18:05
TED2006

Neil Gershenfeld: Unleash your creativity in a Fab Lab

ニール・ガーシェンフェルド:ファブラボ(つくりかたの未来)

Filmed:

MITの教授であるニール・ガーシェンフェルドが、ファブラボについて語ります。ファブラボは、デジタル/アナログのツールを使って人々が必要なものをつくることができる、低コストの実験工房です。シンプルなアイデアで、大きな成果を上げています。

- Physicist, personal fab pioneer
As Director of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms, Neil Gershenfeld explores the boundaries between the digital and physical worlds. Full bio

This meeting has really been about a digital revolution,
この会議はデジタル革命に関連する話が多いのですが
00:25
but I'd like to argue that it's done; we won.
私は革命は既に終わり 成功したと思っています
00:29
We've had a digital revolution but we don't need to keep having it.
デジタル革命は起こりましたが
そこにとどまる必要はありません
00:33
And I'd like to look after that,
その先に目を向けて
00:37
to look what comes after the digital revolution.
その後に何が来るのか考てみたいのです
00:39
So, let me start projecting forward.
では先を見てみましょう
00:42
These are some projects I'm involved in today at MIT,
これらは MITで私が今取り組んでいるプロジェクトで
00:44
looking what comes after computers.
コンピュータの次に 何が来るかを探るものです
00:48
This first one, Internet Zero, up here -- this is a web server
一つ目は この「インターネット・ゼロ」という
ウェブ・サーバーです
00:51
that has the cost and complexity of an RFID tag --
RFID タグ同様の価格と複雑さで
00:56
about a dollar -- that can go in every light bulb and doorknob,
約1ドルで あらゆる電球やドアノブに入れられるもので
00:59
and this is getting commercialized very quickly.
非常に速く商品化が進んでいます
01:02
And what's interesting about it isn't the cost;
興味深いのはコストではなく 通信の仕方です
01:04
it's the way it encodes the Internet.
興味深いのはコストではなく 通信の仕方です
01:06
It uses a kind of a Morse code for the Internet
インターネット用のモールス信号に似たもので
01:07
so you could send it optically; you can communicate acoustically
光や音で通信したり 送電線や
01:10
through a power line, through RF.
ラジオ波長で通信できるのです
01:13
It takes the original principle of the Internet,
コンピュータを相互に繋げる
01:15
which is inter-networking computers,
インターネット本来の考えのように
01:17
and now lets devices inter-network.
デバイスを相互に繋げるわけです
01:19
That we can take the whole idea that gave birth to the Internet
インターネット誕生に至った考えを
01:22
and bring it down to the physical world in this Internet Zero,
「インターネット・ゼロ」では物質的な世界である
01:25
this internet of devices.
デバイス同士の接続に取り入れています
01:28
So this is the next step from there to here,
これは全く新しい世界への
01:30
and this is getting commercialized today.
次のステップであり 商品化も進んでいます
01:32
A step after that is a project on fungible computers.
その先にあるのが
「代替可能なコンピューター」のプロジェクトです
01:35
Fungible goods in economics can be extended and traded.
代替可能な商品は 分割して供与や取引ができます
01:40
So, half as much grain is half as much useful,
半量の穀物は 半分の価値がありますが
01:43
but half a baby or half a computer is less useful than
赤ちゃんやコンピューターは半分にしてしまうと
01:45
a whole baby or a whole computer,
全体のようには機能しません
01:48
and we've been trying to make computers that work that way.
そこで「代替可能なコンピューター」の作成を試みています
01:50
So, what you see in the background is a prototype.
後ろに見えるのが プロトタイプです
01:53
This was from a thesis of a student, Bill Butow, now at Intel,
現在インテルのビル・ビュトウは博士論文で
01:55
who wondered why, instead of making bigger and bigger chips,
チップをどんどん大きくする代わりに小さくして
01:58
you don't make small chips, put them in a viscous medium,
粘性媒質に入れ
コンピューターを重量や面積の単位で
02:01
and pour out computing by the pound or by the square inch.
注ぎ出せないかと考えました
02:04
And that's what you see here.
注ぎ出せないかと考えました
02:06
On the left was postscript being rendered by a conventional computer;
左は従来のコンピュータで生成されたポストスクリプトで
02:08
on the right is postscript being rendered from the first prototype
右が我々の最初のプロトタイプから生成されたものです
02:11
we made, but there's no frame buffer, IO processor,
フレームバッファや
入出力プロセッサといったものは 一切ない
02:14
any of that stuff -- it's just this material.
単なる物質的な素材です
02:18
Unlike this screen where the dots are placed carefully,
画面上に並べられたドットと違い 原料ですから
02:20
this is a raw material.
画面上に並べられたドットと違い 原料ですから
02:22
If you add twice as much of it, you have twice as much display.
量を2倍にすれば 広さ2倍のディスプレイになります
02:23
If you shoot a gun through the middle, nothing happens.
真ん中を撃ち抜いても 問題はありません
02:26
If you need more resource, you just apply more computer.
コンピュータのリソースが もっと必用なら
注ぎ足せばいいだけです
02:29
So, that's the step after this -- of computing as a raw material.
これが次に来る
「原料としてのコンピューター」のステップです
02:33
That's still conventional bits, the step after that is --
ここまでは まだ従来のビットです その先は_
02:36
this is an earlier prototype in the lab;
これは初期のプロトタイプの映像を
02:39
this is high-speed video slowed down.
スロー再生していますが
02:41
Now, integrating chemistry in computation, where the bits are bubbles.
ビットを泡として 計算に化学を組み込む というものです
02:43
This is showing making bits, this is showing --
これはビットを作る様子です
02:46
once again, slowed down so you can see it,
スロー再生で ビット同士作用しあって
02:48
bits interacting to do logic and multiplexing and de-multiplexing.
ロジック、マルチプレクス、
デマルチプレックス している様子です
02:50
So, now we can compute that the output arranges material
つまり「情報処理」と同様に「素材処理」ができるのです
02:54
as well as information. And, ultimately, these are some slides
そして 最終的にはコンピューティングは
02:57
from an early project I did, computing where the bits are stored
この研究初期のスライドにある様に
03:01
quantum-mechanically in the nuclei of atoms, so
ビットが 量子力学的に
原子核に保存される 演算処理になり
03:04
programs rearrange the nuclear structure of molecules.
プログラムが分子構造を変えるようになるのです
03:07
All of these are in the lab pushing further and further and further,
このような研究はどんどん進化して
03:11
not as metaphor but literally integrating bits and atoms,
研究室の名前通り ビットと原子を統合し
03:15
and they lead to the following recognition.
次の考えを導きます
03:18
We all know we've had a digital revolution, but what is that?
デジタル革命とは一体なんだったのでしょう?
03:21
Well, Shannon took us, in the '40s, from here to here:
シャノンは40年代に この変化をもたらしました
03:24
from a telephone being a speaker wire that degraded with distance
距離に比例して音質が落ちる
スビーカー線の様な電話から
03:27
to the Internet. And he proved the first threshold theorem, that shows
インターネットにです 最初の限界定理で
03:31
if you add information and remove it to a signal,
信号に情報を加えてそれを除去すると
不完全な装置からでも
03:35
you can compute perfectly with an imperfect device.
完全な結果が得られる事を証明しました
03:38
And that's when we got the Internet.
そしてインターネットが生まれました
03:40
Von Neumann, in the '50s, did the same thing for computing;
フォン・ノイマンは50年代に
コンピューティングのために同じことをしました
03:42
he showed you can have an unreliable computer but restore its state
信頼性のないコンピューターでも
完璧な状態に復元できることを示しました
03:45
to make it perfect. This was the last great analog computer at MIT:
これは MITの最後の大きなアナログコンピュータでした
03:48
a differential analyzer, and the more you ran it,
この微分解析機は 動かせば動かすほど
03:52
the worse the answer got.
答えの精度は悪くなりました
03:54
After Von Neumann, we have the Pentium, where the billionth transistor
フォン・ノイマンの後 今はPentiumがあります
03:56
is as reliable as the first one.
Pentium上の10億もあるトランジスターは
どれも信頼できます
03:59
But all our fabrication is down in this lower left corner.
しかし 現代の製造は全て左下端にあります
04:02
A state-of-the-art airplane factory rotating metal wax at fixed metal,
最新技術の飛行機工場では
固定金属で 金属ワックスを回転させたり
04:05
or you maybe melt some plastic. A 10-billion-dollar chip fab
多少のプラスチックを溶かすぐらいです
04:08
uses a process a village artisan would recognize --
100億ドルのチップ製造工場では
村の職人でも知っている手法が
04:11
you spread stuff around and bake it.
使われています 材料を広げて焼くだけです
04:14
All the intelligence is external to the system;
頭脳はシステムの外にあり
04:17
the materials don't have information.
素材は情報を持っていません
04:19
Yesterday you heard about molecular biology,
昨日 分子生物学についての話がありました
04:21
which fundamentally computes to build.
これは基本的に演算して構築する
04:24
It's an information processing system.
情報処理システムといえます
04:26
We've had digital revolutions in communication and computation,
デジタル革命は通信と演算の分野で起こりましたが
04:28
but precisely the same idea, precisely the same math
シャノンとフォン・ノイマンのアイデアや数学は
04:32
Shannon and Von Neuman did, hasn't yet come out
物質界にまだ起きていません
04:35
to the physical world. So, inspired by that,
MITの Center for Bits and Atoms は
04:37
colleagues in this program -- the Center for Bits and Atoms
そこに目を向けました
04:40
at MIT -- which is a group of people, like me,
同僚は 私のような人ばかりで
04:42
who never understood the boundary between physical science
自然科学とコンピューターサイエンスの
境界を無視します
04:45
and computer science. I would even go further and say
実は コンピューターサイエンスほど
04:48
computer science is one of the worst things that ever happened
コンピュータにとっても科学にとっても
04:51
to either computers or to science --
良くないものはありません
04:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:55
-- because the canon -- computer science --
コンピューターサイエンスの原理は
良いものも多いのですが
04:56
many of them are great but the canon of computer science
1950年の技術をベースに 未熟に
05:00
prematurely froze a model of computation
コンピュテーションのモデルを固めてしまいました
05:02
based on technology that was available in 1950,
そんなモデルに比べ 自然というのは
05:05
and nature's a much more powerful computer than that.
ずっとパワフルなコンピューターです
05:08
So, you'll hear, tomorrow, from Saul Griffith. He was one of the
明日 サウル・グリフィスのトークがありますが
05:10
first students to emerge from this program.
彼は このプログラムの第一期生でした
05:14
We started to figure out how you can compute to fabricate.
我々は 演算による
ものづくりの方法を考え始めました
05:17
This was just a proof of principle he did of tiles
彼はタイルを使ってこの可能性を証明しました
05:20
that interact magnetically, where you write a code,
コードを書いた箇所が磁気的に相互作用し
05:23
much like protein folding, that specifies their structure.
タンパク質を折りたたむように
構造が決まります
05:25
So, there's no feedback to a tool metrology;
計測技術で評価することなく
05:28
the material itself codes for its structure in just the same ways
素材そのものが構造を決めるのは
05:31
that protein are fabricated. So, you can, for example, do that.
たんぱく質の製造と同様です
他にもいろいろ出来ます
05:36
You can do other things. That's in 2D. It works in 3D.
2次元でも3次元でも機能します
05:40
The video on the upper right -- I won't show for time --
右上の映像は 時間の都合でお見せできませんが
05:43
shows self-replication, templating so something can make something
何かを作る道具を作る…というのを
テンプレート化して 自己複製しています
05:45
that can make something, and we're doing that now over, maybe,
現在おそらく10億倍以上やっていますが
05:49
nine orders of magnitude. Those ideas have been used to show
こうしたアイデアは DNAが生物を作る過程を
05:52
the best fidelity and direct rate DNA to make an organism,
より正確に見せるために使われてきました
05:55
in functionalizing nanoclusters with peptide tails
組み立てコードのペプチドテイルのついたナノクラスターを
05:58
that code for their assembly -- so, much like the magnets,
機能させる様子は まるで先程の磁石のようです
06:01
but now on nanometer scales.
違いはナノスケールだということです
06:03
Laser micro-machining: essentially 3D printers that digitally fabricate
レーザー精密加工機、機能的システムを
デジタルにつくる3Dプリンターの様なものから
06:05
functional systems, all the way up to building buildings,
部品に建物の構造をコードを組み込み
06:09
not by having blueprints,
設計図なしで 建物を建てることまでやっています
06:12
but having the parts code for the structure of the building.
設計図なしで 建物を建てることまでやっています
06:13
So, these are early examples in the lab of emerging technologies
これはラボの初期の事例で
ファブリケーションをデジタル化する未来技術です
06:16
to digitize fabrication. Computers that don't control tools
ツールを制御するコンピューターではなく
06:21
but computers that are tools, where the output of a program
道具自身であるコンピューターが
プログラムの出力として
06:25
rearranges atoms as well as bits.
ビット同様に原子を動かすわけです
06:29
Now, to do that -- with your tax dollars, thank you --
このために 皆さんの税金で_ありがとうございます_
06:33
I bought all these machines. We made a modest proposal
これらの機械を買いました NSFにお願いしたのは
06:36
to the NSF. We wanted to be able to make anything on any length scale,
どんなスケールでも 何でも作れるような場所です
06:40
all in one place, because you can't segregate digital fabrication
なぜなら デジタル・ファブリケーションは
専門領域やスケールで
06:44
by a discipline or a length scale.
分けることができないからです
06:48
So we put together focused nano beam writers
我々は ナノビーム・ライター、ウォータジェット・カッターと
06:50
and supersonic water jet cutters and excimer micro-machining systems.
エキシマー精密加工機からなる システムを作りました
06:54
But I had a problem. Once I had all these machines,
これらの機械の使い方を
学生に教えるのに 時間がかかり
06:59
I was spending too much time teaching students to use them.
問題だったので 授業を始める事にしました
07:02
So I started teaching a class, modestly called,
派手にするつもりはなく
07:05
"How To Make Almost Anything." And that wasn't meant to be provocative;
「ほぼあらゆる物を作る方法」という控えめな名前で
07:07
it was just for a few research students.
数人の研究生の為のものでした
07:10
But the first day of class looked like this.
しかし授業の初日に 何百人もの
07:12
You know, hundreds of people came in begging,
学生に頼み込まれました
07:14
all my life I've been waiting for this class; I'll do anything to do it.
「こんな授業を待っていました
受講するためには何でもします」
07:16
Then they'd ask, can you teach it at MIT? It seems too useful?
「MITで教えてくれませんか? とても役に立ちそうです」と
07:19
And then the next --
「MITで教えてくれませんか? とても役に立ちそうです」と
07:22
(Laughter)
(笑)驚くべきことは 彼らの
07:23
-- surprising thing was they weren't there to do research.
受講目的は研究でなく もの作りだった ということです
07:25
They were there because they wanted to make stuff.
受講目的は研究でなく もの作りだった ということです
07:26
They had no conventional technical background.
彼らには 実技的な経験はありませんでしたが
学期の終わりには
07:28
At the end of a semester they integrated their skills.
総合した技術を身に着けていました
07:32
I'll show an old video. Kelly was a sculptor, and this is what she did
古いビデオをひとつお見せします
ケリーは彫刻家で これは彼女が
07:34
with her semester project.
授業の課題で制作したものです
07:38
(Video): Kelly: Hi, I'm Kelly and this is my scream buddy.
ケリー:私はケリーです
これは私の「スクリーム・ボディ」です
07:40
Do you ever find yourself in a situation
みなさんは こんな経験がありませんか?
07:45
where you really have to scream, but you can't because you're at work,
心の底から叫びたいけど 仕事中だったり
07:48
or you're in a classroom, or you're watching your children,
授業中だったり 子供の面倒を見ていたり
07:53
or you're in any number of situations where it's just not permitted?
叫ぶことができない
色々な状況に遭遇したことはありませんか?
07:56
Well, scream buddy is a portable space for screaming.
スクリーム・ボディは
叫ぶための持ち運び可能なスペースです
08:01
When a user screams into scream buddy, their scream is silenced.
ユーザーがスクリーム・ボディの中に叫ぶと
その叫び声は消されます
08:05
It is also recorded for later release where, when and how
声は録音されるので
ユーザーは後で場所、時間、方法を選んで
08:10
the user chooses.
自由に発散させることができます(叫び声)
08:14
(Scream)
自由に発散させることができます(叫び声)
08:36
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑) (拍手)
08:39
So, Einstein would like this.
アインシュタインも気に入ったことでしょう
08:43
This student made a web browser for parrots --
この学生はオウム用ブラウザを作り
ネット閲覧やオウム同士の会話ができるようにしました
08:45
lets parrots surf the Net and talk to other parrots.
この学生はオウム用ブラウザを作り
ネット閲覧やオウム同士の会話ができるようにしました
08:46
This student's made an alarm clock you wrestle
この学生は目覚まし時計をつくりました
08:49
to prove you're awake; this is one that defends --
止めるには戦わなければなりません
08:51
a dress that defends your personal space.
これはパーソナル空間を守るドレス
08:53
This isn't technology for communication;
コミュニケーションのためではなく
08:55
it's technology to prevent it.
それを避けるためのテクノロジーです
08:57
This is a device that lets you see your music.
これは音楽を可視化する装置です
08:59
This is a student who made a machine that makes machines,
これは「機械を作る機械」
09:02
and he made it by making Lego bricks that do the computing.
コンピューティングをするレゴブロックで作られています
09:05
Just year after year -- and I finally realized
年が経つにつれ わかったことは
09:08
the students were showing the killer app of personal fabrication
パーソナル・ファブリケーションの魅力は
09:10
is products for a market of one person.
1人の市場のための製品だということです
09:14
You don't need this for what you can get in Wal-Mart;
ウォルマートで買える物を作る為でなく
自己表現の手段なのです
09:16
you need this for what makes you unique.
ウォルマートで買える物を作る為でなく
自己表現の手段なのです
09:18
Ken Olsen famously said, nobody needs a computer in the home.
「個人が自宅にコンピュータを持つ理由はない」は
ケン・オルセンの有名な迷言ですが
09:19
But you don't use it for inventory and payroll;
在庫管理や給料支払いが用途ではありません
09:23
DEC is now twice bankrupt. You don't need personal fabrication
DECは2回も破産していますね
店で買える物を家庭で
09:25
in the home to buy what you can buy because you can buy it.
自分で作る必要はありません
09:28
You need it for what makes you unique, just like personalization.
パーソナライズするように
ユニークなものにするための手段です
09:30
So, with that, in turn, 20 million dollars today does this;
今日の2千万ドルでこれが出来ます
09:34
20 years from now we'll make Star Trek replicators that make anything.
20年後なら何でも作れる
スタートレックのリブリケーターをつくります
09:38
The students hijacked all the machines I bought to do personal fabrication.
購入した機械は全て生徒たちの
パーソナル・ファブリケーション用に乗っ取られました
09:42
Today, when you spend that much of your money,
税金をこの様に沢山使う場合
09:46
there's a government requirement to do outreach, which often means
社会奉仕として地元の学校やウェブサイトで
09:48
classes at a local school, a website -- stuff that's just not that exciting.
プログラムを紹介する様 政府から要請されます
09:51
So, I made a deal with my NSF program managers that
ただ話をするだけではつまらないので NSFと交渉し
09:54
instead of talking about it, I'd give people the tools.
人々に道具を与えることにしました
09:58
This wasn't meant to be provocative or important,
大したものでないはずでしたが
10:00
but we put together these Fab Labs. It's about 20,000 dollars in equipment
いくつかのファブラボを整えました
2万ドルの機材で
10:02
that approximate both what the 20 million dollars does and where it's going.
2千万ドルのものと似たような
機能性や方向性を持つものです
10:06
A laser cutter to do press-fit assembly with 3D from 2D,
2Dから3Dへプレスフィット組立を
するためのレーザーカッター
10:11
a sign cutter to plot in copper to do electromagnetics,
電気回路用に銅板を加工するサインカッター
10:14
a micron scale,
1µmスケールで正確な構造をつくるための
数値制御によるミリングマシン
10:16
numerically-controlled milling machine for precise structures,
1µmスケールで正確な構造をつくるための
数値制御によるミリングマシン
10:18
programming tools for less than a dollar,
1ドル未満のプログラミングツール
10:20
100-nanosecond microcontrollers. It lets you work from microns
100ナノ秒のマイクロコントローラー
10:23
and microseconds on up, and they exploded around the world.
ミクロンやナノ秒で 物が作れるラボは
あっという間に世界中へ広がりました
10:26
This wasn't scheduled, but they went from inner-city Boston
当初のボストン市内の低所得地区から
10:30
to Pobal in India, to Secondi-Takoradi on Ghana's coast
インドのポバル、 ガーナの海岸沿いの
セコンディ・タコラディ
10:32
to Soshanguve in a township in South Africa,
南アフリカの黒人居住区のソーシャングーベ
10:36
to the far north of Norway, uncovering, or helping uncover,
そしてノルウェーのずっと北の方まで
10:39
for all the attention to the digital divide,
デジタル・ディバイドを顕にしながら広がっていきました
10:43
we would find unused computers in all these places.
どの場所でも 使われていないコンピューターを見かけます
10:46
A farmer in a rural village -- a kid needs to measure and modify
地方の農村では 子供たちは画面で情報を得るだけでなく
10:50
the world, not just get information about it on a screen.
世界を判断して変えていかなくてはいけません
10:53
That there's really a fabrication and an instrumentation divide
生産技術と所有機器の格差は
10:57
bigger than the digital divide.
デジタル・ディバイドよりずっと大きいものです
10:59
And the way you close it is not IT for the masses but IT development for the masses.
その溝を埋めるのはITの普及でなく IT開発の普及です
11:02
So, in place after place
いろいろな所で 同じようなことが起きました
11:05
we saw this same progression: that we'd open one of these Fab Labs,
予定外の様々な地域に ファブラボを立ち上げていきました
11:08
where we didn't -- this is too crazy to think of.
本当に思いもよらなかったのですが
11:11
We didn't think this up, that we would get pulled to these places;
そのような所に引き込まれラボをオープンしたのです
11:14
we'd open it. The first step was just empowerment.
始めの仕事は エンパワーメントです
11:17
You can see it in their face, just this joy of, I can do it.
彼らの自身に満ちた笑顔を見ればわかるでしょう
11:19
This is a girl in inner-city Boston who had just done a high-tech
この少女はボストン低所得地区の
11:22
on-demand craft sale in the inner city community center.
コミュニティセンターで
ハイテクな注文制作のクラフトセールをしました
11:24
It goes on from there to serious hands-on technical education
そこから 学校外での非公式な
本格的な実践的技術教育へと続いていきます
11:28
informally, out of schools. In Ghana we had set up one of these labs.
ガーナでもラボを立ち上げました
ネットワークセンサーを作っていたのですが
11:32
We designed a network sensor, and kids would show up
来る子供たちが なかなか帰ってくれません
11:37
and refuse to leave the lab.
来る子供たちが なかなか帰ってくれません
11:39
There was a girl who insisted we stay late at night --
夜遅くまでいると言って聞かない女の子がいました
11:40
(Video): Kids: I love the Fab Lab.
子供:ファブラボが大好きです
11:43
-- her first night in the lab because she was going to make the sensor.
彼女はセンサーをつくろうと 初めて夜までラボに残っていました
11:45
So she insisted on fabbing the board, learning how to stuff it,
彼女は基板をつくると言って譲らず
組立てやプログラムの仕方を学びました
11:48
learning how to program it. She didn't really know
彼女は過程や目的を完全には
11:51
what she was doing or why she was doing it, but she knew
理解していなかったけれど
11:53
she just had to do it. There was something electric about it.
緊張と興奮で 途中でやめられない状態でした
11:55
This is late at, you know, 11 o'clock at night
これは夜中の11時でした
11:58
and I think I was the only person surprised when what she built
そして 彼女が造ったものが初めて動いたとき
12:00
worked the first time.
驚いたのは私だけだったと思います
12:03
And I've shown this to engineers at big companies, and they say
大企業のエンジニアにみせると
12:05
they can't do this. Any one thing she's doing, they can do better,
皆 脱帽です 過程の一つ一つなら上手くできますが
12:07
but it's distributed over many people and many sites
全体となると 分散分業に慣れていて
ガーナの田舎のこの少女の様に
12:10
and they can't do in an afternoon
全体となると 分散分業に慣れていて
ガーナの田舎のこの少女の様に
12:13
what this little girl in rural Ghana is doing.
ちょっと作って見ようと思っても 難しいのです
12:14
(Video): Girl: My name is Valentina Kofi; I am eight years old.
女の子:私の名前はバレンティナ・コフィ、8才です
12:33
I made a stacking board.
スタッキングボードを作りました
12:37
And, again, that was just for the joy of it.
これも ただ楽しいからやっただけのことでした
12:40
Then these labs started doing serious problem solving --
そして次第に 本格的な問題に取り組み始めました
12:43
instrumentation for agriculture in India,
インドでは農業のための計測器
12:46
steam turbines for energy conversion in Ghana,
ガーナではエネルギー転換蒸気タービン
12:48
high-gain antennas in thin client computers.
シンクライアントコンピュータ用のハイゲインアンテナ
そしてこうしたものを
12:50
And then, in turn, businesses started to grow,
製造するビジネスも生まれました
12:54
like making these antennas.
製造するビジネスも生まれました
12:55
And finally, the lab started doing invention.
遂に ラボは発明を始めたのです
12:56
We're learning more from them than we're giving them.
教える以上に学ぶことが多くあります
12:58
I was showing my kids in a Fab Lab how to use it.
子供たちにファブラボの使い方を教えていた時のことです
13:00
They invented a way to do a construction kit out of a cardboard box --
彼らは段ボール箱の組み立てキットを発明し
ご覧の通り
13:03
which, as you see up there, that's becoming a business --
それはビジネスになっています
13:07
but their design was better than Saul's design at MIT,
彼らのデザインは
MITのサウルのデザインよりよかったので
13:09
so there's now three students at MIT doing their theses on
現在MITで3人の学生が
8歳の子供たちの仕事を評価する
13:12
scaling the work of eight-year-old children
論文を書いています
子供の方が良いデザインをしたのです
13:15
because they had better designs.
論文を書いています
子供の方が良いデザインをしたのです
13:18
Real invention is happening in these labs.
ファブラボで 本当の発明が生まれています
13:19
And I still kept -- so, in the last year I've been spending time with
ここ一年 現在のラボに興味のある
13:22
heads of state and generals and tribal chiefs who all want this,
政府や軍、部族の長に会って話す度に
13:24
and I keep saying, but this isn't the real thing.
まだ先がある事、20年もすれば
13:27
Wait, like, 20 years and then we'll be done.
なんとかなると強調してきました
13:29
And I finally got what's been going on. This is Kernigan and Ritchie
最近になって ようやく何が起こっているかがわかりました
13:31
inventing UNIX on a PDP.
これは PDPで UNIX を開発中の
カーニハンとリッチーです
13:34
PDPs came between mainframes and minicomputers.
メインフレームとミニコンピュータの
13:37
They were tens of thousands of dollars, hard to use,
中間のPDPは 当時 高価で使用も難しいものでしたが
13:39
but they brought computing down to work groups,
コンピューターを職場に普及させました
13:42
and everything we do today happened there.
今やっている事は 皆そこで生まれたのです
13:44
These Fab Labs are the cost and complexity of a PDP.
現在のファブラボは PDPのように高価で複雑なものです
13:46
The projection of digital fabrication
デジタルファブリケーションを見ても
13:49
isn't a projection for the future; we are now in the PDP era.
将来の予測は出来ません PDPの時代と同じです
13:51
We talked in hushed tones about the great discoveries then.
あの頃は偉大な発見について小声で話したものです
13:54
It was very chaotic, it wasn't, sort of, clear what was going on.
非常に混沌として 何が起こっているのか不明瞭でした
13:57
In the same sense we are now, today, in the minicomputer era
同様に 現在はデジタルファブリケーションにおける
14:00
of digital fabrication.
ミニコンピュータの時代なのです
14:03
The only problem with that is it breaks everybody's boundaries.
その唯一の問題は それは皆の境界を壊すということです
14:05
In DC, I go to every agency that wants to talk, you know;
ワシントンでは 話を聴いてくれる あらゆる機関へ行って話し
14:09
in the Bay Area, I go to every organization you can think of --
ベイエリアでは 思いつく所へどこでも行きます
14:12
they all want to talk about it, but it breaks
皆 話はしたいのですが ラボは
14:14
their organizational boundaries. In fact, it's illegal for them,
組織の規範に合わないのです
テクノロジーを消費させるのではなく
14:16
in many cases, to equip ordinary people to create
何かを作れる様に道具を与えることは
規則違反になってしまうのです
14:19
rather than consume technology.
何かを作れる様に道具を与えることは
規則違反になってしまうのです
14:23
And that problem is so severe that the ultimate invention
この問題は非常に重大であるがゆえに このコミュニティの
14:24
coming from this community surprised me:
発明には驚かされました
14:28
it's the social engineering. That the lab in far north of Norway --
これは「社会工学」です
これはノルウェーの極北にあるラボで
14:31
this is so far north its satellite dishes look at the ground
緯度が高すぎ 衛星アンテナが空でなく
14:35
rather than the sky because that's where the satellites are --
衛星のある方向 つまり地面に向いています
14:37
the lab outgrew the little barn that it was in.
山の家畜を探すために小さな納屋に作ったラボは
手狭になったので
14:41
It was there because they wanted to find animals in the mountains
山の家畜を探すために小さな納屋に作ったラボは
手狭になったので
14:42
but it outgrew it, so they built this extraordinary village for the lab.
ラボのためにこの素晴らしい村を作りました
14:45
This isn't a university; it's not a company. It's essentially
これは大学でも会社でもありません
14:49
a village for invention; it's a village for the outliers in society,
それはまさに発明のための村であり
変わった人たちの集落です
14:51
and those have been growing up around these Fab Labs
こうした集落は世界中の
ファブラボの周辺で成長していました
14:56
all around the world.
こうした集落は世界中の
ファブラボの周辺で成長していました
14:58
So this program has split into an NGO foundation,
このプログラムは 現在分割して運営されています
14:59
a Fab Foundation to support the scaling, a micro VC fund.
NGOのファブ・ファウンデーションは普及ををサポートし
15:03
The person who runs it nicely describes it as
小口金融とVCミックスの
マイクロVCファンドはファンアウトを助けます
15:07
"machines that make machines need businesses that make businesses:"
小口金融とVCミックスの
マイクロVCファンドはファンアウトを助けます
15:08
it's a cross between micro-finance and VC to do fan-out,
「機械をつくる機械には ビジネスを産むビジネスが必要だ」と
15:12
and then the research partnerships back at MIT for what's
運営者は上手いことを言っています
15:15
making it possible.
そして 本拠 MITは研究協力のパートナーです
15:17
So I'd like to leave you with two thoughts.
2つの考えをお話して終わりにします
15:20
There's been a sea change in aid, from top-down mega-projects
近年 援助の仕方が大きく変わってきました
トップダウンの大規模プロジェクトより
15:22
to bottom-up, grassroots, micro-finance investing in the roots,
草の根のマイクロファイナンスで
ボトムアップに支援する方が
15:27
so that everybody's got that that's what works.
効果的だと解ってきたからです
しかしテクノロジーに関しては
15:31
But we still look at technology as top-down mega-projects.
いまだに トップダウンの形で考えられています
15:34
Computing, communication, energy for the rest of the planet
コンピューティング、通信、
地球全体のエネルギーなどが この種の
15:37
are these top-down mega-projects.
トップダウンの大規模プロジェクトです
15:40
If this room full of heroes is just clever enough,
この部屋一杯のヒーローが賢ければ
15:42
you can solve the problems.
問題を解決できるかもしれません
15:44
The message coming from the Fab Labs is that
ファブラボの進展から解る事は
15:46
the other five billion people on the planet
地球上の残りの50億人は
15:48
aren't just technical sinks; they're sources.
単なる技術の浪費者ではなく 源だということです
15:50
The real opportunity is to harness the inventive power of the world
本当のチャンスは
地域の問題解決に世界の発明力を活用し
15:52
to locally design and produce solutions to local problems.
現地でデザイン、製造して解決策を産み出すことにあります
15:55
I thought that's the projection 20 years hence into the future,
これは20年先になると予想していたのですが
15:59
but it's where we are today.
既に現在起こっています
16:02
It breaks every organizational boundary we can think of.
それは あらゆる組織の境界線を壊します
16:04
The hardest thing at this point is the social engineering
最も難しいのは社会工学と組織工学の壁ですが
16:06
and the organizational engineering, but it's here today.
「地域での問題解決」は着実に進んでいます
16:09
And, finally, any talk like this on the future of computing
最後に コンピューティングの未来を語る上では
16:12
is required to show Moore's law, but my favorite version --
ムーアの法則について触れない訳にはいきません
16:14
this is Gordon Moore's original one from his original paper --
これは私の好きな
ゴードン・ムーアの原文の論文のバージョンですが
16:18
and what's happened is, year after year after year,
起こったことは
年々どんどん伸びていったということです
16:23
we've scaled and we've scaled and we've scaled
伸びて、伸びて、伸びて…
16:25
and we've scaled, and we've scaled and we've scaled,
伸びて、伸びて、伸びて……
16:26
and we've scaled and we've scaled,
伸びて、伸びて、伸びて…
16:30
and there's this looming bug of what's going to happen
そして その先には ムーアの法則の最後に
16:31
at the end of Moore's law; this ultimate bug is coming.
予測されている究極のバグが迫っています
16:33
But we're coming to appreciate, is the transition from 2D to 3D,
しかし 2次元から3次元へ移行し
ビットからアトムのプログラミングに移行することで
16:37
from programming bits to programming atoms,
ムーアの法則の縮小限界が究極のバグではなく
16:42
turns the ends of Moore's law scaling from the ultimate bug
特質となり得ると評価し始められました
16:45
to the ultimate feature.
特質となり得ると評価し始められました
16:47
So, we're just at the edge of this digital revolution in fabrication,
我々はちょうどファブリケーションにおける
デジタル革命の先端におり
16:49
where the output of computation programs the physical world.
演算のアウトプットが物質的な世界をプログラムします
16:53
So, together, these two projects answer questions
同時に この二つのプロジェクトからわかることがあります
16:56
I hadn't asked carefully. The class at MIT shows the killer app
MITの授業の例が示すように 先進国において
16:59
for personal fabrication in the developed world
パーソナル・ファブリケーションが普及する要因は
17:03
is technology for a market of one: personal expression in technology
一人のためのものづくりを可能にする技術です
技術による自己表現は
17:05
that touches a passion unlike anything I've seen in technology
これまでテクノロジーの世界では見たこともないくらい
17:09
for a very long time.
人々を夢中にさせます
17:12
And the killer app for the rest of the planet is the instrumentation
そして 世界の他の場所では
機器や生産技術の格差が普及の要因になります
17:14
and the fabrication divide: people locally developing solutions
地域の問題を現地で解決可能にするという魅力です
17:18
to local problems. Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:21
Translated by Yoshiyuki Habashima
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Neil Gershenfeld - Physicist, personal fab pioneer
As Director of MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms, Neil Gershenfeld explores the boundaries between the digital and physical worlds.

Why you should listen

MIT's Neil Gershenfeld is redefining the boundaries between the digital and analog worlds. The digital revolution is over, Gershenfeld says. We won. What comes next? His Center for Bits and Atoms has developed quite a few answers, including Internet 0, a tiny web server that fits into lightbulbs and doorknobs, networking the physical world in previously unimaginable ways.

But Gershenfeld is best known as a pioneer in personal fabrication -- small-scale manufacturing enabled by digital technologies, which gives people the tools to build literally anything they can imagine. His famous Fab Lab is immensely popular among students at MIT, who crowd Gershenfeld's classes. But the concept is potentially life-altering in the developing world, where a Fab Lab with just $20,000 worth of laser cutters, milling machines and soldering irons can transform a community, helping people harness their creativity to build tools, replacement parts and essential products unavailable in the local market. Read more in Fab: The Coming Revolution on Your Desktop.

More profile about the speaker
Neil Gershenfeld | Speaker | TED.com