19:55
TEDxAtlanta

Ellen Dunham-Jones: Retrofitting suburbia

エレン・ダナム・ジョーンズ: 郊外の改造

Filmed:

エレン・ダナム・ジョーンズが、次の50年へ向けた重大なサステナブル・デザインのプロジェクトである「郊外の改造」の火ぶたを切ります。寂れたモールの再生、見捨てられた大型店舗の復活、駐車場跡の生き生きした水辺などが、実例として紹介されます。

- Architect
Ellen Dunham-Jones takes an unblinking look at our underperforming suburbs -- and proposes plans for making them livable and sustainable. Full bio

In the last 50 years,
私たちはここ50年間
00:16
we've been building the suburbs
郊外を作り続け
00:18
with a lot of unintended consequences.
意図せぬ結果を多く生み出しています
00:20
And I'm going to talk about some of those consequences
そこで 私はそれらの結果の
いくつかについて話します
00:22
and just present a whole bunch of really interesting projects
そして興味深いプロジェクトをたくさん紹介するので
00:25
that I think give us tremendous reasons
郊外の改造が
00:28
to be really optimistic
次の50年に重大な影響を及ぼす
00:31
that the big design and development project of the next 50 years
設計や開発のプロジェクトとなるだろうと
00:33
is going to be retrofitting suburbia.
楽観的に期待できるようになるでしょう
00:36
So whether it's redeveloping dying malls
寂れたモールの再開発だとか
00:39
or re-inhabiting dead big-box stores
捨てられた大規模商用施設へのテナント再導入だとか
00:42
or reconstructing wetlands
駐車場を壊して
00:45
out of parking lots,
水辺を再建することもありますが
00:47
I think the fact is
さて実際
00:49
the growing number
郊外の至る所で見られるように
00:51
of empty and under-performing,
空家や不採算の
00:53
especially retail, sites
商用施設が
00:55
throughout suburbia
増大しているということは
00:57
gives us actually a tremendous opportunity
現時点では
最も持続可能性の低い地域に
00:59
to take our least-sustainable
手を入れて
01:02
landscapes right now
もっと持続可能な地域へと
01:04
and convert them into
改造するためのとても大きな機会を
01:06
more sustainable places.
与えてくれるのだと考えます
01:08
And in the process, what that allows us to do
その過程においては
経済成長を 既存のコミュニティーを
01:10
is to redirect a lot more of our growth
支援し
01:13
back into existing communities
そのインフラストラクチャーの
01:15
that could use a boost,
再配置に 経済成長の成果を
01:17
and have the infrastructure in place,
再投下することで これが実現します
01:19
instead of continuing
郊外の周辺部で森を切り開き
01:21
to tear down trees
緑地をはがし続けるのは
01:23
and to tear up the green space out at the edges.
もうおしまいです
01:25
So why is this important?
それでは何故これが重要なのでしょうか?
01:27
I think there are any number of reasons,
私は多くの理由があると考えますが
01:30
and I'm just going to not get into detail but mention a few.
しかし その詳細には立ち入らずに
お話するつもりです
01:33
Just from the perspective of climate change,
まさに気候変動の観点からすると
01:36
the average urban dweller in the U.S.
アメリカの平均的な都市居住者の
01:39
has about one-third the carbon footprint
カーボンフットプリントは
01:41
of the average suburban dweller,
平均的な郊外居住者の3分の1です
01:44
mostly because suburbanites drive a lot more,
何故なら 大抵において郊外居住者は
より多く車を利用し
01:47
and living in detached buildings,
また一戸建てに住んでいるので
01:50
you have that much more exterior surface
エネルギーが逃げ出していく外壁が
01:53
to leak energy out of.
ずっと多いのです
01:55
So strictly from
ですから 厳密な
01:58
a climate change perspective,
気候変動の観点からすると
02:00
the cities are already
都市は既に
02:03
relatively green.
比較的グリーンなのです
02:05
The big opportunity
温室効果ガスの
02:07
to reduce greenhouse gas emissions
排出を削減する
02:09
is actually in urbanizing
大きな機会は
02:11
the suburbs.
まさに 郊外の都市化にあるのです
02:13
All that driving that we've been doing out in the suburbs,
郊外における自動車運転について
02:15
we have doubled the amount of miles we drive.
その総マイルを 私たちは二倍にしてきました
02:18
It's increased our dependence
それは燃料効率の進歩にもかかわらず
02:21
on foreign oil
私たちの輸入石油への依存度を
02:23
despite the gains in fuel efficiency.
高めさせました
02:25
We're just driving so much more;
自動車の利用が増えすぎて
02:27
we haven't been able to keep up technologically.
技術では補えなかったのです
02:29
Public health is another reason
公衆衛生は
02:31
to consider retrofitting.
改造を考えるもうひとつの理由です
02:33
Researchers at the CDC and other places
アメリカ疾病予防管理センターなどの研究員は
02:35
have increasingly been linking
殆ど体を動かさない生活と
02:38
suburban development patterns
郊外開発のパターンを
02:40
with sedentary lifestyles.
強く結びつけてきました
02:42
And those have been linked then
またそれらはさらに
02:44
with the rather alarming,
肥満率の驚くべき増加とも
02:46
growing rates of obesity,
繋がっている事が
02:48
shown in these maps here,
これらのマップに示されています
02:50
and that obesity has also been triggering
そして肥満はまた
02:53
great increases in heart disease
心臓疾患や糖尿病の大きな増加を
02:55
and diabetes
引き起こしており
02:57
to the point where a child born today
今日では生まれる子供の
02:59
has a one-in-three chance
三人に一人が
03:01
of developing diabetes.
糖尿病にかかる可能性を有しているのです
03:03
And that rate has been escalating at the same rate
そしてその比率は
03:05
as children not walking
徒歩で登校しなくなった子供達と
03:08
to school anymore,
同じペースで上昇しています
03:10
again, because of our development patterns.
これももまた 私たちの
開発パターンによるものです
03:12
And then there's finally -- there's the affordability question.
そして最後に値段の問題があります
03:14
I mean, how affordable is it
つまり 上昇するガソリン価格にもかかわらず
03:18
to continue to live in suburbia
郊外に住み続ける事は
03:21
with rising gas prices?
果たしてどれほど手頃なのでしょうか?
03:24
Suburban expansion to cheap land,
過去50年間の
03:26
for the last 50 years --
安価な土地へを求めて郊外は拡大し
03:29
you know the cheap land out on the edge --
安価な辺縁の土地は
03:31
has helped generations of families
アメリカンドリームを享受する世代の家族を
03:33
enjoy the American dream.
助けてきましたが
03:35
But increasingly,
しかしいよいよ
03:37
the savings promised
家の買える郊外まで出ろという
03:39
by drive-till-you-qualify affordability --
これまでの基本的なモデルで
03:41
which is basically our model --
約束された節約は
03:43
those savings are wiped out
交通費を考慮してみると
03:45
when you consider the transportation costs.
消滅する事になります
03:47
For instance, here in Atlanta,
例えば ここアトランタでは
03:50
about half of households
約半数の世帯が
03:52
make between $20,000 and $50,000 a year,
年間二万から五万ドルの間の収入を得ています
03:54
and they are spending 29 percent of their income
そして彼らはその収入のうち29%を
03:57
on housing
住宅に
04:00
and 32 percent
そして32%を
04:02
on transportation.
交通費に費やしているのです
04:04
I mean, that's 2005 figures.
この数字は2005年のもので
04:06
That's before we got up to the four bucks a gallon.
1ガロンあたりの価格が4ドルに
達する前の話です
04:08
You know, none of us
そう
交通費に気を配って
04:11
really tend to do the math on our transportation costs,
わざわざ計算する人はいません
04:13
and they're not going down
それも
04:16
any time soon.
すぐには下がらないでしょう
04:18
Whether you love suburbia's leafy privacy
あなたが郊外の 葉の繁った
個人生活を愛しているにせよ
04:20
or you hate its soulless commercial strips,
その寒々しい商業的な街路を嫌っているにせよ
04:23
there are reasons why it's important to retrofit.
それらは郊外の改造にとって重要な理由です
04:25
But is it practical?
しかしそれは実行可能でしょうか?
04:28
I think it is.
私は可能だと考えます
04:30
June Williamson and I have been researching this topic
ジューン・ウィリアムソンと私は
10年以上に渡って
04:32
for over a decade,
この主題を調査し続けてきました
04:34
and we've found over 80
また私たちは80を超える
04:36
varied projects.
多様な計画を見てきました
04:38
But that they're really all market driven,
しかしその全ては実に市場主導的です
04:41
and what's driving the market in particular --
特に市場を動かしているものは
04:43
number one -- is major demographic shifts.
第一に大規模な人口の動きです
04:46
We all tend to think of suburbia
私たちは皆郊外を
04:49
as this very family-focused place,
家族に強く焦点を合てた場所として考えがちです
04:52
but that's really not the case anymore.
しかし実はもうそうではありません
04:55
Since 2000,
2000年以来
04:58
already two-thirds of households in suburbia
もはや郊外に住む世帯の内3分の2は
05:00
did not have kids in them.
子供を持っていません
05:03
We just haven't caught up with the actual realities of this.
私たちはただその現実に
追いつけていないだけなのです
05:06
The reasons for this have a lot to with
これは ちょうど今
05:09
the dominance of the two big
二つの大きな人口グループが優勢である事と
05:12
demographic groups right now:
大きく関係しています
05:14
the Baby Boomers retiring --
ベビーブーム世代は退職しつつあり
05:16
and then there's a gap,
ここにギャップがあります
05:19
Generation X, which is a small generation.
少数の X世代です
05:21
They're still having kids --
彼らはまだ子供を産み続けていますが
05:23
but Generation Y hasn't even started
しかしY世代はまだ
05:25
hitting child-rearing age.
子供を養育する年齢に達していません
05:28
They're the other big generation.
Y世代はもう一つの大きな世代です
05:30
So as a result of that,
そしてその結果として
05:33
demographers predict
人口統計学者は
05:35
that through 2025,
2025年までには
05:37
75 to 85 percent of new households
75~85%の新しい家庭に
05:39
will not have kids in them.
子供がいないと 予見しています
05:42
And the market research, consumer research,
そして ベビーブーム世代とY世代に
05:45
asking the Boomers and Gen Y
彼らの望みや
05:48
what it is they would like,
望む生活環境について尋ねた
05:50
what they would like to live in,
市場調査 消費者調査は私たちに
05:52
tells us there is going to be a huge demand --
郊外でのより都市的なライフスタイルという
05:54
and we're already seeing it --
既に見てきたような要求が
05:57
for more urban lifestyles
巨大なものになろうとしている事を
06:00
within suburbia.
告げています
06:03
That basically, the Boomers want to be able to age in place,
それは要するに ベビーブーム世代は
年をとるのに適した場所を望み
06:06
and Gen Y would like to live
そしてY世代は
06:09
an urban lifestyle,
都市的なライフスタイルを
望んでいるという事です
06:11
but most of their jobs will continue to be out in suburbia.
しかし彼らの仕事の殆どが郊外にあります
06:13
The other big dynamic of change
もう一つの大きな変化の動態は
06:16
is the sheer performance of
役に立っていないアスファルトの
06:19
underperforming asphalt.
真の性能です
06:21
Now I keep thinking this would be a great name
なんだか インディーズのロックバンドの
06:23
for an indie rock band,
イカした名前みたいですけど―
06:25
but developers generally use it
しかしディベロッパー達は普通
06:27
to refer to underused parking lots --
利用者不足の駐車場のことをこう呼ぶのです
06:30
and suburbia is full of them.
そして郊外はそれらでいっぱいです
06:33
When the postwar suburbs were first built
戦後まず郊外は
06:36
out on the cheap land
街の中心から離れた
06:39
away from downtown,
安い土地で発展しました
06:41
it made sense to just build
平面駐車場だけを作るというのは
06:43
surface parking lots.
理にかなっていました
06:45
But those sites have now been leapfrogged
しかしやがて
06:47
and leapfrogged again,
次々と展開し
06:49
as we've just continued to sprawl,
無秩序な拡大が続いた結果
06:51
and they now have
それらは今では
06:53
a relatively central location.
相対的に中央部となっているのです
06:56
It no longer just makes sense.
もはや理にかなわなくなりました
06:58
That land is more valuable than just surface parking lots.
平面駐車場として使うよりも
価値のある土地になってます
07:01
It now makes sense to go back in,
こういう場所は
07:04
build a deck and build up
デッキを造り高層化をするほうが
07:06
on those sites.
意味をなすのです
07:09
So what do you do
では閑散としたモールで
07:11
with a dead mall,
寂れたオフィス地区で
07:13
dead office park?
あなたは何をするのでしょうか?
07:15
It turns out, all sorts of things.
あらゆる種類のことをすることになりました
07:17
In a slow economy like ours,
不活発な経済において
07:20
re-inhabitation is
新しいテナント導入は
07:22
one of the more popular strategies.
よい戦略のひとつです
07:24
So this happens to be
さて これはたまたまセントルイスの
07:26
a dead mall in St. Louis
寂れたモールですが
07:28
that's been re-inhabited as art-space.
それはアート空間として活用されました
07:30
It's now home to artist studios,
今は芸術家のアトリエ
07:33
theater groups, dance troupes.
演劇グループやダンスグループの
拠点となっています
07:35
It's not pulling in as much tax revenue
それはかつてそうであったような
07:37
as it once was,
大きな税源ではありません
07:39
but it's serving its community.
しかしそのコミュニティに貢献しています
07:41
It's keeping the lights on.
明かりを灯し続けているのです
07:43
It's becoming, I think, a really great institution.
それは本当に 素晴らしい施設に
なりつつあると思います
07:45
Other malls have been re-inhabited
他のモールは
07:48
as nursing homes,
老人ホームとして
07:50
as universities,
大学として
また多様なオフィスとして
07:52
and as all variety of office space.
テナントを獲得しました
07:54
We also found a lot of examples
私たちはさらに
07:56
of dead big-box stores
たくさんの 学校や教会
07:58
that have been converted into
そしての図書館のような
08:00
all sorts of community-serving uses as well --
あらゆる種類のコミュニティを守る用途として
改造された
08:02
lots of schools, lots of churches
閉店した大規模店舗の
08:05
and lots of libraries like this one.
多くの例を見つけました
08:08
This was a little grocery store, a Food Lion grocery store,
これはフードライオンという
食料雑貨店でしたが
08:10
that is now a public library.
今では公共図書館になっています
08:13
In addition to, I think, doing a beautiful adaptive reuse,
加えて 適応的で美しい再利用を
行っていると同時に
08:17
they tore up some of the parking spaces,
それらは駐車場のいくつかを引き剥がし
08:20
put in bioswales to collect and clean the runoff,
雨水を集め浄化するための湿地帯に
08:22
put in a lot more sidewalks
近隣を繋ぐたくさんの歩道に
08:25
to connect to the neighborhoods.
入れ替えました
08:28
And they've made this,
また彼らはこの
08:30
what was just a store along a commercial strip,
商業的な通りに並ぶただの商店だったものを
08:32
into a community gathering space.
コミュニティの集う空間にしました
08:35
This one is a little L-shaped strip shopping center
これはアリゾナ州フェニックスにある
08:38
in Phoenix, Arizona.
小さなL字型のショピングセンターです
08:41
Really all they did was they gave it a fresh coat of bright paint,
実際に彼らがしたのは
新しい鮮やかなペンキを塗り
08:43
a gourmet grocery,
グルメ食品店を開き
08:46
and they put up a restaurant in the old post office.
古い郵便局の中にレストランを作っただけでした
08:48
Never underestimate the power of food
食べ物が
08:51
to turn a place around
その場所を再活性化する力を
08:54
and make it a destination.
決して過小評価してはいけません
08:56
It's been so successful, they've now taken over the strip across the street.
それは大いに成功し
道路の反対側にも及んでいます
08:58
The real estate ads in the neighborhood
またこの近隣内の不動産の広告は
09:01
all very proudly proclaim,
全てとても誇らしげに宣言しています
09:04
"Walking distance to Le Grande Orange,"
"ル・グラーン・オランジュは徒歩圏内”
09:06
because it provided its neighborhood
なぜならそれは社会科学者が好んで言うような
09:09
with what sociologists like to call
"第三の場所"を
09:12
"a third place."
近隣に提供するからです
09:14
If home is the first place
仮に家が第一の場所で
09:16
and work is the second place,
また職場が第二の場所だとすると
09:18
the third place is where you go to hang out
第三の場所はあなたがたむろして
09:20
and build community.
コミュニティを形成しに行く場所です
09:22
And especially as suburbia is becoming
そして特に郊外では
09:24
less centered on the family,
家族への
09:26
the family households,
家族世帯への集中が減ってきているので
09:28
there's a real hunger
そこにはより多くの第三の場所を求める
09:30
for more third places.
真の渇望があるのです
09:32
So the most dramatic retrofits
そこで 最も劇的な改造は
09:35
are really those in the next category,
実のところ次のカテゴリーに属します
09:38
the next strategy: redevelopment.
次の戦略 再開発です
09:40
Now, during the boom, there were several
今 ブームのさなかにあって いくつかの
09:42
really dramatic redevelopment projects
元の建物を解体し
09:44
where the original building
更地にした上でそこを
09:46
was scraped to the ground and then the whole site was rebuilt
さらに高密度に立て直すという実に劇的な
09:48
at significantly greater density,
再開発計画があります
09:51
a sort of compact, walkable urban neighborhoods.
それはある種コンパクトで歩き回れる
都市的地域です
09:53
But some of them have been much more incremental.
しかしそれらの内いくつかは
段階的に作られました
09:56
This is Mashpee Commons,
これはマッシピーコモンズで
09:58
the oldest retrofit that we've found.
我々の見つけた中で最も古い改造です
10:00
And it's just incrementally, over the last 20 years,
またそれは駐車場の上に建てられ
10:02
built urbanism
ここ20年間に段階的に作られた
10:05
on top of its parking lots.
都市計画です
10:07
So the black and white photo shows
このモノクロの写真が示すのは
10:09
the simple 60's strip shopping center.
60年代の簡素な通りのショッピングセンターです
10:11
And then the maps above that
そしてその上の地図は
10:13
show its gradual transformation
漸時的な変化を示します
10:15
into a compact,
それがコンパクトになってゆき
10:17
mixed-use New England village,
複合用途のニューイングランド村となり
10:19
and it has plans now that have been approved
またそれは今 幹線道路の
10:22
for it to connect
反対側にできた
10:25
to new residential neighborhoods
新しい住宅地区に
10:28
across the arterials
接続する認可を得て
10:30
and over to the other side.
向かい側に拡張しました
10:32
So, you know, sometimes it's incremental.
時には段階的に
10:34
Sometimes, it's all at once.
時には一挙に行われます
10:36
This is another infill project on the parking lots,
これは別の駐車場を埋める計画で
10:39
this one of an office park outside of Washington D.C.
このワシントンDC郊外の
オフィス地区のひとつでは
10:42
When Metrorail expanded transit into the suburbs
郊外へと地下鉄路線が延長され
10:45
and opened a station nearby to this site,
またその近くに駅ができた際
10:48
the owners decided
所有者が
10:51
to build a new parking deck
新たな駐車デッキの建設を決めました
10:53
and then insert on top of their surface lots
それから既存のオフィスビルを維持しながら
10:56
a new Main Street, several apartments
平面駐車場跡に
10:59
and condo buildings,
新たな大通りやいくつかのアパートメント
11:02
while keeping the existing office buildings.
そしてマンションを加えました
11:04
Here is the site in 1940:
これはこの場所の1940年の様子です
11:06
It was just a little farm
そこはハイアッツビルの
11:09
in the village of Hyattsville.
小さな農場でした
11:11
By 1980, it had been subdivided
1980年までにはそこは既に
11:13
into a big mall on one side
片側は大きなモールに
11:15
and the office park on the other
そして反対側はオフィス地区に
分割されていました
11:17
and then some buffer sites for a library
それから図書館のための緩衝地帯
11:19
and a church to the far right.
そしてずっと右は教会です
11:21
Today, the transit,
今日ではその交通機関や
11:23
the Main Street and the new housing
大通り そして新しい住宅が
11:25
have all been built.
建てられています
11:27
Eventually, I expect that the streets
最終的にその通りは
11:29
will probably extend through a redevelopment of the mall.
恐らくモールの再開発地区まで
伸びるものと思います
11:31
Plans have already been announced
再開発されるモール上の
11:34
for a lot of those garden apartments
庭付きアパートメント用区画のプランが
11:36
above the mall to be redeveloped.
既に公表されています
11:38
Transit is a big driver of retrofits.
つまり 交通機関は改造の大きな原動力です
11:41
So here's what it looks like.
ここではそのように見えます
11:44
You can sort of see the funky new condo buildings
オフィスビルと公共空間や新たな大通りの間に
11:46
in between the office buildings
新しいファンキーな分譲マンションが
11:48
and the public space and the new Main Street.
見えます
11:50
This one is one of my favorites, Belmar.
これは私のお気に入りの一つ ベルマーです
11:53
I think they really built an attractive place here
彼らはここに実に魅力的な場所を造り
11:55
and have just employed all-green construction.
グリーンな建設作業だけを使ったと思います
11:58
There's massive P.V. arrays on the roofs
屋根の上には風力発電機と
12:01
as well as wind turbines.
巨大な太陽光発電パネルがあります
12:04
This was a very large mall
これは100エーカーのスーパー街区の
12:06
on a hundred-acre superblock.
非常に大きなモールでした
12:08
It's now 22
今では
12:10
walkable urban blocks
公共の通りや
12:12
with public streets,
二つの公共公園と八つのバス路線
12:14
two public parks, eight bus lines
またいくつかの住居形式を持つ
12:16
and a range of housing types,
22の都市街区になっています
12:18
and so it's really given Lakewood, Colorado
コロラド州レイクウッドのダウンタウンに
12:20
the downtown
この郊外が決して
12:23
that this particular suburb never had.
持つ事の無かったものを与えました
12:25
Here was the mall in its heyday.
これはその最盛期のモールです
12:28
They had their prom in the mall. They loved their mall.
モールの中には散歩道をもっており
彼らのモールを愛していました
12:30
So here's the site in 1975
これは1975年の
12:33
with the mall.
そのモールの風景です
12:36
By 1995, the mall has died.
1995年にはすでに そのモールは
寂れていますが
12:38
The department store has been kept --
そのデパートは維持されてきました
12:40
and we found this was true in many cases.
多くの場所で見られる事例です
12:42
The department stores are multistory; they're better built.
そのデパートは複数階で 良質の建物で
12:44
They're easy to be re-adapted.
容易に再活用出来ます
12:46
But the one story stuff ...
しかし一階建てのものは
12:48
that's really history.
まさに過去のものです
12:50
So here it is at projected build-out.
これが建設予定です
12:53
This project, I think, has great connectivity
私はこの計画は既存の近隣地区への
12:56
to the existing neighborhoods.
大きな接続可能性を持っていると思います
12:58
It's providing 1,500 households with the option
それはより都市的なライフスタイルという
オプションを
13:00
of a more urban lifestyle.
1500世帯へと提供します
13:02
It's about two-thirds built out right now.
今ではその約3分の2が竣工しています
13:04
Here's what the new Main Street looks like.
これは新しい大通りの見通しです
13:07
It's very successful,
これはとても成功しています
13:09
and it's helped to prompt --
またそれは
13:11
eight of the 13
デンバー市内に現在ある または発表された
13:13
regional malls in Denver
13のモールの内の8つで
13:15
have now, or have announced plans to
改造を誘発することに
13:17
be, retrofitted.
一役買いました
13:19
But it's important to note that all of this retrofitting
しかし注意すべき重要な点は
ここのような改造の全てが
13:21
is not occurring --
ただブルドーザーがやって来て
13:24
just bulldozers are coming and just plowing down the whole city.
その都市全体をただ掘り起こす
というようなものではないという事です
13:26
No, it's pockets of walkability
そうでなく それは
13:29
on the sites of
利用度の低い土地にできた
13:32
under-performing properties.
歩きやすい小路なのです
13:34
And so it's giving people more choices,
またそれは人々により多くの選択肢を与えます
13:36
but it's not taking away choices.
それは選択肢を奪いとるのではありません
13:39
But it's also not really enough
しかしまたそれは歩きやすい小路を
13:42
to just create pockets of walkability.
作るのだけでは十分ではありません
13:44
You want to also try to get more systemic transformation.
あなたはより全体的な変容を得たいと
望みます
13:47
We need to also retrofit the corridors themselves.
私たちはさらに通り自体を
改造する必要があるのです
13:50
So this is one that has been
これはカリフォルニアで
13:53
retrofitted in California.
行われている改造です
13:55
They took the commercial strip
彼らは下の白黒写真に見られる
13:57
shown on the black-and-white images below,
商業的な通りを採用し
13:59
and they built a boulevard
またその街の目抜き通りとなる
14:01
that has become the Main Street for their town.
並木道を造りました
14:03
And it's transformed from being
そしてそれは
14:06
an ugly, unsafe,
醜く 危険で
14:08
undesirable address,
望ましくない住所を
14:10
to becoming a beautiful,
美しく 魅力的で
14:12
attractive, dignified sort of good address.
品位ある良いものへと変化させました
14:15
I mean now we're hoping we start to see it;
今私たちはその結果を見るところです
14:18
they've already built City Hall, attracted two hotels.
彼らは既に市庁舎を建て
二つのホテルを誘致しました
14:20
I could imagine beautiful housing going up along there
私には美しい住宅が木々を切り倒すことなく
14:23
without tearing down another tree.
そこに並んで建てられる様を想像できます
14:26
So there's a lot of great things,
このように そこにはたくさんの
素晴らしい事がありますが
14:29
but I'd love to see more corridors getting retrofitting.
私はより多くの通りが
改造されるのを見たいのです
14:31
But densification
高密度化は
14:34
is not going to work everywhere.
すべての場所で機能する訳ではありません
14:36
Sometimes re-greening
時に再グリーン化は
14:38
is really the better answer.
より良い答えとなります
14:40
There's a lot to learn from successful
ミシガン州フリントで行われたような
14:43
landbanking programs
ランドバンキング計画の成功には
14:45
in cities like Flint, Michigan.
学ぶべき所がたくさんあります
14:47
There's also a burgeoning suburban farming movement --
それはまたある種の家庭菜園と
インターネットの出会い
14:49
sort of victory gardens meets the Internet.
急成長している郊外の農業運動でもあります
14:51
But perhaps one of the most important re-greening aspects
実際に 恐らく再グリーン化の
最も重要な一側面は
14:54
is the opportunity to restore
このミネアポリスの郊外の例のように
14:57
the local ecology,
地域の生態環境を修復する
14:59
as in this example outside of Minneapolis.
好機だという点です
15:01
When the shopping center died,
ショッピングセンターが寂れた時
15:03
the city restored the site's
その都市は
15:05
original wetlands,
以前の湿地帯を取り戻し
15:07
creating lakefront property,
湖畔の土地を作り出し
15:09
which then attracted private investment,
それは民間投資を引き寄せました
15:11
the first private investment to this very low-income neighborhood
この非常に低収入な地区への40年来
15:14
in over 40 years.
最初の民間投資です
15:17
So they've managed to both restore the local ecology
彼らは首尾よくその地域生態環境と
15:19
and the local economy at the same time.
地域経済を同時に回復させたのです
15:22
This is another re-greening example.
これは別の再グリーン化の例です
15:25
It also makes sense in very strong markets.
それはまた非常に強い市場においても
意味をなします
15:27
This one in Seattle
これはシアトルの
15:29
is on the site of a mall parking lot
新しい公共交通機関の停留所に隣接する
15:31
adjacent to a new transit stop.
モールの駐車場用地にあります
15:33
And the wavy line
またそのうねった動線は
15:35
is a path alongside a creek that has now been daylit.
今では小川に沿った陽の当たる
小道になっています
15:37
The creek had been culverted under the parking lot.
その小川は駐車場の地下排水路でした
15:40
But daylighting our creeks
そして小川に陽を当てると
15:43
really improves their water quality
実際にその水質を向上させ
15:45
and contributions to habitat.
生息環境に寄与するのです
15:47
So I've shown you some of
私はあなたがたにいくつかの
15:49
the first generation of retrofits.
第一世代の改造をお見せしました
15:51
What's next?
次は何でしょうか?
15:53
I think we have three challenges for the future.
私は未来へ向けて3つの挑戦があると考えます
15:55
The first is to plan retrofitting
第一に 改造を
15:58
much more systemically
より体系的に
16:01
at the metropolitan scale.
都市的なスケールで計画することです
16:03
We need to be able to target
私たちは本当に再グリーン化すべきである
16:05
which areas really should be re-greened.
場所を設定する必要があります
16:07
Where should we be redeveloping?
私たちはどこを再開発すべきなのでしょうか?
16:09
And where should we be encouraging re-inhabitation?
またどこで再定住を促進すべきなのでしょうか?
16:11
These slides just show two images
これらのスライドが示すのは
16:14
from a larger project
アトランタでちょうどこのことを試みている
16:16
that looked at trying to do that for Atlanta.
より大きな計画を表した2つのイメージです
16:18
I led a team that was asked to imagine
私はアトランタの100年後を構想するよう
16:20
Atlanta 100 years from now.
依頼されたチームを率いました
16:22
And we chose to try to reverse sprawl
そして私たちはスプロールを
三つのお金のかかるしかし単純な動きで
16:25
through three simple moves -- expensive, but simple.
覆そうと決めました
16:28
One, in a hundred years,
一つは100年間の
16:31
transit on all major
全ての主要な路線や道路
16:33
rail and road corridors.
等の交通機関を提供
16:35
Two, in a hundred years,
第二に 100年間の
16:37
thousand foot buffers
全ての水路に沿った
16:39
on all stream corridors.
300メートルの緩衝地帯
16:41
It's a little extreme, but we've got a little water problem.
これは多少極端ですが
私たちは少々水の問題を抱えてきました
16:43
In a hundred years,
100年間
16:46
subdivisions that simply end up too close to water
単に水に近すぎるか
16:48
or too far from transit won't be viable.
あるいは交通機関から遠すぎるような分譲地は
存続できません
16:50
And so we've created the eco-acre
そこで土地の開発権に
16:53
transfer-to-transfer development rights
エコの面積の確保を義務付け
16:56
to the transit corridors
交通幹線周囲の整備を進めます
16:58
and allow the re-greening
またかつて分譲した土地を再緑化して
17:00
of those former subdivisions
食料やエネルギー生産に
17:02
for food and energy production.
使える制度を整えました
17:04
So the second challenge
そこで 次の挑戦は
17:08
is to improve the architectural design quality
この改造における建築デザインの質を
17:11
of the retrofits.
向上させる事です
17:14
And I close with this image
私はこのデモクラシー活動の
17:16
of democracy in action:
映像をもって締めくくります
17:18
This is a protest that's happening
これはメリーランドのシルバースプリングで
17:21
on a retrofit in Silver Spring, Maryland
改造に対する抗議が
17:23
on an Astroturf town green.
人工芝の上で起こっている模様です
17:26
Now, retrofits are often accused
今 改造はしばしば
17:30
of being examples of faux downtowns
偽の繁華街や即席のアーバニズムとして
17:32
and instant urbanism,
非難されているのです
17:35
and not without reason; you don't get much more phony
その理由が無いわけではありません
17:38
than an Astroturf town green.
人工芝以上のまやかしはないということです
17:40
I have to say, these are very hybrid places.
これらの場所はとても複合的な場所です
17:43
They are new but trying to look old.
それは新しいけれども古く見せかけています
17:46
They have urban streetscapes,
彼らは都市的な街並みに見えますが
17:49
but suburban parking ratios.
郊外の駐車比率です
17:51
Their populations are
その人口は
17:53
more diverse than typical suburbia,
典型的な郊外に比べ多様ですが
17:55
but they're less diverse than cities.
都市ほどではありません
17:58
And they are
またそれは
18:00
public places,
公共空間でありながら
18:02
but that are managed by private companies.
私的な企業に管理されています
18:04
And just the surface appearance
そしてその表面の外観は
18:07
are often -- like the Astroturf here --
この人工芝のように
18:10
they make me wince.
ただ私をひるませます
18:13
So, you know, I mean I'm glad that
さて 私はアーバニズムが
18:16
the urbanism is doing its job.
その役目を果たす事を嬉しく思います
18:18
The fact that a protest is happening
抗議が起こっている事が
18:20
really does mean
実際に意味するのは
18:23
that the layout of the blocks, the streets and blocks, the putting in of public space,
街区のレイアウトや通り そして街区や
公共空間の配置に
18:25
compromised as it may be,
妥協することがおそらく
18:28
is still a really great thing.
未だ大きな問題としてあるという事です
18:30
But we've got to get the architecture better.
しかし私たちは建築を
より良くしなければなりません
18:32
The final challenge is for all of you.
最後の挑戦はあなた方全てのためのものです
18:34
I want you to join the protest
私はあなたがこの抗議に参加し
18:37
and start demanding
より持続可能な
18:39
more sustainable suburban places --
郊外の場を
18:41
more sustainable places, period.
要求する事を強く望みます
18:43
But culturally,
しかし文化的に
18:46
we tend to think that downtowns
私たちは繁華街を動的であるべきだと考え
18:48
should be dynamic, and we expect that.
またそう期待する傾向にあります
18:50
But we seem to have an expectation
他方郊外に対しては
18:52
that the suburbs should forever remain frozen
思春期の形がどのようなものであれ
18:54
in whatever adolescent form
ずっと変わらず
18:56
they were first given birth to.
そのままであるべきだと考えてきました
18:58
It's time to let them grow up,
今や
郊外を成長させる時がきたのです
19:00
so I want you
ですから 私はあなた方からの
19:03
to all support the zoning changes,
ゾーニングの変更や道路の抑制
19:05
the road diets, the infrastructure improvements
インフラストラクチャーの向上や
19:07
and the retrofits that are coming soon to a neighborhood near you.
あなたの近隣にやってくる改造に対する
支援を望みます
19:10
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
19:13
Translated by Nao Yokoyama
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Ellen Dunham-Jones - Architect
Ellen Dunham-Jones takes an unblinking look at our underperforming suburbs -- and proposes plans for making them livable and sustainable.

Why you should listen

Ellen Dunham-Jones teaches architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology, is an award-winning architect and a board member of the Congress for the New Urbanism. She shows how design of where we live impacts some of the most pressing issues of our times -- reducing our ecological footprint and energy consumption while improving our health and communities and providing living options for all ages.

Dunham-Jones is widely recognized as a leader in finding solutions for aging suburbs. She is the co-author of Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs. She and co-author June Williamson share more than 50 case studies across North America of "underperforming asphalt properties" that have been redesigned and redeveloped into walkable, sustainable vital centers of community—libraries, city halls, town centers, schools and more.

More profile about the speaker
Ellen Dunham-Jones | Speaker | TED.com