sponsored links
TED2002

Dean Kamen: To invent is to give

ディーン・ケーメン : 奉仕の発明

February 2, 2002

発明家ディーン・ケーメンは、セグウェイに関する持論を述べ、今取り組んでいる次の大きなアイディアの一部を紹介します。 (発展途上国で利用可能なエネルギー源と水の浄化装置)

Dean Kamen - Inventor
Dean Kamen landed in the limelight with the Segway, but he has been innovating since high school, with more than 150 patents under his belt. Recent projects include portable energy and water purification for the developing world, and a prosthetic arm for maimed soldiers. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
As you pointed out, every time you come here, you learn something.
仰る通り ここではいつも
何か学ばされます
00:24
This morning, the world's experts
今朝 確か
00:28
from I guess three or four different companies on building seats,
椅子を作る企業の内
3、4社から専門家が集まり
00:30
I think concluded that ultimately, the solution is, people shouldn't sit down.
最終的に人々は座るべきではない
と結論付けたと思います
00:34
I could have told them that.
私からそう申し上げても良かったのですが
00:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:41
Yesterday, the automotive guys gave us some new insights.
昨日は自動車業界の人達から
新しい洞察を得ました
00:43
They pointed out that, I believe it was between 30 and 50 years from today,
30年から50年後 自動車の運転は
00:49
they will be steering cars by wire,
電子制御になるという指摘です
00:55
without all that mechanical stuff.
機械的な機構を介さずに
00:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:00
That's reassuring.
これは心強いですね
01:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:04
They then pointed out that there'd be, sort of, the other controls by wire,
そして機械的機構がなくなる代わりに
01:08
to get rid of all that mechanical stuff.
電線が使われると言います
01:13
That's pretty good, but why not get rid of the wires?
素晴らしい話ですが
電線もなくしてしまいたいですよね?
01:15
Then you don't need anything to control the car, except thinking about it.
車を使うのに何も必要なくなります
ただ考えればいいのです
01:20
I would love to talk about the technology,
私は技術について話すのが大好きです
01:28
and sometime, in what's past the 15 minutes,
そして時には
いままでの15分間のように
01:30
I'll be happy to talk to all the techno-geeks around here
ここにいる技術マニアの人達に
01:34
about what's in here.
これの中身について話したいです
01:36
But if I had one thing to say about this, before we get to first,
しかし これに関して
1つだけ話をするとしたら
01:40
it would be that from the time we started building this,
これを作り始めた時の話をしましょう
01:44
the big idea wasn't the technology.
着想の中心は技術ではありませんでした
01:50
It really was a big idea in technology when we started applying it
障害者のための車椅子iBOTに
この技術を適用したときには
01:52
in the iBOT for the disabled community.
技術が中心的でした
01:55
The big idea here is, I think, a new piece of a solution
しかし これの着想の中心は
01:57
to a fairly big problem in transportation.
交通問題に対する
新しい解決策だと思います
02:03
And maybe to put that in perspective: there's so much data on this,
この問題に関する情報はあまりにも多く
様々な形で
02:07
I'll be happy to give it to you in different forms.
皆さんに提供できます
02:12
You never know what strikes the fancy of whom,
誰がどんなことに感銘を覚えるかは
分かりませんが
02:14
but everybody is perfectly willing to believe the car changed the world.
皆 自動車は世界を変えたと
信じていると思います
02:17
And Henry Ford, just about 100 years ago, started cranking out Model Ts.
100年程前 ヘンリー・フォードは
T型フォードを作り始めました
02:22
What I don't think most people think about
しかし 多くの人は この技術が
02:26
is the context of how technology is applied.
どのような状況で適用されたか
考えていないでしょう
02:28
For instance, in that time, 91 percent of America
例えば 当時のアメリカの人口の91%は
02:32
lived either on farms or in small towns.
農場や小さな町に住んでいました
02:35
So, the car --
自動車の出現 すなわち―
02:38
the horseless carriage that replaced the horse and carriage -- was a big deal;
馬と馬車を置き換えた
馬なしの馬車は大事件でした
02:41
it went twice as fast as a horse and carriage.
それは馬車の2倍の早さで移動でき
02:45
It was half as long.
全長は半分
02:47
And it was an environmental improvement, because, for instance,
それはまた環境に優しい乗り物でした
例えば―
02:49
in 1903 they outlawed horses and buggies in downtown Manhattan,
マンハッタンのダウンタウンでは
1903年に馬の乗り入れが禁止されました
02:53
because you can imagine what the roads look like
何百万頭もの馬が行き来する道路が
どうなるか
02:58
when you have a million horses,
想像するのは簡単だと思います
03:01
and a million of them urinating and doing other things,
何百万頭もの馬の
排尿やその他の行為で
03:04
and the typhoid and other problems created were almost unimaginable.
引き起こされる腸チフス等の問題は
想像を絶するものでした
03:08
So the car was the clean environmental alternative to a horse and buggy.
車は馬や馬車に対する
環境に優しい代替手段でした
03:14
It also was a way for people to get from their farm to a farm,
それはまた人々が農場から別の農場へ
農場から町へ ―
03:18
or their farm to a town, or from a town to a city.
町から大きな町へと移動する手段でした
03:22
It all made sense, with 91 percent of the people living there.
91%の人が農場で生活していた時代には
すべて当然のことでした
03:25
By the 1950s, we started connecting all the towns together
1950年代になると
町を道路でつなげるようになりました
03:30
with what a lot of people claim is the eighth wonder of the world, the highway system.
多くの人が世界の8番目の不思議とよぶ
高速道路網のことです
03:34
And it is certainly a wonder.
そしてこれは確かに驚くべき偉業です
03:38
And by the way, as I take shots at old technologies,
ところで 古い技術を話題にする際
皆さんに―
03:41
I want to assure everybody, and particularly the automotive industry --
特に我々をサポートしてくれている
自動車業界の方々に対して
03:45
who's been very supportive of us --
確認しておきたいことがあります
03:49
that I don't think this in any way competes with airplanes, or cars.
それはこの乗り物が飛行機や自動車と
競合しないということです
03:51
But think about where the world is today.
ただ今日の世界の状勢を
考えてみてください
03:59
50 percent of the global population now lives in cities.
全人口の50%が都市で生活しています
04:03
That's 3.2 billion people.
それは32億人に相当します。
04:06
We've solved all the transportation problems
我々は交通に関する問題を
04:10
that have changed the world to get it to where we are today.
全て解決し 世界を変え
今のこの世界にいます
04:12
500 years ago, sailing ships started getting reliable enough;
500年前に帆船が十分実用的になり
04:15
we found a new continent.
我々は新しい大陸を発見しました
04:18
150 years ago, locomotives got efficient enough, steam power,
150年前 蒸気機関車が十分効率的になり
04:20
that we turned the continent into a country.
大陸が国家に変わりました
04:24
Over the last hundred years, we started building cars,
100年前から我々は自動車を作り始め
04:27
and then over the 50 years we've connected every city to every other city
50年をかけとても効率的な方法で
04:30
in an extraordinarily efficient way,
全ての都市をつなぎました
04:33
and we have a very high standard of living as a consequence of that.
その結果 非常に高い水準の
生活を享受しています
04:35
But during that entire process, more and more people have been born,
しかし その過程で
より多くの人が生まれ より多くの人が―
04:38
and more and more people are moving to cities.
都市に移住しました
04:43
China alone is going to move four to six hundred million people
中国単独でも 4億から6億人の人々が
今後15年で
04:45
into cities in the next decade and a half.
都市に移動すると考えられます
04:49
And so, nobody, I think, would argue that airplanes, in the last 50 years,
そして飛行機がここ50年で大陸や国々を
04:53
have turned the continent and the country now into a neighborhood.
隣人同士に変えたことに
誰も異論はありません
04:59
And if you just look at how technology has been applied,
技術の使われ方を見ると
05:03
we've solved all the long-range, high-speed, high-volume,
長距離、高速、大量、重量物の
移動に関する問題は
05:05
large-weight problems of moving things around.
全て解決したと言えます
05:09
Nobody would want to give them up.
誰もそれを手放さないでしょう
05:12
And I certainly wouldn't want to give up my airplane,
私も 飛行機、ヘリコプター
05:14
or my helicopter, or my Humvee, or my Porsche.
SUVやポルシェを
手放したいとは思いません
05:17
I love them all. I don't keep any of them in my living room.
それらは大切で
居間の飾り物ではありません
05:21
The fact is, the last mile is the problem,
しかし 実際は最後の1マイルが
問題として残っています
05:24
and half the world now lives in dense cities.
現在 全人口の半分は
密度の高い都市に住み
05:29
And people spend, depending on who they are,
人々は 個人差はありますが
05:32
between 90 and 95 percent of their energy getting around on foot.
90から95%のエネルギーを
歩いての移動に費やしています
05:34
I think there's -- I don't know what data would impress you,
どのようなデータに
興味をもたれるか分かりませんが
05:39
but how about, 43 percent of the refined fuel produced in the world
例えば 世界中で生産される燃料の43%は
05:42
is consumed by cars in metropolitan areas in the United States.
米国の都市近郊における
車での移動で消費されています
05:48
Three million people die every year in cities due to bad air,
そして都市では 300万人の人々が毎年
汚れた空気が原因で死亡しています
05:54
and almost all particulate pollution on this planet
この地球の粒子状物質による
汚染の大半を
05:59
is produced by transportation devices, particularly sitting in cities.
輸送機械 特に都市での移動用のものが
生じています
06:02
And again, I say that not to attack any industry,
繰り返しますが 私は特定の業界を
批判するつもりはありません
06:07
I think -- I really do -- I love my airplane,
飛行機は大好きですし
06:11
and cars on highways moving 60 miles an hour
高速道路を時速60マイルで
移動する自動車は
06:14
are extraordinarily efficient,
技術的な観点からも
06:17
both from an engineering point of view,
エネルギー消費や実用性の観点からも
06:19
an energy consumption point of view, and a utility point of view.
非常に効率の高いものです
06:22
And we all love our cars, and I do.
皆 車を気に入っていて
私自身もそうです
06:25
The problem is, you get into the city and you want to go four blocks,
しかし 都市のなかで
4ブロックほど移動したいとき
06:28
it's neither fun nor efficient nor productive.
車は楽しくも、効率的でも、
生産的でもありません
06:32
It's not sustainable.
持続可能でもありません
06:35
If -- in China, in the year 1998, 417 million people used bicycles;
中国では1998年時点で
4億1700万人が自転車を使い
06:37
1.7 million people used cars.
170万人が自動車を使っていました
06:43
If five percent of that population became, quote, middle class,
もし人口の5%がいわゆる中間層となり
06:47
and wanted to go the way we've gone in the last hundred years
我々が過去100年間 歩んできたような
生活を選んだとして
06:51
at the same time that 50 percent of their population are moving into cities
同時に人口の50%が
6週毎に
06:56
of the size and density of Manhattan, every six weeks --
マンハッタンと同じ面積と人口密度を
持つ都市に流入すると
06:59
it isn't sustainable environmentally;
環境的に持続不可能です
07:03
it isn't sustainable economically -- there just ain't enough oil --
それは経済的にも不可能です
単純に石油が足りません
07:05
and it's not sustainable politically.
そして 政治的にも持続不可能です
07:09
I mean, what are we fighting over right now?
我々は今 何のために争っていますか?
07:11
We can make it complicated, but what's the world fighting over right now?
問題を複雑にすることもできますが
今 世界は何を巡り争っていますか?
07:13
So it seemed to me that somebody had to work on that last mile,
私には 誰かが最後の1マイルの問題を
解決しなければばらないように見えました
07:17
and it was dumb luck. We were working on iBOTs,
そして幸い 私はiBOTを開発していました
07:24
but once we made this, we instantly decided
iBOTが出来た時に気付きました
07:27
it could be a great alternative to jet skis. You don't need the water.
これは水を必要としない
ジェットスキーになると
07:29
Or snowmobiles. You don't need the snow.
あるいは雪を必要としないスノーモービル
07:33
Or skiing. It's just fun, and people love to move around doing fun things.
あるいはスキー それはただ楽しく
人々はレジャーとして動きまわるのが好きです
07:35
And every one of those industries, by the way --
そして今上げた産業の全てが―
07:42
just golf carts alone is a multi-billion-dollar industry.
ゴルフカートだけをとっても
何十億ドルというビジネスです
07:44
But rather than go license this off, which is what we normally do,
しかし これを通常通り
ライセンスする代わりに
07:47
it seemed to me that if we put all our effort not into the technology,
また技術に全精力をつぎ込む代わりに
07:50
but into an understanding of a world that's solved all its other problems,
今の世の中を理解する手段として
使おうと思いました
07:54
but has somehow come to accept that cities -- which,
世界の問題がほとんど解決された今でも
都市の問題はそのまま残されています
07:58
right back from ancient Greece on, were meant to walk around,
古代ギリシャ時代から
都市の移動手段は徒歩で
08:03
cities that were architected and built for people --
徒歩に適するよう設計されていました
08:06
now have a footprint that,
今は違います
08:09
while we've solved every other transportation problem --
他の交通問題は全て解決済です
08:11
and it's like Moore's law.
まるでムーアの法則のように
08:13
I mean, look at the time it took to cross a continent in a Conestoga wagon,
ほろ馬車で大陸を横断するのに
要する時間と 鉄道や飛行機を
08:15
then on a railroad, then an airplane.
利用した場合を比べてみてください
08:20
Every other form of transportation's been improved.
ほとんど全ての
交通手段は改善されましたが
08:23
In 5,000 years, we've gone backwards in getting around cities.
5000年の間に都市のなかの
移動手段は退行しました
08:27
They've gotten bigger; they're spread out.
都市は大きくなり
広がりました
08:31
The most expensive real estate on this planet in every city --
この地球の都市で
最も高価な不動産の中で―
08:34
Wilshire Boulevard, or Fifth Avenue, or Tokyo, or Paris --
ロサンゼルスのウィルシャ-ブルバード、
ニューヨークの五番街、東京、パリ ―
08:39
the most expensive real estate is their downtowns.
もっとも高価な場所はダウンタウンです
08:43
65 percent of the landmass of our cities are parked cars.
世界中で最も大きな20の都市で
土地面積の65%が
08:46
The 20 largest cities in the world.
駐車場に使われています
08:50
So you wonder, what if cities could give to their pedestrians
都市の歩行者に
都市間の移動と同じ利便性を
08:52
what we take for granted as we now go between cities?
与えることができたら
どうなるでしょうか?
08:57
What if you could make them fun, attractive, clean,
その手段を楽しくて、魅力的で
クリーンで、環境に優しく
09:01
environmentally friendly?
出来たらとうでしょうか?
09:05
What if it would make it a little bit more palatable
もう少し これを使いやすい環境にし
09:09
to have access via this, as that last link to mass transit,
大量輸送の最後のリンクとして
使用することが出来れば
09:12
to get out to your cars so we can all live in the suburbs
皆 車を使える郊外に家をもち
09:18
and use our cars the way we want,
本来の用途で車を利用し
09:21
and then have our cities energized again?
都市部を活性化できるのでは
ないでしょうか?
09:23
We thought it would be really neat to do that,
実現すれば本当に素晴らしいと思います
09:28
and one of the problems we really were worried about
そこで我々が特に頭を悩ませたのは
09:30
is: how do we get legal on the sidewalk?
どうしたら歩道の利用が
合法的になるか?でした
09:32
Because technically I've got motors; I've got wheels -- I'm a motor vehicle.
これは 技術的にはモーターと
車輪があるため乗り物になります
09:35
I don't look like a motor vehicle.
実際は乗り物のようには見えません
09:39
I have the same footprint as a pedestrian;
利用する面積は歩行者と同じです
09:41
I have the same unique capability
混雑のなかでも他の歩行者と
09:43
to deal with other pedestrians in a crowded space.
共存する能力を有します
09:47
I took this down to Ground Zero,
私はこれをグランドゼロに持ち込んで
09:49
and knocked my way through crowds for an hour.
歩行者の中を1時間ほど移動しました
09:51
I'm a pedestrian. But the law typically lags technology by a generation or two,
実際のところ私は歩行者ですが
法律は大抵 技術に1・2世代遅れています
09:54
and if we get told we don't belong on the sidewalk, we have two choices.
歩道での利用が許可されない場合は
2つの選択肢がありました
09:59
We're a recreational vehicle that doesn't really matter,
1つは 娯楽用の乗り物にする
10:05
and I don't spend my time doing that kind of stuff.
しかし 私は娯楽用の乗り物に
時間を掛ける気はありません
10:07
Or maybe we should be out in the street
もう1つは車道を移動すること
10:12
in front of a Greyhound bus or a vehicle.
グレイハウンドバスや
自動車の前を走るということです
10:14
We've been so concerned about that,
この問題は本当に心配だったので
10:18
we went to the Postmaster General of the United States,
米国の郵政長官のところに行きました
10:20
as the first person we ever showed on the outside,
これを最初に公開した
外部の人の一人です
10:22
and said, "Put your people on it. Everybody trusts their postman.
そして「これを使ってください
郵便局員は信頼されてますし
10:25
And they belong on the sidewalks, and they'll use it seriously."
彼らは歩道を移動し これを真面目に
仕事に利用してくれます」と言いました
10:29
He agreed. We went to a number of police departments
長官は同意しました
また 警官を市民の身近に―
10:34
that want their police officers back in the neighborhood
戻したいと考える警察署にも行きました
10:37
on the beat, carrying 70 pounds of stuff. They love it.
70 ポンドの装備を載せることも出来
気にいるに違いありません
10:39
And I can't believe a policeman is going to give themselves a ticket.
そして警官が自分に違反切符を
切るとは思えません
10:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:47
So we've been working really, really hard,
本当に一生懸命働きました
10:50
but we knew that the technology would not be as hard to develop
しかし 技術の開発は
真に重要なことと
10:52
as an attitude about what's important, and how to apply the technology.
技術の適用方法を浸透させる事ほど
難しくないのは分かっていました
10:55
We went out and we found some visionary people
我々は先見の明があり
設計・開発を進める
11:00
with enough money to let us design and build these things,
資金を十分に提供できる
投資家に出会いました
11:03
and in hopefully enough time to get them accepted.
彼らが待ってくれる間に
これが受け入れられることを願います
11:08
So, I'm happy, really, I am happy to talk about this technology as much as you want.
本当にこの技術に関しては
皆さんの好きなだけ話が出来ます
11:12
And yes, it's really fun, and yes, you should all go out and try it.
そしてこれは本当に面白いので
是非 試していただきたいです
11:17
But if I could ask you to do one thing,
しかし1つお願いさせて頂くならば
11:21
it's not to think about it as a piece of technology,
これを一技術として捉えないでください
11:23
but just imagine that, although we all understand somehow
我々はなぜか
重量4000ポンドの時速60マイルで
11:25
that it's reasonable that we use our 4,000-pound machine,
移動可能なマシン―
どこにでも行くところが
11:29
which can go 60 miles an hour,
出来るマシンを―
なぜか最後の1マイルを移動するのに
11:33
that can bring you everywhere you want to go,
出来るマシンを―
なぜか最後の1マイルを移動するのに
11:35
and somehow it's also what we used for the last mile,
使っているということを考えてください
11:37
and it's broken, and it doesn't work.
それは破綻していて 機能していません
11:43
One of the more exciting things that occurred to us
これが受け入れられる
かもしれないと感じた
11:46
about why it might get accepted, happened out here in California.
最も嬉しい出来事は
ここカリフォルニアで起きました
11:49
A few weeks ago, after we launched it,
数週間前 これが公開された後
11:54
we were here with a news crew on Venice Beach, zipping up and back,
取材に来た方とベニスビーチで
これを乗り回していました
11:56
and he's marveling at the technology,
彼はこの技術に驚嘆していました
12:01
and meanwhile bicycles are zipping by,
自転車がスケートボードが
12:03
and skateboarders are zipping by,
すごい勢いで横を通り過ぎるなか
12:05
and a little old lady -- I mean, if you looked in the dictionary,
小さな老婦人が私の所に来ました
12:07
a little old lady -- came by me --
文字通りの小さな老婦人でした
12:11
and now that I'm on this, I'm the height of a normal adult now --
私は平均的な成人男性の身長があり
これに乗っていましたから
12:14
and she just stops, and the camera is there, and she looks up at me
そして 彼女は立ち止まり
横でカメラが回っているなか
12:18
and says, "Can I try that?"
「試してもいいですか?」
と聞きました
12:24
And what was I -- you know, how are you going to say anything?
そして私は
他に答えが浮かばないので
12:27
And so I said, "Sure."
「どうぞ」と言いました
12:30
So I get off, and she gets on, and with a little bit of the usual, ah,
なので私が降りて 彼女が乗って
少ししてコツをつかんだあと
12:32
then she turns around, and she goes about 20 feet,
彼女は方向を変えて
20フィートほど移動し
12:38
and she turns back around, and she's all smiles.
方向をまた変えて 楽しそうにしながら
12:43
And she comes back to me and she stops, and she says,
また戻ってきて こう言いました
12:46
"Finally, they made something for us."
「やっと欲しかったものを作ってくれた」
12:52
And the camera is looking down at her.
カメラは彼女を撮っていました
12:56
I'm thinking, "Wow, that was great --
私は「これはすばらしい」と思いました
12:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:00
-- please lady, don't say another word."
どうか もう何も言わないでください
13:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:03
And the camera is down at her,
カメラは彼女を捉えていました
13:06
and this guy has to put the microphone in her face,
撮影チームはマイクを彼女に向けました
13:08
said, "What do you mean by that?"
「それはどういう意味ですか」
13:10
And I figured, "It's all over now,"
「もうおしまいだ」と感じました
13:12
and she looks up and she says, "Well,"
彼女は顏を上げ 応えました
「その…」
13:14
she's still watching these guys go; she says, "I can't ride a bike," no,
彼女は顔を上げたまま
「私はバイクに乗れません」
13:18
she says, "I can't use a skateboard, and I've never used roller blades,"
「スケートボードやローラーブレードも
使ったことがありません」
13:21
she knew them by name;
言葉に聞き覚えがあっただけです
13:25
she says, "And it's been 50 years since I rode a bicycle."
「最後に自転車に乗ったのは
50年前です」
13:27
Then she looks up, she's looking up, and she says,
そして今度は上を見上げて言いました
13:30
"And I'm 81 years old, and I don't drive a car anymore.
「81才なので 自動車ももう運転しません」
13:34
I still have to get to the store, and I can't carry a lot of things."
「でも買い物はしないといけないけど
沢山物は持てません」
13:38
And it suddenly occurred to me, that among my many fears,
そして急に気づきました
私たちが持つ色々な懸念は
13:42
were not just that the bureaucracy and the regulators
役所や為政者や立法者に
理解されない
13:46
and the legislators might not get it --
というものだけではなかったと
13:49
it was that, fundamentally, you believe there's pressure among the people
本質的なのは 歩道という
人間に残された貴重なスペースを
13:52
not to invade the most precious little bit of space left,
侵してほしくないと
人々が思っている
13:57
the sidewalks in these cities.
可能性があることでした
14:00
When you look at the 36 inches of legal requirement for sidewalk,
36インチという法律で定められた
歩道の幅と
14:02
then the eight foot for the parked car, then the three lanes,
8フィートの駐車レーン
3つの車線 そして
14:06
and then the other eight feet -- it's --
向かいの8フィートを比べると
14:09
that little piece is all that's there.
歩道に与えられたスペースは
微々たるものです
14:11
But she looks up and says this,
しかし彼女は見上げながら
先ほどの言葉を言ってくれました
14:15
and it occurs to me, well, kids aren't going to mind these things,
しかし彼女は見上げながら
先ほどの言葉を言ってくれました
14:17
and they don't vote, and business people and then young adults
子供は特に気にしないでしょう
投票もしませんし 若者や
14:19
aren't going to mind these things -- they're pretty cool --
ビジネスマンにとっては洒落たものと
14:23
so I guess subliminally I was worried
映るかもしれない―
無意識に私は
14:25
that it's the older population that's going to worry.
年配の人々の批判を
心配していたようです
14:27
So, having seen this, and having worried about it for eight years,
8年間の心配の後
この出来事に出会い
14:30
the first thing I do is pick up my phone and ask our marketing and regulatory guys,
すぐにマーケティングと
規制関係のメンバーに電話しました
14:35
call AARP, get an appointment right away.
全米退職者協会と
アポをとり 彼らにこれを
14:39
We've got to show them this thing.
紹介出来るようにしてくれと
14:42
And they took it to Washington; they showed them;
そしてワシントンにいき
これを紹介しました
14:44
and they're going to be involved now,
今では彼らも巻き込み
14:47
watching how these things get absorbed in a number of cities,
いくつかの都市で これがうまく
機能するかを見ています
14:49
like Atlanta, where we're doing trials to see if it really can, in fact,
例えば アトランタでのトライアルで
これが本当に
14:53
help re-energize their downtown.
都市を再度活性化できるか
検証しています
14:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:00
The bottom line is, whether you believe the United Nations,
重要なことは
国連やその他のシンクタンクを
15:07
or any of the other think tanks --
信じるならば
15:12
in the next 20 years, all human population growth on this planet
これからの20年間 世界中の人口増加は
15:14
will be in cities.
都市に集中します
15:18
In Asia alone, it will be over a billion people.
アジアだけでも 数十億人にのぼります
15:20
They learned to start with cell phones.
彼らは始めから携帯電話を使用していました
つまり―
15:23
They didn't have to take the 100-year trip we took.
我々が100年かけた
道筋を辿らずに済んだのです
15:27
They start at the top of the technology food chain.
彼らは技術の最先端からスタートしました
15:30
We've got to start building cities and human environments
我々は都市や人の住環境を
密度が高く 豊かで
15:33
where a 150-pound person can go a couple of miles
緑があり 150ポンドの人間が
簡単に数マイル
15:36
in a dense, rich, green-space environment,
移動できるものに
していかなければなりません
15:39
without being in a 4,000-pound machine to do it.
4000 ポンドの機械を利用せずにです
15:42
Cars were not meant for parallel parking;
自動車の作りは縦列駐車に不適切です
15:46
they're wonderful machines to go between cities, but just think about it:
街から街へ移動する時
車はすばらしいものですが
15:49
we've solved all the long-range, high-speed problems.
長距離を高速に移動する問題は
すでに解決済みです
15:53
The Greeks went from the theater of Dionysus to the Parthenon in their sandals.
古代ギリシャ人はデュオニソス劇場から
パルテノン神殿までサンダルで移動しました
15:58
You do it in your sneakers.
あなたは運動靴で移動します
16:03
Not much has changed.
あまり進歩しているとは言えません
16:05
If this thing goes only three times as fast as walking -- three times --
もしこれが徒歩よりたった3倍速ければ
―3倍でいいのです―
16:07
a 30-minute walk becomes 10 minutes.
徒歩30分は10分になります
16:12
Your choice, when living in a city, if it's now 10 minutes --
都市で生活している際の選択として
10分になれば―
16:14
because at 30 minutes you want an alternative, whether it's a bus, a train --
なぜなら30分だとバスや電車といった
別の手段を選びます
16:19
we've got to build an infrastructure -- a light rail --
そしたら線路等インフラが必要です
16:23
or you're going to keep parking those cars.
もしくは車を駐車し続けるかです
16:25
But if you could put a pin in most cities,
地図で都市の上にピンを置いて
16:27
and imagine how far you could, if you had the time, walk in one half-hour, it's the city.
そこから30分歩けば どこまで行けるか
想像してみてください
16:30
If you could make it fun, and make it eight or 10 minutes,
それを楽しく 8~10分程度にできたら
16:36
you can't find your car, un-park your car, move your car,
移動をするのに 車を探し 発進し 運転し
16:38
re-park your car and go somewhere;
また駐車するのは考えにくいですよね
16:41
you can't get to a cab or a subway.
タクシーや地下鉄も使いません
16:43
We could change the way people allocate their resources,
我々が何に資源を注ぎ込むかを
この星の―
16:46
the way this planet uses its energy,
エネルギー利用を
変えることができます
16:49
make it more fun.
それも もっと面白くできます
16:52
And we're hoping to some extent history will say we were right.
いつか歴史は 我々が正しかったと
証明して欲しいものです
16:54
That's Segway. This is a Stirling cycle engine;
それがセグウェイでした
これはスターリングエンジンです
16:59
this had been confused by a lot of things we're doing.
これは我々のいろいろな
活動と混同されています
17:02
This little beast, right now, is producing a few hundred watts of electricity.
この機械は今 数百ワットの電気を
発電しています
17:06
Yes, it could be attached to this,
そして こいつに取り付け可能です
17:11
and yes, on a kilogram of propane,
そして1キログラムのプロパンガスで
17:13
you could drive from New York to Boston if you so choose.
ニューヨークからボストンまで
移動することができます
17:16
Perhaps more interesting about this little engine is it'll burn any fuel,
このエンジンの最も興味深い所は
どんな燃料でも利用できる点です
17:21
because some of you might be skeptical
中には このエンジンが
17:25
about the capability of this to have an impact,
世界にインパクトを与えることを
疑う人もいるかもしれません
17:27
where most of the world you can't simply plug into your 120-volt outlet.
世界のほとんどの場所では単純に120Vの
電源は利用できませんから
17:31
We've been working on this,
実際 我々はこのエンジンを
17:35
actually, as an alternative energy source,
iBotを動かす 代替エネルギー減として
17:37
starting way back with Johnson & Johnson, to run an iBOT,
ジョンソン&ジョンソンと開発してきました
17:39
because the best batteries you could get --
なぜなら 現在入手可能な
最も性能のよい電池は
17:41
10 watt-hours per kilogram in lead,
鉛蓄電池で10ワット時
17:45
20 watt-hours per kilogram nickel-cadmium,
ニッケルカドミム電池で20ワット時
17:47
40 watt-hours per kilogram in nickel-metal hydride,
ニッケル水素電池で40ワット時
17:49
60 watt-hours per kilogram in lithium,
リチウム電池で60ワット時
17:51
8,750 watt-hours of energy in every kilogram of propane or gasoline --
プロパンあるいはガソリンだと1キロあたり
8750ワット時になります
17:54
which is why nobody drives electric cars.
だから 誰も電気自動車を利用しません
17:59
But, in any event, if you can burn it with the same efficiency --
しかし もし同じ効率でどんな燃料でも
燃焼させることができるのであれば
18:01
because it's external combustion -- as your kitchen stove,
コンロと同じく外部の燃料を利用するので
18:07
if you can burn any fuel, it turns out to be pretty neat.
それはすばらしいことになります
18:10
It makes just enough electricity to, for instance, do this,
例えばこの様なことをするのに
必要な電力を作り
18:13
which at night is enough electricity, in the rest of the world,
しかも それは夜を照らすのに
十分な電力で―
18:16
as Mr. Holly -- Dr. Holly -- pointed out,
ホリー博士が指摘したように
18:19
can run computers and a light bulb.
コンピュータと電灯を動かすことができます
18:22
But more interestingly, the thermodynamics of this say,
もっと興味深いことは
熱力学の法則によって
18:25
you're never going to get more than 20 percent efficiency.
20%以上の効率を
得ることはできませんが
18:29
It doesn't matter much -- it says if you get 200 watts of electricity,
それはすなわち 200ワットの電力と
18:32
you'll get 700 or 800 watts of heat.
700から800ワットの熱を
手にいれることになります
18:35
If you wanted to boil water and re-condense it at a rate of 10 gallons an hour,
水を沸騰させて 1時間あたり10ガロンの
蒸留水を作るためには
18:38
it takes about 25, a little over 25.3 kilowatt --
約25キロワットの25.3キロワット―
18:43
25,000 watts of continuous power -- to do it.
2万5千ワットのエネルギーが
必要となります
18:46
That's so much energy, you couldn't afford to desalinate
この国で こんなエネルギーで水を
きれいにするのは合理的ではありません
18:50
or clean water in this country that way.
この国で こんなエネルギーで水を
きれいにするのは合理的ではありません
18:52
Certainly, in the rest of the world, your choice is to devastate the place,
世界の他の場所では その場所を破壊して
18:54
turning everything that will burn into heat, or drink the water that's available.
燃やせるものをすべて燃すか
水をそのまま飲むことになります
18:58
The number one cause of death on this planet among humans is bad water.
世界で最も多い死因は
汚れた水によるものです
19:03
Depending on whose numbers you believe,
数字には幅がありますが
19:07
it's between 60 and 85,000 people per day.
1日あたり6万から8万5千人です
19:09
We don't need sophisticated heart transplants around the world.
世界には洗練された
心臓移植医療ではなく
19:12
We need water.
水が必要なのです
19:15
And women shouldn't have to spend four hours a day looking for it,
そして 女性に水を探すために
4時間もかけさせたり
19:17
or watching their kids die.
子供が死ぬのを見せてはいけません
19:20
We figured out how to put a vapor-compression distiller on this thing,
我々はこれと真空圧縮蒸留器の
組み合わせに成功しました
19:22
with a counter-flow heat exchanger to take the waste heat,
向流式熱交換器で無駄になる
熱を利用します
19:25
then using a little bit of the electricity control that process,
そして生成される電力の
ごく一部を利用して制御をおこない
19:28
and for 450 watts, which is a little more than half of its waste heat,
無駄になる熱の半分強にあたる
450ワットで
19:32
it will make 10 gallons an hour of distilled water
冷却に利用する水から1時間当たり
19:38
from anything that comes into it to cool it.
10ガロンの蒸留水ができます
19:40
So if we put this box on here in a few years,
数年後 この箱がここに付ければ
19:42
could we have a solution to transportation, electricity,
交通手段 電力 コミュニケーション
そして飲料水の
19:45
and communication, and maybe drinkable water
問題までも解決できる可能性があります
19:51
in a sustainable package that weighs 60 pounds?
持続可能な60ポンドの装置で
19:55
I don't know, but we'll try it.
本当に出来るかは分かりませんが
挑戦は続けます そろそろ終わりますね
19:59
I better shut up.
本当に出来るかは分かりませんが
挑戦は続けます そろそろ終わりますね
20:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:03
Translator:Shigeto Oeda
Reviewer:Makoto Ikeo

sponsored links

Dean Kamen - Inventor
Dean Kamen landed in the limelight with the Segway, but he has been innovating since high school, with more than 150 patents under his belt. Recent projects include portable energy and water purification for the developing world, and a prosthetic arm for maimed soldiers.

Why you should listen

Dean Kamen is an innovator, but not just of things. He hopes to revolutionize attitudes, quality of life, awareness. While an undergraduate, he developed the first portable infusion device, which delivers drug treatments that once required round-the-clock hospital care. And, through his DEKA Research and Development, which he cofounded in 1982, he developed a portable dialysis machine, a vascular stent, and the iBOT -- a motorized wheelchair that climbs stairs (Stephen Colbert took one for a spin).

Yes, he's a college dropout, but he's a huge believer in education, and in 1989 established the nonprofit FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) to inspire teenagers to pursue careers in science. FIRST sponsors lively annual competitions, where students form teams to create the best robot.

His focus now is on off-grid electricity and water purification for developing countries; another recent project, previewed at TED2007, is a prosthetic arm for maimed soldiers (read an update here). He's also working on a power source for the wonderful Think car. And, with more funding in the works, we haven't seen the last of the Segway.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.