sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2005

Barry Schwartz: The paradox of choice

バリー・シュワルツ氏が語る、選択のパラドックスについて

July 15, 2005

心理学者バリー・シュワルツが、選択の自由という西欧社会の根幹をなす教義に狙いを定めます。シュワルツの推定によると、選択は我々を更に自由にではなくより無力に、もっと幸せにではなくより不満足にしています。

Barry Schwartz - Psychologist
Barry Schwartz studies the link between economics and psychology, offering startling insights into modern life. Lately, working with Ken Sharpe, he's studying wisdom. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
私自身の著書にあることについてお話します
00:25
I'm going to talk to you about some stuff that's in this book of mine
既にどこかで聞いた事があるような
他のことと共鳴するでしょう
00:28
that I hope will resonate with other things you've already heard,
00:31
and I'll try to make some connections myself, in case you miss them.
しかしそうでない方のために
私が関連付けながら話していきます
まずは私が「公式教義」と呼ぶもの
から始めたいと思います
00:35
I want to start with what I call the "official dogma."
00:39
The official dogma of what?
何の公式教義なのか?
00:41
The official dogma of all western industrial societies.
西欧の産業社会全ての公式教義です
その公式教義はこんな調子のものです
00:45
And the official dogma runs like this:
もし我々が自らの市民の繁栄を
最大限にすることに興味があるのなら
00:47
if we are interested in maximizing the welfare of our citizens,
その方法は
個人の自由を最大限にすることである
00:51
the way to do that is to maximize individual freedom.
00:57
The reason for this is both that freedom is in and of itself good,
その理由はひとつは
自由そのものが良いということ
貴重で、価値があり、
人であることの根幹をなしているから
01:02
valuable, worthwhile, essential to being human.
01:05
And because if people have freedom,
更に、もし人に自由が与えられれば
一人一人が個人に基づいて行動できる
01:08
then each of us can act on our own
我々自身の繁栄を最大限にするように行動し
01:10
to do the things that will maximize our welfare,
他の誰も
我々のために決断をしないで済みます
01:12
and no one has to decide on our behalf.
自由を最大限にするためには
最大限の選択を与えることです
01:16
The way to maximize freedom is to maximize choice.
選択が多ければ
その分自由度は増し
01:21
The more choice people have, the more freedom they have,
01:24
and the more freedom they have,
自由度が増せば
その分繁栄する
01:26
the more welfare they have.
この考えが 私が思うに
あまりにも深く浸透しているため
01:29
This, I think, is so deeply embedded in the water supply
誰もこれに異議を唱えようとすら
思わないのです
01:34
that it wouldn't occur to anyone to question it.
01:37
And it's also deeply embedded in our lives.
またこれは我々の人生にも
深く埋め込まれています
01:42
I'll give you some examples of what modern progress has made possible for us.
近代の発展で可能になったものから
いくつか例を出しましょう
これが私のスーパーです
それほど大きくはない
01:48
This is my supermarket. Not such a big one.
サラダ・ドレッシングについて一言
01:52
I want to say just a word about salad dressing.
01:54
175 salad dressings in my supermarket,
私のスーパーには
175種のドレッシングがあって
01:57
if you don't count the 10 extra-virgin olive oils
それに加えて10種の
エキストラ・バージン・オリーブ・オイルと
12種のバルサミコ酢があります
02:00
and 12 balsamic vinegars you could buy
もしここの
175の既製品のドレッシングの中には
02:03
to make a very large number of your own salad dressings,
気に入ったのがなかった時に
自分で作れるようにね
02:06
in the off-chance that none of the 175 the store has on offer suit you.
02:11
So this is what the supermarket is like.
まあ、このスーパーはこんな感じです
02:13
And then you go to the consumer electronics store to set up a stereo system --
で、次に電機店にステレオシステムを
作るために行って
スピーカー、CDプレーヤー、テープデッキ、
チューナー、アンプなど
02:17
speakers, CD player, tape player, tuner, amplifier --
それでこの電機店1店舗の中に
02:21
and in this one single consumer electronics store,
上のスーパーと同じ数くらいの
ステレオシステムがある
02:25
there are that many stereo systems.
1店舗の中にある部品を
組み合わせていくだけで
02:29
We can construct six-and-a-half-million different stereo systems
650万種もの
ステレオシステムが組み立てられるのです
02:34
out of the components that are on offer in one store.
これは莫大な数の選択肢だと
認めざるを得ませんね
02:37
You've got to admit that's a lot of choice.
他の分野では
コミュニケーションの世界
02:39
In other domains -- the world of communications.
私が子供だった頃は
02:43
There was a time, when I was a boy,
マーベル社からでさえあれば
どんな電話サービスでも
02:45
when you could get any kind of telephone service you wanted,
受ける事ができる時代がありました
02:48
as long as it came from Ma Bell.
電話は買うものではなく借りるものでした
02:50
You rented your phone. You didn't buy it.
その結果 電話が壊れる事はない
ということがありました
02:52
One consequence of that, by the way, is that the phone never broke.
そんな日々も今は昔
02:55
And those days are gone.
02:58
We now have an almost unlimited variety of phones,
我々の前には
特に携帯電話の世界においては
無尽蔵の選択肢が用意されています
03:01
especially in the world of cell phones.
03:03
These are cell phones of the future.
これらは携帯電話の未来の形です
私のお気に入りは真ん中の
03:06
My favorite is the middle one --
MP3プレーヤー、鼻毛切り
クレームブリュレバーナーが一体化してるもの
03:08
the MP3 player, nose hair trimmer, and creme brulee torch.
もしお近くの店舗で
まだ見かけていなかったとしても大丈夫
03:12
And if by some chance you haven't seen that in your store yet,
近日中にお目にかかれますよ
03:18
you can rest assured that one day soon you will.
03:20
And what this does is
これが何をもたらすかというと
03:22
it leads people to walk into their stores asking this question.
人々が店に来る際
ある質問が既に問われています
その質問の答えを今知りたいですか?
03:26
And do you know what the answer to this question now is?
答えはNoです
03:28
The answer is "No."
余計なことをしない携帯電話を
買おうとしてもそれは不可能なのです
03:30
It is not possible to buy a cell phone that doesn't do too much.
さて 購買活動以上に重要な
人生の他の局面においても
03:34
So, in other aspects of life that are much more significant than buying things,
同じような選択の爆発が起こっています
03:39
the same explosion of choice is true.
医療について 米国では既に
皆さんが医者のところに行くと
03:43
Health care -- it is no longer the case in the United States
医者がどうすれば良いか教えてくれる
という時代は終わりました
03:47
that you go to the doctor, and the doctor tells you what to do.
その代わりに
皆さんが医者に行くと
03:50
Instead, you go to the doctor,
医者から Aをすることができるし
Bをする事もできる と言われます
03:52
and the doctor tells you, "Well, we could do A, or we could do B.
Aにはこのような効果とリスクがあって
03:55
A has these benefits, and these risks.
Bにはこのような効果とリスクがある
あなたはどうしたいですか?と聞かれます
03:58
B has these benefits, and these risks. What do you want to do?"
04:02
And you say, "Doc, what should I do?"
そこで「先生 私はどうしたらいいでしょう?」
と聞くと
医者はAにはこのような効果とリスクが
Bにはこのような効果とリスクがあります
04:05
And the doc says, "A has these benefits and risks, and B has these benefits and risks.
04:09
What do you want to do?"
あなたはどうしたいですか?
そこで「先生が私だったらどうしますか?」
と聞いてみると
04:12
And you say, "If you were me, Doc, what would you do?"
04:15
And the doc says, "But I'm not you."
すると医者は
「でも私はあなたではありません」と言う
04:19
And the result is -- we call it "patient autonomy,"
そしてその結果
―これを「患者の自己決定権」と呼び
こう呼ぶと
とてもいい事のように聞こえますが―
04:22
which makes it sound like a good thing,
でも本当は何が起こっているのかと言うと
決断権の重荷と責任を
04:24
but what it really is is a shifting of the burden and the responsibility
04:26
for decision-making from somebody who knows something --
何らかの知識のある者から
―この場合は医者から―
04:29
namely, the doctor --
04:30
to somebody who knows nothing and is almost certainly sick
何も知らず
少なくともとても具合が悪いので
04:33
and thus not in the best shape to be making decisions --
判断をくだすのに
必ずしも適さない者
すなわち患者に委ねているのです
04:36
namely, the patient.
処方箋薬の市場では
われわれ消費者に対して
04:38
There's enormous marketing of prescription drugs
莫大なマーケティング活動が行われてますが
04:41
to people like you and me,
よくよく考えてみると
これは全く意味のない事で
04:42
which, if you think about it, makes no sense at all,
我々に買う事はできないのです
04:44
since we can't buy them.
我々が購入することができないものを
なぜ売り込むのか?
04:46
Why do they market to us if we can't buy them?
その答えは我々が翌朝
かかりつけの医者に電話をして
04:48
The answer is that they expect us to call our doctors the next morning
処方箋を変えてもらいたいと
頼ませようとしているのです
04:52
and ask for our prescriptions to be changed.
私たちのアイデンティティーという
ドラマチックなものでさえ
04:56
Something as dramatic as our identity
選択できるものとなったことを
05:00
has now become a matter of choice,
このスライドは示しています
[性別は本人に選ばせようと思うの]
05:02
as this slide is meant to indicate.
アイデンティティーを受け継がず
05:06
We don't inherit an identity; we get to invent it.
発明する しかも好きなだけ
再発明するようになると
05:08
And we get to re-invent ourselves as often as we like.
それが意味するところは毎朝目が覚めた時に
05:12
And that means that everyday, when you wake up in the morning,
05:14
you have to decide what kind of person you want to be.
自分がどんな人になりたいのか
決断しなくてはならない
結婚や家族に関しては
05:19
With respect to marriage and family,
以前には
みんなが持つ共通認識として
05:22
there was a time when the default assumption that almost everyone had
できるだけ早く結婚をして
05:28
is that you got married as soon as you could,
05:29
and then you started having kids as soon as you could.
できるだけ早く
子づくりをするということがありました
05:31
The only real choice was who,
本当の選択は誰と結婚するかであって
いつ結婚するかとか
結婚後どうするかではありませんでした
05:35
not when, and not what you did after.
05:38
Nowadays, everything is very much up for grabs.
現在では
全てのものがどうにでもなってしまっています
私は素晴らしく知性にあふれた学生達を
教えていますが
05:41
I teach wonderfully intelligent students,
以前と比べて与える課題を
20%くらい減らしています
05:44
and I assign 20 percent less work than I used to.
それは学生達の頭が
悪くなっているからではなく
05:47
And it's not because they're less smart,
熱心でなくなったからでもありません
05:50
and it's not because they're less diligent.
05:52
It's because they are preoccupied, asking themselves,
それは学生達が
他のことで頭がいっぱいだからです
「結婚をするべきか否か?
今結婚をするべきか?
05:56
"Should I get married or not? Should I get married now?
05:58
Should I get married later? Should I have kids first, or a career first?"
結婚を遅らせるべきか?
子供が先か、キャリアが先か?」
これらは圧倒的な質問です
06:02
All of these are consuming questions.
そして学生達は
私の出した課題を全てやり遂げるかどうかや
06:05
And they're going to answer these questions,
06:07
whether or not it means not doing all the work I assign
いい成績をとるかどうかに関わらず
06:09
and not getting a good grade in my courses.
これらの質問の答を出していくのです
そしてそうすべきなのです
これらはとても重要な質問ですから
06:12
And indeed they should. These are important questions to answer.
カールが指摘したように
仕事に関して 我々は恵まれています
06:17
Work -- we are blessed, as Carl was pointing out,
06:20
with the technology that enables us
世界中のどこにいても
一日のどの時間でも
06:22
to work every minute of every day from any place on the planet --
仕事をすることを可能にする
テクノロジーがあるからです
ランドルフ・ホテルを除いてね
06:29
except the Randolph Hotel.
(笑)
06:31
(Laughter)
それはそうと
1か所だけ
06:36
There is one corner, by the way,
無線が通じる秘密のところがあるんですよ
06:38
that I'm not going to tell anybody about, where the WiFi works.
私が使いたいから誰にも言いません
06:43
I'm not telling you about it because I want to use it.
これが意味するところは
仕事に関して我々に与えられている
06:45
So what this means, this incredible freedom of choice
素晴らしい選択の自由ということですが
06:48
we have with respect to work, is that we have to make a decision,
私達は常に
何度も何度も何度も仕事をすべきか否かの
06:51
again and again and again,
決断を下さなくてはならない
06:53
about whether we should or shouldn't be working.
子供のサッカーの試合を見に行って
06:56
We can go to watch our kid play soccer,
尻ポケットに携帯電話を突っ込んで
06:59
and we have our cell phone on one hip,
反対のポケットにはモバイル端末
07:01
and our Blackberry on our other hip,
膝の上にノートパソコンを開いている
07:03
and our laptop, presumably, on our laps.
それらが全て電源が落とされていたとしても
07:05
And even if they're all shut off,
子供がサッカーの試合を
むちゃくちゃにしているのを観ながら
07:08
every minute that we're watching our kid mutilate a soccer game,
常に自問自答をしているのです
07:10
we are also asking ourselves,
「この電話にでるべきだろうか?
07:12
"Should I answer this cell phone call?
このメールの返事は?
レポートのドラフトは?」
07:15
Should I respond to this email? Should I draft this letter?"
そしてそれらの答えが
たとえ全てNoであったとしても
07:17
And even if the answer to the question is "no,"
子供のサッカーの試合を見ると言う経験は
自問自答がなかった時とは
07:20
it's certainly going to make the experience of your kid's soccer game
とても違ったものになっています
07:23
very different than it would've been.
周りを見回してみると
07:26
So everywhere we look,
大きなことも小さなことも
物質的なことも生活に関わることも
07:28
big things and small things, material things and lifestyle things,
07:31
life is a matter of choice.
人生の全てが選択に集約されています
07:34
And the world we used to live in looked like this.
我々が以前生きていた世界は
このようなものでした
[全て定めのとおり]
というのは
いくつかの選択はありましたが
07:40
That is to say, there were some choices,
全ての物事が選択ということではなかった
07:42
but not everything was a matter of choice.
我々が今生きている世界はこんな感じです
07:44
And the world we now live in looks like this.
ここで出てくる問いは
これはいいニュースか 悪いニュースか?
07:47
And the question is, is this good news, or bad news?
その答えはYesです
07:53
And the answer is yes.
(笑)
07:56
(Laughter)
我々はみんな良さについては知っています
07:58
We all know what's good about it,
ですので私は悪い面について
話したいと思います
08:00
so I'm going to talk about what's bad about it.
これら全ての選択には二つの効果があります
08:03
All of this choice has two effects,
08:06
two negative effects on people.
二つの悪い効果です
一つは 矛盾しているのですが
08:09
One effect, paradoxically,
これが開放感ではなく
無力感を生むということです
08:11
is that it produces paralysis, rather than liberation.
あまりにも多くの選択肢を前にすると
08:16
With so many options to choose from,
人は選択が非常に難しくなってしまいます
08:18
people find it very difficult to choose at all.
これの非常にいい例をひとつ出しましょう
08:22
I'll give you one very dramatic example of this:
定年後の年金投資計画に関する研究で
私の同僚が
08:25
a study that was done of investments in voluntary retirement plans.
ヴァンガードという巨大な投資信託会社から
08:31
A colleague of mine got access to investment records from Vanguard,
約2000か所の職場に渡る
08:36
the gigantic mutual fund company
約100万人の社員の情報を手に入れたのです
08:38
of about a million employees and about 2,000 different workplaces.
彼女が調べたところによると
08:42
And what she found is that
会社が提示する投資信託が10件増えるごとに
08:44
for every 10 mutual funds the employer offered,
参加率が2パーセント落ちた
という結果が出たのです
08:47
rate of participation went down two percent.
50件の投資信託を提示すると
5件提示した時と比べて
08:52
You offer 50 funds -- 10 percent fewer employees participate
参加する社員は10%減る
何故でしょう?
08:56
than if you only offer five. Why?
それは 50件もの投資信託が提示されると
09:00
Because with 50 funds to choose from,
09:02
it's so damn hard to decide which fund to choose
どれを選べばいいのか決めるのが難しくなり
後回しにしてしまうのです
09:06
that you'll just put it off until tomorrow.
それで 一日一日と延ばしていき
09:08
And then tomorrow, and then tomorrow,
それがどんどん積み重なって
09:10
and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
結局決断を下す事はなくなるのです
09:12
and of course tomorrow never comes.
理解しなくてはならないのは
これが人々が
09:14
Understand that not only does this mean
引退した時資金不足に陥り
ドッグフードを食べざるを得ない状況に
09:16
that people are going to have to eat dog food when they retire
陥るということを意味するだけでなく
09:18
because they don't have enough money put away,
決断を下す事があまりにも難しいので
09:20
it also means that making the decision is so hard
会社から受け取る権利のある資金を
放棄してしまっているということです
09:23
that they pass up significant matching money from the employer.
彼等は参加しないことによって
年間5000ドルもの
09:27
By not participating, they are passing up as much as 5,000 dollars a year
会社が喜んで提供すべき資金を
受ける権利を放棄してしまうのです
09:31
from the employer, who would happily match their contribution.
この無力感は
選択が多すぎることに起因しています
09:35
So paralysis is a consequence of having too many choices.
そして世界をこのようにしてしまう
09:39
And I think it makes the world look like this.
(笑) [最後にドレッシングですが フレンチ
ブルーチーズ、 「ランチ」のどれに?]
09:41
(Laughter)
今後無限に影響を及ぼす決断は
正しく下したいですよね?
09:48
You really want to get the decision right if it's for all eternity, right?
間違った投資信託や ましてや
間違ったドレッシングを選びたくはない
09:52
You don't want to pick the wrong mutual fund, or even the wrong salad dressing.
09:55
So that's one effect. The second effect is that
という これが一つの影響です
二つ目の影響は
このような無力感に打ち勝って
決断を下したとしても
09:58
even if we manage to overcome the paralysis and make a choice,
選択肢が少なかった時と比べて
決断の結果に対して
10:03
we end up less satisfied with the result of the choice
得られる満足度は低いということです
10:07
than we would be if we had fewer options to choose from.
これにはいくつかの理由があります
10:10
And there are several reasons for this.
ひとつは
ドレッシングの選択肢がたくさんあると
10:13
One of them is that with a lot of different salad dressings to choose from,
一つ買ってそれが完璧ではなかった時
完璧であった試しがありましたか?
10:17
if you buy one, and it's not perfect -- and, you know, what salad dressing is? --
もっといいものを選べたはずなのに
10:20
it's easy to imagine that you could have made a different choice
と想像することは
いとも たやすいことです
10:23
that would have been better. And what happens is
そこで何が起こるかというと
この取らなかった選択肢が
自分の決断を後悔させることになり
10:27
this imagined alternative induces you to regret the decision you made,
この後悔が下した決断の満足度から
差し引かれていくのです
10:32
and this regret subtracts from the satisfaction you get out of the decision you made,
例えそれがとてもいい決断だったとしても
10:36
even if it was a good decision.
選択肢が増えれば増える程
自分が選んだオプションに対し
10:39
The more options there are, the easier it is to regret anything at all
不満を感じやすいことになります
10:42
that is disappointing about the option that you chose.
二つ目は
経済学者が機会費用と呼ぶものです
10:45
Second, what economists call "opportunity costs."
今朝 ダン・ギルバート氏が
我々の価値判断は
10:48
Dan Gilbert made a big point this morning
比較対象されるものに
影響されると言う点を
10:50
of talking about how much the way in which we value things
その講演の中で語っておられました
10:55
depends on what we compare them to.
多くの選択肢を検討しなくてはならないと
10:57
Well, when there are lots of alternatives to consider,
選ばなかった選択肢の良いところを
11:01
it is easy to imagine the attractive features
想像し 選んだ選択肢に
11:04
of alternatives that you reject,
その分不満を持つ度合いが多くなることは
たやすく想像できます
11:07
that make you less satisfied with the alternative that you've chosen.
ここに一つの例があります
11:12
Here's an example. For those of you who aren't New Yorkers, I apologize.
ニューヨークから来た人には悪いのですが
[85番街の駐車スペースが気になるんだ]
11:16
(Laughter)
このように考えてください
[85番街の駐車スペースが気になるんだ]
11:17
But here's what you're supposed to be thinking.
ここにハンプトンズのカップルがいます
11:19
Here's this couple on the Hamptons.
高価な邸宅に暮らし
11:21
Very expensive real estate.
素晴らしい浜辺で過ごす 素晴らしい日です
全てを手に入れてる
11:23
Gorgeous beach. Beautiful day. They have it all to themselves.
他に何を望むというのでしょう
11:26
What could be better? "Well, damn it,"
この男性は思ってます
「ええい くそっ
11:28
this guy is thinking, "It's August.
今は八月で マンハッタンの隣人達は
みんなどこかに出かけている
11:30
Everybody in my Manhattan neighborhood is away.
だからマンションの目の前の
駐車場が空いているじゃないか」
11:34
I could be parking right in front of my building."
そして2週間 毎日毎日
あの素晴らしい駐車スペースを逃している
11:38
And he spends two weeks nagged by the idea
11:41
that he is missing the opportunity, day after day, to have a great parking space.
という考えに 捕われているのです
機会費用は 我々の選択が
たとえどんなに良いものであっても
11:48
Opportunity costs subtract from the satisfaction we get out of what we choose,
その満足度から
差し引かれていくのです
11:52
even when what we choose is terrific.
だから選択肢が多ければ多いほど
11:55
And the more options there are to consider,
11:57
the more attractive features of these options
またそれらが魅力的であればあるほど
11:59
are going to be reflected by us as opportunity costs.
それらは機会費用として
我々に跳ね返ってくるのです
もう一つの例を挙げましょう
12:03
Here's another example.
この漫画は多くの点を示しています
12:09
Now this cartoon makes a lot of points.
12:11
It makes points about living in the moment as well,
ひとつは 今を生きるという点
また ゆっくりと時間をかけてやるということ
12:15
and probably about doing things slowly.
でも一つあげるとしたら
どれか一つのことを選んだとしたら
12:17
But one point it makes is that whenever you're choosing one thing,
他の事をやらないことを選んだ
ということでもある
12:20
you're choosing not to do other things.
そしてその他のことには
たくさんの魅力的なことがあるかもしれない
12:22
And those other things may have lots of attractive features,
そのことが今自分がやっていることから
魅力を損ねるのです
12:24
and it's going to make what you're doing less attractive.
三つ目は期待値の増大です
12:27
Third: escalation of expectations.
12:29
This hit me when I went to replace my jeans.
これはジーパンを買い換えに行った時に
気がついたのですが
12:32
I wear jeans almost all the time.
私はいつもジーパンを履いてます
12:34
And there was a time when jeans came in one flavor,
以前はジーパンは一種類しかなく
それを購入して
全然体にあってなくて
12:37
and you bought them, and they fit like crap,
12:39
and they were incredibly uncomfortable,
信じられないくらい着心地も悪くて
でも長い事履いて何度も洗うことによって
12:41
and if you wore them long enough and washed them enough times,
なんとなく良くなっていった
12:43
they started to feel OK.
そこで何年も何年も履いていたジーパンを
買い替えるために出かけていって
12:45
So I went to replace my jeans after years and years of wearing these old ones,
12:48
and I said, you know, "I want a pair of jeans. Here's my size."
「ジーパンが欲しい 私のサイズはこれです」
と言いました
すると店員が
12:51
And the shopkeeper said,
12:52
"Do you want slim fit, easy fit, relaxed fit?
「スリムとストレートとリラックスと
どれにしますか?
ボタンフライかジッパーにしますか?
ストーンウォッシュそれともアシッド?
12:55
You want button fly or zipper fly? You want stonewashed or acid-washed?
ダメージ加工のものにしますか?
12:58
Do you want them distressed?
ブーツカットにするかテーパードにするか
それともそれとも」と永遠に続く
13:00
You want boot cut, you want tapered, blah blah blah ..." On and on he went.
私は呆れて何も言えなくなって
しまったのですが ほどなくして
13:03
My jaw dropped, and after I recovered, I said,
「以前一つしかなかったやつと
同じものが欲しい」と言ったのです
13:06
"I want the kind that used to be the only kind."
(笑)
13:09
(Laughter)
彼はそれがどんなものか
見当もつかなかったので
13:14
He had no idea what that was,
私はいろいろのジーパンを
1時間にも渡り試着して
13:16
so I spent an hour trying on all these damn jeans,
13:20
and I walked out of the store -- truth! -- with the best-fitting jeans I had ever had.
正直に言うと今までで最高にフィットした
ジーパンを手に入れてお店を後にしました
これらの多くの選択肢が
私が最高のものを選ぶ事を可能にしました
13:25
I did better. All this choice made it possible for me to do better.
13:29
But I felt worse.
でも気分は最悪でした
何故か?それを自分に説明するために
本を1冊書きました
13:33
Why? I wrote a whole book to try to explain this to myself. (Laughter)
13:37
The reason I felt worse is that,
私の気分が最悪だった理由は
これだけ多くの選択肢が
与えられていることで
13:45
with all of these options available,
私にとっての良いジーパンの
期待値が上がったからです
13:48
my expectations about how good a pair of jeans should be went up.
もともと 選択肢が一つしかなかった時は
全く期待などしていなかったのです
13:54
I had very low --
13:55
I had no particular expectations when they only came in one flavor.
それが100に増えてしまったとたんに、
13:58
When they came in 100 flavors, damn it,
どれかひとつ完璧であるべきだと
14:00
one of them should've been perfect.
そして私が得たものは良いものだったけど
完璧ではない
14:02
And what I got was good, but it wasn't perfect.
そこで期待していたものと
実際のものを比較して
14:04
And so I compared what I got to what I expected,
期待していたものと比べて
満足度の低いものを得たのでした
14:07
and what I got was disappointing in comparison to what I expected.
人々の生活に選択肢を増やすことは
14:10
Adding options to people's lives
それらの選択肢に対する
期待値を増大させることを
14:13
can't help but increase the expectations people have
余儀なくさせてしまいます
14:17
about how good those options will be.
そしてそれは結果がたとえ良くても
その満足度を
14:19
And what that's going to produce is less satisfaction with results,
より少なくするということを生み出します
[どれも素晴らしそう 間違いなくがっかりする]
14:22
even when they're good results.
マーケティング業界は誰もこれを知りません
[どれも素晴らしそう 間違いなくがっかりする]
14:25
Nobody in the world of marketing knows this,
知っていたとしたら
誰もこれが何の事がわからないでしょうから
14:28
because if they did, you wouldn't all know what this was about.
真実とはこのようなものです
14:34
The truth is more like this.
(笑)
[全てがひどかった頃の方が全てが良かった]
14:37
(Laughter)
全てががひどかった頃の方が
全てが良かった理由とは
14:40
The reason that everything was better back when everything was worse
何もかもが良く無かった頃は
14:44
is that when everything was worse,
良い意味での驚きをもたらす体験をすることが
可能だったからです
14:46
it was actually possible for people to have experiences that were a pleasant surprise.
今現在 我々裕福な産業国に住む市民が
この世界で生きている限り
14:51
Nowadays, the world we live in -- we affluent, industrialized citizens,
期待値が完璧を求めている中で
14:55
with perfection the expectation --
望みうる最高のことは
期待通りということなのです
14:57
the best you can ever hope for is that stuff is as good as you expect it to be.
良い意味での驚きというものは
あり得なくなっている
15:01
You will never be pleasantly surprised
それは我々の期待値が
天井知らずになってしまったからなのです
15:03
because your expectations, my expectations, have gone through the roof.
皆さんが今日ここに来た目的
幸せを得る秘密とは
15:07
The secret to happiness -- this is what you all came for --
期待値を低く持つということです
15:10
the secret to happiness is low expectations.
(笑)
15:16
(Laughter)
[頼んだよ]
(拍手)
15:18
(Applause)
ひとつ 個人的な話をします
15:24
I want to say -- just a little autobiographical moment --
私は大変素晴らしい女性を
15:28
that I actually am married to a wife,
妻としています
15:31
and she's really quite wonderful.
これ以上はないというくらい
妥協しませんでした
15:33
I couldn't have done better. I didn't settle.
でも妥協するというのは
必ずしも悪い事ではありません
15:36
But settling isn't always such a bad thing.
最後にきちんとフィットしていない
ジーパンを買う事の 悪影響の一つとして
15:39
Finally, one consequence of buying a bad-fitting pair of jeans
買うものが一種類しかない場合
15:44
when there is only one kind to buy
満足していない理由を考えてみて
15:47
is that when you are dissatisfied, and you ask why,
誰の責任か
答えは明確です
15:49
who's responsible, the answer is clear:
この世の中が悪い
あなたに何ができたでしょう?
15:51
the world is responsible. What could you do?
ジーパンの種類が何百もあるとなって
15:54
When there are hundreds of different styles of jeans available,
満足のいかないものを買ってしまった時
15:57
and you buy one that is disappointing,
誰の責任かと自問自答すると
16:00
and you ask why, who's responsible?
同じように明確に答えは
あなた自身なのです
16:02
It is equally clear that the answer to the question is you.
あなたはもっといいものを選べたはずです
16:07
You could have done better.
何百種類ものジーパンを前にして
16:09
With a hundred different kinds of jeans on display,
失敗は許されません
16:12
there is no excuse for failure.
だから人々が決断を下す時
16:14
And so when people make decisions,
またその決断が
たとえいいものであったとしても
16:16
and even though the results of the decisions are good,
それに満足が得られなかったら
16:19
they feel disappointed about them;
自分自身を責めるのです
16:22
they blame themselves.
ここ数10年で産業国において鬱病が
爆発的に増加しました
16:24
Clinical depression has exploded in the industrial world in the last generation.
私は 鬱病や自殺が爆発的に増えた
大きな要因は
16:28
I believe a significant -- not the only, but a significant -- contributor
―これだけではありませんが―
人々の期待値が高すぎて
16:32
to this explosion of depression, and also suicide,
その結果 経験が不満足なものに
なってしまっているという
16:35
is that people have experiences that are disappointing
ことがあると思っています
16:38
because their standards are so high,
そしてそのような体験を自分自身に
説明しようとする際
16:40
and then when they have to explain these experiences to themselves,
全て 自分の責任だと思ってしまうのです
16:43
they think they're at fault.
すると総体的な結果として 一般的に
客観的には良い事になっているのに
16:45
And so the net result is that we do better in general, objectively,
気持ちは最悪になっています
16:49
and we feel worse.
そこで皆さん覚えていてください
16:52
So let me remind you.
これが皆が自明のこととして信じている
公式教義ですが
16:55
This is the official dogma, the one that we all take to be true,
それはみんな嘘っぱち
真実ではないのです
16:59
and it's all false. It is not true.
全く選択肢がないよりは
多少あった方がいいに決まっています
17:03
There's no question that some choice is better than none,
だからといって選択肢は
多ければ多いほどいいわけではありません
17:07
but it doesn't follow from that that more choice is better than some choice.
私にはわかりませんが
秘密の数値があるのでしょう
17:12
There's some magical amount. I don't know what it is.
私は選択肢の多さが
我々に繁栄をもたらすという地点を
17:15
I'm pretty confident that we have long since passed the point
とっくに通過してしまったと
自信を持って言えます
17:18
where options improve our welfare.
そこで 政策問題として
もう少しで終わりますよ
17:20
Now, as a policy matter -- I'm almost done --
政策問題として考えなくてはならないのは
次の点です
17:23
as a policy matter, the thing to think about is this:
産業社会において選択肢を与えているものは
物質的な豊かさです
17:27
what enables all of this choice in industrial societies is material affluence.
17:34
There are lots of places in the world,
この世の中には
選択肢の多さが問題に
17:36
and we have heard about several of them,
なっているのではないところが
まだ数多くあることを
我々は聞き知っています
17:38
where their problem is not that they have too much choice.
彼等の問題は選択肢が少なすぎることです
17:40
Their problem is that they have too little.
だから私が言っていることは
17:43
So the stuff I'm talking about is the peculiar problem
近代の 豊かな西欧社会独特の問題なのです
17:46
of modern, affluent, Western societies.
そこで非常に不愉快でいらいらさせるのは
次の点です
17:49
And what is so frustrating and infuriating is this:
スティーブ・レヴィットが
昨日皆さんにお話しした
17:53
Steve Levitt talked to you yesterday about how
17:55
these expensive and difficult-to-install child seats don't help. It's a waste of money.
高価で取扱が難しいチャイルドシートが
何の効果もなくお金の無駄だということ
私が言いたいのは
このような高価で難しい選択肢が
18:06
What I'm telling you is that these expensive, complicated choices --
役に立たないだけではない
18:10
it's not simply that they don't help.
実際には危害を加えるのです
18:12
They actually hurt.
我々をより悪い方へと導く事になるのです
18:14
They actually make us worse off.
我々の社会において
多くの選択肢を可能にしているものを
18:17
If some of what enables people in our societies to make all of the choices we make
18:22
were shifted to societies in which people have too few options,
選択肢が少なすぎる社会に
移す事ができたとしたら
選択肢の少なすぎる社会の人たちの
生活が向上するだけでなく
18:27
not only would those people's lives be improved,
18:29
but ours would be improved also.
我々の生活も向上するのです
これが 経済学者が言うところの
パレート改善ということです
18:32
This is what economists call a "Pareto-improving move."
収入の再分配は 貧しい人たちだけでなく
全ての人たちを幸せにします
18:35
Income redistribution will make everyone better off -- not just poor people --
それは多すぎる選択肢の悩みから
解放されるからです
18:40
because of how all this excess choice plagues us.
結論として この漫画を読んだ時
[限界などない ―願ったとおりになれるのだ]
18:44
So to conclude. You're supposed to read this cartoon,
洗練された人は
「この魚が何を知っているのだろう
18:48
and, being a sophisticated person, say,
この金魚鉢の中では
何も可能性などないことを
18:50
"Ah! What does this fish know?
知っているでしょうに」と言うべきなのです
18:52
You know, nothing is possible in this fishbowl."
想像力の欠如 近視眼的な世界観
18:56
Impoverished imagination, a myopic view of the world --
私も初めはそのように解釈していました
18:58
and that's the way I read it at first.
でも色々考えを進めて行くうちに
19:00
The more I thought about it, however,
この魚は何事かを知っているかもしれない
と思うようになりました
19:02
the more I came to the view that this fish knows something.
それは 究極のところ
19:06
Because the truth of the matter is that
可能性を広げるために
金魚鉢を叩き割ってしまったら
19:08
if you shatter the fishbowl so that everything is possible,
得られるのは自由ではなく
無力感だからです
19:13
you don't have freedom. You have paralysis.
可能性を広げるために
金魚鉢を叩き割ってしまったら
19:16
If you shatter this fishbowl so that everything is possible,
満足度を低下させてしまいます
19:19
you decrease satisfaction.
無力感を増大させ
満足度を低下させる
19:23
You increase paralysis, and you decrease satisfaction.
みんなが金魚鉢を必要としています
19:27
Everybody needs a fishbowl.
今あるものはどうしても限界がある
19:29
This one is almost certainly too limited --
我々にとってだけでなく
魚にとってさえも
19:31
perhaps even for the fish, certainly for us.
でも隠喩的な金魚鉢の欠如は
不幸を作るレシピに過ぎません
19:34
But the absence of some metaphorical fishbowl is a recipe for misery,
また 大災害のもとにもなることでしょう
19:38
and, I suspect, disaster.
ありがとうございました
19:41
Thank you very much.
(拍手)
19:43
(Applause)
Translator:Miwa Nakamura
Reviewer:Keisuke Kusunoki

sponsored links

Barry Schwartz - Psychologist
Barry Schwartz studies the link between economics and psychology, offering startling insights into modern life. Lately, working with Ken Sharpe, he's studying wisdom.

Why you should listen

In his 2004 book The Paradox of Choice , Barry Schwartz tackles one of the great mysteries of modern life: Why is it that societies of great abundance — where individuals are offered more freedom and choice (personal, professional, material) than ever before — are now witnessing a near-epidemic of depression? Conventional wisdom tells us that greater choice is for the greater good, but Schwartz argues the opposite: He makes a compelling case that the abundance of choice in today's western world is actually making us miserable.

Infinite choice is paralyzing, Schwartz argues, and exhausting to the human psyche. It leads us to set unreasonably high expectations, question our choices before we even make them and blame our failures entirely on ourselves. His relatable examples, from consumer products (jeans, TVs, salad dressings) to lifestyle choices (where to live, what job to take, who and when to marry), underscore this central point: Too much choice undermines happiness.

Schwartz's previous research has addressed morality, decision-making and the varied inter-relationships between science and society. Before Paradox he published The Costs of Living, which traces the impact of free-market thinking on the explosion of consumerism -- and the effect of the new capitalism on social and cultural institutions that once operated above the market, such as medicine, sports, and the law.

Both books level serious criticism of modern western society, illuminating the under-reported psychological plagues of our time. But they also offer concrete ideas on addressing the problems, from a personal and societal level.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.