sponsored links
Mission Blue Voyage

Barbara Block: Tagging tuna in the deep ocean

バーバラ・ブロック: 深海に生きるマグロのタグ付け

April 16, 2010

マグロは海のアスリートです。この速くて、広範囲を泳ぐ捕食者のことを私たちは理解し始めたばかりです。海洋生物学者のバーバラ・ブロックはマグロに自動送受信機付き追跡タグを取り付け、美しくも危機に瀕している魚と彼らが棲む海について、かつてない規模のデータを収集しています。

Barbara Block - Marine biologist
Barbara Block studies how tuna, billfish and sharks move around (and stay warm) in the open ocean. Knowing how these large predators travel through pelagic waters will help us understand their role in the wider ocean ecosystem. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I've been fascinated for a lifetime
私は生涯を通じて
00:15
by the beauty, form and function
巨大クロマグロの美しい姿と
00:18
of giant bluefin tuna.
その働きに魅了されてきました
00:20
Bluefin are warmblooded like us.
クロマグロは人間と同じ恒温動物です
00:23
They're the largest of the tunas,
マグロの中で最も大きく
00:26
the second-largest fish in the sea -- bony fish.
硬骨魚類としては
2番目に大きい魚です
00:29
They actually are a fish
実は彼らは
00:32
that is endothermic --
内温性で
00:34
powers through the ocean with warm muscles like a mammal.
哺乳類のように温かい筋肉で
海の中を力強く泳ぎます
00:36
That's one of our bluefin at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.
これは私たちがモントレー・ベイ水族館で
飼育しているクロマグロです
00:40
You can see in its shape and its streamlined design
彼らの体型と流線形のデザインが
00:43
it's powered for ocean swimming.
水中を泳ぐのに適していることが分かります
00:46
It flies through the ocean on its pectoral fins, gets lift,
彼らは胸びれで水中を
飛ぶようにして泳ぎ
00:49
powers its movements
三日月状の尾びれで
00:52
with a lunate tail.
力強く進みます
00:54
It's actually got a naked skin for most of its body,
水との抵抗を少なくする為
体の大部分は
00:56
so it reduces friction with the water.
ウロコがありません
00:59
This is what one of nature's finest machines.
大自然が生んだ
最高のマシンの1つです
01:02
Now, bluefin
クロマグロとは
01:05
were revered by Man
人類の歴史上ずっと
01:07
for all of human history.
あがめられてきました
01:09
For 4,000 years, we fished sustainably for this animal,
4千年もの間
我々は持続可能な形で
01:12
and it's evidenced
この動物を捕まえてきましたが
01:15
in the art that we see
それは何千年も昔の芸術からも
01:17
from thousands of years ago.
見て取ることができます
01:19
Bluefin are in cave paintings in France.
クロマグロはフランスの洞窟壁画や
01:21
They're on coins
3千年も昔に遡る
01:24
that date back 3,000 years.
硬貨にも見つけることができます
01:26
This fish was revered by humankind.
この魚は人類に崇拝されてきたのです
01:29
It was fished sustainably
私たちの世代に至るまで
01:32
till all of time,
ずっと持続可能な形で
01:34
except for our generation.
捕獲されてきました
01:36
Bluefin are pursued wherever they go --
クロマグロは
どこにいても追われます
01:38
there is a gold rush on Earth,
世界ではクロマグロ版の
01:41
and this is a gold rush for bluefin.
ゴールドラッシュが起きています
01:43
There are traps that fish sustainably
つい最近まで漁獲は
01:45
up until recently.
持続可能な規模で行われてきました
01:47
And yet, the type of fishing going on today,
しかし現在行われている漁では
01:50
with pens, with enormous stakes,
生け簀や巨大な立て網を使い
01:53
is really wiping bluefin
クロマグロを
01:56
ecologically off the planet.
絶滅の危機に追い込んでいます
01:58
Now bluefin, in general,
一般的にクロマグロは
02:00
goes to one place: Japan.
一ヶ所に運ばれます
日本です
02:02
Some of you may be guilty
皆さんの中にもクロマグロの減少に
02:04
of having contributed to the demise of bluefin.
一役買っている方がいるかもしれません
02:06
They're delectable muscle,
クロマグロの身は
02:08
rich in fat --
美味で 脂が乗って
02:10
absolutely taste delicious.
たまりません
02:12
And that's their problem; we're eating them to death.
それがまた問題なのです 
私たちは食べ過ぎなのです
02:14
Now in the Atlantic, the story is pretty simple.
大西洋を見れば一目瞭然です
02:17
Bluefin have two populations: one large, one small.
ここのクロマグロには
大小2つの個体群が存在します
02:20
The North American population
北アメリカの個体群は
02:23
is fished at about 2,000 ton.
毎年 約2千トン捕らえられ
02:25
The European population and North African -- the Eastern bluefin tuna --
ヨーロッパと北アフリカ
つまり東大西洋系群は
02:28
is fished at tremendous levels:
とんでもないレベルで
02:31
50,000 tons over the last decade almost every year.
約5万トンが この十年
ほぼ毎年 水揚げされてきました
02:34
The result is whether you're looking
その結果
02:37
at the West or the Eastern bluefin population,
東と西 両方の個体群が
02:39
there's been tremendous decline on both sides,
大幅に減少し
02:42
as much as 90 percent
1950年を基準にすると
02:44
if you go back with your baseline
90パーセントも
02:46
to 1950.
減ってしまったのです
02:48
For that, bluefin have been given a status
このため クロマグロは
02:50
equivalent to tigers, to lions,
トラやライオン
02:53
to certain African elephants
一部のアフリカゾウや
02:56
and to pandas.
パンダなどと同じ地位を得ました
02:58
These fish have been proposed
この魚は この2ヶ月間
03:00
for an endangered species listing in the past two months.
絶滅危惧種に指定するかどうか
検討されてきました
03:02
They were voted on and rejected
ちょうど2週間前になりますが
03:05
just two weeks ago,
この提案は否決されました
03:07
despite outstanding science
2つの機関が CITES(ワシントン条約)の
付属書Ⅰにあたるという
03:09
that shows from two committees
2つの機関が CITES(ワシントン条約)の
付属書Ⅰにあたるという
03:11
this fish meets the criteria of CITES I.
明確な科学的根拠を提出したにもかかわらずです
03:14
And if it's tunas you don't care about,
それでもマグロが気にならないと言うなら
03:17
perhaps you might be interested
これならどうでしょう
03:19
that international long lines and pursing
世界中で行われる はえ縄漁業は
03:21
chase down tunas and bycatch animals
マグロのみならず
03:23
such as leatherbacks, sharks,
オサガメ、サメ、カジキマグロ
アホウドリまで捕らえてしまいます
03:26
marlin, albatross.
オサガメ、サメ、カジキマグロ
アホウドリまで捕らえてしまいます
03:28
These animals and their demise
これらの動物の死は
03:30
occurs in the tuna fisheries.
マグロ漁業によってもたらされています
03:32
The challenge we face
実は問題は私たちが
03:35
is that we know very little about tuna,
マグロについて ほとんど何も知らない
ということでしょう
03:37
and everyone in the room knows what it looks like
ここにいる誰もが
アフリカのライオンが
03:40
when an African lion
獲物を仕留める姿を
03:43
takes down its prey.
想像できるはずなのに
03:45
I doubt anyone has seen a giant bluefin feed.
巨大クロマグロがエサを食べる姿は
見たことがないでしょう
03:47
This tuna symbolizes
このマグロが
会場にいる私たち全員の
03:50
what's the problem for all of us in the room.
抱える問題を象徴しています
03:53
It's the 21st century, but we really have only just begun
21世紀になって
私たちは やっと
03:56
to really study our oceans in a deep way.
海について その全容を
理解し始めたばかりです
03:59
Technology has come of age
技術の進歩によって
04:02
that's allowing us to see the Earth from space
宇宙から地球を見下ろしたり
04:04
and go deep into the seas remotely.
遠隔操作で深海を覗くことが
可能になりました
04:07
And we've got to use these technologies immediately
そして我々の海洋の働きを
04:10
to get a better understanding
もっとよく理解するためには
04:12
of how our ocean realm works.
これらの技術を早急に
使わなければなりません
04:14
Most of us from the ship -- even I --
船から見ると ―私でさえ―
04:17
look out at the ocean and see this homogeneous sea.
大海は均質に見えます
04:19
We don't know where the structure is.
どういった構造になっているのか―
04:22
We can't tell where are the watering holes
アフリカの平原のように
04:24
like we can on an African plain.
動物たちの水飲み場が
どこにあるかなんて分かりません
04:27
We can't see the corridors,
廊下もなければ
04:30
and we can't see what it is
マグロ、オサガメ
アホウドリの関係も
04:32
that brings together a tuna,
マグロ、オサガメ
アホウドリの関係も
04:34
a leatherback and an albatross.
分かりません
04:36
We're only just beginning to understand
私たちの理解は始まったばかりで
04:38
how the physical oceanography
それは海洋物理学と
04:40
and the biological oceanography
海洋生物学が
04:42
come together
いかに団結して
04:44
to create a seasonal force
季節的な力を生み出し
04:46
that actually causes the upwelling
ホットスポットが
ホープスポットになるよう
04:48
that might make a hot spot a hope spot.
湧昇できるかということです
04:50
The reasons these challenges are great
これらの課題が難しいのは
04:53
is that technically it's difficult to go to sea.
技術的に 海での研究が
困難だからです
04:55
It's hard to study a bluefin on its turf,
クロマグロを太平洋全体で
04:58
the entire Pacific realm.
研究するのは困難で
05:00
It's really tough to get up close and personal with a mako shark
アオザメに近づいて
タグを付けるのは
05:02
and try to put a tag on it.
さらに難しいのです
05:06
And then imagine being Bruce Mate's team from OSU,
オレゴン州立大学(OSU)の
ブルース・メイトチームの一員になって
05:08
getting up close to a blue whale
シロナガスクジラに近づいて
05:11
and fixing a tag on the blue whale that stays,
外れないタグを取り付ける姿を
想像してください
05:13
an engineering challenge
これはまだ我々も
05:16
we've yet to really overcome.
解決できていない技術上の難題です
05:18
So the story of our team, a dedicated team,
熱心な我々チームの物語は
05:20
is fish and chips.
フィッシュアンドチップスと言えます
05:23
We basically are taking
私たちがやっていることは
05:25
the same satellite phone parts,
衛星電話と同じ
05:27
or the same parts that are in your computer, chips.
または皆さんのコンピューターに
含まれるチップを使います
05:29
We're putting them together in unusual ways,
普段やらないような
組み合わせによって
05:32
and this is taking us into the ocean realm
これまで分からなかったような大海が
05:35
like never before.
明らかになってきました
05:37
And for the first time,
さらに今回初めて
05:39
we're able to watch the journey of a tuna beneath the ocean
海の下のマグロの移動を
見ることができました
05:41
using light and photons
これは光と光量子を利用して
05:44
to measure sunrise and sunset.
日の出と日の入りを測ることで
実現しました
05:46
Now, I've been working with tunas for over 15 years.
私はマグロを15年以上に渡って
研究していますが
05:49
I have the privilege of being a partner
モントレー・ベイ水族館と
05:52
with the Monterey Bay Aquarium.
一緒に働く機会をいただきました
05:54
We've actually taken a sliver of the ocean,
私たちは海の一部を
05:56
put it behind glass,
水槽に再現して
05:58
and we together
展示用として
06:00
have put bluefin tuna and yellowfin tuna on display.
クロマグロとキハダマグロを準備しました
06:02
When the veil of bubbles lifts every morning,
毎朝 泡のベールが浮き上がると
06:05
we can actually see a community from the Pelagic ocean,
眼前に迫るのは外洋魚のコミュニティーで
06:08
one of the only places on Earth
巨大クロマグロが
06:11
you can see giant bluefin swim by.
泳ぐ姿を見れるのはここだけです
06:13
We can see in their beauty of form and function,
その美しい姿と機能や
絶え間ない動きを
06:16
their ceaseless activity.
見ることができます
06:19
They're flying through their space, ocean space.
海という名の宇宙を
飛んでいるのです
06:21
And we can bring two million people a year
私たちはこの魚を間近で見て
06:24
into contact with this fish
その美しさを知ってもらうために
06:26
and show them its beauty.
年間2百万人を集めています
06:28
Behind the scenes is a working lab at Stanford University
舞台裏にはモントレー・ベイ水族館の
協力機関である
06:31
partnered with the Monterey Bay Aquarium.
スタンフォード大学の研究施設があります
06:34
Here, for over 14 or 15 years,
ここで14、5年に渡って
06:36
we've actually brought in
捕獲してきたのは
06:38
both bluefin and yellowfin in captivity.
クロマグロとキハダマグロです
06:40
We'd been studying these fish,
これまで彼らを研究してきましたが
06:42
but first we had to learn how to husbandry them.
まずは飼育法を
学ぶ必要がありました
06:44
What do they like to eat?
何を食べるのか?
06:46
What is it that they're happy with?
彼らにとって心地よい環境とは何か?
06:48
We go in the tanks with the tuna -- we touch their naked skin --
私たちは水槽に入って
マグロの生肌に触れます
06:50
it's pretty amazing. It feels wonderful.
素晴らしい感触です
06:53
And then, better yet,
そしてさらに素晴らしいのは
06:56
we've got our own version of tuna whisperers,
マグロと理解し合える
06:58
our own Chuck Farwell, Alex Norton,
チャック・ファーウェルと
07:00
who can take a big tuna
アレックス・ノートンが
07:02
and in one motion,
大きいマグロを
07:04
put it into an envelope of water,
海水と共に
一息で抱え込みます
07:06
so that we can actually work with the tuna
私たちはマグロの研究をするため
07:08
and learn the techniques it takes
彼らを傷を付けない方法を
07:10
to not injure this fish
学ぶことができます
07:12
who never sees a boundary in the open sea.
マグロは大海においては
境界など知りません
07:14
Jeff and Jason there, are scientists
こちらのジェフとジェイソンは科学者です
07:17
who are going to take a tuna
マグロを取り出して
07:19
and put it in the equivalent of a treadmill, a flume.
踏車のような人工水路に入れます
07:21
And that tuna thinks it's going to Japan, but it's staying in place.
マグロは日本へ連れて行かれると
思うかもしれませんが
07:24
We're actually measuring its oxygen consumption,
実際はマグロの酸素消費量と
07:27
its energy consumption.
熱消費量を計測しているのです
07:29
We're taking this data and building better models.
このデータをもとに
より良いモデルを作っています
07:32
And when I see that tuna -- this is my favorite view --
私はこのマグロを見るとき
―これが一番好きな眺めです―
07:35
I begin to wonder:
不思議に思うのは
07:38
how did this fish solve the longitude problem before we did?
どうやって人間より先に
経度を把握したのだろう?と
07:40
So take a look at that animal.
彼らを ご覧ください
07:44
That's the closest you'll probably ever get.
これ以上近づくことはできないでしょう
07:46
Now, the activities from the lab
ラボでの研究によって
どのように
07:48
have taught us now how to go out in the open ocean.
大海に繰り出せば良いのか
分かってきました
07:51
So in a program called Tag-A-Giant
“Tag-A-Giant”というプログラムでは
07:54
we've actually gone from Ireland to Canada,
私たちはアイルランドからカナダ
07:57
from Corsica to Spain.
コルシカ島からスペインまで
旅をしました
08:00
We've fished with many nations around the world
世界中で釣りをしたのは
08:02
in an effort to basically
巨大マグロの体内に
08:05
put electronic computers
電子コンピューターを
08:07
inside giant tunas.
取り付けるためです
08:10
We've actually tagged 1,100 tunas.
実に1,100匹ものマグロに
タグを付けることができました
08:12
And I'm going to show you three clips,
これから3つの映像をお見せします
08:15
because I tagged 1,100 tunas.
1,100匹もタグを付けましたからね
08:17
It's a very hard process, but it's a ballet.
とても大変ですが
チームプレーが要です
08:20
We bring the tuna out, we measure it.
マグロを引き揚げ 測定します
08:23
A team of fishers, captains, scientists and technicians
漁師、船長、科学者、技術者のチームが
08:26
work together to keep this animal out of the ocean
一丸となって この動物を
海上にあげておきます
08:29
for about four to five minutes.
4〜5分ほどです
08:32
We put water over its gills, give it oxygen.
酸素を与えるため
エラに海水をかけてあげます
08:35
And then with a lot of effort, after tagging,
そうして懸命にタグを付けて
08:38
putting in the computer,
コンピュータを埋め込み
08:41
making sure the stalk is sticking out so it senses the environment,
周りの環境を感知するよう
アンテナが出ていることを確認して
08:43
we send this fish back into the sea.
海に帰してやります
08:46
And when it goes, we're always happy.
彼らを見送る時は
いつも幸せになります
08:49
We see a flick of the tail.
尾びれを振って行きます
08:51
And from our data that gets collected,
データを収集できるのは
08:53
when that tag comes back,
ダグが戻って来る時です
08:56
because a fisher returns it
漁師が千ドルの報酬のために
08:58
for a thousand-dollar reward,
返してくれます
09:00
we can get tracks beneath the sea
脊椎動物なら
今では5年分までの
09:02
for up to five years now,
海の中の情報を
09:04
on a backboned animal.
得ることができます
09:06
Now sometimes the tunas are really large,
時には ナンタケットで
捕まえたような
09:08
such as this fish off Nantucket.
巨大なマグロもいます
09:11
But that's about half the size
しかしそれでも我々が
タグを付けた中では
09:13
of the biggest tuna we've ever tagged.
一番大きい個体の
半分しかありません
09:15
It takes a human effort,
マグロを引き揚げるには
09:17
a team effort, to bring the fish in.
人間のチーム力が必要です
09:19
In this case, what we're going to do
ここでやっているのは
ポップアップ式の
09:21
is put a pop-up satellite archival tag on the tuna.
衛星アーカイバルタグを
マグロに付けています
09:23
This tag rides on the tuna,
マグロに装着されたタグは
09:27
senses the environment around the tuna
周りの環境を感知すると
09:29
and actually will come off the fish,
後にマグロから外れて
09:32
detach, float to the surface
切り離されると 海面に浮上し
09:35
and send back to Earth-orbiting satellites
地球周回軌道衛星に
09:37
position data estimated by math on the tag,
タグから計算された
位置データ、圧力データ
09:40
pressure data and temperature data.
温度データなどが送られます
09:43
And so what we get then from the pop-up satellite tag
ポップアップ式衛星タグは
09:46
is we get away from having to have a human interaction
人間がタグを回収する
09:48
to recapture the tag.
手間を省いてくれます
09:51
Both the electronic tags I'm talking about are expensive.
どちらの電子タグも高額です
09:53
These tags have been engineered
これらは北米の
09:56
by a variety of teams in North America.
様々なチームによって
開発されてきました
09:58
They are some of our finest instruments,
現在 海で使用できる新しい
10:01
our new technology in the ocean today.
最高の機器の1つです
10:03
One community in general
どこよりも我々を支援してくれた
10:07
has given more to help us than any other community.
コミュニティーがあります
10:09
And that's the fisheries off the state of North Carolina.
ノースカロライナ州沿岸の漁業者です
10:11
There are two villages, Harris and Morehead City,
ハリス市とモリヘッド市という 
2つの町では
10:14
every winter for over a decade,
数十年に渡って 毎冬
10:17
held a party called Tag-A-Giant,
“Tag-A-Giant”というパーティーを開き
10:19
and together, fishers worked with us
漁師の人たちと一緒に
10:22
to tag 800 to 900 fish.
8百から9百匹もの魚に
タグを付けたのです
10:24
In this case, we're actually going to measure the fish.
この作業では魚の大きさも測ります
10:27
We're going to do something that in recent years we've started:
私たちがここ数年始めたことは
10:30
take a mucus sample.
粘液を採取することです
10:33
Watch how shiny the skin is; you can see my reflection there.
とても光沢のある肌です
私の姿が映っているのが見えます
10:35
And from that mucus, we can get gene profiles,
この粘液から遺伝子情報を
得ることができるのです
10:38
we can get information on gender,
性別も分かります
10:41
checking the pop-up tag one more time,
ポップアップ式のタグを再確認して
10:43
and then it's out in the ocean.
あとは海に帰してあげます
10:45
And this is my favorite.
ここが私のお気に入りです
10:47
With the help of my former postdoc, Gareth Lawson,
以前 一緒に研究した
ギャレス・ローソンのお陰ですが
10:49
this is a gorgeous picture of a single tuna.
これは一匹のマグロの
素晴らしい画像です
10:52
This tuna is actually moving on a numerical ocean.
このマグロは数値化した
海中を移動しています
10:54
The warm is the Gulf Stream,
暖かい方がメキシコ湾流で
10:57
the cold up there in the Gulf of Maine.
上の寒い方がメイン湾です
10:59
That's where the tuna wants to go -- it wants to forage on schools of herring --
マグロはそこに行きたがります
ニシンの群れでも探すのでしょう
11:02
but it can't get there. It's too cold.
しかしそこには行けません 
寒すぎるのです
11:05
But then it warms up, and the tuna pops in, gets some fish,
暖かくなると そこにマグロが現れ
魚を食べて
11:07
maybe comes back to home base,
元の場所に帰ったり
11:10
goes in again
また獲りに行ったりして
11:12
and then comes back to winter down there in North Carolina
冬になると またノースカロライナ州まで
下りてきて
11:14
and then on to the Bahamas.
その後バハマまで下っていきます
11:17
And my favorite scene, three tunas going into the Gulf of Mexico.
ここから私の好きなシーンです
3匹のマグロがメキシコ湾に向かいます
11:19
Three tunas tagged.
タグを付けてあります
11:22
Astronomically, we're calculating positions.
天文学的な見地から
位置を計算しています
11:24
They're coming together. That could be tuna sex --
一緒にやってきました
交尾かもしれません
11:26
and there it is.
ここです
11:29
That is where the tuna spawn.
ここがマグロの産卵場所なのです
11:31
So from data like this,
このようなデータから
11:33
we're able now to put the map up,
マップを作ることができました
11:35
and in this map
このマップには
11:37
you see thousands of positions
15年にも及ぶタグ付け作業による
11:39
generated by this decade and a half of tagging.
何千もの位置が記録されています
11:41
And now we're showing that tunas on the western side
これで西側のマグロたちは
東側へ移動することが
11:44
go to the eastern side.
分かってきました
11:47
So two populations of tunas --
2つのマグロの個体群は
11:49
that is, we have a Gulf population, one that we can tag --
片方はメキシコ湾流の個体群で
11:51
they go to the Gulf of Mexico, I showed you that --
タグ付けができ 先ほどのとおり
メキシコ湾にも行きます
11:53
and a second population.
そしてもう一方
11:56
Living amongst our tunas -- our North American tunas --
私たちの北米のマグロにも
入り混じっているのが
11:58
are European tunas that go back to the Med.
地中海方面から来る
ヨーロッパのクロマグロです
12:00
On the hot spots -- the hope spots --
ホットスポットや
ホープスポットに関わらず
12:03
they're mixed populations.
彼らは入り混じって
存在しているのです
12:05
And so what we've done with the science
この科学情報をもとに
12:07
is we're showing the International Commission,
私たちは国際委員会に向けて
12:09
building new models,
新しいモデルを構築することで
12:11
showing them that a two-stock no-mixing model --
今日まで2つの個体群が
12:13
to this day, used to reject
それぞれ独立して存在するという
12:15
the CITES treaty --
ワシントン条約の否決にも用いられた
12:18
that model isn't the right model.
モデルの間違いを訴えています
12:20
This model, a model of overlap,
こちらの重なり合うモデルが
12:22
is the way to move forward.
前に進む方法です
12:24
So we can then predict
どの海域を管理すればよいのか
12:26
where management places should be.
予測できるからです
12:28
Places like the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean
メキシコ湾や地中海などは
12:30
are places where the single species,
単一の種や個体群が
12:33
the single population, can be captured.
捕獲できるところです
12:35
These become forthright in places we need to protect.
これらが真っ先に保護しなければ
ならない場所になります
12:37
The center of the Atlantic where the mixing is,
混じり合いが起きている
大西洋の中心で
12:40
I could imagine a policy that lets Canada and America fish,
漁業体制がしっかりしている
12:43
because they manage their fisheries well,
アメリカとカナダには
漁業権を認める政策を
12:45
they're doing a good job.
取っても良いと思います
12:48
But in the international realm,
ただし過剰な漁業が行われてきた
12:50
where fishing and overfishing has really gone wild,
国際海域においては
ホープスポットを
12:52
these are the places that we have to make hope spots in.
作らなければならない所もあります
12:54
That's the size they have to be to protect the bluefin tuna.
クロマグロを保護するには
これだけの海域が必要なのです
12:57
Now in a second project
次のプロジェクトは
13:00
called Tagging of Pacific Pelagics,
“Tagging of Pacific Pelagics”(TOPP)で
13:02
we took on the planet as a team,
海洋生物センサスに身を置く私たちは
13:04
those of us in the Census of Marine Life.
地球を相手に一丸となって挑みました
13:06
And, funded primarily through Sloan Foundation and others,
当初はスローン財団などから
資金提供を受け
13:08
we were able to actually go in, in our project --
17あるフィールドプログラムの一つである
13:12
we're one of 17 field programs
私たちのプログラムを遂行することができ
13:15
and begin to take on tagging large numbers of predators,
マグロのみならず多くの捕食者に
13:17
not just tunas.
タグを付け始めることができました
13:20
So what we've done
私たちがやったのは
13:22
is actually gone up to tag salmon shark in Alaska,
アラスカでネズミザメに
タグを取り付けるために
13:24
met salmon shark on their home territory,
彼らがホームグラウンドで
13:27
followed them catching salmon
サケを捕まえる姿を追いかけながら
13:30
and then went in and figured out
分かったことがあります
13:32
that, if we take a salmon and put it on a line,
もしサケをエサに釣り糸を垂らせば
13:34
we can actually take up a salmon shark --
ホホジロザメの仲間である
ネズミザメを
13:37
This is the cousin of the white shark --
捕まえられるということです
13:39
and very carefully --
そして注意深く
13:41
note, I say "very carefully," --
―これが重要です―
13:43
we can actually keep it calm,
暴れないよう
13:45
put a hose in its mouth, keep it off the deck
ホースを口に入れ デッキから遠ざけて
13:47
and then tag it with a satellite tag.
衛星タグを取り付けることができます
13:50
That satellite tag will now have your shark phone home
そうすれば通信衛星がサメの状況を
13:53
and send in a message.
連絡してくれます
13:56
And that shark leaping there, if you look carefully, has an antenna.
ジャンプしているサメを
よく見ると アンテナが見えます
13:58
It's a free swimming shark with a satellite tag
衛星タグ付きの野生のサメが
14:01
jumping after salmon,
サケをジャンプして追いながら
14:03
sending home its data.
データをこちらに送信してくれるのです
14:05
Salmon sharks aren't the only sharks we tag.
タグを取り付けるのは
ネズミザメだけではありませんが
14:09
But there goes salmon sharks with this meter-level resolution
ここではネズミザメがいる
水温をレベルメーターで
14:11
on an ocean of temperature -- warm colors are warmer.
色分けします
暖かい海は明るい色になります
14:14
Salmon sharks go down
サメたちは熱帯に
14:17
to the tropics to pup
産卵のため南下し
14:19
and come into Monterey.
その後モントレーにやってきます
14:21
Now right next door in Monterey and up at the Farallones
モントレーの隣のファラロン諸島の
14:23
are a white shark team led by Scott Anderson -- there --
ホホジロザメのチームは
スコット・アンダーソンと
14:26
and Sal Jorgensen.
サル・ジョルゲンセンが率いています
14:28
They can throw out a target --
彼らはアシカのような形をした
14:30
it's a carpet shaped like a seal --
マットを投げて おとりに使い
14:32
and in will come a white shark, a curious critter
私たちの5メートルあるボートに
14:34
that will come right up to our 16-ft. boat.
好奇心につられてやってくるのを待ちます
14:37
It's a several thousand-pound animal.
数トンもある生き物です
14:40
And we'll wind in the target.
そこで おとりを引き込みます
14:42
And we'll place an acoustic tag
音響タグは
14:45
that says, "OMSHARK 10165,"
“OMSHARK 10165”などと呼ばれ
14:47
or something like that, acoustically with a ping.
これをピンで取り付けるのです
14:49
And then we'll put on a satellite tag
そこに衛星タグをつければ
14:52
that will give us the long-distance journeys
長旅の様子が分かります
14:54
with the light-based geolocation algorithms
魚につけたコンピューターから
算出された発光式の
14:57
solved on the computer that's on the fish.
地理情報アルゴリズムのおかげです
14:59
So in this case, Sal's looking at two tags there,
この場合 サルは2つのタグを
見ることになります
15:02
and there they are: the white sharks of California
カリフォルニアのホホジロザメが
15:05
going off to the white shark cafe and coming back.
仲間のところに行って
戻ってきました
15:08
We also tag makos with our NOAA colleagues,
米国海洋大気庁(NOAA)の
仲間と共に アオザメや
15:12
blue sharks.
ヨシキリザメにもタグを取り付けます
15:14
And now, together, what we can see
これによって 私たちは
15:16
on this ocean of color that's temperature,
温度で色分けされた海を
15:18
we can see ten-day worms of makos and salmon sharks.
10日間にわたって
アオザメ、ネズミザメ
15:20
We have white sharks and blue sharks.
ホホジロザメ、ヨシキリザメが
移動するのを確認できます
15:24
For the first time,
これまでに前例がなかった
15:26
an ecoscape as large as ocean-scale,
海全体のサメの移動経路が分かる
15:28
showing where the sharks go.
生態図ができたのです
15:30
The tuna team from TOPP has done the unthinkable:
TOPPのマグロチームは何と
15:33
three teams tagged 1,700 tunas,
3つのチームが1,700匹もの
タグ付けに成功しました
15:36
bluefin, yellowfin and albacore
クロマグロ、キハダマグロ
15:39
all at the same time --
ビンチョウマグロ
すべてに同時に―
15:41
carefully rehearsed tagging programs
注意深く練習した
15:43
in which we go out, pick up juvenile tunas,
タグ付け作業を行います
若いマグロを選んで
15:45
put in the tags that actually have the sensors,
各種センサーがついた
15:48
stick out the tuna
タグを埋め込み
15:51
and then let them go.
放してやります
15:53
They get returned, and when they get returned,
放流されたマグロは戻っていきますが
15:55
here on a NASA numerical ocean
NASAによって数式化された海の上を
15:57
you can see bluefin in blue
クロマグロなら青色で
16:00
go across their corridor,
大海原を渡って
16:02
returning to the Western Pacific.
西太平洋に戻って行くのがわかります
16:04
Our team from UCSC has tagged elephant seals
我がUCSC(カリフォルニア大学
サンタクルーズ校)チームも
16:07
with tags that are glued on their heads, that come off when they slough.
ゾウアザラシの頭に
脱皮の際に外れるタグを付けています
16:10
These elephant seals cover half an ocean,
ゾウアザラシの行動範囲は
太平洋の半分もカバーし
16:13
take data down to 1,800 feet --
水深500メートルからも
16:16
amazing data.
素晴らしいデータを送ってくれます
16:18
And then there's Scott Shaffer and our shearwaters
スコット・シェイファーは
ミズナギドリに
16:20
wearing tuna tags, light-based tags,
マグロタグである
発光式のタグを付けることで
16:23
that now are going to take you from New Zealand to Monterey and back,
ニュージーランドからモントレーの往復
16:26
journeys of 35,000 nautical miles
3千5百海里にも及ぶ旅を
見ることができます
16:29
we had never seen before.
これまで見たことのない光景です
16:32
But now with light-based geolocation tags that are very small,
今では小型の発光式
地理位置情報タグによって
16:34
we can actually see these journeys.
彼らの旅路を観察できるのです
16:37
Same thing with Laysan albatross
コアホウドリも
16:39
who travel an entire ocean
時々 マグロと同じ
16:41
on a trip sometimes,
海域を通って
16:43
up to the same zone the tunas use.
大海を旅をします
16:45
You can see why they might be caught.
だから捕まえられるわけですね
16:47
Then there's George Schillinger and our leatherback team out of Playa Grande
ジョージ・シリンジャーと
プラヤ・グランデのオサガメのチームは
16:50
tagging leatherbacks
オサガメにもタグを付けます
16:53
that go right past where we are.
彼らも同じように移動します
16:55
And Scott Benson's team
スコット・ベンソンのチームが証明したのは
16:58
that showed that leatherbacks go from Indonesia
アオガメがインドネシアから
17:00
all the way to Monterey.
はるかモントレーに移動することでした
17:02
So what we can see on this moving ocean
この変化する海の図によって
17:04
is we can finally see where the predators are.
ようやく 捕食者たちの場所が
分かってきました
17:07
We can actually see how they're using ecospaces
海全体に及ぶ
彼らの生態域を
17:10
as large as an ocean.
見ることができるのです
17:13
And from this information,
この情報をもとに
17:15
we can begin to map the hope spots.
ホープスポットを
描き出すことができます
17:17
So this is just three years of data right here --
これは3年分だけのデータですが
17:20
and there's a decade of this data.
これが10年分あります
17:22
We see the pulse and the seasonal activities
彼らの脈拍や
季節的な行動の変化などを
17:24
that these animals are going on.
観察することができます
17:26
So what we're able to do with this information
これらのデータを使ってできるのは
17:30
is boil it down to hot spots,
ホットスポットを特定し
17:32
4,000 deployments,
4千個ものタグを放つという
17:35
a huge herculean task,
非常に困難な仕事で
17:37
2,000 tags
初めて分かったのは
17:40
in an area, shown here for the first time,
2千個ものタグが集まる
17:42
off the California coast,
集合場所のような所が
17:44
that appears to be a gathering place.
カリフォルニア沿岸にあることでした
17:46
And then for sort of an encore from these animals,
アンコールに応えてくれるように
17:50
they're helping us.
彼らがやってくれるのは
17:53
They're carrying instruments
タグを利用して 水深2千メートルから
17:55
that are actually taking data down to 2,000 meters.
データを送ってくれることです
17:57
They're taking information from our planet
彼らが送ってくれる情報に含まれるのは
18:00
at very critical places like Antarctica and the Poles.
人類が容易に足を踏み入れられない
南極や北極です
18:02
Those are seals from many countries
様々な国から放たれた
18:05
being released
アザラシは
18:07
who are sampling underneath the ice sheets
氷床の下をくぐって
18:09
and giving us temperature data of oceanographic quality
海洋学的な温度データを
提供してくれます
18:11
on both poles.
南北の両極地方においてです
18:14
This data, when visualized, is captivating to watch.
大変興味深いのは
データが可視化された時ですが
18:16
We still haven't figured out best how to visualize the data.
データを可視化する
最善の方法は模索中です
18:19
And then, as these animals swim
水中の動物達が
18:22
and give us the information
私たちに送ってくれるデータは
18:24
that's important to climate issues,
気候変動問題に大変有用です
18:26
we also think it's critical
また私たちは
18:28
to get this information to the public,
この情報を社会に発信して
18:30
to engage the public with this kind of data.
皆さんに参画していただくことも
重要だと考えます
18:32
We did this with the Great Turtle Race --
グレート・タートル・レースでは
18:35
tagged turtles, brought in four million hits.
タグを付けたカメたちが
4万件ものアクセスを集めました
18:37
And now with Google's Oceans,
そして今やグーグル・オーシャンによって
18:40
we can actually put a white shark in that ocean.
海に放たれたホホジロザメが
18:43
And when we do and it swims,
まるでその美しい道を
18:45
we see this magnificent bathymetry
知っているような
18:47
that the shark knows is there on its path
カリフォルニアからハワイまでの
18:49
as it goes from California to Hawaii.
壮大な海底地形を映し出してくれます
18:51
But maybe Mission Blue
“Mission Blue”の役割は
18:53
can fill in that ocean that we can't see.
私たちが見えない海の様子を
教えてくれることです
18:55
We've got the capacity, NASA has the ocean.
我々にはノウハウがあり
NASAは海全体の様子を知っています
18:58
We just need to put it together.
力を合わせれば良いのです
19:01
So in conclusion,
まとめますと
19:03
we know where Yellowstone is for North America;
北米のイエローストーンは
私たちの海岸沖にも
19:05
it's off our coast.
あるということです
19:08
We have the technology that's shown us where it is.
テクノロジーによって
その場所も分かります
19:10
What we need to think about perhaps for Mission Blue
“Mission Blue”のために
我々ができることは
19:12
is increasing the biologging capacity.
バイオロギングの量を
増やすことかもしれません
19:15
How is it that we can actually
どうすればこのような活動を
19:18
take this type of activity elsewhere?
他の地域でも広められるでしょうか?
19:20
And then finally -- to basically get the message home --
そして最後に
考えていただきたいのが
19:23
maybe use live links
シロナガスクジラや
19:26
from animals such as blue whales and white sharks.
ホホジロザメからの映像を
生中継すること
19:28
Make killer apps, if you will.
どうか凄いアプリを作ってください
19:30
A lot of people are excited
多くの方が
19:32
when sharks actually went under the Golden Gate Bridge.
ゴールデンゲートブリッジの下を
泳ぐサメに喜ぶでしょう
19:34
Let's connect the public to this activity right on their iPhone.
皆さんのiPhoneで
この活動に繋がってください
19:37
That way we do away with a few internet myths.
そうすれば妙な都市伝説も廃れるでしょう
19:40
So we can save the bluefin tuna.
私たちはクロマグロを救えます
19:44
We can save the white shark.
ホホジロザメも救えるのです
19:46
We have the science and technology.
私たちには科学技術があります
19:48
Hope is here. Yes we can.
希望が見えてきました
私たちにはできます
19:50
We need just to apply this capacity
この可能性を
19:52
further in the oceans.
海にかけてみようではありませんか
19:54
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
19:56
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:58
Translator:Taihei Matsuda
Reviewer:Mari Arimitsu

sponsored links

Barbara Block - Marine biologist
Barbara Block studies how tuna, billfish and sharks move around (and stay warm) in the open ocean. Knowing how these large predators travel through pelagic waters will help us understand their role in the wider ocean ecosystem.

Why you should listen

Barbara Block takes a multidisciplinary approach to studying how large pelagic fish live and travel in the open ocean. Using novel electronic tags, Block and her team track large predators — tunas, billfish and sharks — on their ocean journeys. She also studies how and why muscle makes heat at a molecular level in fish.

Working out of Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station, Block and her colleagues run the Tuna Research and Conservation Center, a member of the Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP) program. Combining tracking data with physiological and genetic analyses, Block (a MacArthur "genius" grant winner) is developing population and ecological models to help us understand these fishes' roles in the ocean ecosystem — and perhaps learn to better manage these important food fish.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.