sponsored links
Mission Blue Voyage

Rob Dunbar: Discovering ancient climates in oceans and ice

ロブ・ダンバー: 海洋と氷に古代の気候を見る

April 15, 2010

ロブ・ダンバーは、古代の海底や、サンゴそして氷棚の中に蓄積されたものを手がかりに、1万2000年もの昔からの地球の気候に関するデータを追い求める。彼の研究は、現在の気候変動を修正するための基準設定に、そして海洋生物に致命的となる海洋酸性化の追跡に不可欠なものなのだ。

Rob Dunbar - Oceanographer, biogeochemist
Rob Dunbar looks deeply at ancient corals and sediments to study how the climate and the oceans have shifted over the past 50 to 12,000 years -- and how the Antarctic ecosystem is changing right now. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
00:15
If you really want to understand
いま直面している海の問題について
本当に理解しようとするなら
00:18
the problem that we're facing with the oceans,
生物学だけでなく
00:21
you have to think about the biology
物理学についても考察しなければいけません
00:23
at the same time you think about the physics.
問題を解決するには
00:26
We can't solve the problems
海洋について もっと学際的な方法で
00:28
unless we start studying the ocean
研究を始めなければなりません
00:30
in a very much more interdisciplinary way.
今日はその例を説明してみましょう
00:33
So I'm going to demonstrate that through
取り上げるのは 海洋での
気候変動についての議論です
00:35
discussion of some of the climate change things that are going on in the ocean.
海水面の上昇
00:38
We'll look at sea level rise.
海洋の温暖化
00:40
We'll look at ocean warming.
そして海洋の酸性化
00:42
And then the last thing on the list there, ocean acidification --
もし「何が一番心配ですか?」
00:45
if you were to ask me, you know, "What do you worry about the most?
「一番恐れているのは?」と聞かれたら
00:48
What frightens you?"
私は 海洋の酸性化と答えます
00:50
for me, it's ocean acidification.
つい最近になって注目され始めました
00:52
And this has come onto the stage pretty recently.
後で説明しましょう
00:54
So I will spend a little time at the end.
私は 12月にコペンハーゲンに居ました
00:57
I was in Copenhagen in December
ここにも 居た方がいるでしょう
00:59
like a number of you in this room.
その時に 皆さん気づいたと思うのですが
01:01
And I think we all found it, simultaneously,
目を見開くような
01:04
an eye-opening
かつ非常に苛立たしい経験でした
01:06
and a very frustrating experience.
この大きな交渉の会場で
01:08
I sat in this large negotiation hall,
3時間も4時間も
01:11
at one point, for three or four hours,
”海洋”の一言を聞かないことがあるなんて
01:13
without hearing the word "oceans" one time.
表に出てこないんです
01:17
It really wasn't on the radar screen.
そこに集まった各国リーダー達の
01:20
The nations that brought it up
スピーチの時間がありました
01:22
when we had the speeches of the national leaders --
島嶼国や海抜の低い国々のリーダーが
01:24
it tended to be the leaders of the small island states,
行う予定でしたが
01:27
the low-lying island states.
実に奇妙なアルファベット順の
01:29
And by this weird quirk
めぐり合わせのおかげで
01:31
of alphabetical order of the nations,
キリバスやナウルのよう
01:34
a lot of the low-lying states,
たくさんの低海抜国が
01:36
like Kiribati and Nauru,
おそろしく長い列の
最後に位置していたのです
01:38
they were seated at the very end of these immensely long rows.
交渉の場で隅に
01:41
You know, they were marginalized
追いやられていたのです
01:43
in the negotiation room.
問題の1つに
01:45
One of the problems
適正な目標設定が挙げられます
01:47
is coming up with the right target.
目標値がはっきりしないし
01:49
It's not clear what the target should be.
定め方もはっきりしません
01:51
And how can you figure out how to fix something
はっきりとした目標がない?
01:53
if you don't have a clear target?
「2度」という言葉を聞いたことがあるでしょう
01:55
Now, you've heard about "two degrees":
気温の上昇を2度以内に収めるべきだと
01:57
that we should limit temperature rise to no more than two degrees.
しかにその数字の科学的裏付けは少ない
02:00
But there's not a lot of science behind that number.
ほかにも
02:03
We've also talked about
大気中の二酸化炭素濃度
02:05
concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.
450にすべき? 400?
02:07
Should it be 450? Should it be 400?
これも科学的裏付けはあまりない
02:10
There's not a lot of science behind that one either.
こういうふうに掲げられた目標数値の
02:13
Most of the science that is behind these numbers,
科学的裏付けは
02:15
these potential targets,
地上での研究に基づいています
02:17
is based on studies on land.
私に言わせれば 海洋関係者が
02:19
And I would say, for the people that work in the ocean
目標を定めるなら
02:22
and think about what the targets should be,
もっと低いものにすべきと主張するでしょう
02:24
we would argue that they must be much lower.
海洋の見地からすると
02:26
You know, from an oceanic perspective,
450は高過ぎる
02:28
450 is way too high.
説得力のある証拠によれば
02:30
Now there's compelling evidence
350とするべきなのです
02:32
that it really needs to be 350.
現在の大気中の二酸化炭素濃度は
02:34
We are, right now, at 390 parts per million
390ppmとなっていますが
02:37
of CO2 in the atmosphere.
450で止まるよう手を打っているのではダメなんです
02:39
We're not going to put the brakes on in time to stop at 450,
(濃度が)超過するということを受けとめ
02:42
so we've got to accept we're going to do an overshoot,
その上で議論の焦点は
02:45
and the discussion as we go forward
どれだけ超過するのかと
02:47
has to focus on how far the overshoot goes
350に戻す方法を議論すべきです
02:50
and what's the pathway back to 350.
なぜこんなに難しいことに?
02:53
Now, why is this so complicated?
なぜ よく分かってないのでしょう?
02:55
Why don't we know some of these things a little bit better?
問題は
02:57
Well, the problem is that
気候システムには複雑な
要因がからまっている事です
02:59
we've got very complicated forces in the climate system.
気候変動には様々な
自然要因が関係しています
03:01
There's all kinds of natural causes of climate change.
大気と海の相互作用があります
03:04
There's air-sea interactions.
ガラパゴスでは
03:06
Here in Galapagos,
エル・ニーニョとラ・ニーニャの影響が
03:08
we're affected by El Ninos and La Nina.
しかし大規模なエル・ニーニョは
地球全体を温めます
03:10
But the entire planet warms up when there's a big El Nino.
噴火で煙霧質(エアロゾル)が放散されれば
03:13
Volcanoes eject aerosols into the atmosphere.
それも気候を変えます
03:16
That changes our climate.
海洋は地球上の交換可能な
熱量の大半を蓄えています
03:18
The ocean contains most of the exchangeable heat on the planet.
なので 表層と深層の海水の
03:21
So anything that influences
混じり方に影響するものはなんでも
03:23
how ocean surface waters mix with the deep water
地球上の海洋を変化させます
03:26
changes the ocean of the planet.
太陽の活動量が一定でないことも
分かっています
03:28
And we know the solar output's not constant through time.
これらが気候変動の自然要因です
03:31
So those are all natural causes of climate change.
気候変動の人為的な要因もあります
03:34
And then we have the human-induced causes
03:36
of climate change as well.
私たちは土地表面の
特性を変化させています
03:38
We're changing the characteristics of the surface of the land,
反射率です
03:40
the reflectivity.
大気に人工の煙霧質も
放散しています
03:42
We inject our own aerosols into the atmosphere,
微量ガスの問題もあります
二酸化炭素の他に
03:44
and we have trace gases, and not just carbon dioxide --
メタン オゾン
03:47
it's methane, ozone,
二酸化硫黄 そして窒素
03:49
oxides of sulfur and nitrogen.
ここで問題です 簡単な質問です
03:51
So here's the thing. It sounds like a simple question.
人間の活動で生産されたCO2は
03:53
Is CO2 produced by man's activities
地球温暖化を起こしているか?
03:56
causing the planet to warm up?
これに答えるには
03:58
But to answer that question,
何がCO2に起因しているか明確にし
04:00
to make a clear attribution to carbon dioxide,
そのほかすべての原因について
04:03
you have to know something about
知らなければなりません
04:05
all of these other agents of change.
多くのことはわかっているのです
04:07
But the fact is we do know a lot about all of those things.
数多くの科学者が
04:10
You know, thousands of scientists
研究してきました
04:12
have been working on understanding
すべての人為的要因と
04:14
all of these man-made causes
自然要因を理解するために
04:16
and the natural causes.
そこで ようやくこう言えるのです
04:18
And we've got it worked out, and we can say,
「そう CO2が温暖化させている」と
04:21
"Yes, CO2 is causing the planet to warm up now."
自然の変動性を調べる
方法はたくさんあります
04:25
Now, we have many ways to study natural variability.
いくつか例をお見せしましょう
04:28
I'll show you a few examples of this now.
この船で 南極で3カ月過ごしました
04:30
This is the ship that I spent the last three months on in the Antarctic.
科学用の掘削船です
04:33
It's a scientific drilling vessel.
1回の海底掘削に
何カ月もかかります
04:36
We go out for months at a time and drill into the sea bed
気候変動を語る
04:39
to recover sediments
堆積物を取り出すためにです
04:41
that tell us stories of climate change, right.
温室効果の行方を理解するために
04:44
Like one of the ways to understand our greenhouse future
掘り下げて時間を遡ったのです
04:47
is to drill down in time
CO2量が今の2倍あった
04:49
to the last period
過去の時代まで
04:51
where we had CO2 double what it is today.
それがこの船で行われたのです
04:53
And so that's what we've done with this ship.
南極線より極地寄りですが
04:55
This was -- this is south of the Antarctic Circle.
熱帯に見えるでしょう
04:58
It looks downright tropical there.
1日だけ 海も日差しも
穏やかな日があって
05:00
One day where we had calm seas and sun,
なので下船できたんですが
05:03
which was the reason I could get off the ship.
大抵はこんなです
05:05
Most of the time it looked like this.
15mほどの波や
05:07
We had a waves up to 50 ft.
平均風速20mもの
05:10
and winds averaging
風に見舞われました
05:12
about 40 knots for most of the voyage
風速35〜40mになることも
05:14
and up to 70 or 80 knots.
旅は終わったばかりで
05:16
So that trip just ended,
まだ 沢山の成果は
お見せできませんが
05:18
and I can't show you too many results from that right now,
もう1年ここに行って
05:20
but we'll go back one more year,
別の採掘探査に参加します
05:22
to another drilling expedition I've been involved in.
これはロス・パウウェルと
ティム・ネイシュ率いる
05:25
This was led by Ross Powell and Tim Naish.
ANDRILLプロジェクト
05:28
It's the ANDRILL project.
地球上で最大の浮き氷棚に
05:30
And we made the very first bore hole
一番最初の掘削孔を掘りました
05:32
through the largest floating ice shelf on the planet.
本当に大変でした 
ドリル装置は保温のため
05:34
This is a crazy thing, this big drill rig wrapped in a blanket
毛布にくるまれ
05:37
to keep everybody warm,
-40℃の中で掘削します
05:39
drilling at temperatures of minus 40.
ロス海で行いましたが
05:41
And we drilled in the Ross Sea.
右手がロス海氷棚です
05:43
That's the Ross Sea Ice Shelf on the right there.
この巨大な浮き氷棚は
05:46
So, this huge floating ice shelf
アラスカほどのサイズで
05:48
the size of Alaska
西南極からのものです
05:50
comes from West Antarctica.
西南極は大陸の一部で
05:52
Now, West Antarctica is the part of the continent
2000mほどの深さで
05:55
where the ice is grounded on sea floor
氷は海底と接地しています
05:57
as much as 2,000 meters deep.
一部は浮いていて
06:00
So that ice sheet is partly floating,
海の熱にさらされているのです
06:02
and it's exposed to the ocean, to the ocean heat.
このことが心配の種なのです
06:06
This is the part of Antarctica that we worry about.
一部が浮いているので
06:08
Because it's partly floating, you can imagine,
海面が少しでも上昇すると
06:10
is sea level rises a little bit,
氷が海底から浮き 割れて北に流れます
06:12
the ice lifts off the bed, and then it can break off and float north.
氷が溶けると海面は6m上昇します
06:15
When that ice melts, sea level rises by six meters.
それが起こった回数と 氷が溶ける
06:19
So we drill back in time to see how often that's happened,
正確な早さを知るため掘削しています
06:22
and exactly how fast that ice can melt.
左が掘削の図です
06:25
Here's the cartoon on the left there.
浮き氷棚を100m掘り
06:28
We drilled through a hundred meters of floating ice shelf
海水を900m進み
06:31
then through 900 meters of water
海底を1300m掘りました
06:33
and then 1,300 meters into the sea floor.
今までで一番深い
地質調査用掘削孔です
06:36
So it's the deepest geological bore hole ever drilled.
このプロジェクトに10年かかりました
06:39
It took about 10 years to put this project together.
これが発見したものです
06:42
And here's what we found.
今や40人もの科学者が参加しています
06:44
Now, there's 40 scientists working on this project,
極めて複雑で高コストの分析を
06:46
and people are doing all kinds of really complicated
行っていますが
06:48
and expensive analyses.
一番よく説明できたのは
06:51
But it turns out, you know, the thing that told the best story
このシンプルな写真なのです
06:54
was this simple visual description.
上がってきたボーリングコアを見て
06:56
You know, we saw this in the core samples as they came up.
このように堆積物が
交互になっているとわかりました
06:59
We saw these alternations
07:01
between sediments that look like this --
まず砂利ともう少し大きい石
07:03
there's gravel and cobbles in there
それに砂もありますね
07:05
and a bunch of sand.
これは深海にある物質で
07:07
That's the kind of material in the deep sea.
氷に運ばれたからあるのです
07:09
It can only get there if it's carried out by ice.
上に氷棚があるのはわかっています
07:12
So we know there's an ice shelf overhead.
そしてこの堆積物と交互になっています
07:14
And that alternates with a sediment that looks like this.
本当に美しい
07:17
This is absolutely beautiful stuff.
この堆積物は100%
07:19
This sediment is 100 percent made up
植物プランクトンの
殻でできています
07:21
of the shells of microscopic plants.
これらの生物は日光が必要です
07:24
And these plants need sunlight,
なので 頭上に氷がなかった時の
07:26
so we know when we find that sediment
堆積物だとわかります
07:28
there's no ice overhead.
氷で覆われた時とない時
07:30
And we saw about 35 alternations
つまり砂利とプランクトンの堆積が
07:32
between open water and ice-covered water,
35層になっているのを発見しました
07:35
between gravels and these plant sediments.
それが何を意味するかというと
07:38
So what that means is, what it tells us
ロス海域では この氷棚が
07:41
is that the Ross Sea region, this ice shelf,
溶けては再生するのを
07:44
melted back and formed anew
約35回繰り返したのです
07:46
about 35 times.
この400万年間でです
07:48
And this is in the past four million years.
これはまったく驚きでした
07:52
This was completely unexpected.
西南極氷床がこんなにダイナミックな
07:54
Nobody imagined that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet
変化をしていたとは
07:56
was this dynamic.
何年間も一般的な学識は
07:58
In fact, the lore for many years has been,
「氷は何千万年もの昔にできて
08:01
"The ice formed many tens of millions of years ago,
ずっとそこにあった」
08:03
and it's been there ever since."
今や 近年でも溶けて再生したと
08:05
And now we know that in our recent past
わかりました
08:07
it melted back and formed again,
海水面も6m上下しました
08:09
and sea level went up and down, six meters at a time.
何故なのでしょう?
08:12
What caused it?
地球の軌道の自然変化による
08:14
Well, we're pretty sure that it's very small changes
南極に届く日光量の
08:16
in the amount of sunlight reaching Antarctica,
わずかな変化のせいだろうと確証していますが
08:19
just caused by natural changes in the orbit of the Earth.
しかし 肝心なことがあります
08:22
But here's the key thing:
もう1つわかっているのは
08:24
you know, the other thing we found out
氷床が閾値を超えると
08:26
is that the ice sheet passed a threshold,
つまり 地球が温暖化し
08:28
that the planet warmed up enough --
1〜1.5℃ほど温度が上昇すると
08:30
and the number's about one degree to one and a half degrees Centigrade --
氷床が非常に変動しやすい状態になり
08:32
the planet warmed up enough that it became ...
氷床が非常に変動しやすい状態になり
08:35
that ice sheet became very dynamic
非常に溶けやすくなります
08:37
and was very easily melted.
それで?
08:39
And you know what?
実は 人間は20世紀にまさにその閾値分
気温を変化させました
08:41
We've actually changed the temperature in the last century
08:43
just the right amount.
西南極氷床が溶け始めるだろうと
08:45
So many of us are convinced now
多くの人が確信しています
08:48
that West Antarctica, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is starting to melt.
海水面上昇を予想しています
08:51
We do expect to see a sea-level rise
この世紀末までに1〜2mになるでしょう
08:54
on the order of one to two meters by the end of this century.
それより大きい可能性もあります
08:57
And it could be larger than that.
キリバスなどの国には
09:00
This is a serious consequence
深刻な結果です
09:02
for nations like Kiribati,
国土が平均して海面から1mほどなのです
09:04
you know, where the average elevation
09:06
is about a little over a meter above sea level.
09:08
Okay, the second story takes place here in Galapagos.
では 2つめの話はガラパゴス
これは白化したサンゴです
09:11
This is a bleached coral,
1982-83年のエル・ニーニョで死にました
09:13
coral that died during the 1982-'83 El Nino.
チャンピオン島にある
09:16
This is from Champion Island.
1mほどの大きさのコモンシコロサンゴ群です
09:18
It's about a meter tall Pavona clavus colony.
藻に覆われていますが
09:21
And it's covered with algae. That's what happens.
こういう生物が死ぬと
09:24
When these things die,
すぐに別の生命体が
09:26
immediately, organisms come in
死んだ生き物の上で繁殖します
09:28
and encrust and live on that dead surface.
なので サンゴ群がエル・ニ−ニョで死滅すると
09:31
And so, when a coral colony is killed
09:33
by an El Nino event,
09:35
it leaves this indelible record.
消えない記録を残します
そこで サンゴを調べれば
09:37
You can go then and study corals
どれだけ頻繁に起こるかわかります
09:39
and figure out how often do you see this.
そこで 80年代に考えられたのは
09:41
So one of the things thought of in the '80s
ガラパゴス中のサンゴの
09:43
was to go back and take cores
頭部の芯を取り出して
09:45
of coral heads throughout the Galapagos
壊滅的な現象の回数を調べるということです
09:47
and find out how often was there a devastating event.
ちょうど1982-83年のエル・ニーニョが
09:50
And just so you know, 1982-'83,
ガラパゴスにある95%の
09:53
that El Nino killed 95 percent
サンゴを死滅させたように
09:55
of all the corals here in Galapagos.
97-98年度も似たようなことが
09:58
Then there was similar mortality in '97-'98.
わかったのは
10:01
And what we found
400年分を取り出すと こういう現象は
10:03
after drilling back in time two to 400 years
きわめて稀だったというこです
10:05
was that these were unique events.
ほかの大量死滅などなかったのです
10:07
We saw no other mass mortality events.
近年のこういう事象はほんとうに稀なのです
10:10
So these events in our recent past really are unique.
まさに破壊的なエル・ニーニョか
10:13
So they're either just truly monster El Ninos,
地球温暖化を背景として起きた
10:15
or they're just very strong El Ninos
単に強いエル・ニーニョか
10:17
that occurred against a backdrop of global warming.
どちらにせよ ガラパゴス諸島の
10:21
Either case, it's bad news
サンゴには悪いニュースです
10:23
for the corals of the Galapagos Islands.
どうやってサンプルを取るか
10:27
Here's how we sample the corals.
見てください イースター島のこの巨大なサンゴ!
10:29
This is actually Easter Island. Look at this monster.
8mもの高さがあります
10:32
This coral is eight meters tall, right.
約600年も成長しているのです
10:35
And it been growing for about 600 years.
シルヴィア・アールが
このサンゴを教えてくれました
10:37
Now, Sylvia Earle turned me on to this exact same coral.
彼女はジョン・ローレットと
1994年に潜っていました
10:40
And she was diving here with John Lauret -- I think it was 1994 --
そして小さな塊を私に送ってくれました
10:43
and collected a little nugget and sent it to me.
それから研究を始めました
10:45
And we started working on it,
このようなサンゴの分析で古代の海の
温度がわかると突き止めました
10:47
and we figured out we could tell the temperature of the ancient ocean
10:49
from analyzing a coral like this.
ダイアのドリルを使います
10:52
So we have a diamond drill.
サンゴ群は殺しません 表面から
小さなサンプルを取るのです
10:54
We're not killing the colony; we're taking a small core sample out of the top.
サンプルは筒状の石灰岩として出てきます
10:57
The core comes up as these cylindrical tubes of limestone.
研究室に持ち帰り 分析します
11:00
And that material then we take back to the lab and analyze it.
右側にサンゴのサンプルが
11:04
You can see some of the coral cores there on the right.
東太平洋はすべて終わったので
11:07
So we've done that all over the Eastern Pacific.
西太平洋に取りかかっています
11:09
We're starting to do it in the Western Pacific as well.
ガラパゴス諸島に戻りましょう
11:12
I'll take you back here to the Galapagos Islands.
ウルビーナ湾のこの非常に
興味深い 隆起した土地
11:14
And we've been working at this fascinating uplift here in Urbina Bay.
この場所は
11:17
That the place where,
1954年の地震中に
11:19
during an earthquake in 1954,
この海成段丘が 海から急激に持ち上げられ
11:21
this marine terrace was lifted up
11:23
out of the ocean very quickly,
6−7mほど隆起しました
11:26
and it was lifted up about six to seven meters.
なので濡れることなくサンゴ礁を歩き回れます
11:29
And so now you can walk through a coral reef without getting wet.
地上はこんな感じです
11:32
If you go on the ground there, it looks like this,
この古豪サンゴ
11:34
and this is the grandaddy coral.
直径11mあります
11:36
It's 11 meters in diameter,
成長が始まったのは
11:38
and we know that it started growing
1584年
11:40
in the year 1584.
想像してください
11:42
Imagine that.
浅瀬で幸せに成長していたのです
11:44
And that coral was growing happily in those shallow waters,
1954年に地震が起きるまで
11:47
until 1954, when the earthquake happened.
1584年とわかっているのは
11:50
Now the reason we know it's 1584
これらのサンゴには成長輪があり
11:52
is that these corals have growth bands.
芯を半分に切り レントゲンを取ると
11:54
When you cut them, slice those cores in half and x-ray them,
明るい部分と暗い部分があります
11:57
you see these light and dark bands.
それぞれが1年です
11:59
Each one of those is a year.
これらのサンゴは1年で1.5cm成長します
12:01
We know these corals grow about a centimeter and a half a year.
それで底まで計算したのです
12:03
And we just count on down to the bottom.
もう1つの特質として
12:06
Then their other attribute is
素晴らしい化学反応をもっています
12:08
that they have this great chemistry.
サンゴを構成する
12:10
We can analyze the carbonate
炭酸塩を分析すれば
12:12
that makes up the coral,
たくさんのことが分かります
12:14
and there's a whole bunch of things we can do.
今回 いろいろな酸素の
同位体を測定しました
12:16
But in this case, we measured the different isotopes of oxygen.
その比率で水温がわかります
12:19
Their ratio tells us the water temperature.
このサンプルでは
12:21
In this example here,
ガラパゴスのこのサンゴ礁を
12:23
we had monitored this reef in Galapagos
温度を記録したので
12:25
with temperature recorders,
サンゴが成長する水温がわかっています
12:27
so we know the temperature of the water the coral's growing in.
そしてサンゴを採取し 比率を測定したら
12:30
Then after we harvest a coral, we measure this ratio,
水温と同位体比率の曲線が
完全にマッチしています
12:33
and now you can see, those curves match perfectly.
今回のこれらの島で
12:36
In this case, at these islands,
サンゴは海水変化の記録に
非常に役立っています
12:38
you know, corals
12:40
are instrumental-quality recorders of change in the water.
温度計はたかだか50年の歴史ですが
12:43
And of course, our thermometers
12:45
only take us back 50 years or so here.
サンゴは何千年も昔のことがわかります
12:47
The coral can take us back
12:49
hundreds and thousands of years.
12:51
So, what we do:
そこで
世界中の30ものグループの
12:53
we've merged a lot of different data sets.
さまざまなデータ群を合わせました
12:56
It's not just my group; there's maybe 30 groups worldwide doing this.
数百年間の気温変化についての有効な記録
12:59
But we get these instrumental- and near-instrumental-quality records
もしくはそれに近い記録を
13:02
of temperature change that go back hundreds of years,
まとめたのです
13:04
and we put them together.
これがその図です
13:06
Here's a synthetic diagram.
すべての線があります
13:08
There's a whole family of curves here.
しかし 私たちは過去数千年の地球の
13:10
But what's happening: we're looking at the last thousand years
温度変化を見ているのです
13:13
of temperature on the planet.
5、6のデータがまとめられていますが
13:15
And there's five or six different compilations there,
どれもがサンゴからの数百のデータを
13:17
But each one of those compilations reflects input
反映させたものです
13:20
from hundreds of these kinds of records from corals.
氷のサンプルからも
13:23
We do similar things with ice cores.
木の年輪も同じように
13:26
We work with tree rings.
そうやって何が自然要因で
13:28
And that's how we discover
そして前世紀とどう違うか
13:30
what is truly natural
発見したのです
13:32
and how different is the last century, right?
これを選んだのは
13:35
And I chose this one
複雑で乱雑な感じだからです
13:37
because it's complicated and messy looking, right.
この問題はそうなのです
13:40
This is as messy as it gets.
いくつか兆候が見えるでしょう
13:42
You can see there's some signals there.
記録のいくつかは
13:45
Some of the records
他のより低い温度です
13:47
show lower temperatures than others.
変動が大きいものもあります
13:49
Some of them show greater variability.
しかし全部 自然の変動が
13:52
But they all tell us
どれだけか示しています
13:54
what the natural variability is.
いくつかは北半球から
13:56
Some of them are from the northern hemisphere;
地球全体の記録も
13:58
some are from the entire globe.
ここで言えるのは
14:00
But here's what we can say:
過去数千年で自然なのは 地球は冷却していること
14:02
what's natural in the last thousand years is that the planet was cooling down.
およそ1900年まで冷却しているのです
14:05
It was cooling down
14:07
until about 1900 or so.
14:09
And there is natural variability
そして太陽やエル・ニーニョなど
自然の変動要因があります
14:11
caused by the Sun, caused by El Ninos.
100年や10年単位の変動
14:14
A century-scale, decadal-scale variability,
その規模もわかっています
14:16
and we know the magnitude;
だいたい0.2〜0.4℃です
14:18
it's about two-tenths to four-tenths of a degree Centigrade.
しかしグラフの端は
14:21
But then at the very end is where
有効な記録は真っ黒です
14:23
we have the instrumental record in black.
温度は2009年まであります
14:25
And there's the temperature up there in 2009.
私たちが20世紀に1℃ほど地球を温めたのです
14:28
You know, we've warmed the globe
14:30
about a degree Centigrade in the last century,
そして 自然の部分の記録にそれと同じような
14:33
and there's nothing
14:35
in the natural part of that record
変動はないんです
14:37
that resembles what we've seen in the last century.
このことは 我々の与えている影響は―
14:39
You know, that's the strength of our argument,
全く別物だという我々の考えを 強く支持しています
14:41
that we are doing something that's truly different.
終わりに 海洋酸性化の手短な議論を
14:45
So I'll close with a short discussion
14:48
of ocean acidification.
地球変動を語る要素として気に入っています
14:51
I like it as a component of global change to talk about,
どんなに頑固な温暖化懐疑派でも
14:54
because, even if you are a hard-bitten global warming skeptic,
よくそのグループと話しますが
14:58
and I talk to that community fairly often,
CO2は海に溶けているという
15:00
you cannot deny
単純な物理現象は否定できません
15:02
the simple physics
15:04
of CO2 dissolving in the ocean.
15:07
You know, we're pumping out lots of CO2 into the atmosphere,
私たちは大気に大量の
CO2を排出しています
化石燃料やコンクリート製品から
15:10
from fossil fuels, from cement production.
いま その3分の1は
15:13
Right now, about a third of that carbon dioxide
海にそのまま溶けています
15:15
is dissolving straight into the sea, right?
そうすると
15:17
And as it does so,
海洋を酸性化させます
15:19
it makes the ocean more acidic.
これは確かなのです
15:22
So, you cannot argue with that.
それが起きていることです
15:24
That is what's happening right now,
地球温暖化とは
15:26
and it's a very different issue
また別の問題なのです
15:28
than the global warming issue.
さまざまな影響が出ています
15:30
It has many consequences.
炭酸塩生物や 炭酸カルシウムを殻に用いる
15:32
There's consequences for carbonate organisms.
15:35
There are many organisms
さまざまな動植物への影響が出ています
15:37
that build their shells out of calcium carbonate --
15:39
plants and animals both.
サンゴ礁を形作る主な素材は
15:42
The main framework material of coral reefs
炭酸カルシウムです
15:44
is calcium carbonate.
これは酸性の液体には
15:46
That material is more soluble
溶けやすいのです
15:48
in acidic fluid.
なので いま起きているのは
15:51
So one of the things we're seeing
生物が殻を維持する代謝に
15:53
is organisms are having
さらにエネルギーを
15:55
to spend more metabolic energy
必要としているのです
15:57
to build and maintain their shells.
このままCO2の海洋への融解が進めば
15:59
At some point, as this transience,
ある時点で炭酸カルシウムの
融解が始まります
16:01
as this CO2 uptake in the ocean continues,
ある時点で炭酸カルシウムの
融解が始まります
16:04
that material's actually going to start to dissolve.
サンゴ礁では
16:06
And on coral reefs,
骨格をなしている生物が姿を消します
16:08
where some of the main framework organisms disappear,
海洋生物の多様性の
16:11
we will see a major loss
大規模な損失を見るでしょう
16:13
of marine biodiversity.
しかも炭酸塩を生産する生物が
影響を受けるばかりでなく
16:15
But it's not just the carbonate producers that are affected.
海洋の酸度に影響される
16:18
There's many physiological processes
生理学的プロセスも多くあります
16:21
that are influenced by the acidity of the ocean.
多くの化学反応に関する
酵素やタンパク質が
16:24
So many reactions involving enzymes and proteins
海洋の酸性物質に敏感なのです
16:27
are sensitive to the acid content of the ocean.
これらすべてのこと つまり
16:30
So, all of these things --
よりエネルギーが必要な代謝
16:32
greater metabolic demands,
繁殖率の低下
16:34
reduced reproductive success,
呼吸と代謝の変化
16:36
changes in respiration and metabolism.
これらが この酸性化で
負荷がかかると予想される
16:39
You know, these are things that we have good physiological reasons
十分な生物学的な確証があるのです
16:42
to expect to see stressed
十分な生物学的な確証があるのです
16:44
caused by this transience.
数百万年もの大気中のCO2量を
16:46
So we figured out some pretty interesting ways
追跡する面白い方法を
16:48
to track CO2 levels in the atmosphere,
見つけ出しました
16:51
going back millions of years.
氷のボーリングコアを用いますが
16:53
We used to do it just with ice cores,
今回は2000万年遡ります
16:55
but in this case, we're going back 20 million years.
堆積物のサンプルから
16:58
And we take samples of the sediment,
海洋のCO2量がわかります
17:00
and it tells us the CO2 level of the ocean,
そこから大気中のCO2量がわかるのです
17:03
and therefore the CO2 level of the atmosphere.
さてここで
17:05
And here's the thing:
CO2量が現代と同じくらいの
17:07
you have to go back about 15 million years
時代を見つけるには
17:09
to find a time when CO2 levels
1500万年ぐらい遡らないといけません
17:12
were about what they are today.
2倍の量の時代を見つけるには
17:14
You have to go back about 30 million years
3000万年遡らないと
17:16
to find a time when CO2 levels
いけません
17:18
were double what they are today.
つまり
17:20
Now, what that means is
海に住むすべての生物は
17:22
that all of the organisms that live in the sea
CO2は今よりも低いレベルの
17:24
have evolved in this chemostatted ocean,
培養槽のような海で進化したのです
17:27
with CO2 levels lower than they are today.
これが 進行している急激な酸性化に
17:30
That's the reason that they're not able to respond or adapt
これらの生物が対応できない
17:33
to this rapid acidification
理由なのです
17:36
that's going on right now.
チャーリー・ヴェロンは
17:38
So, Charlie Veron
昨年 このように述べました
17:40
came up with this statement last year:
「海洋酸性化の見通しは
17:42
"The prospect of ocean acidification
大気中へのCO2放散の
17:44
may well be the most serious
予想される結果の中でも
17:46
of all of the predicted outcomes
一番深刻なものかもれしない」と
17:48
of anthropogenic CO2 release."
私もそれが十分ありえると思います
17:51
And I think that may very well be true,
そこでこれを締めくくりに
17:54
so I'll close with this.
絶対的に保護区は必要でしょう
17:56
You know, we do need the protected areas, absolutely,
しかし 海洋のためには
17:59
but for the sake of the oceans,
CO2排出を制限すべきです
18:01
we have to cap or limit CO2 emissions
できるだけ早く
18:03
as soon as possible.
ありがとうございました
18:05
Thank you very much.
(拍手)
18:07
(Applause)
Translator:Mitsuko Atsusaka
Reviewer:Kana Mhatre

sponsored links

Rob Dunbar - Oceanographer, biogeochemist
Rob Dunbar looks deeply at ancient corals and sediments to study how the climate and the oceans have shifted over the past 50 to 12,000 years -- and how the Antarctic ecosystem is changing right now.

Why you should listen

Rob Dunbar's research looks at the earth and ocean as an interconnected system over time. With his group at Stanford, he makes high-resolution studies of climate change over the past 50 to 12,000 years.

Where does 12,000-year-old climate data come from? It's locked in the skeletons of ancient corals from the tropics and the deep sea, and buried in sediments from lakes and other marine environments. His lab measures the chemical and isotopic makeup of these materials, and looks at how they've changed in response to changes in the solar and carbon cycles.

Dunbar's also studying the reverse equation -- how climate change is affecting a modern environment right now. He's working in the Ross Sea of Antarctica with the ANDRILL project to study the ocean's ability to take up carbon, drilling for ice cores to uncover the history of the climate of Antarctica.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.