sponsored links
Business Innovation Factory

Carne Ross: An independent diplomat

カーン・ロス:独立外交官

October 10, 2009

15年にわたってイギリス外務省に勤務した後、カーン・ロスは”フリーランス外交官”に転身。非営利組織を設立し、国際社会の中で軽視され国家として認識されない小集団に発言権を与えるという挑戦に果敢に挑んでいる。BIF-5の会合で、小国に発言権を与える外交プロセスや移り変わる世界情勢に適応する新しい外交手段、そして革新を迎え入れる新たな外交の形を提案する。

Carne Ross - Diplomat
Carne Ross is the founder of Independent Diplomat, a nonprofit that offers freelance diplomatic representation to small, developing and yet-unrecognized nations in the complex world of international negotiations. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
My story is a little bit about war.
少し紛争に関係した話をします
00:16
It's about disillusionment.
幻滅したことや
00:19
It's about death.
死についての話
00:21
And it's about rediscovering
そして 混沌とした世界で
00:23
idealism
理想主義を
00:25
in all of that wreckage.
再認識することについての話です
00:27
And perhaps also, there's a lesson
教訓についても話すつもりです
00:29
about how to deal with
混乱と分裂の続く
00:31
our screwed-up, fragmenting
物騒な21世紀の世界と
00:33
and dangerous world of the 21st century.
どのように向き合うかについての教訓です
00:36
I don't believe in straightforward narratives.
私は単純で明快な説明を信じません
00:40
I don't believe in a life or history
例えば 人生や歴史を記述する中に
00:43
written as decision "A" led to consequence "B"
決定Aから結果Bが導かれ そこから結果Cが導かれた
00:45
led to consequence "C" --
という説明があっても信じません
00:48
these neat narratives that we're presented with,
我々が期待しているともいえる
00:50
and that perhaps we encourage in each other.
整理され単純化された説明は信じないのです
00:52
I believe in randomness,
信じるのは偶発的なことです
00:55
and one of the reasons I believe that
その理由の一つは
00:57
is because me becoming a diplomat was random.
外交官になった経緯が偶然だったことです
00:59
I'm colorblind.
私は色覚障害で 生まれつき
01:02
I was born unable to see most colors.
ほとんどの色を見分けられません
01:04
This is why I wear gray and black most of the time,
いつも灰色や黒しか身に着けないのは そのせいです
01:06
and I have to take my wife with me
ですから
01:09
to chose clothes.
洋服は 妻に選んでもらわなければなりません
01:11
And I'd always wanted to be a fighter pilot when I was a boy.
幼い頃 ずっと戦闘機のパイロットになりたくて
01:14
I loved watching planes barrel over
田舎の別荘で
01:17
our holiday home in the countryside.
上空を飛ぶ飛行機を見て過ごすのが大好きでした
01:19
And it was my boyhood dream to be a fighter pilot.
戦闘機パイロットになることが少年時代の夢だったのです
01:22
And I did the tests in the Royal Air Force to become a pilot,
英国空軍パイロットの試験を受けましたが
01:25
and sure enough, I failed.
もちろん 落ちました
01:28
I couldn't see all the blinking different lights,
ランプの点滅を見極められず
01:30
and I can't distinguish color.
色も識別できませんでしたから
01:32
So I had to choose another career,
職業を考え直す必要に迫られました
01:34
and this was in fact relatively easy for me,
しかし それは案外簡単なことでした
01:36
because I had an abiding passion all the way through my childhood,
少年時代ずっと熱中していたことがあったからです
01:39
which was international relations.
それは国際関係です
01:42
As a child,
私は
01:44
I read the newspaper thoroughly.
新聞を熟読する子供でした
01:46
I was fascinated by the Cold War,
冷戦や
01:49
by the INF negotiations
中距離核戦力をめぐるINF交渉や
01:51
over intermediate-range nuclear missiles,
アンゴラやアフガニスタンで起きた
01:53
the proxy war between the Soviet Union and the U.S.
米ソ代理戦争などのニュースに
01:56
in Angola or Afghanistan.
夢中になりました
01:59
These things really interested me.
こういったことに強い関心があったので
02:02
And so I decided quite at an early age
幼い頃から
02:05
I wanted to be a diplomat.
外交官になりたいと思っていました
02:07
And I, one day, I announced this to my parents --
ある日 それを両親に伝えようと --
02:09
and my father denies this story to this day --
父親はいまだにこの話を否定しますが
02:12
I said, "Daddy, I want to be a diplomat."
"パパ ぼく外交官になりたい"と言うと
02:14
And he turned to me, and he said,
父親はこう答えました
02:16
"Carne, you have to be very clever to be a diplomat."
"じゃあものすごく賢くならなくちゃね"
02:18
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:20
And my ambition was sealed.
決意を固め
02:22
In 1989,
1989年
02:25
I entered the British Foreign Service.
イギリスの外交官になりました
02:27
That year, 5,000 people applied to become a diplomat,
その年の志願者は5000人で
02:30
and 20 of us succeeded.
合格者はわずか20人でした
02:32
And as those numbers suggest,
この数からも分かるように
02:35
I was inducted into an elite
エリートの集まりです
02:38
and fascinating and exhilarating world.
刺激的で魅惑的な集団に仲間入りしたのです
02:41
Being a diplomat, then and now,
当時も今も 外交官という職業は
02:45
is an incredible job, and I loved every minute of it --
とても素晴らしく 私はその全てを堪能し
02:47
I enjoyed the status of it.
その社会的地位を満喫しました
02:50
I bought myself a nice suit and wore leather-soled shoes
見栄えの良いスーツと革底の靴を身にまとい
02:52
and reveled in
国際情勢と深く関わる自分の地位に
02:55
this amazing access I had to world events.
酔いしれました
02:57
I traveled to the Gaza Strip.
ガザ地区に赴いたり
03:00
I headed the Middle East Peace Process section
イギリス外務省で
03:02
in the British Foreign Ministry.
中東和平プロセスを指揮したり
03:04
I became a speechwriter
イギリスの外務大臣の
03:06
for the British Foreign Secretary.
スピーチライターも務めました
03:08
I met Yasser Arafat.
アラファト議長にも会いました
03:10
I negotiated
国連で
03:12
with Saddam's diplomats at the U.N.
フセイン政権下の外交団と交渉もしました
03:14
Later, I traveled to Kabul
タリバン崩壊後はカブールに赴き
03:17
and served in Afghanistan after the fall of the Taliban.
アフガニスタンでの任務に就きました
03:19
And I would travel
そして
03:22
in a C-130 transport
C-130輸送機に乗りこんで
03:24
and go and visit warlords
山中に潜伏している
03:27
in mountain hideaways
リーダーたちに会いに行きました
03:29
and negotiate with them
彼らとともに アフガニスタンから
03:31
about how we were going to eradicate Al Qaeda from Afghanistan,
アルカイダを根絶する方法について話し合いました
03:33
surrounded by my Special Forces escort,
私たちを 特殊部隊が護衛し
03:36
who, themselves, had to have an escort of a platoon of Royal Marines,
その特殊部隊を 英国海兵隊が護衛していました
03:39
because it was so dangerous.
非常に危険な任務だったからです
03:42
And that was exciting -- that was fun.
刺激的でやりがいがあり
03:44
It was really interesting.
非常に興味深い任務でした
03:47
And it's a great cadre of people,
優れた組織で
03:49
incredibly close-knit community of people.
極めて結束の強い集団でした
03:51
And the pinnacle of my career, as it turned out,
振り返ってみると 外交官としての私のピークは
03:54
was when I was posted to New York.
ニューヨークに配属された頃でした
03:57
I'd already served in Germany, Norway,
それまでにドイツやノルウェーのほか
04:00
various other places,
様々な地域で任務に就きましたが
04:02
but I was posted to New York
ニューヨークでは
04:04
to serve on the U.N. Security Council for the British delegation.
イギリス代表部に属し 国連安保理の仕事を任されました
04:06
And my responsibility was the Middle East,
担当は中東でした
04:09
which was my specialty.
中東は私の専門です
04:11
And there, I dealt with things
そこでは
04:13
like the Middle East peace process,
中東和平プロセスや
04:15
the Lockerbie issue --
ロッカビー問題などに取り組みました
04:17
we can talk about that later, if you wish --
それは別の機会にお話しすることにしましょう
04:19
but above all, my responsibility was Iraq
とりわけその中で
04:22
and its weapons of mass destruction
イラクと大量破壊兵器
04:24
and the sanctions we placed on Iraq
そしてその武装解除を求める
04:26
to oblige it to disarm itself of these weapons.
イギリスの対イラク制裁を担当しました
04:28
I was the chief British negotiator
イギリス側の交渉責任者として
04:32
on the subject,
その任務に
04:34
and I was steeped in the issue.
没頭しました
04:36
And anyway,
とにかく
04:39
my tour -- it was kind of a very exciting time.
大規模で劇的な外交だったという意味で
04:42
I mean it was very dramatic diplomacy.
非常に刺激的な任務でした
04:45
We went through several wars
ニューヨークに配属されていた間に
04:48
during my time in New York.
何度か戦争がありました
04:50
I negotiated for my country
私はイギリスのために
04:53
the resolution in the Security Council
2001年9月12日の
04:55
of the 12th of September 2001
国連安保理決議案をまとめ
04:57
condemning the attacks of the day before,
前日のテロ攻撃を非難しました
04:59
which were, of course, deeply present to us
その当時ニューヨークにいた私たちに
05:02
actually living in New York at the time.
深い衝撃を与えた事件でした
05:04
So it was kind of the best of time, worst of times
ですからニューヨークでの経験は
05:07
kind of experience.
最高とも最悪とも言えるものでした
05:09
I lived the high-life.
ニューヨークでは贅沢に暮らし
05:11
Although I worked very long hours,
長時間勤務とはいえ 家は
05:13
I lived in a penthouse in Union Square.
ユニオン スクエアにあるマンションの最上階でした
05:15
I was a single British diplomat in New York City;
独身イギリス外交官がどんなニューヨーク生活を送るか
05:17
you can imagine what that might have meant.
皆さん大体想像ができますよね?
05:20
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:22
I had a good time.
とても楽しい生活でした
05:25
But in 2002,
しかし2002年
05:27
when my tour came to an end,
任務が終了した後
05:29
I decided I wasn't going to go back
ロンドンには戻らないことに決めました
05:32
to the job that was waiting for me in London.
ロンドンで任務が待っていましたが
05:35
I decided to take a sabbatical,
特別研究休暇をとって
05:37
in fact, at the New School, Bruce.
ニュー スクール大学で過ごすことにしました
05:39
In some inchoate, inarticulate way
曖昧でぼんやりとした感覚でしたが
05:42
I realized that there was something wrong
仕事や自分の何かが
05:45
with my work, with me.
間違っていると感じたのです
05:47
I was exhausted,
疲れ果てていましたし
05:49
and I was also disillusioned
理由ははっきりとしないのですが
05:51
in a way I couldn't quite put my finger on.
幻滅もしていたので
05:53
And I decided to take some time out from work.
少し仕事から離れてみることにしたのです
05:55
The Foreign Office was very generous.
外務省は非常に寛大でした
05:58
You could take these special unpaid leave, as they called them,
外交官の地位を残したまま
06:00
and yet remain part of the diplomatic service, but not actually do any work.
実際の任務に就かずに 特別な無給休暇をとれたのです
06:02
It was nice.
良い待遇でした
06:05
And eventually, I decided
その後しばらくして
06:07
to take a secondment to join the U.N. in Kosovo,
国連コソボミッションへの配属を希望しました
06:09
which was then under U.N. administration.
当時コソボは国連の管理下におかれていました
06:14
And two things happened in Kosovo,
コソボでは二つのことが起きました
06:17
which kind of, again,
これもまた
06:19
shows the randomness of life,
人生の偶発性を示す出来事でした
06:21
because these things turned out to be
なぜならこの二つが
06:23
two of the pivots of my life
私の人生の転換期となったからです
06:25
and helped to deliver me to the next stage.
私の背中を押してくれた出来事です
06:27
But they were random things.
しかしこの二つは別々の出来事です
06:30
One was that, in the summer of 2004,
一つは2004年の夏
06:32
the British government, somewhat reluctantly,
公式調査委員会がやっと設立されて
06:35
decided to have an official inquiry
大量破壊兵器に関する機密情報を
06:37
into the use of intelligence on WMD
イラク戦争の開戦前に
06:39
in the run up to the Iraq War,
イギリス政府がどう使ったか調べると決めた時のことです
06:41
a very limited subject.
非常に制限のかかっていた問題でした
06:44
And I testified to that inquiry in secret.
私は極秘に委員会で証言しました
06:46
I had been steeped in the intelligence on Iraq
私はイラクとその大量破壊兵器の情報に
06:49
and its WMD,
精通していました
06:52
and my testimony to the inquiry said three things:
証言では三つのことを述べました
06:54
that the government exaggerated the intelligence,
まず 政府によって情報が誇張されたこと
06:57
which was very clear in all the years I'd read it.
どの資料をみてもこれは明らかでした
07:00
And indeed, our own internal assessment was very clear
実際 内部調査によってイラクの大量破壊兵器が
07:03
that Iraq's WMD
イラク周辺国はもちろん
07:06
did not pose a threat to its neighbors, let alone to us.
ましてイギリスの脅威となり得ないことは明らかでした
07:08
Secondly, the government had ignored all available alternatives to war,
次に 戦争以外に取り得る選択肢を政府が全て無視したこと
07:11
which in some ways
これは色々な意味で
07:14
was a more discreditable thing still.
より恥ずべき行為だと言えるでしょう
07:16
The third reason, I won't go into.
三つめはご紹介しませんが
07:19
But anyway, I gave that testimony,
とにかく 証言しました
07:21
and that presented me with a crisis.
そして窮地に陥りました
07:23
What was I going to do?
証言することで
07:25
This testimony was deeply critical of my colleagues,
"虚偽に基づく戦争"に賛成だったと思われる
07:27
of my ministers, who had, in my view
同僚や大臣などを
07:30
had perpetrated a war on a falsehood.
酷評する結果となって
07:32
And so I was in crisis.
私は苦境に陥ったのです
07:35
And this wasn't a pretty thing.
良い気分ではありませんでした
07:37
I moaned about it, I hesitated,
不平や不満 戸惑いや躊躇を
07:39
I went on and on and on to my long-suffering wife,
辛抱強い妻に何度も何度も聞かせたあと
07:41
and eventually I decided to resign from the British Foreign Service.
私はイギリス外務省を辞める決意をしました
07:45
I felt -- there's a scene in the Al Pacino movie "The Insider," which you may know,
アル パチーノ主演の映画"インサイダー"の中に次のような場面があります
07:48
where he goes back to CBS
タバコ会社を内部告発した男の件で
07:52
after they've let him down over the tobacco guy,
CBS上層部の対応に失望したアル パチーノが最後に一言
07:54
and he goes, "You know, I just can't do this anymore. Something's broken."
"もうここでは続けられないよ 何かが壊れちまった"
07:57
And it was like that for me. I love that movie.
まさに私の台詞でした 大好きな映画です
08:00
I felt just something's broken.
私の中で何か壊れた気がしました
08:02
I can't actually sit with my foreign minister
外務大臣や首相と笑顔で同席し
08:04
or my prime minister again with a smile on my face
かつては喜んでしてきた任務を
08:06
and do what I used to do gladly for them.
続けられなくなっていたのです
08:08
So took a running leap
思い切り助走をつけて
08:11
and jumped over the edge of a cliff.
断崖から飛び降りる思いでした
08:14
And it was a very, very uncomfortable, unpleasant feeling.
非常に居心地が悪く 気分の良いものではありませんでした
08:17
And I started to fall.
落下を始めた私は
08:21
And today, that fall hasn't stopped;
今でも止まることなく
08:23
I'm still falling.
落ち続けています
08:26
But, in a way, I've got used to the sensation of it.
しかしなんとなくこの感覚に慣れてきました
08:28
And in a way, I kind of like
崖の上に立って
08:31
the sensation of it a lot better
何をすべきか
08:33
than I like actually standing on top of the cliff,
思い悩んでいることを考えれば
08:35
wondering what to do.
ずっとましな感覚です
08:37
A second thing happened in Kosovo,
二つめはコソボで起きました
08:39
which kind of -- I need a quick gulp of water, forgive me.
ちょっと水を飲ませて下さい
08:41
A second thing happened in Kosovo,
二つめはコソボで起きました
08:46
which kind of delivered the answer,
私に答えを教えてくれた出来事です
08:48
which I couldn't really answer,
ずっと答えを出せずにいた
08:50
which is, "What do I do with my life?"
"この先何をして生きていくのか?"という問いの答えです
08:53
I love diplomacy --
私は外交が好きです
08:57
I have no career --
他にキャリアはありませんし
08:59
I expected my entire life to be a diplomat, to be serving my country.
一生外交官としてイギリスのために働くと思っていました
09:01
I wanted to be an ambassador,
大使になることが私の目標でした
09:04
and my mentors, my heroes,
大使は私の師でありヒーローであり
09:06
people who got to the top of my profession,
外交官のトップです
09:08
and here I was throwing it all away.
ここにきて 全て投げ出したのです
09:10
A lot of my friends were still in it.
外務省に残る多くの友人
09:12
My pension was in it.
積み立てた年金
09:14
And I gave it up.
それを全て手放したのです
09:16
And what was I going to do?
では そのあとの話をしましょう
09:18
And that year, in Kosovo,
その年コソボで
09:20
this terrible, terrible thing happened, which I saw.
悲惨な事件が起こり 私はその場に居合わせました
09:22
In March 2004, there were terrible riots
2004年3月
09:25
all over the province -- as it then was -- of Kosovo.
当時のコソボ自治州全域で暴動が起こりました
09:27
18 people were killed.
暴動によって18人が殺され
09:30
It was anarchy.
無政府状態でした
09:32
And it's a very horrible thing to see anarchy,
酷い光景でした
09:34
to know that the police and the military --
多くの軍隊が駐留していましたが
09:36
there were lots of military troops there --
警察や軍隊でさえ
09:38
actually can't stop that rampaging mob
暴動を抑えることが出来ませんでした
09:40
who's coming down the street.
町中を暴れまわる
09:42
And the only way that rampaging mob coming down the street will stop
暴徒を止めることができるものは
09:44
is when they decide to stop
暴徒の意思のみであり
09:47
and when they've had enough burning and killing.
破壊や殺戮に満足するまで続きました
09:49
And that is not a very nice feeling to see, and I saw it.
極めて悲惨な状況を目の当たりにしました
09:51
And I went through it. I went through those mobs.
アルバニア人の友人らと共に説得を試みましたが
09:54
And with my Albanian friends, we tried to stop it, but we failed.
暴徒を抑えることは出来ませんでした
09:57
And that riot taught me something,
この暴動によって
10:00
which isn't immediately obvious and it's kind of a complicated story.
一見しても分からない ある複雑な事実を学びました
10:03
But one of the reasons that riot took place --
数日にわたって
10:06
those riots, which went on for several days, took place --
暴動が繰り返された理由の一つは
10:08
was because the Kosovo people
コソボの人たちが
10:10
were disenfranchised from their own future.
コソボの将来を決める権利を奪われたことにありました
10:12
There were diplomatic negotiations about the future of Kosovo
当時 コソボの将来をめぐって
10:16
going on then,
外交交渉が行われていましたが
10:19
and the Kosovo government, let alone the Kosovo people,
コソボ政府 ましてやコソボの人たちは
10:21
were not actually
その交渉の場に
10:23
participating in those talks.
招かれていませんでした
10:25
There was this whole fancy diplomatic system,
おかしな外交体制で
10:27
this negotiation process about the future of Kosovo,
コソボの将来について話し合う交渉プロセスでありながら
10:30
and the Kosovars weren't part of it.
コソボの人たちは蚊帳の外でした
10:33
And funnily enough, they were frustrated about that.
当然コソボの人たちはそんな現状に不満を抱いていました
10:35
Those riots were part of the manifestation of that frustration.
暴動はその不満の表れでもありました
10:38
It wasn't the only reason,
理由はこれだけではありません
10:41
and life is not simple, one reason narratives.
そんなに単純ではなく
10:43
It was a complicated thing,
理由はもっと複雑です
10:45
and I'm not pretending it was more simple than it was.
事実を単純化するつもりはないのですが
10:47
But that was one of the reasons.
理由の一つではあります
10:49
And that kind of gave me the inspiration --
このとき ふと思いつきました
10:51
or rather to be precise,
正確には
10:53
it gave my wife the inspiration.
妻に言われたのです
10:55
She said, "Why don't you advise the Kosovars?
"どうしてコソボの人たちにアドバイスしないの?"
10:57
Why don't you advise their government on their diplomacy?"
"雇われ外交官としてコソボ政府に外交アドバイスをしたら?"
11:00
And the Kosovars were not allowed a diplomatic service.
コソボには外務省がありませんでした
11:03
They were not allowed diplomats.
外交団の存在が認められず
11:05
They were not allowed a foreign office
外交機関も認められていませんでした
11:07
to help them deal with this immensely complicated process,
"コソボの最終地位決定プロセス"として知られる
11:09
which became known as the Final Status Process of Kosovo.
非常に複雑な外交プロセスを担う組織が存在しませんでした
11:12
And so that was the idea.
そこで思いついた
11:15
That was the origin of the thing that became Independent Diplomat,
雇われ外交官のアイデアが
11:17
the world's first diplomatic advisory group
世界で初めて外交アドバイスを行う非営利組織
11:19
and a non-profit to boot.
"独立外交官"の原点となりました
11:22
And it began when I flew back from London
最初の契約はロンドンから戻った時のことでした
11:24
after my time at the U.N. in Kosovo.
国連コソボミッションを終えた後のことです
11:27
I flew back and had dinner with the Kosovo prime minister and said to him,
夕食に同席したコソボの首相に こう言いました
11:30
"Look, I'm proposing that I come and advise you on the diplomacy.
"外交アドバイスをしますよ 知識も経験もあります"
11:33
I know this stuff. It's what I do. Why don't I come and help you?"
"あなたの国の外交を手伝わせてください"
11:36
And he raised his glass of raki to me and said,
グラスを合わせて首相は答えました
11:39
"Yes, Carne. Come."
"ぜひ君にお願いしよう"
11:41
And I came to Kosovo
こうして コソボ政府の
11:43
and advised the Kosovo government.
外交アドバイザーに就任しました
11:45
Independent Diplomat ended up advising three successive Kosovo prime ministers
3代続けてコソボ首相の外交アドバイザーを務め
11:47
and the multi-party negotiation team of Kosovo.
多国間交渉に参加する交渉団にもアドバイスしました
11:50
And Kosovo became independent.
やがてコソボは独立しました
11:53
Independent Diplomat is now established
"独立外交官"は現在
11:56
in five diplomatic centers around the world,
世界5ヶ所にオフィスを構えて
11:59
and we're advising seven or eight
7か8の国
12:01
different countries, or political groups,
あるいは政治組織とも呼ばれる人たち
12:03
depending on how you wish to define them --
そういった相手に
12:06
and I'm not big on definitions.
外交アドバイスを行っています
12:08
We're advising the Northern Cypriots on how to reunify their island.
顧客はキプロス島の再統合を目指す北キプロスや
12:10
We're advising the Burmese opposition,
ビルマの反対派勢力です
12:13
the government of Southern Sudan,
初耳かもしれませんが
12:15
which -- you heard it here first --
南部スーダン自治政府は
12:17
is going to be a new country within the next few years.
数年のうちに独立国となるでしょう
12:19
We're advising the Polisario Front of the Western Sahara,
西サハラのポリサリオ戦線も私たちの顧客です
12:23
who are fighting to get their country back
彼らは34年間にわたり
12:26
from Moroccan occupation
モロッコを相手に
12:28
after 34 years of dispossession.
民族自決の戦いを続けています
12:30
We're advising various island states in the climate change negotiations,
コペンハーゲンで開催が予定される
12:33
which is suppose to culminate
国連気候変動会議に関して
12:36
in Copenhagen.
小島嶼諸国にもアドバイスしています
12:38
There's a bit of randomness here too
また偶然という話になりますが
12:41
because, when I was beginning Independent Diplomat,
"独立外交官"として駆け出しの頃
12:43
I went to a party in the House of Lords,
上院議員のパーティに
12:45
which is a ridiculous place,
顔を出した時のことでした
12:47
but I was holding my drink like this, and I bumped into
こんなふうにグラスを持ったまま
12:49
this guy who was standing behind me.
後ろにいた男性にぶつかってしまって
12:51
And we started talking, and he said --
その男性と会話が始まり
12:53
I told him what I was doing,
私が何をしているか話しました
12:55
and I told him rather grandly
いささか重々しい口調で
12:57
I was going to establish Independent Diplomat in New York.
ニューヨークで"独立外交官"を始めること
12:59
At that time there was just me --
スタッフは私だけで
13:01
and me and my wife were moving back to New York.
妻とニューヨークへ戻ることを話すと
13:03
And he said, "Why don't you see my colleagues in New York?"
ニューヨークにいる同僚に会うよう勧められました
13:05
And it turned out
実は 革新を提供する会社
13:08
he worked for an innovation company called ?What If!,
"?What If!"の社員だったのです
13:10
which some of you have probably heard of.
社名はご存知かもしれませんね
13:12
And one thing led to another,
その後いろんな事が重なり
13:14
and I ended up having a desk
"独立外交官"を始動させた頃
13:16
in ?What If! in New York,
ニューヨークで"?What If!"に
13:18
when I started Independent Diplomat.
籍を置くことになりました
13:20
And watching ?What If!
"?What If!"で
13:22
develop new flavors of chewing gum for Wrigley
チューイングガムやコーラの
13:24
or new flavors for Coke
新しい風味を開発するのを見ることが
13:26
actually helped me innovate
コソボの人たちや
13:28
new strategies for the Kosovars
西サハラのサハラウィのために
13:30
and for the Saharawis of the Western Sahara.
新しい戦略を編み出すのにとても役に立ちました
13:32
And I began to realize that there are different ways of doing diplomacy --
外交の方法は一つではないことに気づき始めました
13:35
that diplomacy, like business,
外交とはつまりビジネスのように
13:38
is a business of solving problems,
問題を解決するという事業なのです
13:40
and yet the word innovation doesn't exist in diplomacy;
しかし従来の外交には"革新"という言葉が存在しません
13:42
it's all zero sum games and realpolitik
ゼロ サムゲームやリアルポリティック(現実的政治)であり
13:45
and ancient institutions that have been there for generations
脈々と受け継がれた古臭い慣例に他なりません
13:48
and do things the same way they've always done things.
そんな伝統を守っているのが今の外交の姿なのです
13:51
And Independent Diplomat, today,
"独立外交官"は現在
13:54
tries to incorporate some of the things I learned at ?What If!.
"?What If!"から学んだことを取り入れようとしています
13:56
We all sit in one office and shout at each other across the office.
全員が一室に集まることで あちこちで議論が起こり
13:59
We all work on little laptops and try to move desks to change the way we think.
発想の転換を図るためノートパソコンを手に席を移動します
14:02
And we use naive experts
また顧客に関する知識を持たない
14:05
who may know nothing about the countries we're dealing with,
別分野の専門家を起用して
14:07
but may know something about something else
私たちが取り組む問題に
14:10
to try to inject new thinking
斬新な考えを
14:12
into the problems
取り入れるようにしています
14:14
that we try to address for our clients.
当然ながら私たちの顧客は
14:16
It's not easy, because our clients, by definition,
国際社会で困難な立場にあるため
14:18
are having a difficult time, diplomatically.
仕事は簡単ではありません
14:20
There are, I don't know,
そうしたなかで
14:25
some lessons from all of this,
いくつか教訓を得ました
14:27
personal and political --
個人的なものと政治的なものですが
14:30
and in a way, they're the same thing.
ある意味でこの二つは同じものです
14:32
The personal one
個人的な教訓は
14:35
is falling off a cliff
崖から飛び降りるような経験が
14:37
is actually a good thing, and I recommend it.
実は良いことだということです ぜひお勧めします
14:39
And it's a good thing to do at least once in your life
少なくとも人生の中で一度くらい
14:43
just to tear everything up and jump.
全てをめちゃくちゃにして飛び降りるのも良いものです
14:45
The second thing is a bigger lesson about the world today.
もう一つは今日の世界に関するもっと大きな教訓です
14:49
Independent Diplomat is part of a trend
"独立外交官"は世界に広がる
14:52
which is emerging and evident across the world,
新たな動向の一部だといえます
14:55
which is that the world is fragmenting.
世界はますます分裂が進み
14:58
States mean less than they used to,
国家はかつてほど重要性を持たなくなりました
15:01
and the power of the state is declining.
国家権力は減退しつつあります
15:04
That means the power of others things is rising.
国家以外の勢力が増大しているのです
15:06
Those other things are called non-state actors.
非国家主体と呼ばれ
15:08
They may be corporations,
企業や
15:10
they may be mafiosi, they may be nice NGOs,
マフィア集団 善良なNGOなど
15:12
they may anything,
その形態は
15:15
any number of things.
いくらでもあります
15:17
We are living in a more complicated and fragmented world.
以前よりも複雑で分化した世界に私たちは生きています
15:19
If governments are less able
私たちに影響が及ぶ問題に対し
15:22
to affect the problems
政府の介入能力が
15:24
that affect us in the world,
減退しているのであれば
15:26
then that means, who is left to deal with them,
代わりにその問題に対応してくれる人
15:29
who has to take greater responsibility to deal with them?
責任を負うべき人は誰か?
15:32
Us.
それは私たちです
15:34
If they can't do it, who's left to deal with it?
政府の代わりに行動を起こすのは私たちなのです
15:36
We have no choice but to embrace that reality.
私たちはこの現実を受け入れなければなりません
15:39
What this means is
それは
15:42
it's no longer good enough
国際関係や国際問題
15:44
to say that international relations, or global affairs,
あるいはソマリアの混乱
15:47
or chaos in Somalia,
ビルマで起きていることなどを
15:50
or what's going on in Burma is none of your business,
自分と無関係だから政府にまかせておけば良い
15:52
and that you can leave it to governments to get on with.
とは言えなくなったことを意味します
15:55
I can connect any one of you
ここにいる皆さん一人一人を
15:58
by six degrees of separation
いわゆる"六次の隔たり"で
16:00
to the Al-Shabaab militia in Somalia.
ソマリアのアルシャバブ市民軍に結びつけられます
16:02
Ask me how later, particularly if you eat fish, interestingly enough,
詳細は省きますが 興味深いことに 口にしている魚が 皆さんを
16:05
but that connection is there.
ソマリアの市民軍に結びつけるのです
16:09
We are all intimately connected.
私たちは密接に結びついています
16:11
And this isn't just Tom Friedman,
トム フリードマンの論にとどまらず
16:13
it's actually provable in case after case after case.
実際にどんなケースにもあてはまります
16:15
What that means is, instead of asking your politicians to do things,
政治家に頼らず
16:18
you have to look to yourself to do things.
自分で行動を起こす必要があるということなのです
16:21
And Independent Diplomat is a kind of example of this
このような例を具体化したものが
16:24
in a sort of loose way.
"独立外交官"だと言えるでしょう
16:26
There aren't neat examples, but one example is this:
一つ例をあげてみましょう
16:28
the way the world is changing
世界が移り変わる様相は
16:31
is embodied in what's going on at the place I used to work --
国連安保理の活動からも
16:33
the U.N. Security Council.
見て取れます
16:35
The U.N. was established in 1945.
国際連合は1945年に発足しました
16:37
Its charter is basically designed
国連憲章は加盟国間 つまり --
16:40
to stop conflicts between states --
国と国との紛争を解決するために
16:42
interstate conflict.
定められたものです
16:44
Today, 80 percent of the agenda
今日の国連安保理では
16:46
of the U.N. Security Council
議題の8割が
16:48
is about conflicts within states,
内紛に関するものです
16:50
involving non-state parties --
非国家集団
16:52
guerillas, separatists,
ゲリラや分離主義者
16:54
terrorists, if you want to call them that,
テロリストが関与しています
16:56
people who are not normal governments, who are not normal states.
彼らは従来の政府や国家主体の集団ではありません
16:58
That is the state of the world today.
これが今日の世界情勢なのです
17:01
When I realized this,
この事実を理解し
17:04
and when I look back on my time at the Security Council
国連安保理で行われていたことや
17:06
and what happened with the Kosovars,
コソボの状況を思い返して
17:09
and I realize that often
私は気が付きました
17:11
the people who were most directly affected
国連安保理の活動から
17:13
by what we were doing in the Security Council
最も大きな影響を受ける人たちが
17:15
weren't actually there, weren't actually invited
話し合いに招かれず
17:17
to give their views to the Security Council,
発言権を与えられていないのです
17:19
I thought, this is wrong.
これは間違っていると思いました
17:21
Something's got to be done about this.
どうにかしなければと思いました
17:23
So I started off in a traditional mode.
まずは一般的なやり方から始めようと
17:25
Me and my colleagues at Independent Diplomat
"独立外交官"のスタッフらと共に
17:28
went around the U.N. Security Council.
国連安保理や
17:30
We went around 70 U.N. member states --
カザフスタン エチオピア イスラエルなど
17:32
the Kazaks, the Ethiopians, the Israelis --
70近い国連加盟国を訪問して
17:34
you name them, we went to see them --
国連事務総長や多くの関係者に
17:36
the secretary general, all of them,
こう言いました
17:38
and said, "This is all wrong.
"実際に影響を受ける人から"
17:40
This is terrible that you don't consult these people who are actually affected.
"意見を聞かないのは間違いです"
17:42
You've got to institutionalize a system
"コソボの人たちの参加できる体制が"
17:44
where you actually invite the Kosovars
"必要なのです そうすれば"
17:46
to come and tell you what they think.
"相手の考えを聞くだけでなく"
17:48
This will allow you to tell me -- you can tell them what you think.
"あなた方の考えも伝えられます"
17:50
It'll be great. You can have an exchange.
"つまり意見の交換です"
17:52
You can actually incorporate these people's views into your decisions,
"相手の考えを取り入れれば あなた方の決定が もっと"
17:54
which means your decisions will be more effective and durable."
"効果的で永続的なものになるのです"
17:57
Super-logical, you would think.
正論です
18:02
I mean, incredibly logical. So obvious, anybody could get it.
非常に道理にかなっています
18:04
And of course, everybody got it. Everybody went, "Yes, of course, you're absolutely right.
もちろん全員が納得して こう言いました
18:06
Come back to us
"おっしゃるとおりです"
18:09
in maybe six months."
"6ヶ月後に また連絡ください"
18:11
And of course, nothing happened -- nobody did anything.
もちろん何も起きませんでした 誰も何もしなかったのです
18:13
The Security Council does its business
国連安保理は 今でも
18:16
in exactly the same way today
ずっと昔と同じやり方で
18:18
that it did X number of years ago,
任務を遂行しています
18:20
when I was there 10 years ago.
私が10年前に働いていた頃と何も変わっていません
18:23
So we looked at that observation
この働きかけは
18:26
of basically failure
失敗に終わったので
18:28
and thought, what can we do about it.
他の方法を考えることにしました
18:30
And I thought, I'm buggered
こんなことを思っていました
18:32
if I'm going to spend the rest of my life
"希望どおり動いてもらうために"
18:34
lobbying for these crummy governments
"あんな政府を相手にしていたら"
18:36
to do what needs to be done.
"残りの人生が台無しだ"
18:38
So what we're going to do
そこで私たちは
18:40
is we're actually going to set up these meetings ourselves.
会議を設定することを思いつきました
18:42
So now, Independent Diplomat
"独立外交官"は現在
18:44
is in the process of setting up meetings
国連安保理の議題にのった紛争の
18:46
between the U.N. Security Council
当事者と
18:48
and the parties to the disputes
国連安保理との会議を
18:50
that are on the agenda of the Security Council.
準備しています
18:52
So we will be bringing
今後
18:55
Darfuri rebel groups,
ダルフールの反乱グループや
18:57
the Northern Cypriots and the Southern Cypriots,
南北キプロス
19:00
rebels from Aceh,
アチェの反体制派など
19:04
and awful long laundry list
混乱状態にある
19:07
of chaotic conflicts around the world.
山ほどある紛争の当事者に参加してもらいます
19:09
And we will be trying to bring the parties to New York
また彼らをニューヨークに招き
19:12
to sit down in a quiet room
静かな一室に座り
19:15
in a private setting with no press
報道陣のいない非公式の設定で
19:17
and actually explain what they want
当事者と安全保障理事国が
19:19
to the members of the U. N. Security Council,
双方の利害に関して
19:21
and for the members of the U.N. Security Council
お互いの意見を交換する場を
19:23
to explain to them what they want.
設けます
19:25
So there's actually a conversation,
これは対話の場です
19:27
which has never before happened.
初めて実現したのです
19:29
And of course, describing all this,
政治についてよく知っている人たちは
19:31
any of you who know politics will think this is incredibly difficult,
それは途方もなく困難だと思うでしょう
19:34
and I entirely agree with you.
私もその考えに同感です
19:37
The chances of failure are very high,
失敗する可能性はかなり高いでしょうが
19:39
but it certainly won't happen
失敗を恐れて何もしなければ
19:42
if we don't try to make it happen.
成功の可能性など無いのです
19:44
And my politics has changed fundamentally
外交官だった時と比べて
19:47
from when I was a diplomat to what I am today,
私の戦略は根本から変わりました
19:50
and I think that outputs is what matters, not process,
肝心なのは結果だと思っています 率直に言って
19:52
not technology, frankly, so much either.
プロセスもテクノロジーもさほど重要ではありません
19:55
Preach technology
デモのツールとして
19:58
to all the Twittering members of all the Iranian demonstrations
ツイッターを駆使するイランの示威運動者にテクノロジーを説いても
20:00
who are now in political prison in Tehran,
彼らを政治犯として拘束するイラン政府は
20:03
where Ahmadinejad remains in power.
アハマディネジャドが握ったままです
20:06
Technology has not delivered political change in Iran.
テクノロジーはイランに政治改革をもたらしてはいません
20:08
You've got to look at the outputs, and you got to say to yourself,
結果を見定めて自分に問いかけなければなりません
20:12
"What can I do to produce that particular output?"
"結果に向け 自分にできることは?"
20:15
That is the politics of the 21st century,
これが21世紀の政治です
20:17
and in a way, Independent Diplomat
ある意味 "独立外交官"は
20:20
embodies that fragmentation, that change,
誰にでも関係のある 分裂や変化というものを
20:22
that is happening to all of us.
包括的に扱っていく手段なのです
20:25
That's my story. Thanks.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
20:29
Translator:yuki momma
Reviewer:Satoshi Tatsuhara

sponsored links

Carne Ross - Diplomat
Carne Ross is the founder of Independent Diplomat, a nonprofit that offers freelance diplomatic representation to small, developing and yet-unrecognized nations in the complex world of international negotiations.

Why you should listen

Carne Ross was a member of the British diplomat corps for a decade and a half -- until a crisis of faith in the system drove him to go freelance. With his nonprofit, Independent Diplomat, he and a team advise small and developing nations without a diplomatic corps, as well as unrecognized nations that would otherwise lack a voice in negotiations on their own futures. His group helped advise the Kosovars in their quest for recognition as a nation, and with Croatia on its application to join the EU. They're now working with Southern Sudan as it approaches a vote to separate (a vote that, on Sept. 8, 2010, US Secretary of State Clinton called "inevitable").

As Ross said to Time magazine, when it profiled him in a 2008 story called "Innovators/Peacemakers": "Our work is based on the belief that everybody has a right to some say in the resolution of their issues." He's the author of the 2007 book Independent Diplomat: Dispatches from an Unaccountable Elite.

Read BIF's in-depth interview and feature on Carne Ross , by Christine Flanagan >>

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.