23:39
TEDGlobal 2010

Jason Clay: How big brands can help save biodiversity

ジェイソン・クレイ: いかにして大企業が生物多様性保護に寄与できるか

Filmed:

WWFのジェイソン・クレイは、100の主要企業を持続可能な方向へ向かわせることで、世界の市場が我々人類の消費が増えすぎた地球を守るようになると言います。彼の特別な円卓会議が、いかにして大企業のライバル同士を、彼らが商品を店頭に並べ戦わせる前に、環境活動に同意させようとしているのか、聞いて下さい。

- Market transformer
Jason Clay’s ideas are changing the way governments, foundations, researchers and NGOs identify and address risks and opportunities for their work. Full bio

I grew up on a small farm in Missouri.
私はミズーリ州にある
小さな牧場で育ちました
00:16
We lived on less than a dollar a day
1日1ドル以下の生活を
00:19
for about 15 years.
約15年間 続け
00:21
I got a scholarship, went to university,
奨学金を貰って大学に進み
00:23
studied international agriculture, studied anthropology,
国際農学と人類学を学び
それを世の中に
00:26
and decided I was going to give back.
還元していこうと決めました
00:29
I was going to work with small farmers.
小規模農家の人々と共に働いたり
00:31
I was going to help alleviate poverty.
貧困を減らしたり
00:33
I was going to work on international development,
国際発展に寄与したりするつもりでしたが
00:35
and then I took a turn
あるとき方向を転換し
00:38
and ended up here.
ここに行き着きました
00:41
Now, if you get a Ph.D., and you decide not to teach,
博士号を取って
教壇に上らないからといって
00:44
you don't always end up in a place like this.
必ずしもこんな地に
たどり着くとは限りません
00:46
It's a choice. You might end up driving a taxicab.
あなたの選択次第
タクシーを運転しているかもしれない
00:48
You could be in New York.
ニューヨークにいるかもしれない
00:51
What I found was,
難民 飢饉の犠牲者や
00:55
I started working with refugees and famine victims --
小規模農家の人々と働き始め
私が気付いたのは
00:57
small farmers, all, or nearly all --
彼らの全て もしくはほとんどが
01:00
who had been dispossessed and displaced.
よりどころがなかったり
追い出された人々だったということです
01:03
Now, what I'd been trained to do
私が学んできたこととは
01:07
was methodological research on such people.
そういった人々に対して
方法論的な研究を行うことでした
01:10
So I did it: I found out how many women
それを実践したんです
何人の女性が
01:13
had been raped en route to these camps.
キャンプにたどり着くまでに
レイプされたかを知りました
01:16
I found out how many people had been put in jail,
何人の人が
投獄されたのかを知りました
01:19
how many family members had been killed.
そして彼らの家族の何人が
殺されたかも知りました
01:22
I assessed how long they were going to stay
彼らがそこに
どれぐらい滞在するつもりなのか
01:25
and how much it would take to feed them.
食糧の配布に
どれくらい労力が必要かを調べました
01:27
And I got really good at predicting
そしてキャンプで死んでいく人々のために
01:29
how many body bags you would need
遺体袋が何枚必要かを
01:31
for the people who were going to die in these camps.
予測できるようになりました
01:33
Now this is God's work, but it's not my work.
これらは神の仕事であって
私の仕事ではありません
01:36
It's not the work I set out to do.
私がやろうとしたことではないのです
01:39
So I was at a Grateful Dead benefit concert on the rainforests
1988年 私は熱帯雨林の保護を訴える
01:45
in 1988.
グレイトフル・デッドの
チャリティコンサートに行きました
01:48
I met a guy -- the guy on the left.
そこで1人の男に出会いました
この写真の左の彼です
01:51
His name was Ben.
彼の名前はベン
彼は言いました
01:54
He said, "What can I do to save the rainforests?"
「熱帯雨林を守るために
何が出来るんだろう?」
01:56
I said, "Well, Ben, what do you do?"
私は言いました
「仕事は何をしてるの?」
01:58
"I make ice cream."
「アイスクリームを作ってる」
02:00
So I said, "Well, you've got to make
「じゃぁ君は
熱帯雨林アイスクリームを
02:02
a rainforest ice cream.
作るべきだね
02:04
And you've got to use nuts from the rainforests
そこに熱帯雨林で採れるナッツを使えば
02:06
to show that forests are worth more as forests
熱帯雨林を牧場にするより
02:08
than they are as pasture."
森のままにしておく方が良いと
伝えられるじゃないか」
02:10
He said, "Okay."
彼は「分かった」と言いました
02:13
Within a year,
それから1年も経たずして
彼と私で作った
02:15
Rainforest Crunch was on the shelves.
レインフォレスト・クランチが
店頭に並びました
02:17
It was a great success.
これは大変な成功を収めました
02:19
We did our first million-dollars-worth of trade
30日間の買い付けと
21日間の販売で
02:21
by buying on 30 days and selling on 21.
取引総額は1億円に上りました
02:24
That gets your adrenaline going.
これには興奮しましたよ
02:27
Then we had a four and a half million-dollar line of credit
さらに信用が増し
02:30
because we were credit-worthy at that point.
無担保で
4億5000万円まで借りることが出来ました
02:32
We had 15 to 20, maybe 22 percent
世界のブラジル産ナッツの
15から20
02:35
of the global Brazil-nut market.
いや22%程度 保有していたのです
02:37
We paid two to three times more than anybody else.
他よりも2倍から3倍高い値段で
買い付けていたので
02:39
Everybody else raised their prices to the gatherers of Brazil nuts
他社が買うためには
ブラジルナッツを収穫する人に
02:42
because we would buy it otherwise.
支払う金額を
他社も上げていくしかありませんでした
02:45
A great success.
素晴らしい成功です
02:49
50 companies signed up, 200 products came out,
50社が契約し、200の製品が生まれ
02:51
generated 100 million in sales.
100億円の売り上げを達成しました
02:54
It failed.
しかし結局失敗だったのです
02:59
Why did it fail?
なぜ失敗したのか
03:01
Because the people who were gathering Brazil nuts
なぜならブラジルナッツを集めている人々と
03:03
weren't the same people who were cutting the forests.
熱帯雨林を切り倒している人々は
違ったからです
03:05
And the people who made money from Brazil nuts
ブラジルナッツから利益を得る人と
03:08
were not the people who made money from cutting the forests.
森の伐採で利益を得る人が違ったのです
03:11
We were attacking the wrong driver.
戦う相手を間違えていました
03:14
We needed to be working on beef.
牛肉に取り組むべきであり
03:16
We needed to be working on lumber.
木材に取り組むべきであり
03:18
We needed to be working on soy --
大豆に取り組むべきだったのです
03:20
things that we were not focused on.
私たちはこれらに
注意を払っていませんでした
03:22
So let's go back to Sudan.
さて 話をスーダンに戻しましょう
03:25
I often talk to refugees:
私は難民の方々とこんな話をします
03:27
"Why was it that the West didn't realize
「なぜ欧米諸国は 飢餓が天候等ではなく
03:29
that famines are caused by policies and politics,
政策や政治によって引き起こされる
03:32
not by weather?"
ということに気付かないのか」
03:34
And this farmer said to me, one day,
ある日 農家の1人が
03:36
something that was very profound.
とても深い一言を 私に言いました
03:39
He said, "You can't wake a person who's pretending to sleep."
「寝たふりをしている人を起こすことはできない」
03:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:44
Okay. Fast forward.
話を進めましょう
03:46
We live on a planet.
私たちは地球に住んでいます
03:49
There's just one of them.
地球は1つしかありません
03:52
We've got to wake up to the fact
地球は私たちにとって
03:54
that we don't have any more
唯一無二であり 限りがある
03:56
and that this is a finite planet.
という事実に気付かなければなりません
03:58
We know the limits of the resources we have.
私たちは今ある資源の限界を知っています
04:00
We may be able to use them differently.
それらを違った方法で
使えるかもしれません
04:03
We may have some innovative, new ideas.
革新的で新しいアイディアが
あるかもしれません
04:05
But in general, this is what we've got.
しかし概して 限界は変わりません
04:07
There's no more of it.
これ以上はないのです
04:09
There's a basic equation that we can't get away from.
私たちが排除できない
基本的な方程式があります
04:12
Population times consumption
人口×消費という式は
04:15
has got to have some kind of relationship to the planet,
地球と切っても切れない関係にありますが
04:17
and right now, it's a simple "not equal."
現在 そのバランスは崩れています
04:20
Our work shows that we're living
私たちの研究では 人類は
04:24
at about 1.3 planets.
地球1.3個分の値で生きています
04:26
Since 1990,
1990年から 私たちは
04:28
we crossed the line
地球との持続的な関係において
04:30
of being in a sustainable relationship to the planet.
一線を越えてしまいました
04:32
Now we're at 1.3.
人類は1.3倍 消費しているのです
04:35
If we were farmers, we'd be eating our seed.
もし私たちが農家なら
種を食べていることになります
04:37
For bankers, we'd be living off the principal, not the interest.
銀行家なら
利息ではなく元本をかじっています
04:40
This is where we stand today.
これが現在
私たちが置かれている状況です
04:43
A lot of people like to point
この原因は いつも
04:46
to some place else as the cause of the problem.
「ある問題」にあると言われます
04:49
It's always population growth.
人口増加です
04:52
Population growth's important,
人口増加も 重大な問題ですが
04:54
but it's also about how much each person consumes.
1人の人間がどれくらい消費するかも
問題なのです
04:56
So when the average American
例えば 平均的なアメリカ人は
05:00
consumes 43 times as much
平均的なアフリカ人の
05:02
as the average African,
43倍の消費をします
この消費活動に問題があると
05:05
we've got to think that consumption is an issue.
認識しなくてはなりません
05:08
It's not just about population,
人口のことだけではなく
05:10
and it's not just about them; it's about us.
そして他人事ではなく
私たち自身のことなのです
05:12
But it's not just about people;
しかしそれはただ人間自体の問題ではなく
05:16
it's about lifestyles.
ライフスタイルの問題なのです
05:18
There's very good evidence --
とても良い証拠があります
05:20
again, we don't necessarily have
繰り返しますが
私たちは決して
05:22
a peer-reviewed methodology
専門家によってしっかり評価された
05:24
that's bulletproof yet --
方法論を持っているわけではありません
05:26
but there's very good evidence
しかし分かりやすい証拠があるんです
05:28
that the average cat in Europe
平均的なヨーロッパの猫の
05:30
has a larger environmental footprint in its lifetime
環境フットプリントは
05:32
than the average African.
平均的なアフリカ人のそれより広いんです
05:35
You think that's not an issue going forward?
これが問題ではないと言えますか?
05:38
You think that's not a question
この問題が
「我々は如何に地球資源を
05:41
as to how we should be using the Earth's resources?
使用すべきか」という問いに
関係ないと思いますか
05:43
Let's go back and visit our equation.
では先程の方程式に話を戻しましょう
05:46
In 2000, we had six billion people on the planet.
2000年
地球上の人口は60億人でした
05:48
They were consuming what they were consuming --
彼ら1人1人が消費する量
05:51
let's say one unit of consumption each.
その量を1消費ユニットと言いましょう
05:53
We have six billion units of consumption.
すると60億消費ユニットがあったことになります
05:55
By 2050,
人口は2050年までに
05:58
we're going to have nine billion people -- all the scientists agree.
90億人に達します
科学者全員がそう言っています
06:00
They're all going to consume twice as much as they currently do --
その時には今の
2倍の消費量になるでしょう
06:03
scientists, again, agree --
科学者はこれにも同意しています
06:06
because income is going to grow in developing countries
新興国の人々の収入が
06:08
five times what it is today --
今の5倍になり
06:11
on global average, about [2.9].
世界平均では2.9倍になります。
06:13
So we're going to have 18 billion units of consumption.
その結果 180億消費ユニットを
消費することになります
06:15
Who have you heard talking lately
モノとサービスを 今の
06:19
that's said we have to triple production
3倍にしなければならないという話を
06:22
of goods and services?
聞いたことがありますか?
06:24
But that's what the math says.
数字はそう言っているのですが
06:26
We're not going to be able to do that.
そんなこと 出来るわけがありません
06:28
We can get productivity up.
生産性を高めることは出来ます
06:30
We can get efficiency up.
効率を上げることも出来ます
06:32
But we've also got to get consumption down.
しかし同時に
消費を抑えなければならない
06:34
We need to use less
使用を控えなければ
06:38
to make more.
生産高は増えないのです
06:40
And then we need to use less again.
そして更に使用を抑え
06:42
And then we need to consume less.
消費を抑えなければなりません
06:44
All of those things are part of that equation.
これらのこと全てが
先程の方程式の一部なのです
06:46
But it basically raises a fundamental question:
しかし根本的な疑問が湧きます
06:49
should consumers have a choice
消費者は
06:52
about sustainability, about sustainable products?
継続して使用可能な製品を
選べるようになるべきなのか
06:54
Should you be able to buy a product that's sustainable
使い捨て商品の隣の
使い続けられるモノを
06:57
sitting next to one that isn't,
選べるようになるべきなのか
それとも
06:59
or should all the products on the shelf be sustainable?
棚に並ぶ全ての商品が
持続可能なモノになるべきなのか
07:01
If they should all be sustainable on a finite planet,
全商品を 限られた地球上で
持続可能なモノにする -
07:06
how do you make that happen?
どうやったら実現できるのでしょうか
07:09
The average consumer takes 1.8 seconds in the U.S.
アメリカの消費者は
平均1.8秒で商品を選びます
07:12
Okay, so let's be generous.
気前がいいですね
07:14
Let's say it's 3.5 seconds in Europe.
ヨーロッパでは
3.5秒くらいですかね
07:16
How do you evaluate all the scientific data
商品を取り巻く
全ての科学的なデータを
07:19
around a product,
どうやって評価するのですか
07:22
the data that's changing on a weekly, if not a daily, basis?
それらのデータは毎週 もしくは
毎日更新されるんですよ
07:24
How do you get informed?
どうやって情報を得るんですか
07:27
You don't.
得られないのです
07:29
Here's a little question.
質問があります
07:33
From a greenhouse gas perspective,
温室効果ガスの観点から考えて
07:35
is lamb produced in the U.K.
イギリスで生育された羊と
07:37
better than lamb produced in New Zealand,
ニュージーランドで生育され 冷凍され
07:40
frozen and shipped to the U.K.?
輸入された羊
どちらが良いのでしょうか
07:42
Is a bad feeder lot operation for beef
牛にたくさん飼料をあたえることは
07:45
better or worse than
牛に草を食べさせることより
良いのでしょうか
07:48
a bad grazing operation for beef?
それとも 悪いのでしょうか?
07:51
Do organic potatoes
有機栽培のジャガイモは
07:53
actually have fewer toxic chemicals
本当に従来のジャガイモより
07:55
used to produce them
有害な化学物質が
07:57
than conventional potatoes?
少ないのでしょうか?
07:59
In every single case,
全てのケースにおいて
08:01
the answer is "it depends."
答えは「場合による」です
08:03
It depends on who produced it and how,
どの事例も
誰がどう生産したかに
08:05
in every single instance.
よるのです
08:08
And there are many others.
問題は他にもあります
08:10
How is a consumer going to walk through this minefield?
このような地雷を
踏まずに済む方法は?
08:12
They're not.
ありません
08:14
They may have a lot of opinions about it,
消費者は商品選びに
08:16
but they're not going to be terribly informed.
多くの意見を持っていまが
十分な情報は持っていません
08:18
Sustainability has got to be a pre-competitive issue.
持続可能性というのは
市場競争以前の問題であり
08:21
It's got to be something we all care about.
私たち全員が考慮しなければ
ならないことです
08:24
And we need collusion.
私たちは団結しなくてはなりません
08:29
We need groups to work together that never have.
今までなかったような
恊働グループを作るのです
08:31
We need Cargill to work with Bunge.
カーギルはブンゲと組み
08:34
We need Coke to work with Pepsi.
コカコーラはペプシと
08:37
We need Oxford to work with Cambridge.
オックスフォードはケンブリッジと
08:40
We need Greenpeace to work with WWF.
グリーンピースはWWFと
08:42
Everybody's got to work together --
皆で協力するのです
08:44
China and the U.S.
中国とアメリカだってそうです
08:46
We need to begin to manage this planet
私たちの将来が懸かっていると考え
08:48
as if our life depended on it,
地球を管理する必要があります
08:50
because it does,
実際にそうなんです
08:52
it fundamentally does.
根本的にそうなんです
08:54
But we can't do everything.
しかし何でも出来るわけではありません
08:56
Even if we get everybody working on it,
例え皆が この問題に
取り組むとしても
08:58
we've got to be strategic.
何か戦略が必要です
09:00
We need to focus on the where,
着目すべきは 何処に
09:02
the what and the who.
何に 誰に
09:04
So, the where:
ではまず 「何処」から説明します
09:06
We've identified 35 places globally that we need to work.
取り組むべき地域を
世界で35カ所確定しました
09:08
These are the places that are the richest in biodiversity
世界には
生物の多様性が豊かで
09:10
and the most important from an ecosystem function point-of-view.
生態系の観点から
とても重要な場所があります
09:13
We have to work in these places.
これらの地に取り組む必要があります
09:16
We have to save these places if we want a chance in hell
現在知られている多様な生物の種を
保存するためにも
09:18
of preserving biodiversity as we know it.
これらの地を守らなくてはならない
09:21
We looked at the threats to these places.
これらの場所での脅威は何なのか
09:26
These are the 15 commodities
ここの15品目が
09:28
that fundamentally pose the biggest threats
そういった場所での
09:30
to these places
最大の脅威なのですが
09:32
because of deforestation,
何故ならば 森林伐採
09:34
soil loss, water use, pesticide use,
土砂流出、水の利用
農薬の利用
09:36
over-fishing, etc.
乱獲などにつながるからです
09:39
So we've got 35 places,
さて 35カ所の地域と
09:44
we've got 15 priority commodities,
15の優先的生産物があります
09:47
who do we work with
ではこれらの生産過程を変えるには
09:49
to change the way those commodities are produced?
誰と恊働すればいいのでしょうか
09:51
Are we going to work with 6.9 billion consumers?
69億人の消費者でしょうか
09:54
Let's see, that's about 7,000 languages,
7,000種類の言語で -
09:58
350 major languages --
主要なものだけでも350種類あるんですよ
10:01
a lot of work there.
大変な仕事になります
10:03
I don't see anybody actually being able
とてもじゃないですが
10:05
to do that very effectively.
効率的には出来ないでしょう
10:07
Are we going to work with 1.5 billion producers?
では15億の生産者と
手を組むべきでしょうか
10:09
Again, a daunting task.
これもまた気の遠くなる仕事です
10:13
There must be a better way.
もっといい方法があるはずです
10:16
300 to 500 companies
300から500の企業が
10:19
control 70 percent or more
この15種類の生産物の
10:21
of the trade of each of the 15 commodities
70%以上を取り扱っていて
それらの企業こそが
10:23
that we've identified as the most significant.
最も重要であると考えました
10:26
If we work with those, if we change those companies
彼らと手を組み
彼らのビジネスのやり方を
10:29
and the way they do business,
変えることが出来れば
10:32
then the rest will happen automatically.
その他の事業者は必然的に変わります
10:34
So, we went through our 15 commodities.
先程の15の生産物に取り組みました
10:38
This is nine of them.
これがそのうちの9個です
10:40
We lined them up side-by-side,
それらを横に並べ
10:42
and we put the names of the companies that work
それぞれに取り組む企業も
10:44
on each of those.
並べました
10:46
And if you go through the first 25 or 30 names
それぞれの生産物の
10:49
of each of the commodities,
最初の20か30の企業名を見ていくと
10:51
what you begin to see is,
こう思うでしょう
10:53
gosh, there's Cargill here, there's Cargill there,
カーギルがここにもあそこにもいる
10:55
there's Cargill everywhere.
カーギルはそこら中にいる と
10:58
In fact, these names start coming up over and over again.
実はカーギルのような大企業は
あちこちに現れるのです
11:00
So we did the analysis again a slightly different way.
そこで分析方法を少し変えました
11:03
We said: if we take the top hundred companies,
こう考えたのです
もしこれらの
11:07
what percentage
上位100社を集めたら
11:10
of all 15 commodities
15の生産物のうち 何%を
11:12
do they touch, buy or sell?
彼らが売買しているのだろう?
11:15
And what we found is it's 25 percent.
25%であると判明しました
11:18
So 100 companies
つまり100の企業が
11:22
control 25 percent of the trade
地球で最も重要な
11:24
of all 15 of the most significant
15の生産物の
11:27
commodities on the planet.
25%を取引しているのです
11:29
We can get our arms around a hundred companies.
100社となら
手をつなげます
11:32
A hundred companies, we can work with.
100の企業となら
一緒に取り組めます
11:35
Why is 25 percent important?
なぜ25%がそんなに大事なのか
11:38
Because if these companies demand sustainable products,
これらの企業が持続可能な商品を
要求すれば
11:41
they'll pull 40 to 50 percent of production.
40から50%の生産物を
変えることができるからです
11:44
Companies can push producers
彼らは消費者より早く
11:48
faster than consumers can.
生産者を動かせるのです
11:51
By companies asking for this,
企業が頼むことで
11:54
we can leverage production so much faster
消費者を待つより
断然早く
11:56
than by waiting for consumers to do it.
生産物に てこ入れできるのです
11:59
After 40 years, the global organic movement
40年も経ったのに
世界的な有機栽培は
12:01
has achieved 0.7 of one percent
世界の食糧の0.7%しか
12:04
of global food.
占めていません
12:06
We can't wait that long.
私たちはそんなに待てません
12:08
We don't have that kind of time.
そんな時間はないのです
12:10
We need change
人類には
12:12
that's going to accelerate.
加速していく変化が
必要なのです
12:14
Even working with individual companies
個々の企業と恊働することさえも
12:17
is not probably going to get us there.
不十分でしょう
12:19
We need to begin to work with industries.
業界全体と恊働し始めなくては
ならないのです
12:21
So we've started roundtables
私たちは円卓会議を開きました
12:24
where we bring together the entire value chain,
そこでは 生産者から小売り店
12:26
from producers
大企業に至るまでの
12:28
all the way to the retailers and brands.
価値連鎖の全てが
同じ席に着きました
12:30
We bring in civil society, we bring in NGOs,
市民団体
NGO(非政府組織)
12:32
we bring in researchers and scientists
そして研究者や科学者も招き入れ
12:34
to have an informed discussion --
時には大論戦になりながらも
12:36
sometimes a battle royale --
何がこれらの生産物に
重要なインパクトを
12:38
to figure out what are the key impacts
与えるのか
世界的指標とは何か
12:40
of these products,
受容できるインパクトとは何か を
12:43
what is a global benchmark,
理解するために
12:45
what's an acceptable impact,
情報に基づいた議論を
行いました
12:46
and design standards around that.
さらにそれらに関する基準を設けました
12:48
It's not all fun and games.
全てが楽しく ゲームのようであった訳では
ありません
12:52
In salmon aquaculture,
鮭の養殖では
12:56
we kicked off a roundtable
円卓会議を約6年前に
12:58
almost six years ago.
始めました
13:00
Eight entities came to the table.
8つの団体が参加しました
13:02
We eventually got, I think, 60 percent
結果的に世界生産の60%、
13:05
of global production at the table
需要の25%に値する事業者が
13:07
and 25 percent of demand at the table.
議論に加わりました
13:09
Three of the original eight entities were suing each other.
8つのうち3つの団体は
お互いに訴訟を起こしてしまいました
13:12
And yet, next week, we launch
それでも来週
世界で検討され
13:15
globally verified, vetted and certified
厳しく吟味され 認定された
13:18
standards for salmon aquaculture.
鮭の養殖における基準を発表します
13:21
It can happen.
可能性はあるのです
13:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:26
So what brings
では異なった事業者を
13:33
the different entities to the table?
議論に就かせる動機は
何なのでしょうか
13:36
It's risk and demand.
それはリスクと需要です
大企業にとって
13:40
For the big companies, it's reputational risk,
これらは評判に関わる問題なのです
13:42
but more importantly,
更に重要なことに
13:44
they don't care what the price of commodities is.
企業が生産物の価格を
気にしていません
13:46
If they don't have commodities, they don't have a business.
生産物がなかったら
事業が成り立たないので
13:48
They care about availability,
企業は供給の安定を懸念します
13:51
so the big risk for them is not having product at all.
ですから最大の企業リスクは
生産物が無くなることなのです
13:53
For the producers,
生産者にとっては
13:56
if a buyer wants to buy something produced a certain way,
方法次第でバイヤーが買ってくれるならば
13:58
that's what brings them to the table.
それが彼らにとっての動機です
14:01
So it's the demand that brings them to the table.
つまりこれらが需要であり
彼らを議論につかせるのです
14:03
The good news is
良い結果が出ました
14:06
we identified a hundred companies two years ago.
2年前に100社を探しだしましたが
14:08
In the last 18 months, we've signed agreements
18ヶ月で
そのうち40社と
14:10
with 40 of those hundred companies
サプライチェーンにおける
14:12
to begin to work with them on their supply chain.
取り組みを開始する契約を結びました
14:14
And in the next 18 months,
そして今から18ヶ月以内に
14:16
we will have signed up to work with another 40,
さらに40社と
協力する契約を結ぶ予定で
14:19
and we think we'll get those signed as well.
同様の契約内容になるでしょう
14:22
Now what we're doing is bringing the CEOs
これら80社の
最高経営責任者に
14:24
of these 80 companies together
協力してもらい
14:26
to help twist the arms of the final 20,
残りの20社と 手を組んで
一緒に 議論に
14:28
to bring them to the table,
参加してもらおうとしています
14:31
because they don't like NGOs, they've never worked with NGOs,
彼らは非政府組織が嫌いで
協力的ではありません
14:33
they're concerned about this, they're concerned about that,
団体により
懸念事項は異なりますが
14:36
but we all need to be in this together.
重要なのは共に活動することです
14:38
So we're pulling out all the stops.
私たちは全力を尽くしています
14:40
We're using whatever leverage we have to bring them to the table.
彼らを議論に引き入れるためならば
何でも使います
14:42
One company we're working with that's begun --
協力企業のうち
既に取り組みを始め
14:46
in baby steps, perhaps --
- まだ初期段階でしょうが
14:48
but has begun this journey on sustainability is Cargill.
持続可能性に向かう道のりを
歩み始めたのはカーギルです
14:50
They've funded research that shows
カーギルは20年間 1本の木も伐らずに
14:53
that we can double global palm oil production
ヤシ油の世界生産量を
14:56
without cutting a single tree in the next 20 years,
2倍にする研究に出資し
14:58
and do it all in Borneo alone
それを 荒れ果てたボルネオの地に
15:01
by planting on land that's already degraded.
植林して
実践しています
15:03
The study shows that the highest net present value
調査に拠れば
ヤシ油の最も高い
15:05
for palm oil
正味現在価値(NPV)には
15:08
is on land that's been degraded.
荒れた土地が関係しているそうです
15:10
They're also undertaking a study to look at
更に そのヤシ油供給が
15:13
all of their supplies of palm oil
認められるかどうか
そして
15:15
to see if they could be certified
彼らが 信用性のある評価プログラムに
15:18
and what they would need to change in order to become third-party certified
認定された第三者機関になるためには
15:20
under a credible certification program.
いかなる改善が必要か
調査が行われています
15:23
Why is Cargill important?
なぜカーギルは
それほどまで重要なのか
15:27
Because Cargill has 20 to 25 percent
なぜならカーギルは
世界のヤシ油市場で
15:29
of global palm oil.
20から25%を占めているからです
15:31
If Cargill makes a decision,
もしカーギルが決断すれば
15:33
the entire palm oil industry moves,
ヤシ油業界全体が動きます
15:35
or at least 40 or 50 percent of it.
少なくとも40か50%は
15:38
That's not insignificant.
これこそが重要なのです
15:40
More importantly, Cargill and one other company
さらに大事なのは
カーギルともう一社で
15:42
ship 50 percent of the palm oil
中国に輸出されるヤシ油の
15:44
that goes to China.
50%を占めているということ
15:47
We don't have to change the way
カーギルに持続可能性のある
15:49
a single Chinese company works
ヤシ油だけを輸出するよう働きかければ
15:51
if we get Cargill to only send
中国企業のやり方を1つ1つ
15:53
sustainable palm oil to China.
変えていく必要がなくなるのです
15:55
It's a pre-competitive issue.
これは競争以前の問題なんです
15:58
All the palm oil going there is good.
中国に輸出されるヤシ油が
良い製品になる
16:00
Buy it.
素晴らしいでしょう
16:02
Mars is also on a similar journey.
マースも同じような道を歩んでいます
16:04
Now most people understand that Mars is a chocolate company,
多くの人が マースを
チョコレート会社だと思っていますが
16:07
but Mars has made sustainability pledges
海産食品には
認定された原材料のみを使う
16:10
to buy only certified product for all of its seafood.
という 環境持続性に関する
公約を設けています
16:12
It turns out Mars buys more seafood than Walmart
マースは ペットフード用に
魚介類を
16:15
because of pet food.
ウォールマートよりも多く
買い付けているのです
16:17
But they're doing some really interesting things around chocolate,
しかしチョコレートに関して
とても興味深い
16:19
and it all comes from the fact
取り組みをしています
16:22
that Mars wants to be in business in the future.
将来的なビジネスを
考えた上でのことです
16:24
And what they see is that they need to
彼らは チョコレートの生産性を
16:27
improve chocolate production.
向上させる必要があると
気付きました
16:29
On any given plantation,
既存のどの栽培でも
16:32
20 percent of the trees produce 80 percent of the crop,
20%の木々で
80%の収穫を生み出しているのです
16:34
so Mars is looking at the genome,
マースはゲノムに着目し
カカオの木の
16:37
they're sequencing the genome of the cocoa plant.
ゲノム配列解析に取り組んでいます
16:39
They're doing it with IBM and the USDA,
これをIBMとUSDA(アメリカ農務省)と
協力して行い
16:41
and they're putting it in the public domain
その成果を公共財産にしています
16:43
because they want everybody to have access to this data,
誰でもそのデータにアクセスできるようにし
16:45
because they want everybody to help them
カカオの生産性
持続可能性の向上に
16:48
make cocoa more productive and more sustainable.
協力してもらいたいという
願いからです
16:50
What they've realized
そうして明らかになったことは
16:53
is that if they can identify the traits
もし生産性と干ばつ耐用性に
16:55
on productivity and drought tolerance,
関係する性質を特定出来れば
16:57
they can produce 320 percent as much cocoa
現在の3.2倍のカカオを生産するのに
17:00
on 40 percent of the land.
40%の土地で済むということです
17:03
The rest of the land can be used for something else.
残りの土地は別のことに使えるんです
17:06
It's more with less and less again.
より少ない元手で
より多くのものを ということです
17:09
That's what the future has got to be,
それが将来のあるべき姿であり
17:12
and putting it in the public domain is smart.
彼らがこの成果を
公共財産にしたのは素晴らしいですね
17:14
They don't want to be an I.P. company; they want to be a chocolate company,
マースは 情報提供会社ではなく
チョコレート会社になりたいんです
17:17
but they want to be a chocolate company forever.
しかも 永遠に
チョコレート会社でいたいのです
17:20
Now, the price of food, many people complain about,
さて 多くの人が食品の価格に
文句を言っていますが
17:23
but in fact, the price of food is going down,
現実には食品価格は
下がっています
17:26
and that's odd because in fact,
おかしなことですが
実際には
17:29
consumers are not paying for the true cost of food.
消費者は食べ物に
お金を払っているのではありません
17:31
If you take a look just at water,
例えば水を考えてみて下さい
17:34
what we see is that,
4つの主要生産物から
17:36
with four very common products,
見て取れるのは
17:38
you look at how much a farmer produced to make those products,
どれだけの量を農家の人々が生産したか
17:41
and then you look at how much water input was put into them,
どれだけの水が使われたか
そして
17:44
and then you look at what the farmer was paid.
どれだけの収入を
農家の人々が得たかということです
17:47
If you divide the amount of water
水の料金を
農家の収入から差し引くと
17:50
into what the farmer was paid,
農家は
生産物に使われる水に
17:52
the farmer didn't receive enough money
相当な金額を費やしているため
17:54
to pay a decent price for water in any of those commodities.
十分な金額が手元に
残らないことが分かります
17:56
That is an externality by definition.
これが定義上の「外部性」です
17:59
This is the subsidy from nature.
これは自然から課された税金なのです
18:01
Coca-Cola, they've worked a lot on water,
コカコーラは水利用に
多くの取り組みをしていますが
18:03
but right now, they're entering into 17-year contracts
ヨーロッパでジュースを売るために
18:06
with growers in Turkey
現在トルコの栽培農家と
18:09
to sell juice into Europe,
17年間の契約を結ぼうとしています
18:11
and they're doing that because they want to have a product
ヨーロッパの市場の近くから
18:13
that's closer to the European market.
生産物を得られるようにしたいのです
18:16
But they're not just buying the juice;
ヨーロッパの人々は
ジュースを買っているだけではありません
18:18
they're also buying the carbon in the trees
価格の中には
ヨーロッパまでの輸送にかかった
18:20
to offset the shipment costs associated with carbon
木の中の炭素まで
含まれているので
18:23
to get the product into Europe.
炭素も買っていることになります
18:25
There's carbon that's being bought with sugar,
砂糖と共に買われる炭素もあれば
18:28
with coffee, with beef.
コーヒーや牛肉と共に
買われるものもあり
18:31
This is called bundling. It's bringing those externalities
「バンドリング」と言います
先程の「外部性」を
18:33
back into the price of the commodity.
生産物の価格に盛り込むということです
18:35
We need to take what we've learned in private, voluntary standards
世界中の優秀な生産者に対する
18:39
of what the best producers in the world are doing
民間の自主基準から
私たちが学んだことを
18:42
and use that to inform government regulation,
政策規制に情報提供することで
18:45
so we can shift the entire performance curve.
成果をさらに高めることができるのです
18:48
We can't just focus on identifying the best;
トップを見つけることだけに
注力できません
18:51
we've got to move the rest.
その他を動かさなければならないのです
18:53
The issue isn't what to think, it's how to think.
問題は何を考えるか ではなく
どのように考えるか です
18:56
These companies have begun to think differently.
企業はそれぞれ異なる考え方を
し始めました
18:59
They're on a journey; there's no turning back.
これは冒険なのです
後戻りはありません
19:01
We're all on that same journey with them.
私たち全員が
その冒険を共にするのです
19:04
We have to really begin to change
人類は本当に
何においても考え方を
19:07
the way we think about everything.
変えなければなりません
19:10
Whatever was sustainable on a planet of six billion
60億人の住む地球にとって
持続可能なことは
19:12
is not going to be sustainable on a planet with nine.
90億人のいる地球にとって
持続可能ではないのです
19:15
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
19:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:20
Translated by Yuki Kawakami
Reviewed by Yuriko Hida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jason Clay - Market transformer
Jason Clay’s ideas are changing the way governments, foundations, researchers and NGOs identify and address risks and opportunities for their work.

Why you should listen

A senior vice president in charge of markets at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF-US), Clay's goal is to create global standards for producing and using raw materials, particularly in terms of carbon and water. He has convened roundtables of retailers, buyers, producers and environmentalists to reduce the impacts of producing a range of goods and to encourage environmentally sensitive practices in agriculture, aquaculture and industry. He thinks deeply about the evolving role of the NGOs in the 21st century, using venture philanthropy to make them more nimble and operating at the speed and scale of life on the planet today. Before joining WWF in 1999, Clay ran a family farm, taught at Harvard and Yale, worked at the US Department of Agriculture and spent more than 25 years working with NGOs.

More profile about the speaker
Jason Clay | Speaker | TED.com