06:45
TED@State Street Boston

David Grady: How to save the world (or at least yourself) from bad meetings

데이빗 그래디(David Grady): 잘못된 회의에서 세계를 (적어도 여러분 자신을) 구하는 방법

Filmed:

만연하고 있는 잘못되고 비효율적이며 혼잡한 회의가 세계의 기업을 괴롭히고 있습니다. 그리고 직원들을 비참하게 만듭니다. 데이빗 그레이는 그것을 멈출 수 있는 아이디어를 들려 줍니다.

- Information security manager
David Grady is on a crusade to help you take back your calendar. Full bio

이런 걸 상상해 보세요.
00:13
Picture this:
오늘은 월요일 아침인데
00:14
It's Monday morning,
00:15
you're at the office,
여러분이 사무실에서
일을 하려고 앉아 있습니다.
00:16
you're settling in for the day at work,
그런데 어떤 사람이 통로에서부터
00:18
and this guy that you sort of
recognize from down the hall,
00:21
walks right into your cubicle
여러분이 있는 구역으로 와서는
의자를 뺏어버리는 겁니다.
00:23
and he steals your chair.
한 마디도 안하고 앉아
의자를 굴려 가버립니다.
00:24
Doesn't say a word —
00:25
just rolls away with it.
00:27
Doesn't give you any information
about why he took your chair
그 많은 의자들 중에서
여러분의 의자를 뺏어간
이유를 말해 주지도 않고
00:29
out of all the other chairs
that are out there.
하루 일을 하기 위해
00:31
Doesn't acknowledge the fact
that you might need your chair
여러분이 그 의자가 필요하다는
것도 생각지도 않습니다.
00:34
to get some work done today.
여러분은 그걸 그대로 두지 않고
뭐라고 한 바탕 하실 겁니다.
00:35
You wouldn't stand for
it. You'd make a stink.
그 사람한테 가서 말할 겁니다.
"왜 내 의자를 가져가는 거예요?"
00:37
You'd follow that guy
back to his cubicle
00:39
and you'd say, "Why my chair?"
이제 화요일 아침에 사무실에 있어요.
달력에 회의 참석 메세지가 뜹니다.
00:43
Okay, so now it's Tuesday morning
and you're at the office,
00:47
and a meeting invitation pops
up in your calendar.
(웃음)
00:50
(Laughter)
00:51
And it's from this woman who you
kind of know from down the hall,
통로에서 부터 본 여자가 보낸 것인데
얼핏 들어본 과제에 대한 주제입니다.
그런데 회의계획안이 없습니다.
00:54
and the subject line references some
project that you heard a little bit about.
00:58
But there's no agenda.
01:00
There's no information about why
you were invited to the meeting.
회의에 초대된 이유를 모릅니다.
회의 참석을 수락하고 갑니다.
01:03
And yet you accept the
meeting invitation, and you go.
매우 비생산적인 시간이 끝났을 때
01:07
And when this highly
unproductive session is over,
자리로 돌아가서는 서서 말하죠,
01:10
you go back to your desk,
01:12
and you stand at your
desk and you say,
01:14
"Boy, I wish I had those two hours back,
"에이, 내 두시간 다시 돌려 받고,
내 의자도 돌려 받았으면 좋겠어."
01:16
like I wish I had my chair back."
01:18
(Laughter)
(웃음)
우리는 매일 다른 일만 아니면
매우 친절할 동료들에게
01:20
Every day, we allow our coworkers,
01:22
who are otherwise very,
very nice people,
01:24
to steal from us.
우리의 것을 뺏어가게 둡니다.
01:26
And I'm talking about something far
more valuable than office furniture.
저는 사무 가구보다 훨씬
중요한 것을 말씀드리는 겁니다.
시간이요. 여러분의 시간입니다.
01:30
I'm talking about time. Your time.
01:33
In fact, I believe that
사실, 우리는 "많이"이라는
끔찍한 신종질병이
01:36
we are in the middle
of a global epidemic
01:38
of a terrible new illness
known as MAS:
세계적으로 퍼진 곳에 살고 있습니다.
"생각없이 수락하기 증후군"이죠.
01:43
Mindless Accept Syndrome.
(웃음)
01:46
(Laughter)
'생수증'의 주요 증상은
01:48
The primary symptom of
Mindless Accept Syndrome
달력에 회의 초대가 뜨는 순간
그냥 받아들이는 겁니다.
01:50
is just accepting a meeting invitation
the minute it pops up in your calendar.
(웃음)
01:54
(Laughter)
본능적인 반사작용으로, 띵, 클릭, 뿅
달력에 알림이 뜹니다.
01:55
It's an involuntary reflex — ding,
click, bing — it's in your calendar,
"얼른 가야지, 회의에 늦었네." (웃음)
01:59
"Gotta go, I'm already late
for a meeting." (Laughter)
회의는 중요합니다. 그렇죠?
협력이 사업 성공의 핵심입니다.
02:02
Meetings are important, right?
02:05
And collaboration is key to
the success of any enterprise.
02:08
And a well-run meeting can yield
really positive, actionable results.
잘 운영된 회의는 매우 긍정적인
실행가능한 결과를 냅니다.
그러나 세계화와
널리 퍼진 정보기술 사이에서
02:11
But between globalization
02:13
and pervasive information technology,
02:15
the way that we work
우리가 일하는 방식은
지난 몇년 사이 급격하게
변화했습니다.
02:17
has really changed dramatically
over the last few years.
그리고 우린 불행해졌죠. (웃음)
02:20
And we're miserable. (Laughter)
사람들이 좋은 회의를
안해서 그런게 아니라
02:23
And we're miserable not because the
other guy can't run a good meeting,
"생각없이 수락하기
증후군" 때문입니다.
02:27
it's because of MAS, our
Mindless Accept Syndrome,
자해로 인한 상처인거죠.
02:30
which is a self-inflicted wound.
사실 '생수증'이 세계적인
현상임을 증명할 수 있습니다.
02:33
Actually, I have evidence to prove
that MAS is a global epidemic.
이유를 말씀드리죠.
02:39
Let me tell you why.
몇 년전에, 제가 유투브에
영상을 올렸습니다.
02:40
A couple of years ago, I put a video
on Youtube, and in the video,
여러분들이 겪었을 법한 모든 끔찍한
전화회의를 연기 했습니다.
02:45
I acted out every terrible
conference call you've ever been on.
약 5분정도 분량인데
02:48
It goes on for about five minutes,
나쁜 회의에서 싫어 할만한 게
다 들어 있습니다.
02:49
and it has all the things that we
hate about really bad meetings.
회의를 어떻게 진행해야 할 지
모르는 사회자도 있고
02:53
There's the moderator who has
no idea how to run the meeting.
왜 참석했는지 모르는
참여자도 있습니다.
02:56
There are the participants who
have no idea why they're there.
모든 것이 연쇄적으로 난리가 납니다.
02:58
The whole thing kind of collapses
into this collaborative train wreck.
모두 화가나서 자리를 뜨죠.
03:02
And everybody leaves very angry.
꽤 재미있습니다.
03:05
It's kind of funny.
(웃음)
03:06
(Laughter)
살짝 보겠습니다.
03:08
Let's take a quick look.
(영상) 오늘 회의는 매우 중요한
제안에 합의하는 게 목표입니다.
03:10
(Video) Our goal today is to come to an
agreement on a very important proposal.
모임에서 우리가 만약 --
03:14
As a group, we need to decide if —
삐리 삐리 --
03:16
bloop bloop —
안녕하세요, 누가 참석했죠?
03:19
Hi, who just joined?
조에요. 오늘 재택근무해요.
03:22
Hi, it's Joe. I'm working from home today.
(웃음)
03:25
(Laughter)
어서와요, 조.
회의 참석해 줘서 고마워요.
03:27
Hi, Joe. Thanks for
joining us today, great.
우리 참석자가 많으니까
출석확인은 넘기도록 하죠.
03:30
I was just saying, we have a lot of people
on the call we'd like to get through,
03:33
so let's skip the roll call
03:35
and I'm gonna dive right in.
본론으로 바로 가겠습니다.
오늘 회의는 매우 중요한 제안에
합의하는 게 목표입니다.
03:37
Our goal today is to come to an
agreement on a very important proposal.
모임에서 우리가 만약 --
03:41
As a group, we need to decide if —
삐리 삐리 --
03:44
bloop bloop —
(웃음)
03:45
(Laughter)
안녕하세요, 누군가요?
03:47
Hi, who just joined?
없어요? 저는 또 삐소리
난 줄 알고요. (웃음)
03:49
No? I thought I heard a beep. (Laughter)
공감하시죠?
03:53
Sound familiar?
저도 공감합니다.
03:55
Yeah, it sounds familiar
to me, too.
몇 주뒤에 인터넷에 올렸는데
수 십개국에서 오십만명이 봤어요.
03:57
A couple of weeks after I put that online,
03:59
500,000 people in dozens of countries,
04:02
I mean dozens of countries,
수 십개의 나라에서
이 영상을 봤습니다.
04:04
watched this video.
삼 년뒤에도 매 달 수천건의
조회수가 올라갑니다.
04:05
And three years later, it's still getting
thousands of views every month.
현재는 약 백만에 가깝습니다.
04:08
It's close to about a million right now.
사실, 세계에서 가장 큰 회사들도,
이름을 말 안해도 아실만한 회사들이
04:10
And in fact, some of the biggest
companies in the world,
04:12
companies that you've
heard of but I won't name,
04:14
have asked for my permission to use
this video in their new-hire training
이 영상을 신입사원 연수용으로
사용 허가를 요청했습니다.
회사에서 회의를 하지 않는 방법을
신입사원에서 연수한다고 합니다.
04:18
to teach their new employees how
not to run a meeting at their company.
만약 조회수가 --
04:22
And if the numbers —
백만건의 조회수가 있고
이 회사들이 사용하고 있는 게,
04:24
there are a million views and it's
being used by all these companies —
회의와 관련된 세계적인
문제의 증거로 충분치 않다면
04:26
aren't enough proof that we have
a global problem with meetings,
수 천건의 댓글이 영상에
달려있습니다.
04:30
there are the many, many thousands
04:31
of comments posted online
04:33
after the video went up.
04:35
Thousands of people wrote things like,
수 천명이 이렇게 반응했습니다.
"세상에, 딱 오늘 제 얘기네요!"
04:37
"OMG, that was my day today!"
"매일 딱 저래요!"
04:39
"That was my day every day!"
"제 삶이네요."
04:41
"This is my life."
한 사람이 이렇게 썼습니다.
04:42
One guy wrote,
"너무 사실이라 웃기네요.
04:43
"It's funny because it's true.
소름끼치게, 슬프게,
우울하게도 사실이에요.
04:45
Eerily, sadly, depressingly true.
눈물나게 웃깁니다.
04:46
It made me laugh until I cried.
눈물이 나네요. 좀더 나네요."
04:48
And cried. And I cried some more."
(웃음)
04:51
(Laughter)
이 불쌍한 친구가 말하길,
04:53
This poor guy said,
"은퇴 또는 죽을 때까지의
나의 일상생활, 휴우."
04:54
"My daily life until
retirement or death, sigh."
실제의 이야기들인데
정말 슬픈 일이죠.
04:59
These are real quotes
05:01
and it's real sad.
05:02
A common theme running through
all of these comments online
인터넷 댓글의 공통된 주제는
우리가 회의에 가서
형편 없는 회의로 인해
05:05
is this fundamental belief
that we are powerless
무력할 수 밖에 없고
05:08
to do anything other
than go to meetings
또 다음날 회의에 가야하는
무기력함을 나타낸다는 겁니다.
05:10
and suffer through these
poorly run meetings
05:12
and live to meet another day.
05:14
But the truth is, we're
not powerless at all.
그러나 사실은 우리가
무력하지 않습니다.
사실, "생수증"은
우리 손에 달려 있죠.
05:17
In fact, the cure for MAS
is right here in our hands.
05:20
It's right at our fingertips, literally.
말 그대로 손끝에 달려있습니다.
저는 "생수증 안돼!"라고 합니다.
05:22
It's something that I call ¡No MAS!
(웃음)
05:26
(Laughter)
제가 고등학교 때 배운 스페인어로
05:28
Which, if I remember my
high school Spanish,
"이제 충분하니 그만하자!"
그런 의미입니다.
05:30
means something like,
"Enough already, make it stop!"
'생수증 안돼'는 이렇게
간단하게 작동합니다.
05:33
Here's how No MAS
works. It's very simple.
먼저, 다음에 별 정보없는
회의 초대를 받으시면
05:36
First of all, the next time you
get a meeting invitation
05:39
that doesn't have a lot
of information in it at all,
05:42
click the tentative button!
참석불확실 버튼을 누르세요.
그렇게 해도 괜찮습니다.
그러라고 있는 거니까요.
05:44
It's okay, you're allowed,
that's why it's there.
수락버튼 바로 옆에 있습니다.
05:46
It's right next to the accept button.
아니면 당장 수락하지 않는
어떤 버튼이든 누르세요.
05:48
Or the maybe button, or whatever button
is there for you not to accept immediately.
그리고 회의에 부른
사람에게 물어보세요.
05:51
Then, get in touch with the person
who asked you to the meeting.
함께 일해서 무척 좋다고 말하면서
05:55
Tell them you're very excited
to support their work,
회의 목표가 뭔지 물어 보세요.
05:58
ask them what the goal
of the meeting is,
그리고 목표달성을 위해
배우고 싶다고 말하세요.
06:00
and tell them you're interested in learning
how you can help them achieve their goal.
이것을 여러 번 하고,
매우 예의바르게 하면,
06:03
And if we do this often enough,
06:05
and we do it respectfully,
그럼 사람들이 여러분을 회의에 초대하는
것에 좀 더 신중해 질 겁니다.
06:07
people might start to be
a little bit more thoughtful
06:09
about the way they put together
meeting invitations.
06:11
And you can make more thoughtful
decisions about accepting it.
여러분도 회의 수락에
신중해 질 겁니다.
그리고 실제로 회의계획안에
대해 보내 줄 겁니다. 좋겠죠.
06:14
People might actually start
sending out agendas. Imagine!
아니면 이메일로 신속하게
해결할 수 있는 12명의 사람들과
06:17
Or they might not have a conference call
with 12 people to talk about a status
전화회의 같은 것을 안 할겁니다.
06:21
when they could just do a quick
email and get it done with.
여러분의 행동이 바뀌면
그들의 행동이 바뀔 겁니다.
06:24
People just might start to change their
behavior because you changed yours.
여러분의 의자도
돌려 줄 겁니다. (웃음)
06:29
And they just might bring
your chair back, too. (Laughter)
'생수증 안돼!'
06:33
No MAS!
감사합니다.
06:34
Thank you.
(박수)
06:35
(Applause).
Translated by Jihyeon J. Kim
Reviewed by Jeong-Lan Kinser

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

David Grady - Information security manager
David Grady is on a crusade to help you take back your calendar.

Why you should listen

David Grady is an information security manager who believes that strong communication skills are
a necessity in today’s global economy. He has been a print journalist, a “PR guy” and a website producer, and has ghostwritten speeches and magazine articles for Fortune 500 company executives. A mid-life career change brought him into the world of information risk management, where every day he uses his communications experience to transform complex problems into understandable challenges.

More profile about the speaker
David Grady | Speaker | TED.com