sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2010

Inge Missmahl: Bringing peace to the minds of Afghanistan

インゲ・ミスマール、アフガニスタンの心に平穏をもたらす。

July 15, 2010

ユング分析家インゲ・ミスマールがアフガニスタンを訪れた際、彼女は戦争による内面の傷、絶望、トラウマ、鬱病の蔓延、を目の当たりにした。この国では、3千万の人口に対して、24名の精神科医しかいませんでした。ミスマールは、個人と恐らく国家の治療を発展させた、国の精神社会カウンセリングシステム構築に関する彼女の取組みについて話します。

Inge Missmahl - Analytical psychologist
By building psychosocial care into the primary health care system in Afghanistan, Inge Missmahl offers hope to a society traumatized by decades of conflict and insecurity. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So I want to tell you a story -- an encouraging story --
今日は皆さんにとても希望に溢れる話をしたいと思います
00:16
about addressing
それは アフガニスタンでの
00:19
desperation, depression and despair in Afghanistan,
絶望や失望 自暴自棄を乗り越える話と
00:21
and what we have learned from it,
そこから私たちが学んだこと
00:24
and how to help people
また トラウマ経験を乗り越えるために
00:26
to overcome traumatic experiences
どのような支援ができるのかについての話
00:28
and how to help them to regain some confidence
そして彼らの今後 つまり将来における
00:32
in the time ahead -- in the future --
自信を取り戻すための支援の方法や
00:35
and how to participate again in everyday life.
日常生活へ復帰する方法についての話です
00:37
So, I am a Jungian psychoanalyst,
私はユング派の精神分析医で
00:41
and I went to Afghanistan in January 2004, by chance,
2004年1月にメディカ・モンディアルの仕事で
00:43
on an assignment for Medica Mondiale.
たまたまアフガニスタンへ行きました
00:47
Jung in Afghanistan --
ユングとアフガニスタン
00:50
you get the picture.
これが写真です
00:52
Afghanistan is one of the poorest countries in the world,
アフガニスタンは世界で最も貧しい国の1つで
00:55
and 70 percent of the people are illiterate.
人口の70%は読み書きができません
00:58
War and malnutrition kills people
戦争と栄養失調により
01:01
together with hope.
希望と共に人々の命が奪われています
01:03
You may know this from the media,
これはメディアの情報で既にご存知でしょう
01:05
but what you may not know
しかし アフガニスタンの平均年齢が
01:07
is that the average age of the Afghan people is 17 years old,
17歳だということは御存じないでしょう
01:09
which means they grow up in such an environment
これは 彼らはこのような環境と -繰り返しますが -
01:12
and -- I repeat myself --
30年に渡る戦争の中で
01:15
in 30 years of war.
成長するということを意味しています
01:17
So this translates
つまりこのことは
01:19
into ongoing violence,
現在進行形の暴力や
01:21
foreign interests, bribery,
外部の利害 汚職
01:23
drugs, ethnic conflicts,
薬物 民族紛争
01:25
bad health, shame, fear
不衛生 恥 恐怖
01:28
and cumulative traumatic experiences.
そして継続的なトラウマ経験と言い換えることができます
01:31
Local and foreign military
現地と海外の軍隊は
01:34
are supposed to build peace together with the donors
支援者や政府組織 NGOとともに
01:36
and the governmental and non-governmental organizations.
平和を築くはずでした
01:39
And people had hope, yes,
人々には希望がありました
01:42
but until they realized
しかしそれは 日々状況が
01:44
their situation worsens every day --
悪化していることに気付くまででした
01:46
either because they are being killed
殺人事件が続いたり
01:48
or because, somehow,
なぜか8年前よりも
01:50
they are poorer than eight years ago.
より貧しくなっているからです
01:53
One figure for that:
このことを示す1つの数字があります
01:56
54 percent of the children under the age of five years
5歳以下の子供の54%は
01:58
suffer from malnutrition.
栄養失調に見舞われています
02:01
Yet, there is hope.
しかし まだ希望はあります
02:03
One day a man told me,
ある日 男性が私にこう言いました
02:06
"My future does not look brilliant,
「私の未来は明るくないでしょう
02:08
but I want to have a brilliant future for my son."
でも 自分の子供には明るい未来を送ってほしい」
02:10
This is a picture I took in 2005,
これは2005年に撮った写真で
02:14
walking on Fridays over the hills in Kabul,
ある金曜日にカブールの丘を散歩したものです
02:16
and for me it's a symbolic picture
私にとって この写真は
02:19
of an open future for a young generation.
新しい世代の未来を開く象徴的なものです
02:21
So, doctors prescribe medication.
医者は薬を処方し
02:27
And donors
支援者は
02:31
are supposed to bring peace
学校や道を造ることで
02:33
by building schools and roads.
平和をもたらそうとします
02:35
Military collect weapons,
軍隊は武器を回収します
02:40
and depression stays intact.
しかし うつ病は放り出されたままです
02:42
Why?
なぜでしょうか?
02:45
Because people don't have tools
それは現地の人たちが そのような問題に
02:47
to cope with it, to get over it.
対処し 乗り越えるための術を知らないからです
02:49
So, soon after my arrival,
私は現地に着いてすぐに
02:54
I had confirmed something which I had already known;
あることを再確認しました
02:56
that my instruments come from the heart of modern Europe, yes.
それは 私の手法は最新のヨーロッパのものですが
02:59
However, what can wound us
私たちを傷つけるものと
03:02
and our reaction to those wounds --
それに対する我々の反応は
03:04
they are universal.
普遍的だと言うことです
03:06
And the big challenge
難しかったのは
03:08
was how to understand the meaning of the symptom
アフガン特有の文化的背景において病気の兆候を
03:10
in this specific cultural context.
どのようにして把握するかということです
03:13
After a counseling session, a woman said to me,
カウンセリングの終了後にある女性がこう言いました
03:16
"Because you have felt me, I can feel myself again,
「あなたが私を感じてくれたから
03:19
and I want to participate again
自分を再び感じることができるようになりました
03:22
in my family life."
また家庭生活に復帰したいです」
03:24
This was very important,
これはとても大事なことです
03:27
because the family is central
アフガンの社会システムでは
03:29
in Afghans' social system.
家族が中心だからです
03:31
No one can survive alone.
誰もが一人では生きられません
03:34
And if people feel used, worthless and ashamed,
もしなにか恐ろしいことが起こり 自分が
03:37
because something horrible has happened to them,
利用されている 役立たず 恥ずかしい と思ったら
03:40
then they retreat, and they fall into social isolation,
人々は引き込もり 社会的に孤立してしまいます
03:43
and they do not dare to tell this evil
そして その体験を周囲の人や
03:46
to other people or to their loved ones,
愛する人たちに話そうとしません
03:49
because they do not want to burden them.
周りの人たちの重荷になりたくないのです
03:52
And very often violence is a way to cope with it.
そして往々にして暴力が問題への対処方法になります
03:54
Traumatized people also easily lose control --
心に傷を負った人たちは 簡単にコントロールを失います
03:58
symptoms are hyper-arousal and memory flashbacks --
不意に 前触れも無く
04:01
so people are in a constant fear
過覚醒とフラッシュバックにより
04:03
that those horrible feelings of that traumatic event
衝撃的な出来事による恐怖が
04:05
might come back unexpectedly,
甦るかもしれないと
04:08
suddenly,
常に怯えているのです
04:10
and they cannot control it.
それらはコントロールできないのです
04:12
To compensate this loss of inner control,
自分自身のコントロールができないため
04:15
they try to control the outside,
彼らは代わりに自分以外
04:18
very understandably -- mostly the family --
とても理解しやすいことに 多くの場合家族をコントロールしようとします
04:21
and unfortunately,
そして不幸なことに これは
04:23
this fits very well
伝統的
04:25
into the traditional side,
退行的 抑圧的
04:27
regressive side, repressive side,
束縛的な文化的背景に
04:30
restrictive side of the cultural context.
非常によく一致してしまうのです
04:32
So, husbands start beating wives,
夫は妻に暴力を振るい
04:36
mothers and fathers beat their children,
両親は子供を虐待します
04:39
and afterward, they feel awful.
その後 彼らは恐怖心を抱きます
04:41
They did not want to do this, it just happened --
本心とは違い 無意識なのです
04:43
they lost control.
コントロールを失っているのです
04:45
The desperate try
絶望した人たちは
04:48
to restore order and normality,
秩序と平穏を取り戻そうとします もし
04:50
and if we are not able to cut this circle of violence,
この暴力の連鎖を断ち切ることができなければ
04:53
it will be transferred to the next generation without a doubt.
これは間違いなく次の世代にも伝わります
04:57
And partly this is already happening.
そして一部では既に起こっているのです
05:00
So everybody needs a sense for the future,
そのため 全員に未来に対するセンスが必要です
05:03
and the Afghan sense of the future
そして アフガンの未来へのセンスは
05:06
is shattered.
打ち砕かれています
05:08
But let me repeat the words of the woman.
ですが 先ほどの女性の言葉を繰り返させてください
05:12
"Because you have felt me,
「あなたが私を感じてくれたから
05:15
I can feel myself again."
自分を再び感じることができました」
05:17
So the key here is empathy.
重要なのは共感することです
05:20
Somebody has to be a witness
誰かがその人に対して起こったことの
05:22
to what has happened to you.
立会人にならなければいけないのです
05:24
Somebody has to feel how you felt.
その人が感じた事に共感し
05:26
And somebody has to see you and listen to you.
そして 目を見て 話を聞く必要があるのです
05:29
Everybody must be able
その人に対して起こったことが
05:34
to know what he or she has experienced is true,
真実であると 全員が知らなければならないのです
05:36
and this only goes with another person.
これは一人では出来ません
05:40
So everybody must be able to say,
だから全員がこう言う必要があります
05:43
"This happened to me, and it did this with me,
「これは以前私も経験し 私の時はこうだったと
05:45
but I'm able to live with it, to cope with it,
でも私はそれと向き合い 対処し
05:48
and to learn from it.
学びとることができた
05:50
And I want to engage myself
そして 自分の子供や孫のための
05:52
in the bright future for my children
輝かしい未来に
05:54
and the children of my children,
貢献したい
05:56
and I will not marry-off my 13 year-old daughter," --
そして私は13歳の娘を嫁に出したりしない」と
05:58
what happens too often in Afghanistan.
これはアフガニスタンではよくあることです
06:01
So something can be done,
アフガニスタンのような苛酷な環境でも
06:04
even in such extreme environments as Afghanistan.
何か行動を起こすことができます
06:06
And I started thinking about a counseling program.
私はカウンセリングプログラムについて考え始めました
06:09
But, of course, I needed help and funds.
しかし 当然ですが援助と資金が必要です
06:12
And one evening,
ある日のことです
06:14
I was sitting next to a very nice gentleman in Kabul,
カブールである紳士の横に座ると
06:16
and he asked what I thought would be good in Afghanistan.
アフガニスタンのために何をすれば良いか と尋ねてきました
06:18
And I explained to him quickly,
私は 精神・社会的カウンセラーを養成し
06:21
I would train psycho-social counselors,
カウンセリングセンターを開設したいと回答し
06:23
I would open centers, and I explained to him why.
そしてその理由を説明しました
06:26
This man gave me his contact details at the end of the evening
その後 彼は私に連絡先を伝え こう言いました
06:30
and said, "If you want to do this, call me."
「もし今言ったことを実行したかったら 連絡してください」
06:33
At that time, it was the head of Caritas Germany.
彼はCaritas Germanyの代表だったのです そして
06:36
So, I was able to launch a three-year project with Caritas Germany,
Caritas Germanyで3年間のプロジェクトを始めました
06:41
and we trained 30 Afghan women and men,
私たちは30人の現地の男女を養成し
06:44
and we opened 15 counseling centers in Kabul.
カブールに15のカウンセリングセンターを開設しました
06:46
This was our sign -- it's hand-painted,
これが私たちのサインです
06:49
and we had 45 all over Kabul.
手作りで カブール中の45箇所にあります
06:52
Eleven thousand people came -- more than that.
これまでに11,000人以上の人たちが訪れ
06:55
And 70 percent regained their lives.
その内の70%が元の生活を取り戻しました
06:57
This was a very exciting time,
すばらしいアフガンのチームとともに
07:00
developing this with my wonderful Afghan team.
プロジェクトを発展させ 本当に充実した時でした
07:02
And they are working with me up to today.
彼らとは今でも一緒に仕事をしています
07:05
We developed a culturally-sensitive
私たちは 文化的感覚を伴った
07:07
psycho-social counseling approach.
精神・社会的カウンセリングアプローチを作り上げたのです
07:09
So, from 2008 up until today,
2008年から今日までの間に
07:12
a substantial change and step forward
大きな変化を起こし
07:15
has been taking place.
前進することができました
07:17
The European Union delegation in Kabul
ある日 カブールのEU代表団がやって来て
07:19
came into this and hired me to work
公衆衛生省で仕事をし
07:22
inside the Ministry of Public Health,
このアプローチを広めるために
07:24
to lobby this approach --
私を雇ってくれました
07:26
we succeeded.
うまくいったのです
07:28
We revised the mental health component
私たちは一次医療サービスの
07:30
of the primary health care services
メンタルヘルスの部分を改定し
07:33
by adding psycho-social care
このシステムに精神・社会的ケアと
07:35
and psycho-social counselors to the system.
精神・社会的カウンセラーを追加しました
07:37
This means, certainly, to retrain all health staff.
これは 全てのスタッフに再教育を実施することを意味していますが
07:40
But for that, we already have the training manuals,
私たちは教育用マニュアルを作成していました
07:43
which are approved by the Ministry
そしてこのマニュアルは衛生省で承認され
07:46
and moreover, this approach is now part
さらにこの取組は 今や
07:49
of the mental health strategy in Afghanistan.
アフガニスタンのメンタルヘルス政策の一部になっています
07:51
So we also have implemented it already
私たちは3つの州にある一部のクリニックで
07:55
in some selected clinics in three provinces,
すでにこれを実施しており
07:57
and you are the first to see the results.
結果を見るのは皆さんが初めてです
08:00
We wanted to know if what is being done is effective.
私たちは どの治療が効果的であったか に興味がありました
08:03
And here you can see
そしてこれが結果です
08:06
the patients all had symptoms of depression,
全ての患者には中度と重度の
08:08
moderate and severe.
うつ病の症状がありました
08:11
And the red line is the treatment as usual --
写真の中の赤線は通常の治療
08:14
medication with a medical doctor.
つまり医者による投薬治療を示しており
08:16
And all the symptoms
全ての症状において
08:18
stayed the same or even got worse.
症状はそのままか 一部では悪化していました
08:20
And the green line is treatment with psycho-social counseling only,
緑の線は 精神・社会的カウンセリングによる治療のみで
08:23
without medication.
薬は用いていません
08:25
And you can see the symptoms almost completely go away,
症状がほぼなくなっているのが分かります
08:27
and the psycho-social stress has dropped significantly,
そして精神・社会的ストレスも大幅に低下しています
08:30
which is explicable,
ストレスが完全になくならない理由は
08:33
because you cannot take away the psycho-social stresses,
精神・社会的ストレスは取り除けないからです
08:35
but you can learn how to cope with them.
しかし ストレスの対処法を学ぶことが出来ます
08:37
So this makes us very happy,
このシステムがうまく機能しているという
08:40
because now we also have some evidence
結果が得られ
08:42
that this is working.
私たちは非常に喜びました
08:44
So here you see,
この写真は
08:47
this is a health facility in Northern Afghanistan,
アフガニスタン北部にある保健施設です
08:49
and every morning it looks like this all over.
毎朝どこでもこのような光景が見られます
08:51
And doctors usually have three to six minutes for the patients,
現在 医者の診察時間は通常 各患者に3分から6分です
08:54
but now this will change.
しかし 今後これは変わるでしょう
08:57
They go to the clinics,
彼らはクリニックに来ますが
08:59
because they want to cure their immediate symptoms,
それは初期の徴候を治療したいからです
09:01
and they will find somebody to talk to
そして そこで話し相手を見つけて
09:03
and discuss these issues
問題について話し合います
09:05
and talk about what is burdening them
何が重荷になっているのか語り合い
09:07
and find solutions, develop their resources,
解決策を見つけ 腕を磨き
09:09
learn tools to solve their family conflicts
家族の対立を解決する手法を学び
09:12
and gain some confidence in the future.
そして未来の自信を得るのです
09:16
And I would like to share one short vignette.
ここで皆さんにあるエピソードをお話したいと思います
09:19
One Hazara said to his Pashtun counselor,
あるハザラ人がパシュトゥーン人のカウンセラーにこう言いました
09:23
"If we were to have met some years ago,
「もし 私たちが数年前に会っていたら
09:27
then we would have killed each other.
恐らくお互いを殺していただろう
09:30
And now you are helping me
でも今あなたは私の未来への自信を
09:32
to regain some confidence in the future."
取り戻すための手助けをしてくれている」
09:34
And another counselor said to me after the training,
別のカウンセラーは養成訓練の後に私にこう言いました
09:37
"You know, I never knew why I survived the killings in my village,
「私は今まで なぜ村であった虐殺を生き残れたのか
09:40
but now I know,
わかりませんでした
09:44
because I am part of a nucleus
でもその理由が分かりました それは私が
09:46
of a new peaceful society in Afghanistan."
アフガニスタンの新しい平和社会の輪の一部だからです」
09:48
So I believe this kept me running.
この言葉が私を動かしてるのだと思います
09:51
And this is a really emancipatory and political contribution
これは本当の 平和と和解への
09:54
to peace and reconciliation.
解放的で政治的な貢献です
09:57
And also -- I think --
そしてまた
10:00
without psycho-social therapy,
精神社会療法なしに
10:02
and without considering this
そして全ての人道的事業においても
10:04
in all humanitarian projects,
これを考えること抜きに
10:06
we cannot build-up civil societies.
私たちは市民社会を構築することはできません
10:08
I thought it was an idea worth spreading,
これは皆に知ってもらう価値のある考えであると思います
10:11
and I think it must be,
そして この考えは 多くの場所で
10:14
can be, could be replicated elsewhere.
繰り返されるべきだと考えています
10:16
I thank you for your attention.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
10:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:21
Translator:Soh Morishita
Reviewer:Takafusa Kitazume

sponsored links

Inge Missmahl - Analytical psychologist
By building psychosocial care into the primary health care system in Afghanistan, Inge Missmahl offers hope to a society traumatized by decades of conflict and insecurity.

Why you should listen

From dancer to humanitarian by way of analytical psychology, Inge Missmahl's unusual life trajectory led her to Kabul in 2004, where she saw that more than 60 percent of the population were suffering from depressive symptoms and traumatic experiences -- hardly surprising in a country that had lived with ongoing violence, poverty, and insecurity for 30 years. In response, Missmahl founded the psychosocial Project Kabul for Caritas Germany, a project that trained Afghan men and women to offer psychosocial counseling in 15 centers throughout the city.

The project has offered free treatment to 12,000 clients to date, helping to restore self-determination and well-being while breaking down ingrained gender barriers and social stigma of mental illness. Psychosocial counseling is now integrated in the Afghan health system thanks to Missmahl's efforts. She now works on behalf of the European Union as Technical Advisor for Mental Health for the Afghan government, and is founder of International Psychosocial Organisation (IPSO), a network of experts dedicated to developing and implementing psychosocial programs in various contexts.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.