19:29
TEDSalon London 2010

Charles Leadbeater: Education innovation in the slums

チャールズ リードビーター:スラム街の教育革新

Filmed:

革新的な教育形態を探し求めるなかで、チャールズ リードビーターはリオやキベラのスラム街でそれを見つけました。そこでは世界でも特に貧しい子供たちに柔軟で新しい学習手段が提供されています。このような非公式で破壊的な新形態の学校こそ、世界中の学校が目指すものだと語っています。

- Innovation consultant
A researcher at the London think tank Demos, Charles Leadbeater was early to notice the rise of "amateur innovation" -- great ideas from outside the traditional walls, from people who suddenly have the tools to collaborate, innovate and make their expertise known. Full bio

It's a great pleasure to be here.
ここに来られて光栄です
00:15
It's a great pleasure to speak after
CERNのブライアン・コックスの次
00:17
Brian Cox from CERN.
というのも光栄です
00:19
I think CERN is the home
CERNには
00:21
of the Large Hadron Collider.
大型ハドロン衝突型加速器があります
00:23
What ever happened to the Small Hadron Collider?
じゃあ小型のほうはどうなったのでしょう?
00:26
Where is the Small Hadron Collider?
小型のハドロン衝突型加速器はあるのでしょうか?
00:29
Because the Small Hadron Collider once was the big thing.
かつてはそれが大型だったはずですから
00:32
Now, the Small Hadron Collider
きっと 小型のほうは
00:35
is in a cupboard, overlooked and neglected.
戸棚にしまわれて 忘れ去られたのでしょう
00:38
You know when the Large Hadron Collider started,
ご存知のとおり 大型ハドロン衝突型加速器は
00:41
and it didn't work, and people tried to work out why,
始動時のトラブルで原因究明が必要になりました
00:44
it was the Small Hadron Collider team
それを小型のほうのメンバーが
00:47
who sabotaged it
邪魔しました
00:50
because they were so jealous.
とても嫉妬していたのでしょう
00:52
The whole Hadron Collider family
関係者は
00:54
needs unlocking.
そのあたりを解明すべきですね
00:56
The lesson of Brian's presentation, in a way --
ブライアンの講演や あの素晴らしい写真から
00:58
all those fantastic pictures --
分かることは
01:01
is this really:
こういうことです
01:03
that vantage point determines everything that you see.
「視点の置き方が 成果を決定づける」
01:05
What Brian was saying was
ブライアンによれば 科学は
01:08
science has opened up successively different vantage points
我々を見つめる新たな視点を
01:10
from which we can see ourselves,
絶えず開拓してきた
01:12
and that's why it's so valuable.
だから価値があるのです
01:14
So the vantage point you take
視点の選び方によって
01:16
determines virtually everything that you will see.
成果がほぼすべて決まり
01:18
The question that you will ask
投げかける質問によって
01:20
will determine much of the answer that you get.
答えがほぼ決まるのです
01:22
And so if you ask this question:
この質問を見てください
01:25
Where would you look to see the future of education?
「教育の未来を知るにはどうすればいいのか?」
01:27
The answer that we've traditionally given to that
今までなら 答えは単純です
01:30
is very straightforward, at least in the last 20 years:
少なくともこの20年では
01:33
You go to Finland.
フィンランドに行けと言われました
01:35
Finland is the best place in the world to see school systems.
フィンランドには世界有数の教育システムがあります
01:37
The Finns may be a bit boring and depressive and there's a very high suicide rate,
フィンランド人は退屈で鬱っぽく自殺率が高いとしても
01:40
but by golly, they are qualified.
いかんせん良い教育を受けています
01:43
And they have absolutely amazing education systems.
教育システムはすばらしいのです
01:46
So we all troop off to Finland,
みんなフィンランドに押しかけて
01:49
and we wonder at the social democratic miracle of Finland
フィンランドの社会民主主義的な偉業や
01:51
and its cultural homogeneity and all the rest of it,
均質な文化などに驚きます
01:54
and then we struggle to imagine how we might
でも どうやってその成果を
01:57
bring lessons back.
自国に反映させようかと悩みます
01:59
Well, so, for this last year,
そこで この一年
02:01
with the help of Cisco who sponsored me,
幸いにも シスコ社の
02:03
for some balmy reason, to do this,
資金協力を受けながら
02:05
I've been looking somewhere else.
新たな答えを探ってきました
02:08
Because actually radical innovation does sometimes
急進的革新というのは ときには
02:10
come from the very best,
最高の状態から生まれますが
02:13
but it often comes from places
ときには
02:15
where you have huge need --
ひっぱくした欲求
02:17
unmet, latent demand --
満たされない潜在的な需要
02:19
and not enough resources for traditional solutions to work --
日常的な各種資源の不足 つまり
02:21
traditional, high-cost solutions,
学校や病院が供給する専門的で
02:24
which depend on professionals,
高コストなサービスの不足
02:26
which is what schools and hospitals are.
などが背景となることもあります
02:28
So I ended up in places like this.
そこで私が行き着いたのが
02:30
This is a place called Monkey Hill.
モンキーヒルと呼ばれる地です
02:32
It's one of the hundreds of favelas in Rio.
リオに何百とある貧民街の一つです
02:35
Most of the population growth of the next 50 years
今後50年の人口増加は市街地で
02:38
will be in cities.
発生します
02:41
We'll grow by six cities of 12 million people a year
今後30年には1年で6都市1200万人ずつ
02:43
for the next 30 years.
増加します
02:46
Almost all of that growth will be in the developed world.
増加が起こるのは ほとんど
02:48
Almost all of that growth will be
途上国やモンキーヒルのような
02:51
in places like Monkey Hill.
場所なのです
02:53
This is where you'll find the fastest growing
ここでは世界で一番速く
02:55
young populations of the world.
年少者の人口が増えています
02:57
So if you want recipes to work --
健康や教育とか
02:59
for virtually anything -- health, education,
政策などについて
03:01
government politics
何らかの方策が必要なら
03:03
and education --
こういった地域に
03:05
you have to go to these places.
行くべきです
03:07
And if you go to these places, you meet people like this.
そうすると彼のような人に会えます
03:09
This is a guy called Juanderson.
名前はワンダソン
03:11
At the age of 14,
14才です
03:13
in common with many 14-year-olds in the Brazilian education system,
多くの14才と同様にブラジルの教育システム下で
03:15
he dropped out of school.
落ちこぼれてしまいました
03:18
It was boring.
退屈だったのです
03:20
And Juanderson, instead, went into
その代わりにワンダソンは
03:22
what provided kind of opportunity and hope
彼が住むこの地域で
03:24
in the place that he lived, which was the drugs trade.
機会と希望を生む世界 麻薬売買に手を染めたのです
03:26
And by the age of 16, with rapid promotion,
16才までには急激に立場も強くなって
03:29
he was running the drugs trade in 10 favelas.
10の貧民街を仕切るようになり
03:32
He was turning over 200,000 dollars a week.
週に20万ドルを売り上げ
03:34
He employed 200 people.
200人を雇っていました
03:37
He was going to be dead by the age of 25.
25才には死んでいたでしょうが
03:39
And luckily, he met this guy,
幸いにもこの男に出会いました
03:41
who is Rodrigo Baggio,
ロドリゴ・バッジォです
03:43
the owner of the first laptop to ever appear in Brazil.
ブラジルに初めてラップトップを持ち込んだ男です
03:45
1994, Rodrigo started something
1994年にロドリゴは
03:48
called CDI,
CDIという活動を始めました
03:50
which took computers
企業から寄付された
03:52
donated by corporations,
コンピュータを 貧民街の
03:54
put them into community centers in favelas
コミュニティーセンターに設置して
03:56
and created places like this.
このような場所をつくったのです
03:58
What turned Juanderson around
ワンダソンを立ち直らせたのは
04:01
was technology for learning
学習を手軽で楽しくしてくれる
04:03
that made learning fun and accessible.
技術なのです
04:05
Or you can go to places like this.
こんな場所もあります
04:07
This is Kibera, which is the largest slum in East Africa.
キベラといい 東アフリカで最大のスラム街です
04:09
Millions of people living here,
何百万人もの人がここに暮らし
04:12
stretched over many kilometers.
何キロメートルも広がっています
04:14
And there I met these two,
ここで この二人に出会いました
04:16
Azra on the left, Maureen on the right.
左がアズラ 右がモーリーンです
04:18
They just finished their Kenyan certificate
ケニアの中等教育を
04:20
of secondary education.
修了したばかりでした
04:22
That name should tell you that the Kenyan education system
ケニアの教育システムは
04:24
borrows almost everything
ほとんどすべて
04:27
from Britain, circa 1950,
1950年頃のイギリスから導入されました
04:29
but has managed to make it even worse.
でもずいぶん質の悪いものなってしまいました
04:32
So there are schools in slums like this.
スラム街の学校はこんな感じです
04:35
They're places like this.
このような場所です
04:37
That's where Maureen went to school.
モーリーンが通った学校です
04:39
They're private schools. There are no state schools in slums.
ここは私立学校です スラム街に公立学校はありません
04:41
And the education they got was pitiful.
ここでの教育はお粗末なものです
04:44
It was in places like this. This a school set up by some nuns
いろんな地域にありますが こちらは
04:47
in another slum called Nakuru.
ナクルという別の貧民街に修道女が作った学校です
04:50
Half the children in this classroom have no parents
クラスの半分は両親がいません
04:53
because they've died through AIDS.
エイズで亡くなったからです
04:56
The other half have one parent
残りの半分は親が一人です
04:58
because the other parent has died through AIDS.
一方の親がエイズで亡くなったからです
05:00
So the challenges of education
こういった地域で
05:03
in this kind of place
教育すべきことは
05:05
are not to learn the kings and queens of Kenya or Britain.
ケニアやイギリスの国王や女王を知ることではなく
05:07
They are to stay alive, to earn a living,
生き延びて生活費を稼いだり
05:10
to not become HIV positive.
HIV陽性にならないようにすることです
05:13
The one technology that spans rich and poor
こういった地域で貧富の差を埋める解決策は
05:16
in places like this
産業技術では
05:19
is not anything to do with industrial technology.
ありません
05:21
It's not to do with electricity or water.
電気や水でもなく
05:23
It's the mobile phone.
携帯電話なのです
05:25
If you want to design from scratch
アフリカで実際にゼロから
05:27
virtually any service in Africa,
何か公共事業をやるなら
05:29
you would start now with the mobile phone.
携帯電話から始めることになります
05:31
Or you could go to places like this.
また こんな地域もあります
05:34
This is a place called the Madangiri Settlement Colony,
マダンギリ移住植民地といいまして
05:36
which is a very developed slum
かなり発展したスラム街で
05:39
about 25 minutes outside New Delhi,
ニューデリーから約25分離れた地域にあります
05:41
where I met these characters
ここで この子たちに出会って
05:44
who showed me around for the day.
その日はあちこち案内してくれました
05:46
The remarkable thing about these girls,
この子たちには注目すべき点があります
05:48
and the sign of the kind of social revolution
途上国に押し寄せる
05:51
sweeping through the developing world
社会革命の兆候でもあります
05:53
is that these girls are not married.
実は この子たちは結婚していないのです
05:55
Ten years ago, they certainly would have been married.
10年前なら結婚していたはずです
05:58
Now they're not married, and they want to go on
でも結婚せずに
06:00
to study further, to have a career.
もっと学んで仕事をしたいのです
06:02
They've been brought up by mothers who are illiterate,
彼女たちを育てた母親は
06:04
who have never ever done homework.
読み書きができず宿題などしたことがありませんでした
06:07
All across the developing world there are millions of parents --
世界中の途上国で
06:10
tens, hundreds of millions --
何百万 何千万 何億という親が
06:12
who for the first time
初めて 自分の子に
06:14
are with children doing homework and exams.
宿題させ テストを受けさせているのです
06:16
And the reason they carry on studying
彼女たちが勉強し続けているのは
06:19
is not because they went to a school like this.
こんな学校に行くためではありません
06:21
This is a private school.
こちらは私立学校です
06:23
This is a fee-pay school. This is a good school.
授業料がかかるけど良い学校です
06:25
This is the best you can get
ここはインドの教育環境としては
06:27
in Hyderabad in Indian education.
ハイデラーバードで一番良い学校です
06:29
The reason they went on studying was this.
勉強を続けている理由は学校ではなくこちら
06:32
This is a computer installed in the entrance to their slum
これはスラム街の入口に設置されたコンピュータです
06:35
by a revolutionary social entrepreneur
スガタ・ミトラという革命的な
06:38
called Sugata Mitra
社会企業家が設置したものです
06:40
who has conducted the most radical experiments,
彼は先進的な実験を試みました
06:42
showing that children, in the right conditions,
適切な環境下で 子どもたちがコンピュータを使い
06:44
can learn on their own with the help of computers.
自分で学習できることが分かった実験でした
06:47
Those girls have never touched Google.
この子たちはグーグルをいじったことはありませんし
06:50
They know nothing about Wikipedia.
ウィキペディアなど全く知りません
06:53
Imagine what their lives would be like
使えるようにしてあげたら 子どもたちの生活が
06:55
if you could get that to them.
どう変わるか考えてみてください
06:58
So if you look, as I did,
私がしたように
07:00
through this tour,
この旅を経験したり
07:02
and by looking at about a hundred case studies
非常に厳しい環境に取り組む
07:04
of different social entrepreneurs
さまざまな社会企業家たちの
07:07
working in these very extreme conditions,
たくさんの事例を通して見ると
07:09
look at the recipes that they come up with for learning,
学習について彼らが考えた方策は
07:12
they look nothing like school.
学校とは全く別物です
07:15
What do they look like?
どんなものでしょう?
07:17
Well, education is a global religion.
教育とは世界的な信仰といえます
07:19
And education, plus technology,
教育とテクノロジーを融合すれば
07:21
is a great source of hope.
希望のあふれる源泉が生まれます
07:23
You can go to places like this.
こういった地域もあります
07:25
This is a school three hours outside of Sao Paulo.
ここはサンパウロから3時間の郊外にある学校です
07:28
Most of the children there have parents who are illiterate.
子どもたちの両親のほとんどは読み書きができません
07:31
Many of them don't have electricity at home.
ほとんどの家に電気が通っていませんが
07:34
But they find it completely obvious
コンピュータを使ったりウェブサイトを見たり
07:37
to use computers, websites,
動画を作ったりすることは
07:40
make videos, so on and so forth.
当たり前のことです
07:42
When you go to places like this
こういった地域に行くと
07:44
what you see is that
そこの環境での教育は
07:46
education in these settings
押し付けではなく引き出す形で機能していることが
07:48
works by pull, not push.
分かります
07:51
Most of our education system is push.
私たちの教育システムは押し付けです
07:53
I was literally pushed to school.
私は学校に行かされていました
07:55
When you get to school, things are pushed at you:
学校に行けば
07:57
knowledge, exams,
知識 試験 体制 時間割などを
07:59
systems, timetables.
押し付けられます
08:01
If you want to attract people like Juanderson
でも ワンダソンのように
08:03
who could, for instance,
麻薬取引を通じて
08:05
buy guns, wear jewelry,
銃を買い 宝石を身に着け
08:07
ride motorbikes and get girls
バイクに乗り
08:09
through the drugs trade,
女の子を引っ掛けるような子に
08:11
and you want to attract him into education,
教育への興味を持たせるには
08:13
having a compulsory curriculum doesn't really make sense.
強制的なカリキュラムは無力なのです
08:15
That isn't really going to attract him.
それでは見向きもしません
08:18
You need to pull him.
興味を引き出す必要があります
08:20
And so education needs to work by pull, not push.
押し付けずに引き出すのです
08:22
And so the idea of a curriculum
こういった環境ではカリキュラムの概念は
08:24
is completely irrelevant in a setting like this.
無意味です
08:27
You need to start education
こういった環境にいる
08:29
from things that make a difference
彼らにとって重要なことから
08:31
to them in their settings.
教育を始める必要があります
08:33
What does that?
それは何でしょうか?
08:35
Well, the key is motivation, and there are two aspects to it.
動機というのが重要で そこには二つの側面があります
08:37
One is to deliver extrinsic motivation,
一つは外発的動機を与えることです
08:40
that education has a payoff.
教育には見返りがあります
08:43
Our education systems all work
見返りがあるという原則の下で 全ての教育システムが
08:45
on the principle that there is a payoff,
機能していますが
08:48
but you have to wait quite a long time.
待ち時間が長いのです
08:50
That's too long if you're poor.
貧しい人には長すぎます
08:52
Waiting 10 years for the payoff from education
教育から見返りを得るまで10年待つというのは
08:54
is too long when you need to meet daily needs,
日常品が必要だったり 兄弟に手がかかったり
08:57
when you've got siblings to look after
仕事を手伝っている人には
09:00
or a business to help with.
長すぎるのです
09:02
So you need education to be relevant and help people
生活に関連があって
09:04
to make a living there and then, often.
生計を立てるのにすぐ役立つ教育が必要なのです
09:06
And you also need to make it intrinsically interesting.
もう一つ 内発的動機がなければなりません
09:09
So time and again, I found people like this.
何度もこういう人に出会いました
09:12
This is an amazing guy, Sebastiao Rocha,
セバスチャオ・ロッカというすごい人です
09:15
in Belo Horizonte,
ブラジル第三の都市の
09:18
in the third largest city in Brazil.
ベロオリゾンテにいます
09:20
He's invented more than 200 games
彼は200を超す
09:22
to teach virtually any subject under the sun.
ありとあらゆる題材の教育ゲームを考案しました
09:24
In the schools and communities
タイオという人が働く
09:27
that Taio works in,
学校やコミュニティーでは
09:29
the day always starts in a circle
一日の初めに円になって
09:31
and always starts from a question.
いつも質問から始まります
09:33
Imagine an education system that started from questions,
知識を与えるのではなく質問で始まる教育システムを
09:36
not from knowledge to be imparted,
想像してみてください
09:39
or started from a game, not from a lesson,
授業ではなくゲームから始まったりもします
09:41
or started from the premise
教育をうまくやるには
09:44
that you have to engage people first
引き付けておくことが必要だという
09:46
before you can possibly teach them.
原則に従って始めるのです
09:49
Our education systems,
私たちの教育システムなら
09:51
you do all that stuff afterward, if you're lucky,
スポーツ 劇 音楽などは
09:53
sport, drama, music.
運が良ければ後で経験できますが
09:55
These things, they teach through.
彼らはそれを通じて教育するのです
09:57
They attract people to learning
学習に引き付けることが可能なのは
10:00
because it's really a dance project
ダンスを取り入れ
10:02
or a circus project
サーカスを取り入れているからです
10:04
or, the best example of all --
その典型例は
10:06
El Sistema in Venezuela --
ベネズエラのエル・システマです
10:08
it's a music project.
これは音楽を取り入れています
10:10
And so you attract people through that into learning,
これで引き付けられるのです
10:12
not adding that on after
決して 学習し終えたあとや
10:14
all the learning has been done
若い認知力が失われてから
10:16
and you've eaten your cognitive greens.
やるのではありません
10:18
So El Sistema in Venezuela
ベネズエラのエル・システマは
10:21
uses a violin as a technology of learning.
バイオリンを学習手段として利用し
10:23
Taio Rocha uses making soap
タイオ・ロッカは石けん作りを
10:26
as a technology of learning.
学習手段として利用します
10:29
And what you find when you go to these schemes
こういった方策をとる場合
10:31
is that they use people and places
人や環境を信じられないほど
10:33
in incredibly creative ways.
独創的に利用することが分かります
10:35
Masses of peer learning.
ピア・ラーニングは種々あるのです
10:37
How do you get learning to people
先生がいないとき 来ないとき
10:39
when there are no teachers,
依頼するお金がないとき
10:41
when teachers won't come, when you can't afford them,
コミュニティーに
10:43
and even if you do get teachers,
関係ない内容を教える先生が来たとき
10:45
what they teach isn't relevant to the communities that they serve?
どうやって学習させるか?
10:48
Well, you create your own teachers.
独自の「先生」を用意するのです
10:51
You create peer-to-peer learning,
教え合ったり 臨時教員を雇ったり
10:53
or you create para-teachers, or you bring in specialist skills.
自分で専門を増やすことも考えられます
10:55
But you find ways to get learning that's relevant to people
いろいろな技術 人 環境を利用して
10:58
through technology, people and places that are different.
人に応じた学習方法を考えましょう
11:01
So this is a school in a bus
こちらは建設現場にある
11:04
on a building site
バスの中の学校です
11:06
in Pune, the fastest growing city in Asia.
アジアでも最速で成長する都市プネにあります
11:09
Pune has 5,000 building sites.
プネには5千の建設現場があり
11:12
It has 30,000 children
3万人の子どもたちがこのような
11:15
on those building sites.
建設現場で学んでいます
11:17
That's one city.
一つの都市だけでです
11:19
Imagine that urban explosion
あらゆる途上国の
11:21
that's going to take place across the developing world
爆発的な成長を続ける都市部では
11:23
and how many thousands of children
何千万という子どもたちが
11:26
will spend their school years on building sites.
建設現場で学校に通うことになります
11:28
Well, this is a very simple scheme
バスを利用して
11:30
to get the learning to them through a bus.
学習の場を提供するというのは簡単な構想です
11:32
And they all treat learning,
ここでは 学習を
11:35
not as some sort of academic, analytical activity,
研究や分析といった活動ではなく
11:38
but as that's something that's productive,
生産的な活動としてとらえ
11:41
something you make,
何かを作ったり
11:43
something that you can do, perhaps earn a living from.
生活費を稼いだりできる活動ととらえています
11:45
So I met this character, Steven.
こちらのスティーブンに出会いました
11:48
He'd spent three years in Nairobi living on the streets
彼はナイロビで3年 路上生活していました
11:51
because his parents had died of AIDS.
両親をエイズで亡くしたからです
11:54
And he was finally brought back into school,
でも学校に帰ってきました
11:56
not by the offer of GCSEs,
GCSEを取得できるからではなく
11:58
but by the offer of learning how to become a carpenter,
実技など実践的に大工になる方法を
12:00
a practical making skill.
教えてくれるからです
12:03
So the trendiest schools in the world,
世界最先端の
12:05
High Tech High and others,
ハイテクハイという学校などは
12:07
they espouse a philosophy of learning as productive activity.
生産活動を学習理念として掲げています
12:09
Here, there isn't really an option.
選択肢はありません
12:12
Learning has to be productive
学習は生産的であるべきです
12:14
in order for it to make sense.
有意義なものとするためです
12:16
And finally, they have a different model of scale,
普及にあたって参照するモデルは変わったもので
12:19
and it's a Chinese restaurant model
中華料理店のように
12:22
of how to scale.
広まっていくモデルです
12:24
And I learned it from this guy,
教えてくれたのはこの人です
12:26
who is an amazing character.
彼はすごく個性的で
12:28
He's probably the most remarkable social entrepreneur
教育分野で世界的にも
12:30
in education in the world.
注目される社会企業家です
12:32
His name is Madhav Chavan,
名前はマドハブ・チャバンといい
12:34
and he created something called Pratham.
プラサムというものをつくりました
12:36
And Pratham runs preschool play groups
プラサムはインドで2100万人の子供たちのために
12:38
for, now, 21 million children in India.
未就学児が集まる場所を運営しています
12:41
It's the largest NGO in education in the world.
世界最大の教育NGOで 他にも
12:44
And it also supports working-class kids going into Indian schools.
労働者階級の子の進学を支援したりしています
12:47
He's a complete revolutionary.
彼は完全なる革命児でして
12:50
He's actually a trade union organizer by background,
労働組合のまとめ役という経歴も持っています
12:52
and that's how he learned the skills
こういった組織づくりは
12:55
to build his organization.
そこで習得したのです
12:57
When they got to a certain stage,
ある時期にプラサムは
12:59
Pratham got big enough to attract
マッキンジーの慈善協力を
13:01
some pro bono support from McKinsey.
得られるまでに成長しました
13:03
McKinsey came along and looked at his model and said,
彼のモデルを見てマッキンジーが言いました
13:05
"You know what you should do with this, Madhav?
「何をすべきだと思う?
13:08
You should turn it into McDonald's.
マクドナルドに変えるんだよ
13:10
And what you do when you go to any new site
別の地域でやるときは
13:12
is you kind of roll out a franchise.
フランチャイズ展開するんだ
13:14
And it's the same wherever you go.
どの地域でも同じ
13:16
It's reliable and people know exactly where they are.
信頼できて 場所も分かりやすい
13:18
And there will be no mistakes."
それに失敗もない」
13:21
And Madhav said,
するとマドハブは返しました
13:23
"Why do we have to do it that way?
「そうする必要があるのか?
13:25
Why can't we do it more like the Chinese restaurants?"
中華料理店のようにはできないのだろうか?」
13:27
There are Chinese restaurants everywhere,
いたるところに中華料理店がありますが
13:30
but there is no Chinese restaurant chain.
中華料理店のチェーン組織はありません それでも
13:32
Yet, everyone knows what is a Chinese restaurant.
中華料理店は知られています
13:35
They know what to expect, even though it'll be subtly different
色や名前など微妙な違いはあるかもしれませんが
13:37
and the colors will be different and the name will be different.
予想はつきます
13:40
You know a Chinese restaurant when you see it.
中華料理店を見ればそれと認識できます
13:42
These people work with the Chinese restaurant model --
中華料理店モデルを共有しているのです
13:45
same principles, different applications and different settings --
実施方法や環境は違っても原則は同じです
13:48
not the McDonald's model.
マクドナルド型モデルとは違います
13:51
The McDonald's model scales.
マクドナルド型モデルは拡大します
13:53
The Chinese restaurant model spreads.
中華料理店モデルは拡散します
13:55
So mass education
大衆教育というのは
13:58
started with social entrepreneurship
19世紀に
14:00
in the 19th century.
社会企業家が始めました
14:02
And that's desperately what we need again
今またこれが世界規模で
14:04
on a global scale.
なんとしても必要なのです
14:06
And what can we learn from all of that?
そこから何か得られるでしょうか?
14:08
Well, we can learn a lot
もちろん多くを学べます
14:10
because our education systems
私たちの教育システムは
14:12
are failing desperately in many ways.
とにかく欠陥だらけだからです
14:14
They fail to reach the people
一番必要としている人に
14:16
they most need to serve.
与えられていません
14:18
They often hit their target but miss the point.
標的をとらえても 中心を外し
14:20
Improvement is increasingly
改良を試みることさえ
14:23
difficult to organize;
難しくなりつつあります
14:25
our faith in these systems, incredibly fraught.
このシステムへの信頼はかなり揺らいでいます
14:27
And this is just a very simple way of
どんな革新が必要か
14:30
understanding what kind of innovation,
どんな新計画が必要か
14:32
what kind of different design we need.
分かりやすくまとめたのがこちら
14:35
There are two basic types of innovation.
革新には二つの基本型があります
14:38
There's sustaining innovation,
一つは支援的革新で
14:40
which will sustain an existing institution or an organization,
既存の機関や組織を支援するものです
14:42
and disruptive innovation
もう一つは破壊的革新で
14:45
that will break it apart, create some different way of doing it.
既存のものを解体して新しい手法で作り直すものです
14:47
There are formal settings --
革新が起きる環境としては
14:50
schools, colleges, hospitals --
学校 大学 病院など
14:52
in which innovation can take place,
公的な環境や
14:54
and informal settings -- communities,
コミュニティー 家族 付き合いなど
14:56
families, social networks.
私的な環境があります
14:58
Almost all our effort goes in this box,
たいていはこの黄色い部分を実行します
15:00
sustaining innovation in formal settings,
つまり公的な環境での支援的革新です
15:02
getting a better version
これは19世紀に発展した
15:05
of the essentially Bismarckian school system
ビスマルク的学校システムを
15:07
that developed in the 19th century.
改良する手法です
15:09
And as I said, the trouble with this is that,
ここでの問題点は
15:12
in the developing world
この手法を実現できる先生が
15:14
there just aren't teachers to make this model work.
途上国にはいないのです
15:16
You'd need millions and millions of teachers
中国 インド ナイジェリアその他の途上国では
15:18
in China, India, Nigeria
その需要を満たすには
15:21
and the rest of developing world to meet need.
膨大な数の先生が必要なのです
15:23
And in our system, we know
私たちと同じやり方を
15:26
that simply doing more of this won't eat into
単に押し進めていくだけでは
15:28
deep educational inequalities,
都心や かつての工業地帯にある
15:31
especially in inner cities
深刻な教育格差に
15:33
and former industrial areas.
切り込めないのです
15:35
So that's why we need three more kinds of innovation.
そこでさらに3種類の革新が必要となります
15:37
We need more reinvention.
もっと改革が必要です
15:40
And all around the world now you see
世界中では今
15:42
more and more schools reinventing themselves.
学校自身がどんどん改革を進めています
15:44
They're recognizably schools, but they look different.
学校は学校でも様相が違います
15:47
There are Big Picture schools
ビッグ ピクチャーという学校が
15:50
in the U.S. and Australia.
アメリカとオーストラリアにあります
15:52
There are Kunskapsskolan schools
クンスカップ スコーンという学校が
15:54
in Sweden.
スウェーデンにあります
15:56
Of 14 of them,
14校のうち学校に含まれるのは
15:58
only two of them are in schools.
二つだけです
16:01
Most of them are in other buildings not designed as schools.
多くは学校ではない別の施設として建てられています
16:03
There is an amazing school in Northen Queensland
北クイーンズランドには変わった
16:06
called Jaringan.
ジャーリガンという学校があります
16:08
And they all have the same kind of features:
すべてに共通しているのは
16:10
highly collaborative, very personalized,
協力の度合いが高く 個々に適したやり方で
16:12
often pervasive technology,
普及しやすい手法をとっている点です
16:15
learning that starts from questions
知識やカリキュラムからではなく
16:18
and problems and projects,
質問 課題の検討 提案
16:20
not from knowledge and curriculum.
そこから始まる学習です
16:22
So we certainly need more of that.
まだまだ検討事項はありますが
16:24
But because so many of the issues in education
教育問題の多くは単に学校だけでなく
16:26
aren't just in school,
家庭やコミュニティーの
16:29
they're in family and community,
問題でもありますから
16:31
what you also need, definitely,
当然右側の領域も
16:33
is more on the right hand side.
必要になってきます
16:35
You need efforts to supplement schools.
学校を補うような取り組みが必要です
16:37
The most famous of these is Reggio Emilia in Italy,
一番有名なのはイタリアのレッジョ・エミリアという
16:40
the family-based learning system
家族を基盤とした学習システムで
16:43
to support and encourage people in schools.
学生を支援したり 後押ししたりするものです
16:46
The most exciting is the Harlem Children's Zone,
特に10年以上ジェフリー・カナダが主導してきた
16:49
which over 10 years, led by Geoffrey Canada,
ハーレム チルドレンズ ゾーンは面白く
16:52
has, through a mixture of schooling
学校教育に家庭やコミュニティーの
16:55
and family and community projects,
取り組みを連携させて
16:57
attempted to transform not just education in schools,
学校だけでなく文化や
16:59
but the entire culture and aspiration
ハーレムに住む約1万の家族の希望を
17:02
of about 10,000 families in Harlem.
全て改革することを試みてきました
17:05
We need more of that
さらに全く新しく
17:08
completely new and radical thinking.
先進的な考え方も必要です
17:10
You can go to places an hour away, less,
この部屋から1時間以内にたどり着けるような
17:12
from this room,
すぐ近くの所に
17:15
just down the road, which need that,
皆さんが考えもしなかったような革新的なものを
17:17
which need radicalism of a kind that we haven't imagined.
必要としている地域があるのです
17:20
And finally, you need transformational innovation
最後に 全く新しい別の手法による
17:23
that could imagine getting learning to people
学習機会の提供を期待できる
17:25
in completely new and different ways.
大きな変革が必要です
17:27
So we are on the verge, 2015,
2015年には
17:30
of an amazing achievement,
素晴らしい成果が得られそうです
17:33
the schoolification of the world.
世界中での通学実現です
17:36
Every child up to the age of 15 who wants a place in school
2015年には 15才以下で望むなら誰でも
17:38
will be able to have one in 2015.
通学できるようになります
17:41
It's an amazing thing.
素晴らしいことです
17:43
But it is,
でも これは
17:45
unlike cars, which have developed
急速に整然と発展をとげた
17:47
so rapidly and orderly,
自動車産業とは違います
17:49
actually the school system is recognizably
学校システムはもちろん
17:51
an inheritance from the 19th century,
19世紀の
17:54
from a Bismarkian model of German schooling
ビスマルク的なドイツの学校制度の遺産であって
17:56
that got taken up by English reformers,
イギリスの改革者や
17:59
and often by
宗教伝道者によって導入されたもので
18:02
religious missionaries,
社会の結束を強めるために
18:05
taken up in the United States
アメリカで導入されたり
18:07
as a force of social cohesion,
日本や韓国で
18:09
and then in Japan and South Korea as they developed.
成長期に導入されたものです
18:11
It's recognizably 19th century in its roots.
19世紀が起源です
18:14
And of course it's a huge achievement.
素晴らしい成果は出ました
18:16
And of course it will bring great things.
これからも出すでしょう
18:18
It will bring skills and learning and reading.
技能 学習 識字などの成果は得られるでしょう
18:20
But it will also lay waste to imagination.
でも想像力を荒廃させることになるでしょうし
18:23
It will lay waste to appetite. It will lay waste to social confidence.
学習意欲や社会的信頼を荒廃させます
18:26
It will stratify society
自由化するにつれて
18:29
as much as it liberates it.
社会を階層化させます
18:31
And we are bequeathing to the developing world
私たちは途上国に
18:33
school systems that they will now spend
改革に1世紀かかるような学校システムを
18:35
a century trying to reform.
伝えることになってしまいます
18:38
That is why we need really radical thinking,
ですから 学習の手法を考えるにあたって
18:40
and why radical thinking is now
抜本的な思考の転換が
18:43
more possible and more needed than ever in how we learn.
かつてなく現実的で 今こそ必要とされているのです
18:45
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
18:48
Translated by Satoshi Tatsuhara
Reviewed by Takahiro Shimpo

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Charles Leadbeater - Innovation consultant
A researcher at the London think tank Demos, Charles Leadbeater was early to notice the rise of "amateur innovation" -- great ideas from outside the traditional walls, from people who suddenly have the tools to collaborate, innovate and make their expertise known.

Why you should listen

Charles Leadbeater's theories on innovation have compelled some of the world's largest organizations to rethink their strategies. A financial journalist turned innovation consultant (for clients ranging from the British government to Microsoft), Leadbeater noticed the rise of "pro-ams" -- passionate amateurs who act like professionals, making breakthrough discoveries in many fields, from software to astronomy to kite-surfing. His 2004 essay "The Pro-Am Revolution" -- which The New York Times called one of the year's biggest global ideas -- highlighted the rise of this new breed of amateur.

Prominent examples range from the mountain bike to the open-source operating system Linux, from Wikipedia to the Jubilee 2000 campaign, which helped persuade Western nations to cancel more than $30 billion in third-world debt. In his upcoming book, We-Think, Leadbeater explores how this emerging culture of mass creativity and participation could reshape companies and governments. A business reporter by training, he was previously an editor for the Financial Times, and later, The Independent, where, with Helen Fielding, he developed the "Bridget Jones' Diary" column. Currently, he is researching for Atlas of Ideas, a program that is mapping changes in the global geography of science and innovation.

More profile about the speaker
Charles Leadbeater | Speaker | TED.com