります
05:07
Well, in a place like Sarasota, Florida,
フロリダのサラソタのような場所では
05:09
the average interval between times
イルカの群れの100メートル先を
05:11
that a boat is passing within a hundred meters of a dolphin group
平均して6分ごとに船が通り過ぎます
05:13
is six minutes.
それが日常的な光景です
05:16
So even in the situation that doesn't look as bad as this,
この写真よりはマシな状況と言えるでしょうが
05:18
it's still affecting the amount of time these animals have
それでもなおイルカの日常生活に
05:21
to do their normal work.
影響を与えているのです
05:23
And if we look at a very pristine environment like western Australia,
手つかずの環境が残る西オーストラリアで
05:25
Lars Bider has done work
ラーズ・バイダー氏が研究しています
05:28
comparing dolphin behavior and distribution
イルカウォッチングが始まる前と後での
05:30
before there were dolphin-watching boats.
イルカの行動と分布状況を比較したのです
05:33
When there was one boat, not much of an impact.
船が1隻の場合 あまり影響はありません
05:36
And two boats: When the second boat was added,
しかし 船が2隻になると
05:39
what happened was that some of the dolphins
何匹かのイルカは
05:42
left the area completely.
その領域から去ってしまいました
05:44
Of the ones that stayed, their reproductive rate declined.
残ったイルカの間でも 出生率の減少が見られました
05:46
So it could have a negative impact on the whole population.
船の存在は 全個体数に悪い影響を与えるのです
05:49
When we think of marine-protected areas for animals like dolphins,
イルカなど動物の海洋保護区域において
05:52
this means that we have to be
私たちは今以上に 自らの行動に
05:55
quite conscious about activities that we thought were benign.
気を付けなければなりません
05:57
We may need to regulate the intensity
これら問題を回避するために
06:00
of recreational boating and actual whale watching
遊覧船やクジラウォッチングの船の数を
06:02
in order to prevent these kinds of problems.
制限する必要があるかもしれません
06:05
I'd also like to point out that sound
これも覚えておいてください
06:08
doesn't obey boundaries.
音は境界に関係なく伝搬します
06:10
So you can draw a line to try to protect an area,
境界線を引いて ある区域を保護はできますが
06:12
but chemical pollution and noise pollution
化学汚染や騒音は
06:15
will continue to move through the area.
境界を越えて入り続けるのです
06:17
And I'd like to switch now from this local,
さてここからは話を
06:19
familiar, coastal environment
局所的で馴染み深い 沿岸環境から
06:21
to a much broader world of the baleen whales and the open ocean.
より広域の海で生活するヒゲクジラに変えましょう
06:24
This is a kind of map we've all been looking at.
よく見慣れているような世界地図です
06:27
The world is mostly blue.
世界は殆ど青です
06:30
But I'd also like to point out that the oceans
海は私たちが思っている以上に
06:32
are much more connected than we think.
繋がっていることに注目してください
06:34
Notice how few barriers there are to movement
陸上での移動に比べ 海中での移動には
06:36
across all of the oceans compared to land.
障害物がほとんどありません
06:39
To me, the most mind-bending example
海がひと続きであることを示す
06:41
of the interconnectedness of the ocean
ショッキングな実験があります
06:43
comes from an acoustic experiment
海洋学者が
06:45
where oceanographers
南インド洋へ赴き
06:47
took a ship to the southern Indian Ocean,
海中にスピーカーを設置して
06:49
deployed an underwater loudspeaker
音を再生するという
06:52
and played back a sound.
音響実験を行いました
06:54
That same sound
スピーカーから発せられた音は
06:56
traveled to the west, and could be heard in Bermuda,
西はアメリカ東海岸沖合のバミューダ諸島まで届き
06:58
and traveled to the east, and could be heard in Monterey --
東はカリフォルニア州のモントレーへと到達し
07:01
the same sound.
同じ音が聞かれたのです
07:04
So we live in a world of satellite communication,
我々は衛星通信で全世界と
07:06
are used to global communication,
通信できる世界に暮らしていますが
07:08
but it's still amazing to me.
それでも 低周波数の音を
07:10
The ocean has properties
地球規模で伝播させる
07:12
that allow low-frequency sound
この海の性質には
07:14
to basically move globally.
とても驚かされます
07:16
The acoustic transit time for each of these paths is about three hours.
それぞれの経路で音の伝わる時間は 約3時間です
07:18
It's nearly halfway around the globe.
殆ど地球を半周する距離です
07:21
In the early '70s,
70年代前半に
07:24
Roger Payne and an ocean acoustician
海洋音響学者のロジャー・ペイン氏が
07:26
published a theoretical paper
理論的な論文を発表し
07:28
pointing out that it was possible
音はこのような広範囲に
07:30
that sound could transmit over these large areas,
伝搬しうることを指摘しましたが
07:32
but very few biologists believed it.
生物学者の多くは信じませんでした
07:35
It actually turns out, though,
人間が この事実を知ったのは
07:38
even though we've only known of long-range propagation for a few decades,
数十年前に過ぎませんが
07:40
the whales clearly have evolved,
クジラたちは 数千万年かけて この海の
07:43
over tens of millions of years,
驚くべき性質の利用法を
07:46
a way to exploit this amazing property of the ocean.
進化させてきたのです
07:48
So blue whales and fin whales
シロナガスクジラと ナガスクジラは
07:51
produce very low-frequency sounds
遠くまで伝えることのできる
07:53
that can travel over very long ranges.
低周波の音を発します
07:55
The top plot here shows
上の図は
07:57
a complicated series of calls
雄が繰り返し発する
07:59
that are repeated by males.
一連の複雑な鳴き声です
08:01
They form songs, and they appear to play a role in reproduction,
歌を作るのは繁殖活動の一部で
08:03
sort of like that of song birds.
鳥が歌を歌うようなものです
08:06
Down below here, we see calls made by both males and females
下図は雄と雌の鳴き声です
08:08
that also carry over very long ranges.
これもかなり広範囲に届きます
08:11
The biologists continued to be skeptical
生物学者たちは
08:15
of the long-range communication issue
このクジラ達の広域通信について
08:17
well past the '70s,
懐疑的で それは70年代を経て
08:19
until the end of the Cold War.
冷戦が終わるまで続きました
08:21
What happened was, during the Cold War,
何がそれを覆すことになったかですが
08:23
the U.S. Navy had a system that was secret at the time,
冷戦中のこと 当時は秘密でしたが アメリカ海軍は
08:25
that they used to track Russian submarines.
ロシアの潜水艦を追跡するシステムを持っていました
08:28
It had deep underwater microphones, or hydrophones,
陸まで伸びたケーブルに繋がる
08:31
cabled to shore,
深海に設置された水中聴音器があり
08:33
all wired back to a central place that could listen
ケーブルの先にある基地では
08:35
to sounds over the whole North Atlantic.
北大西洋全体の音を聞けました
08:37
And after the Berlin Wall fell, the Navy made these systems available
ベルリンの壁が崩壊した後 海軍はこのシステムを
08:39
to whale bio-acousticians
どんな音が聞けるのか調べる
08:42
to see what they could hear.
クジラ専門の音響学者たちに開放しました
08:44
This is a plot from Christopher Clark
これはクリス・クラーク氏によるもので
08:46
who tracked one individual blue whale
1頭のシロナガスクジラを追跡しています
08:48
as it passed by Bermuda,
クジラはバミューダ諸島を通過して
08:51
went down to the latitude of Miami and came back again.
マイアミの緯度まで南下し そして戻ってきています
08:53
It was tracked for 43 days,
追跡は43日間続けられ
08:56
swimming 1,700 kilometers,
距離にすると1700キロ
08:58
or more than 1,000 miles.
1000マイル以上ですね
09:00
This shows us both that the calls
この実験でわかったのは
09:02
are detectable over hundreds of miles
鳴き声は数百マイル先まで届き
09:04
and that whales routinely swim hundreds of miles.
クジラは普段 何百マイルも泳ぐことです
09:06
They're ocean-based and scale animals
クジラは 我々の予想以上に
09:08
who are communicating over much longer ranges
長距離交信ができる
09:10
than we had anticipated.
スケールの大きな海の動物だったのです
09:12
Unlike fins and blues, which
温帯や熱帯の海に生息する
09:14
disperse into the temperate and tropical oceans,
シロナガスクジラや ナガスクジラとは異なり
09:16
the humpbacked whales congregate
ザトウクジラは 馴染みのある
09:18
in local traditional breeding grounds,
限られた繁殖地に集中しています
09:20
so they can make a sound that's a little higher in frequency,
比較的高い 広範囲の周波数を使い
09:23
broader-band and more complicated.
複雑な音を作ります
09:26
So you're listening to the complicated song
今お聞きいただいているのは
09:28
produced by humpbacks here.
ザトウクジラによる複雑な歌です
09:30
Humpbacks, when they develop
ザトウクジラは歌う能力を発展させる過程で
09:32
the ability to sing this song,
他のクジラの歌を聞き
09:34
they're listening to other whales
聞いた歌に基づいて
09:36
and modifying what they sing based on what they're hearing,
自分の歌を変えるのです
09:38
just like song birds or the dolphin whistles I described.
鳴き鳥や 先ほどの鳴き真似するイルカと同じですね
09:41
This means that humpback song
だから ザトウクジラの歌は
09:44
is a form of animal culture,
人間にとっての音楽と同じように
09:46
just like music for humans would be.
一種の文化なのです
09:48
I think one of the most interesting examples of this
これを示す とても面白い例が
09:50
comes from Australia.
オーストラリアで見つかりました
09:53
Biologists on the east coast of Australia
オーストラリア東海岸の生物学者が
09:55
were recording the songs of humpbacks in that area.
その地域のザトウクジラの歌を録音していました
09:57
And this orange line here marks the typical songs
このオレンジの棒は 東海岸ザトウクジラの
10:00
of east coast humpbacks.
典型的な歌を示します
10:03
In '95 they all sang the normal song.
1995年にはみんな同じ歌でしたが
10:05
But in '96 they heard a few weird songs,
1996年に違う歌が現れました
10:07
and it turned out that these strange songs
この変わった歌は西海岸のクジラに
10:09
were typical of west coast whales.
典型的な歌だったのです
10:12
The west coast calls became more and more popular,
西海岸のクジラの歌は大ヒットし どんどん歌われるようになり
10:14
until by 1998,
そして 1998年までには
10:17
none of the whales sang the east coast song; it was completely gone.
東海岸の歌はすっかり消えて クールで新しい西海岸の歌ばかりを
10:19
They just sang the cool new west coast song.
クジラたちは歌うようになったのです
10:22
It's as if some new hit style
ちょうど新しい流行のスタイルが
10:24
had completely wiped out
それまでの古くさいスタイルを
10:26
the old-fashioned style before,
すっかり駆逐してしまい
10:28
and with no golden oldies stations.
どの局もオールディーズを流さなくなったように
10:30
Nobody sang the old ones.
懐メロを歌うクジラは いなくなったのです
10:32
I'd like to briefly just show what the ocean does to these calls.
これらの歌に対する海の役割をこれからお話します
10:35
Now you are listening to a recording made by Chris Clark,
この音は ザトウクジラから0.2マイル離れた場所で
10:38
0.2 miles away from a humpback.
クリス・クラーク氏が録音したものです
10:41
You can hear the full frequency range. It's quite loud.
全周波数帯域の音が聞こえます とても大きい音です
10:44
You sound very nearby.
すごく近くに聞こえますね
10:47
The next recording you're going to hear
さてお次は 同じザトウクジラの歌ですが
10:49
was made of the same humpback song
50マイル離れて録音したものです
10:51
50 miles away.
聞いてみてください
10:53
That's shown down here.
これです
10:55
You only hear the low frequencies.
低周波の音しか聞こえませんね
10:57
You hear the reverberation
海の中を長い距離通ってきた
10:59
as the sound travels over long-range in the ocean
音の残響です
11:01
and is not quite as loud.
音も大きくありません
11:03
Now after I play back these humpback calls,
ザトウクジラの鳴き声の次に
11:06
I'll play blue whale calls, but they have to be sped up
シロナガスクジラの鳴き声を再生します 少し早回ししています
11:09
because they're so low in frequency
かなり低周波の音なので
11:12
that you wouldn't be able to hear it otherwise.
早回ししなければ聞こえません
11:14
Here's a blue whale call at 50 miles,
50マイル先のシロナガスクジラの声です
11:16
which was distant for the humpback.
ザトウクジラには遠すぎましたが
11:18
It's loud, clear -- you can hear it very clearly.
こちらは大きくクリアに聞こえます
11:20
Here's the same call recorded from a hydrophone
同じ声を 500マイル離れた水中聴音機で
11:23
500 miles away.
録音した音です
11:26
There's a lot of noise, which is mostly other whales.
他のクジラのノイズが多く入ってますが
11:28
But you can still hear that faint call.
微かに聞こえます
11:31
Let's now switch and think about
さて 今からは
11:34
a potential for human impacts.
人間が及ぼす影響を考えてみましょう
11:36
The most dominant sound that humans put into the ocean
海で人間が出す騒音といえば
11:38
comes from shipping.
ほとんどは船からのものです
11:41
This is the sound of a ship,
これが船の音です
11:43
and I'm having to talk a little louder to talk over it.
声を大きくしないと聞こえませんよね
11:45
Imagine that whale listening from 500 miles.
クジラが500マイル先の音に耳を澄ましているところを
11:47
There's a potential problem that maybe
想像してみてください
11:50
this kind of shipping noise would prevent whales
船の音は クジラ同士の交信を
11:52
from being able to hear each other.
阻害する可能性があるのです
11:54
Now this is something that's been known for quite a while.
この問題は結構前から知られていました
11:56
This is a figure from a textbook on underwater sound.
この図は海中音のテキストからの抜粋です
11:58
And on the y-axis
Y軸は
12:01
is the loudness of average ambient noise in the deep ocean
深海の平均的な環境雑音の音量です
12:03
by frequency.
X軸は周波数です
12:06
In the low frequencies, this line indicates
そして 低周波数にある この線は
12:08
sound that comes from seismic activity of the earth.
地球の地震活動による音です
12:11
Up high, these variable lines
高周波帯にある これらの線は
12:14
indicate increasing noise in this frequency range
この周波数帯で大きくなる
12:16
from higher wind and wave.
上方からの風や波によるノイズです
12:19
But right in the middle here where there's a sweet spot,
その中間の 本来は音が良く聞こえる周波数域が
12:21
the noise is dominated by human ships.
人間の船の騒音に満たされています
12:24
Now think about it. This is an amazing thing:
考えてみてください 驚くべきことです
12:26
That in this frequency range where whales communicate,
クジラが交信するこの周波数域で
12:28
the main source globally, on our planet, for the noise
全地球的に 騒音の主な源になっているのは
12:31
comes from human ships,
人間の船なのです
12:34
thousands of human ships, distant, far away,
遠く離れた何千もの人間の船の音が
12:36
just all aggregating.
集積したものです
12:39
The next slide will show what the impact this may have
次のスライドで クジラの交信範囲に
12:41
on the range at which whales can communicate.
船の騒音が与える影響を説明します
12:44
So here we have the loudness of a call at the whale.
これがクジラの鳴き声の大きさで
12:46
And as we get farther away,
遠くへ行けば行くほど
12:49
the sound gets fainter and fainter.
その音は小さくなっていきます
12:51
Now in the pre-industrial ocean, as we were mentioning,
産業革命以前の海では
12:53
this whale call could be easily detected.
このクジラの鳴き声は簡単に検知できました
12:56
It's louder than noise
1000キロ離れても 鳴き声が
12:58
at a range of a thousand kilometers.
騒音よりも大きかったからです
13:00
Let's now take that additional increase in noise
船が発する騒音を
13:02
that we saw comes from shipping.
これに加えてみましょう
13:05
All of a sudden, the effective range of communication
そうすると 交信可能な範囲は 一気に
13:07
goes from a thousand kilometers to 10 kilometers.
1000キロから10キロへ狭まりました
13:09
Now if this signal is used for males and females
広く散らばった雄と雌が
13:12
to find each other for mating and they're dispersed,
つがいの相手を見つけるのに この信号を使っているなら
13:14
imagine the impact this could have
これが絶滅の危機にある種の存続に
13:17
on the recovery of endangered populations.
与えうる影響を考えてみてください
13:19
Whales also have contact calls
クジラはまた イルカ同様に
13:22
like I described for the dolphins.
コンタクトコールを使います
13:24
I'll play the sound of a contact call used
ここで セミクジラが交信に用いる
13:27
by right whales to stay in touch.
コンタクトコールの音を再生します
13:29
And this is the kind of call that is used by,
この鳴き声は
13:31
say, right whale mothers and calves
母子がはぐれてしまったときに
13:33
as they separate to come back again.
互いを見つけるために用いられます
13:35
Now imagine -- let's put the ship noise in the picture.
そこに船の騒音があったらどうなるでしょう
13:37
What's a mother to do
子とはぐれたときに船が来たら
13:39
if the ship comes by and her calf isn't there?
母クジラはどうすると思いますか?
13:41
I'll describe a couple strategies.
母親の戦略を説明しましょう
13:43
One strategy is if your call's down here,
母イルカの鳴き声が 下の周波数帯にあり
13:46
and the noise is in this band,
騒音が重なる帯域にあると
13:48
you could shift the frequency of your call out of the noise band
騒音帯域からはずれるように 鳴き声を高くするのです
13:50
and communicate better.
そうすれば交信はうまくいきます
13:53
Susan Parks of Penn State has actually studied this.
ペンシルベニア州立大学のスーザン・パークス氏がこの研究をしています
13:55
She's looked in the Atlantic. Here's data from the South Atlantic.
こちらは南大西洋のデータで
13:58
Here's a typical South Atlantic contact call from the '70s.
70年代に典型的だったコンタクトコールです
14:01
Look what happened by 2000 to the average call.
2000年には 平均的なコンタクトコールはこうなりました
14:04
Same thing in the North Atlantic,
北大西洋でも同様です
14:07
in the '50s versus 2000.
50年代と 2000年
14:09
Over the last 50 years,
50年を経た比較です
14:11
as we've put more noise into the oceans,
海における人工騒音が酷くなればなるほど
14:13
these whales have had to shift.
クジラは鳴き声の高くしなければならず
14:15
It's as if the whole population had to shift
クジラがみんな バスからテノールへと
14:17
from being basses to singing as a tenor.
切り替えたようなものです
14:19
It's an amazing shift, induced by humans
時間的にも空間的にもスケールの大きな
14:22
over this large scale,
人間によって引き起こされた
14:24
in both time and space.
驚くべき変化です
14:26
And we now know that whales can compensate for noise
クジラは騒音を相殺するために
14:28
by calling louder, like I did when that ship was playing,
さっき船の音を流したときみたいに 声を大きくするか
14:30
by waiting for silence
静かになるのを待つか
14:33
and by shifting their call out of the noise band.
騒音の周波数帯から 音をずらすのがわかりました
14:35
Now there's probably costs to calling louder
大きな声を出したり 高さを変えるのは
14:38
or shifting the frequency away from where you want to be,
相応のコストがかかるだろうし
14:40
and there's probably lost opportunities.
それでチャンスを逃すこともあり得ます
14:42
If we also have to wait for silence,
静寂を待っている間に
14:44
they may miss a critical opportunity to communicate.
交信の決定的なチャンスを逃す可能性もあるのです
14:46
So we have to be very concerned
私たちは動物たちについて
14:49
about when the noise in habitats
騒音による生息環境の悪化や
14:51
degrades the habitat enough
騒音に対して払う多大なコストや
14:53
that the animals either have to pay too much to be able to communicate,
重要な行動を行えなくなる可能性を
14:55
or are not able to perform critical functions.
懸念する必要があります
14:58
It's a really important problem.
とても重要な問題です
15:00
And I'm happy to say that there are several
喜ばしいことに
15:03
very promising developments in this area,
船のクジラへの影響を配慮するという面で
15:05
looking at the impact of shipping on whales.
心強い進展があります
15:08
In terms of the shipping noise,
国連の国際海事機関は
15:11
the International Maritime Organization of the United Nations
船の静穏化に関するガイドラインを設定する
15:13
has formed a group whose job is to establish
組織を作り 産業界に対して
15:16
guidelines for quieting ships,
船の騒音を小さくする方法を
15:19
to tell the industry how you could quiet ships.
示すようになりました
15:21
And they've already found
そして既に
15:23
that by being more intelligent about better propeller design,
スクリューのデザインを工夫することで
15:25
you can reduce that noise by 90 percent.
騒音を90パーセントも減らせることを発見しました
15:28
If you actually insulate and isolate
さらに 動力装置を防音し
15:31
the machinery of the ship from the hull,
船体と隔てることで
15:34
you can reduce that noise by 99 percent.
騒音は99パーセント減らすことが出来ます
15:36
So at this point, it's primarily an issue of cost and standards.
取り入れるかどうかは コストと基準の問題です
15:39
If this group can establish standards,
この組織が船の規格を作り
15:42
and if the shipbuilding industry adopts them for building new ships,
造船業界が規格に準じて船を作れば
15:44
we can now see a gradual decline
少しずつ 潜在的な問題は
15:47
in this potential problem.
減っていくでしょう
15:49
But there's also another problem from ships that I'm illustrating here,
しかし まだ別の問題があります
15:51
and that's the problem of collision.
衝突の問題です
15:54
This is a whale that just squeaked by
このクジラは 高速で走るコンテナ船を
15:56
a rapidly moving container ship and avoided collision.
かろうじてよけて衝突を避けました
15:59
But collision is a serious problem.
衝突に関する問題は深刻です
16:02
Endangered whales are killed every year by ship collision,
絶滅危惧種のクジラが毎年 船との衝突で死んでいます
16:04
and it's very important to try to reduce this.
このような事故を減らすことはとても重要なことです
16:07
I'll discuss two very promising approaches.
この問題に対する期待のできる2つの対処法をお話します
16:10
The first case comes from the Bay of Fundy.
1つ目はファンディ湾のケースです
16:13
These black lines mark shipping lanes
これら黒い線は ファンディ湾を
16:15
in and out of the Bay of Fundy.
出入りする航路です
16:17
The colorized area
色つき部分は航路上で
16:19
shows the risk of collision for endangered right whales
絶滅危惧種のセミクジラと船が衝突する
16:21
because of the ships moving in this lane.
リスクのあるエリアを示します
16:24
It turns out that this lane here
この航路はセミクジラが
16:26
goes right through a major feeding area of right whales in the summer time,
夏季に利用する餌場と重なっており
16:29
and it makes an area of a significant risk of collision.
そのことが衝突のリスクを高くしているのです
16:32
Well, biologists
この事実を放っておけない
16:35
who couldn't take no for an answer
生物学者たちは
16:37
went to the International Maritime Organization
国際海事機関へ行き
16:39
and petitioned them to say,
嘆願書を提出しました
16:41
"Can't you move that lane? Those are just lines on the ground.
「航路を移動してくれませんか?
16:43
Can't you move them over to a place
大事な場所を通っているんです
16:45
where there's less of a risk?"
リスクの少ない所に移せませんか?」
16:47
And the International Maritime Organization responded very strongly,
国際海事機関は力強く回答しました
16:49
"These are the new lanes."
「これが新しい航路です」
16:51
The shipping lanes have been moved.
航路は移動され
16:53
And as you can see, the risk of collision is much lower.
ご覧のように衝突のリスクは減りました
16:55
So it's very promising, actually.
実際に効果が期待できます
16:58
We can be very creative about thinking
リスク回避のため様々な方法を
17:00
of different ways to reduce these risks.
クリエイティブに 考えられるのです
17:02
Another action which was just taken independently
もう1つ 輸送会社自身による
17:04
by a shipping company itself
自主的なアクションをご紹介しましょう
17:06
was initiated because of concerns the shipping company had
元々は 地球温暖化にかかわる温室ガス排出量を
17:09
about greenhouse gas emissions with global warming.
考慮して取られたアクションです
17:12
The Maersk Line looked at their competition
マースクライン社は競合他社を見て 造船業界では
17:15
and saw that everybody who is in shipping thinks time is money.
時間が何よりも重視されていることに注目しました
17:18
They rush as fast as they can to get to their port.
船はできるだけ急いで目的地に向かいますが
17:21
But then they often wait there.
着くと 大抵は待つことになるのです
17:23
What Maersk did is they worked ways to slow down.
そこで彼らはスピードを下げる工夫をし
17:25
They could slow down by about 50 percent.
50パーセントも速度を落とすことに成功しました
17:27
This reduced their fuel consumption by about 30 percent,
燃料消費量が30パーセントも減少し
17:30
which saved them money,
大いに節約することができました
17:33
and at the same time, it had a significant benefit for whales.
同時に クジラにも恩恵があったのです
17:35
It you slow down, you reduce the amount of noise you make
速度を落とせば 騒音が減り
17:38
and you reduce the risk of collision.
衝突のリスクも下げることが出来ます
17:41
So to conclude, I'd just like to point out,
まとめとして こう言いたいです
17:43
you know, the whales live in
クジラは 驚異的な音の世界に
17:45
an amazing acoustic environment.
住んでおり 海の音響環境を
17:47
They've evolved over tens of millions of years
利用するよう 数千万年もかけて
17:49
to take advantage of this.
進化してきたのです
17:51
And we need to be very attentive and vigilant
私たちの行動が 知らず知らずのうちに
17:53
to thinking about where things that we do
彼らにとって極めて重要な活動を
17:56
may unintentionally prevent them
阻害している可能性を
17:58
from being able to achieve their important activities.
私たちは真摯に考える必要があります
18:00
At the same time, we need to be really creative
同時に 様々な問題を軽減するため
18:03
in thinking of solutions to be able to help reduce these problems.
クリエイティブに解決方法を模索する必要があります
18:05
I hope these examples have shown
これまで見てきた例は
18:08
some of the different directions we can take
保護区以外にも我々に取れる方法が
18:10
in addition to protected areas
いろいろあることを示していると思います
18:12
to be able to keep the ocean safe for whales to be able to continue to communicate.
クジラが安全に交信できる海の環境を 皆で守っていきましょう
18:14
Thank you very much.
有難うございました
18:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:19
Translator:kie ikeda
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Peter Tyack - Behavioral ecologist
Peter Tyack studies the social behavior and acoustic communication in whales and dolphins, learning how these animals use sound to perform critical activities, such as mating and locating food.

Why you should listen

Peter Tyack, a senior scientist in biology at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, has always been intrigued by animal behavior. A class at Woods Hole while still in college led Peter down his current path of research on acoustic communication and social behavior in marine mammals. 

He has studied the songs of humpback whales, the signature whistles of dolphins and the echolocation pulses of sperm whales and dolphins. Tyack has pioneered several new methods to sample the behavior of these mammals, including the development of sound-and-orientation recording tags.

As a result of his work recording the sounds of whales, Tyack is concerned that the ubiquitous noises from human activity in the ocean -- sonar, oil rigs, motorboats, shipping traffic -- are disturbing marine mammals.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.