17:49
Mission Blue Voyage

Greg Stone: Saving the ocean one island at a time

グレッグ・ストーン: 一つずつ島を救って 海を守る

Filmed:

ミッション・ブルーの船上のトークで、キリバス共和国が太平洋の中央で巨大な保護地域を作るのをどのように支援したかという物語を、科学者グレッグ・ストーンは語ります -魚、海洋生物と島国それ自体の保護を。

- Oceanographer
Greg Stone was a key driver in the establishment of the Phoenix Island Protected Area in the island nation of Kiribati. The second-largest marine protected area in the world -- and one of the most pristine -- PIPA is a laboratory for exploring and monitoring the recovery of coral reefs from bleaching events. Full bio

話は
00:16
I guess the story actually has to start
1960年に始まります
00:18
maybe back in the the 1960s,
私が7歳か8歳の時です
00:20
when I was seven or eight years old,
リビングルームで
クストーのドキュメンタリーを見ながら
00:23
watching Jacques Cousteau documentaries on the living room floor
水中マスクと足ヒレをつけて
00:26
with my mask and flippers on.
番組の後に 私は湯船に入りました
00:29
Then after every episode, I had to go up to the bathtub
湯船で泳ぎ 排水口を見つめました
00:32
and swim around the bathtub and look at the drain,
排水口しか見るものがなかったからです
00:34
because that's all there was to look at.
16才の時
00:37
And by the time I turned 16,
私は 海洋科学の道を選びました
00:39
I pursued a career in marine science,
探査やダイビングを
00:42
in exploration and diving,
そしてフロリダキーズ沖などの
水中居住室で暮らました
00:45
and lived in underwater habitats, like this one off the Florida Keys,
30日間
00:48
for 30 days total.
ブライアン・スケリーがこの写真を撮りました 
ありがとう ブライアン
00:50
Brian Skerry took this shot. Thanks, Brian.
そして 私は世界各地の海を
深海潜水艇で潜りました
00:52
And I've dived in deep-sea submersibles around the world.
そしてこれは 世界で最も深くもぐれる
00:55
And this one is the deepest diving submarine in the world,
日本の潜水艇です
00:58
operated by the Japanese government.
そしてシルビア・アールと私は
01:00
And Sylvia Earle and I
この潜水艇での探検に参加しました
01:02
were on an expedition in this submarine
20年前 日本で
01:04
20 years ago in Japan.
水深5400メートルまで潜りました
01:07
And on my dive, I went down 18,000 feet,
そこは
01:10
to an area that I thought
手付かずの
未知の海底であると思っていました
01:12
would be pristine wilderness area on the sea floor.
しかしそこに着いたとき
01:15
But when I got there, I found
たくさんのプラスチックゴミや
他のゴミを見つけました
01:17
lots of plastic garbage and other debris.
私は楽しく科学し
探索だけをしているわけにいかないことに
01:19
And it was really a turning point in my life,
気づきました
01:21
where I started to realize
それは私の人生の転機となりました
01:23
that I couldn't just go have fun doing science and exploration.
全体を見る必要がありました
01:26
I needed to put it into a context.
環境保護のゴールに向かって
進む必要がありました
01:28
I needed to head towards conservation goals.
そこで私は
01:31
So I began to work
ナショナルジオグラフィック協会や
他の協会と共同で
01:33
with National Geographic Society and others
南極探検に参加しました
01:36
and led expeditions to Antarctica.
3度の南極ダイビング探索に参加したのです
01:39
I led three diving expeditions to Antarctica.
10年前 発端となる旅でした
01:41
Ten years ago was a seminal trip,
私たちはB-15と呼ばれる
大きな氷山を探索しました
01:43
where we explored that big iceberg, B-15,
ロス棚氷から崩れ落ちた史上最大の氷山です
01:46
the largest iceberg in history, that broke off the Ross Ice Shelf.
氷山の内側と下に潜る
01:49
And we developed techniques
新しい技術を開発しをました
01:51
to dive inside and under the iceberg,
腎臓を温めるパッドを
01:53
such as heating pads on our kidneys
電池を引きずって使うようなもので
01:55
with a battery that we dragged around,
血液が腎臓を流れるときに
01:57
so that, as the blood flowed through our kidneys,
私たちの体に戻って行く前に
01:59
it would get a little boost of warmth
少し温められるようになっています
02:01
before going back into our bodies.
しかし 3回の南極への探索の後
02:03
But after three trips to Antarctica,
温かい水の中で仕事をしたほうがよいと
思うようになりました
02:05
I decided that it might be nicer to work in warmer water.
その同じ年 10年前
02:09
And that same year, 10 years ago,
私はフェニックス諸島に向いました
02:11
I headed north to the Phoenix Islands.
これから そのお話をしたいと思います
02:13
And I'm going to tell you that story here in a moment.
その前に このグラフをご覧ください
02:16
But before I do, I just want you to ponder this graph for a moment.
別の形でご覧になっているかもしれません
02:19
You may have seen this in other forms,
上の線は 全地球の陸上での
02:21
but the top line is the amount of protected area
保護地区の合計です
02:24
on land, globally,
約12%です
02:26
and it's about 12 percent.
ホッケースティックの形をしています
02:28
And you can see that it kind of hockey sticks up
1960年代と70年代から
02:30
around the 1960s and '70s,
現在にかけて増加傾向です
02:32
and it's on kind of a nice trajectory right now.
たぶん
02:35
And that's probably because
誰もが環境に注目するようになり
02:37
that's when everybody got aware of the environment
地球の日や
02:39
and Earth Day
ヒッピーなどと共に
60年代に起こったすべてのことは
02:41
and all the stuff that happened in the '60s with the Hippies and everything
地球環境への意識を高めたと思います
02:44
really did, I think, have an affect on global awareness.
しかし 海の保護海域は
02:46
But the ocean-protected area
基本的には変化なしです
02:48
is basically flat line
現在わずかに増加しているかもしれません
02:50
until right about now -- it appears to be ticking up.
海洋の保護海域は
02:52
And I do believe that we are at the hockey stick point
これから増加すると思います
02:55
of the protected area in the ocean.
地上で起ったことから
02:57
I think we would have gotten there a lot earlier
海で何が起こるかを見ることができたなら
03:00
if we could see what happens in the ocean
もっと早くそうなったと思います
03:02
like we can see what happens on land.
しかし不幸にも海洋は不透明で
03:04
But unfortunately, the ocean is opaque,
何が起こっているのかを見ることはできません
03:07
and we can't see what's going on.
したがって 海洋の保護は
陸の保護に後れを取っています
03:09
And therefore we're way behind on protection.
しかし スキューバダイビング ​​潜水艇
03:11
But scuba diving, submersibles
私たちが行おうとしているすべての事は
03:13
and all the work that we're setting about to do here
その是正に役立つでしょう
03:16
will help rectify that.
フェニックス諸島はどこでしょう?
03:19
So where are the Phoenix Islands?
そこは世界最大の海洋保護区でした
03:21
They were the world's largest marine-protected area
先週までは
03:24
up until last week
今週からはチャゴス諸島が最大です
03:26
when the Chagos Archipelago was declared.
それは中央太平洋にあります
それはどこからでも約5日の距離です
03:28
It's in the mid-Pacific. It's about five days from anywhere.
フェニックス諸島に行く場合
03:31
If you want to get to the Phoenix Islands,
フィジーから5日
03:33
it's five days from Fiji,
ハワイから5日 サモアからも5日です
03:35
it's five days from Hawaii, it's five days from Samoa.
太平洋の真ん中です
03:37
It's out in the middle of the Pacific,
赤道直下です
03:39
right around the Equator.
10年前には
島のことを聞いたことがありませんでした
03:42
I had never heard of the islands 10 years ago,
それらを所有している国 キリバスについてもです
03:44
nor the country, Kiribati, that owns them,
フィジーで船中泊ダイビングボートを経営する
私の二人の友人が
03:46
till two friends of mine who run a liveaboard dive boat in Fiji
これらの島へ
科学的な探検をする気はあるかいと尋ねるまで
03:49
said, "Greg, would you lead a scientific expedition up to these islands?
彼らはここで潜ったことがありませんでした
03:52
They've never been dived."
私は「うん」と答えました
03:54
And I said, "Yeah.
「でも島の場所と所属する国を教えてくれよ」
03:56
But tell me where they are and the country that owns them."
始めに島のことを知ったとき
03:58
So that's when I first learned of the Islands
どんなことになるか想像もつきませんでした
04:00
and had no idea what I was getting into.
でも私は探索に興味を持っていました
04:02
But I was in for the adventure.
ここでフェニックス諸島保護区を
少し紹介しましょう
04:06
Let me give you a little peek here of the Phoenix Islands-protected area.
地球の最も深海の部分です
04:09
It's a very deep-water part of our planet.
平均水深は約3600メートルです
04:13
The average depths are about 12,000 ft.
フェニックス諸島には多くの海山があります
04:15
There's lots of seamounts in the Phoenix Islands,
これは特に保護された部分です
04:17
which are specifically part of the protected area.
海山は生物多様性のために重要です
04:20
Seamounts are important for biodiversity.
海洋には実際陸地より山が多く存在しています
04:22
There's actually more mountains in the ocean than there are on land.
興味深い事です
04:25
It's an interesting fact.
フェニックス諸島には海山がたくさんあるのです
04:27
And the Phoenix Islands is very rich in those seamounts.
深い 三次元空間を想像してみて下さい
04:31
So it's a deep -- think about it in a big three-dimensional space,
非常に深い三次元空間です
04:34
very deep three-dimensional space
マグロ クジラの群れと
04:36
with herds of tuna, whales,
いろいろな深海の海洋生物
04:39
all kinds of deep sea marine life
これまでの講演で見ましたね
04:41
like we've seen here before.
これが研究のために 早い段階から
04:43
That's the vessel that we took up there
私たちが使った船です
04:45
for these studies, early on,
後ろに見える これが島です
04:47
and that's what the Islands look like -- you can see in the background.
水面すれすれで
04:50
They're very low to the water,
1つを除いてすべて無人島です
04:52
and they're all uninhabited, except one island
そこには約35人の管理者が住んでいます
04:54
has about 35 caretakers on it.
長い間無人島でした
04:56
And they've been uninhabited for most of time
04:59
because even in the ancient days,
広く太平洋を旅していた
05:01
these islands were too far away
古代ポリネシア人にとってさえ
05:03
from the bright lights of Fiji and Hawaii and Tahiti
これらの島は
05:06
for those ancient Polynesian mariners
フィジー、ハワイ、タヒチから遠く離れていました
05:08
that were traversing the Pacific so widely.
私たちはそこに行ったのです
05:11
But we got up there,
今までダイビングされたことのない場所に行って
05:13
and I had the unique and wonderful scientific opportunity and personal opportunity
ユニークで素晴らしい科学的 個人的な
チャンスだったのです
05:16
to get to a place that had never been dived
島に着いて「どこで私たちはダイビングしよう?」
05:18
and just get to an island and go, "Okay, where are we going to dive?
「そこにしよう」
05:20
Let's try there,"
そして潜る
05:22
and then falling into the water.
私的生活と専門家としての生活
両方が変わりました
05:24
Both my personal and my professional life changed.
突然
05:26
Suddenly, I saw a world
私は海洋で
今まで見たことがなかった世界を見ました
05:28
that I had never seen before in the ocean --
密集した魚の群れは
05:31
schools of fish that were so dense
海面からの光の通過を妨げ
05:33
they dulled the penetration of sunlight from the surface,
ぎっしりと連続した
05:36
coral reefs that were continuous
カラフルなサンゴ礁
05:38
and solid and colorful,
いたるところにいる大きな魚
05:40
large fish everywhere,
マンタエイ
05:42
manta rays.
ブダイの産卵 それは一つの生態系でした
05:45
It was an ecosystem. Parrotfish spawning --
これは 約5千尾の
ロ​​ングノーズブダイの産卵です
05:47
this is about 5,000 longnose parrotfish spawning
フェニックスアイランドの入り口で
05:50
at the entrance to one of the Phoenix Islands.
この魚が交尾しているのを見ることができます
05:52
You can see the fish are balled up
生殖のために卵と精子を交換し
05:54
and then there's a little cloudy area there
海水が濁ります
05:56
where they're exchanging the eggs and sperm for reproduction --
海洋で行なわれるイベントです
06:00
events that the ocean is supposed to do,
しかし人間の活動のため
06:02
but struggles to do in many places now
多くの場所で行うのが難しくなっています
06:04
because of human activity.
フェニックス諸島と赤道の部分は
06:06
The Phoenix Islands and all the equatorial parts of our planet
マグロ漁業にとって非常に重要です
06:08
are very important for tuna fisheries,
このキハダマグロ
06:10
especially this yellowfin tuna that you see here.
フェニックス諸島は 主要なマグ​​ロ漁場です
06:14
Phoenix Islands is a major tuna location.
そして サメも
私たちのダイビングの初めのころ
06:16
And sharks -- we had sharks on our early dives,
一度に最大150頭のサメに出会いました
06:19
up to 150 sharks at once,
これは
06:21
which is an indication
非常に健康で強力な生態系であることを
示しています
06:23
of a very, very healthy, very strong, system.
だから私は
06:26
So I thought the scenes
終わることのない野生の情景が
06:28
of never-ending wilderness
永遠に続くだろうと思いました
06:30
would go on forever,
しかしそうはいきませんでした
06:32
but they did finally come to an end.
そして私たちはさらに島の地上を探検しました
06:34
And we explored the surface of the Islands as well --
重要な鳥の巣作りの場所
06:37
very important bird nesting site,
世界で 太平洋の中で
最も重要な鳥の巣作りの場所です
06:39
some of the most important bird-nesting sites in the Pacific, in the world.
そして旅を終えました
06:44
And we finished our trip.
これがそのエリアです
06:46
And that's the area again.
8つの島があります
06:49
You can see the Islands -- there are eight islands --
水から顔を出しています
06:51
that pop out of the water.
水から出ていないのは海山です
06:53
The peaks that don't come out of the water are the seamounts.
海山が海面から出ると島になります
06:56
Remember, a seamount turns into an island when it hits the surface.
フェニックス諸島周囲の状況は?
07:02
And what's the context of the Phoenix Islands?
どこにあるのか?
07:04
Where do these exist?
キリバス共和国にあって
07:06
Well they exist in the Republic of Kiribati,
キリバスは中部太平洋に位置しています
07:08
and Kiribati is located in the Central Pacific
三つの島のグループとして
07:10
in three island groups.
西にはギルバート諸島が
07:13
In the west we have the Gilbert Islands.
中央にフェニックス諸島があります
07:15
In the center we have the Phoenix Islands,
それが今私が話している話題です
07:17
which is the subject that I'm talking about.
そして東にはライン諸島があります
07:19
And then over to the east we have the Line Islands.
これは世界最大の環礁の国です
07:21
It's the largest atoll nation in the world.
その国の人口は
07:24
And they have
約11万人です
07:26
about 110,000 people
33の島々に広がっており
07:28
spread out over 33 islands.
大洋の1360万立方キロメートルに相当し
07:31
They control 3.4 million cubic miles of ocean,
地球上のすべての海水の
07:34
and that's between one and two percent
1%から2%です
07:36
of all the ocean water on the planet.
10年前に私が初めてそこに行ったとき
07:38
And when I was first going up there,
この国の名前をほとんど知りませんでした
07:40
I barely knew the name of this country 10 years ago,
「なぜキリバスなんて所にいくの?」
07:43
and people would ask me,
と聞かれるくらいでした
07:45
"Why are you going to this place called Kiribati?"
古いジョークを思い出しました
07:47
And it reminded me of that old joke
銀行強盗が手錠をかけられて
裁判所から出てくると
07:49
where the bank robber comes out of the courthouse handcuffed,
記者が「ウィリー
何故あなたは銀行強盗をするのかね?」と叫ぶ
07:51
and the reporter yells, "Hey, Willy. Why do you rob banks?"
すると
「すべてのお金がそこにあるから」と答える
07:54
And he says, "cause that's where all the money is."
「なぜ私がキリバスに行くのかだって?」
07:56
And I would tell people, "Why do I go to Kiribati?
「それはすべての海があるからさ」
07:59
Because that's where all the ocean is."
それは基本的に一つの国で
08:01
They basically are one nation
中部太平洋の
08:03
that controls most of the equatorial waters
赤道海域の大部分の海を
08:06
of the Central Pacific Ocean.
領有している国です
08:09
They're also a country
差し迫った危険にさらされている国でもあります
08:11
that is in dire danger.
気候変動により海面は上昇し
08:13
Sea levels are rising,
熱膨張による海面上昇
08:15
and Kiribati, along with 42 other nations in the world,
そして海への淡水の溶解により
08:18
will be under water within 50 to 100 years
42の他の国々と一緒に
08:20
due to climate change
50から100年の内に
08:22
and the associated sea-level rise from thermal expansion
水面下になることが予測されます
08:25
and the melting of freshwater into the ocean.
諸島は海抜わずか1〜2メートルです
08:28
The Islands rise only one to two meters
諸島のいくつかは
08:30
above the surface.
すでに水面下にあります
08:32
Some of the islands have already gone under water.
これらの国は本当の問題に直面しているのです
08:35
And these nations are faced with a real problem.
世界として私たちも問題に直面しています
08:37
We as a world are faced with a problem.
すでに家を失った
08:40
What do we do with displaced fellow Earthlings
地球人仲間はどうすればよいのでしょうか?
08:43
who no longer have a home on the planet?
モルディブの大統領は
08:46
The president of the Maldives
これらの国の苦境を強調するために
08:48
conducted a mock cabinet meeting
最近模擬閣議を実施しました
08:50
underwater recently
最近模擬閣議を実施しました
08:52
to highlight the dire straits of these countries.
私たちが焦点を当てる必要があるものなのです
08:54
So it's something we need to focus on.
話をフェニックス諸島にもどしますと
08:57
But back to the Phoenix Islands,
この講演の主題ですが
09:00
which is the subject of this Talk.
帰ってきて私は
09:02
After I got back, I said,
私たちが見たものは素晴らしかったと言いました
09:04
okay, this is amazing, what we found.
西端の
09:06
I'd like to go back and share it with the government of Kiribati,
タラワにあるキリバス共和国政府と
09:09
who are over in Tarawa,
それを共有したいのです
09:11
the westernmost group.
それで彼らと連絡を開始しました
09:13
So I started contacting them --
実際に
私に探索の許可を与えてくれたのですから
09:15
because they had actually given me a permit to do this --
「私たちが見つけたものを
あなた方にお伝えしたい」と言いました
09:17
and I said, "I want to come up and tell you what we found."
ところが何故か彼らは
私が訪れることを望んでいませんでした
09:20
And for some reason they didn't want me to come,
タイミングと場所が悪かったのでしょうか 
しばらく時間がかかりました
09:22
or it was hard to find a time and a place, and it took a while,
最終的には「来てもいいよ
09:25
but finally they said, "Okay, you can come.
でも来るなら
セミナーに参加する全員に昼食を
09:27
But if you come, you have to buy lunch
用意してください」という返事をもらいました
09:29
for everybody who comes to the seminar."
私は「参加する人の為に
09:31
So I said, "Okay, I'm happy to buy lunch.
喜んで昼食をご用意します」と言いました
09:33
Just get whatever anybody wants."
サンゴ礁生物学者 デービッド・オブラと私は
タラワに行きました
09:35
So David Obura, a coral reef biologist, and I went to Tarawa,
フェニックス諸島での素晴らしい発見を
09:38
and we presented for two hours
2時間にわたって説明しました
09:40
on the amazing findings of the Phoenix Islands.
この国はこの領域からの情報を
持っていなかったのです
09:42
And the country never knew this. They never had any data from this area.
フェニックス諸島からの情報は
なにもありませんでした
09:45
They'd never had any information from the Phoenix Islands.
話の後で水産大臣は私に歩み寄り
09:48
After the talk, the Minister of Fisheries walked up to me
「グレッグ
09:51
and he said, "Greg, do you realize
あなたは いままで帰ってきて
09:53
that you are the first scientist
何をしたかを私たちに報告してくれた
09:55
who has ever come back
最初の科学者です
09:57
and told us what they did?"
私たちの領海の研究を行うための許可証を
09:59
He said, "We often issue these permits
何度でも発行しますよ」と言いました
10:01
to do research in our waters,
「普通だと2、3年後に簡単な手紙か
10:03
but usually we get a note two or three years later,
論文のコピーを受けとりますが
10:05
or a reprint.
あなたは 私たちに何をしたか語ってくれた
最初の人です
10:07
But you're the first one who's ever come back and told us what you did.
本当に感謝しています 今日の昼食はおごらせてください
10:10
And we really appreciate that. And we're buying you lunch today.
夕食に時間がありますか?」
10:13
And are you free for dinner?"
私は夕食に時間があったのです
10:15
And I was free for dinner,
キリバスの水産大臣と夕食に出かけました
10:17
and I went out to dinner with the Minister of Fisheries in Kiribati.
ディナーを食べながら
10:19
And over the course of dinner,
非常に貧しいキリバスは
10:21
I learned that Kiribati gains most of its revenue --
その歳入のほとんどを
10:24
it's a very poor country --
歳入というものを
10:26
but it gains what revenue is has
その海域から魚を取るための
10:28
by selling access to foreign nations
アクセスを外国に売ることで得ています
10:30
to take fish out of its waters,
キリバスは魚を取る
10:32
because Kiribati does not have the capacity
能力を持っていないからです
10:34
to take the fish itself.
協定というのは
10:36
And the deal that they strike
捕獲国が
10:38
is the extracting country
捕獲価値の5%を
10:40
gives Kiribati five percent
キリバスに与えるというものです
10:42
of the landed value.
そうもしアメリカ合衆国が
10:44
So if the United States
サンゴ礁から
10:46
removes a million dollars'
百万ドル分のロブスターを捕獲するとすると
10:48
worth of lobsters from a reef,
キリバスは5万ドルを取得します
10:50
Kiribati gets 50,000 dollars.
私には
とても良い取引のようには思えませんでしたので
10:53
And, you know, it didn't seem like a very good deal to me.
夕食の席で大臣に聞くと
10:56
So I asked the Minister over dinner,
「資源価値を計算して
10:58
I said, "Would you consider a situation
魚やサメを取らずに
11:01
where you would still get paid --
海の中のエビをそのままにして
11:04
we do the math and figure out what the value of the resource is --
さらにまだ支払いを得られるような方法を
11:07
but you leave fish and the sharks
検討して下さい」と言いました
11:09
and the shrimp in the water?"
彼は食べるのをやめ
11:11
He stopped, and he said, "Yes, we would like to do that
「乱獲問題に対処するためにそうしたい
11:14
to deal with our overfishing problem,
「逆漁業許可証」と呼ぶようなものです」
と言いました
11:16
and I think we would call it a reverse fishing license."
彼は「逆漁業許可証」という言葉を作り出しました
11:19
He coined the term "reverse fishing license."
私は「そうです 逆漁業許可証です」と言いました
11:21
So I said, "Yes, a 'reverse fishing license.'"
夕食をおえました
11:24
So we walked away from this dinner
その後どの方向に向かって行ったらいいのか
分からずに
11:26
really not knowing where to go at that point.
私はアメリカに戻って 周囲を見回し
11:28
I went back to the States and started looking around
どこで逆漁業許可証が
11:30
to see if I could find examples
使われている例が見られるか
11:33
where reverse fishing licenses
探し始めました
11:35
had been issued,
どこにもありませんでした
11:37
and it turned out there were none.
漁業をしないことに対して金が支払われている
11:39
There were no oceanic deals
海洋協定はありませんでした
11:41
where countries were compensated for not fishing.
地上にはあります
11:44
It had occurred on land,
南米とアフリカの熱帯雨林では
11:46
in rainforests of South America and Africa,
地主が木を伐採しないことに対して
11:49
where landowners had been paid
支払われているのです
11:51
not to cut the trees down.
コンサベーションインターナショナルが
この協定を扱っています
11:53
And Conservation International had struck some of those deals.
私はコンサベーションインターナショナルに行き
11:55
So I went to Conservation International
援助を求めてパートナーとして加わってもらい
11:57
and brought them in as a partner
漁業資源の
12:00
and went through the process
評価作業を行いました
12:02
of valuing the fishery resource,
キリバス共和国はいくら受け取るべきか
12:05
deciding how much Kiribati should be compensated,
魚の種類は
12:08
what the range of the fishes were,
他のパートナーの参加も得ました
12:10
brought in a whole bunch of other partners --
オーストラリア政府
12:12
the government of Australia,
ニュージーランド、世界銀行
12:14
the government of New Zealand, the World Bank.
オーク財団とナショナルジオグラフィックも
12:16
The Oak Foundation and National Geographic
多額の資金提供者となりました
12:18
have been big funders of this as well.
失われた漁業許可料と同額を
12:20
And we basically founded the park
この貧しい国に支払い
12:22
on the idea of an endowment
海域を保護するという
12:24
that would pay the equivalent lost fishing license fees
基金の考え方に基づいて
12:27
to this very poor country
海域を設定しました
12:29
to keep the area intact.
このプロセスの途中で
私はキリバスの大統領に会いました
12:31
Halfway through this process, I met the president of Kiribati,
アノト・トングさんです
12:33
President Anote Tong.
彼は 本当に重要なリーダーです
12:35
He's a really important leader,
先見の明 先進的な考えを持つ人です
12:37
a real visionary, forward-thinking man,
私が彼にアプローチしたとき
彼は私に二つのことを語ってくれました
12:39
and he told me two things when I approached him.
「グレッグしてほしいことが二つあります
12:41
He said, "Greg, there's two things I'd like you to do.
一つは 私は政治家なので
12:44
One is, remember I'm a politician,
私の閣僚と一緒に働いてほしい
12:46
so you've got to go out and work with my ministers
これが良い考えであることを
キリバスの人々に納得させてほしいのです
12:48
and convince the people of Kiribati that this is a good idea.
第二に 私の大統領任期が終わっても続くような
12:51
Secondly, I'd like you to create principles
根本理念を作ってほしいのです
12:53
that will transcend my own presidency.
私の大統領任期とともに
終わってしまうようなことを
12:55
I don't want to do something like this
したくありません」
12:57
if it's going to go away after I'm voted out of office."
先見性と強いリーダーシップ
13:00
So we had very strong leadership, very good vision
多くの科学情報 多くの弁護士を手に入れました
13:03
and a lot of science, a lot of lawyers involved.
実現するには手間取りました
13:06
Many, many steps were taken to pull this off.
第一にキリバス共和国が
13:09
And it was primarily because Kiribati realized
彼ら自身の利益になると理解したからです
13:12
that this was in their own self-interest to do this.
環境保護団体と共有できる
13:14
They realized that this was a common cause
主張であることを理解しました
13:16
that they had found
主張であることを理解しました
13:18
with the conservation community.
2002年
13:21
Then in 2002,
全てがうまく進んでいるとき
13:23
when this was all going full-swing,
サンゴ白化事件が
フェニックス諸島で起こりました
13:26
a coral-bleaching event happened in the Phoenix Islands.
これが私たちが保護しようとした資源です
13:29
Here's this resource that we're looking to save,
記録破りの
13:32
and it turns out it's the hottest heating event
高温だったのです
13:34
that we can find on record.
時々このような海水の異常高温が見られます
13:36
The ocean heated up as it does sometimes,
熱気団が形成され
13:39
and the hot spot formed and stalled
フェニックス諸島に6ヶ月とどまったのです
13:42
right over the Phoenix Islands for six months.
6か月間 32℃以上だったのです
13:45
It was over 32 degrees Celsius for six months
それはサンゴの60%を
13:48
and it basically killed
死滅させました
13:50
60 percent of the coral.
私たちが保護していたこの海域が
13:52
So suddenly we had this area that we were protecting,
少なくともサンゴ礁は
死んでしまったかのようでした
13:54
but now it appeared to be dead, at least in the coral areas.
もちろん 深い海域と外洋はよいのですが
13:57
Of course the deep-sea areas and the open ocean areas were fine,
誰もが見たいサンゴは苦境に陥りました
14:00
but the coral, which everybody likes to look at, was in trouble.
うれしいことにそれは回復し
14:03
Well, the good news is it's recovered
急速に回復しました
14:05
and recovering fast,
私たちが見てきたどのサンゴ礁よりも速く
14:07
faster than any reef we've seen.
この写真は数ヶ月前に
ブライアン・スケリーによって撮影されました
14:09
This picture was just taken by Brian Skerry a few months ago
わたしたちがフェニックス諸島に戻ったとき
14:12
when we returned to the Phoenix Islands
保護された海域だったので
14:14
and discovered that, because it is a protected area
健康な魚の群が生息し
14:17
and has healthy fish populations
海草を食べ
14:20
that keep the algae grazed down
健康なサンゴ礁を保っていたため
14:23
and keep the rest of the reef healthy,
サンゴが力強く息を吹き返したのです
14:25
the coral is booming, is just booming back.
それはまるで
14:28
It's almost like if a person
14:30
has multiple diseases,
ヒトがいくつもの病気に罹っていると
治すのは難しく死ぬかもしれないけれど
14:32
it's hard to get well, you might die,
でも病気が一つだけの時は簡単に回復できるのと
似ています
14:34
but if you only have one disease to deal with, you can get better.
気候温暖化が問題でした
14:37
And that's the story with climate-change heating.
それだけが脅威でした
14:39
It's the only threat,
サンゴ礁が対処しなければならない
唯一のものでした
14:41
the only influence that the reef had to deal with.
漁業もないし 水質汚染もない
沿岸開発もありませんでしたから
14:44
There was no fishing, there was no pollution, there was no coastal development,
サンゴ礁は順調な回復過程にありました
14:47
and the reef is on a full-bore recovery.
私は10年前 水産大臣との夕食を覚えています
14:51
Now I remember that dinner I had with the Minister of Fisheries 10 years ago
私たちが夕食のとき最初にこの話を持ち出して
とても元気づいた時
14:54
when we first brought this up and I got quite animated during the dinner
「環境保護団体が
14:57
and said, "Well, I think that the conservation community
このアイデアを採用する可能性があります」
と言ったとき
14:59
might embrace this idea, Minister."
彼はいったん話をやめ 両手を置き
15:01
He paused and put his hands together and said,
「そうだねグレッグ
15:03
"Yes, Greg,
しかし ”細部”が問題なのさ」と言いました
15:05
but the devil will be in the details," he said.
そのとおりでした
15:07
And it certainly was.
過去10年間 次から次へ”細部”が続きました
15:09
The last 10 years have been detail after detail
法案を作成することから
15:12
ranging from creating legislation
何度も研究のための探索
15:15
to multiple research expeditions
コミュニケーションプランまで
15:18
to communication plans,
弁護士のチームが
15:20
as I said, teams of lawyers,
了解覚書や
15:22
MOUs,
フェニックス諸島信託理事会を作りました
15:24
creating the Phoenix Islands Trust Board.
完全に寄付金でまかなえるよう準備中です
15:27
And we are now in the process of raising the full endowment.
募金活動中のキリバス共和国は
15:29
Kiribati has frozen extracting activities
現状で課金を中止しています
15:32
at its current state while we raise the endowment.
3週前
最初のPIPA(フェニックス諸島保護海域)
15:35
We just had our first PIPA Trust Board meeting three weeks ago.
信託理事会がありました
完全に機能しています
15:38
So it's a fully functional
実動しています
15:40
up-and-running entity
「逆漁業許可証」について交渉を担当し
15:42
that negotiates the reverse fishing license with the country.
PIPA信託委理事会がライセンスを持ち
15:45
And the PIPA Trust Board holds that license
国に支払いをしています
15:48
and pays the country for this.
非常に堅実な よく考え抜かれたものです
15:50
So it's a very solid, very well thought-out,
安定したシステムです
15:52
very well grounded system,
ボトムアップで作られました
15:55
and it was a bottom-up system,
それはこの仕事にとても重要でした
15:57
and that was very important with this work,
これを保証するためにボトムアップで
作られました
15:59
from the bottom up to secure this.
成功の条件をここに挙げます
16:01
So the conditions for success here are listed.
ご自分で読んでいただけます
16:03
You can read them yourselves.
自分が最も重要だと思うのは
16:05
But I would say the most important one in my mind
市場経済の中で
16:07
was working within the market forces
うまくいっていることです
16:09
of the situation.
このやり方を前に進められることが
保証されました
16:11
And that insured that we could move this forward
それはキリバス共和国と世界双方の
16:14
and it would have both the self-interest of Kiribati
自己利益でもあります
16:17
as well as the self-interest of the world.
最後のスライドをお見せします
16:20
And I'll leave you with one final slide,
どのようにこれをスケールアップするか
ということです
16:22
that is: how do we scale this up?
どのように シルビアの夢を実現するのでしょう
16:24
How do we realize Sylvia's dream?
最終的にどこで実現するのでしょう
16:26
Where eventually do we take this?
ここは保護地域を持った
16:28
Here's the Pacific
大きなMPA(海洋保護地区)のある
16:30
with large MPAs
太平洋です
16:33
and large conservation zones on it.
ごらんのとおり
16:37
And as you can see,
つぎはぎ状態です
16:39
we have a patchwork across this ocean.
今日はそのうちの一つの話をしました
16:42
I've just described to you the one story
長方形の領域
そのうしろにフェニックス諸島があります
16:44
behind that rectangular area in the middle, the Phoenix Islands,
他のすべての緑の部分が
16:47
but every other green patch on that
独自のストーリーを持っています
16:49
has its own story.
今しなければならないことは
16:51
And what we need to do now
太平洋を
16:53
is look at the whole Pacific Ocean
全体として見ることです
16:55
in its entirety
太平洋全域に
16:57
and make a network of MPAs
MPAのネットワークを作ることです
16:59
across the Pacific
世界最大の海洋が
17:01
so that we have our world's largest ocean
時代を超えて
17:03
protected and self-sustaining
保護され自立できるように
17:05
over time.
どうもありがとうございました
17:07
Thank you very much. (Applause)
Translated by Takashi Tanaka
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Greg Stone - Oceanographer
Greg Stone was a key driver in the establishment of the Phoenix Island Protected Area in the island nation of Kiribati. The second-largest marine protected area in the world -- and one of the most pristine -- PIPA is a laboratory for exploring and monitoring the recovery of coral reefs from bleaching events.

Why you should listen

Greg Stone began his career as an ocean scientist, pioneering research in Antarctica on marine mammals and ice ecology where he mastered the art of diving into icebergs. Today he is well-known for his leadership in the effort to create the world’s second-largest marine protected area (MPA), around the Phoenix Islands in Kiribati.

Working with the government of Kiribati, Stone helped establish the MPA using market-based tools to conserve ocean biodiversity, in order to encourage continued local economic development rather than destruction of local communities livelihoods. Stone is the Chief Scientist for Oceans at Conservation International and a prolific author and speaker on the state of the marine environment and how policy can make change.

More profile about the speaker
Greg Stone | Speaker | TED.com