18:45
TED2010

Nicholas Christakis: The hidden influence of social networks

니콜라스 크리스타키스: 사회연결망의 숨겨진 영향력

Filmed:

사람들은 누구나 친구, 가족, 동료 및 기타 여러 방식으로 구성된 커다란 사회연결망들 속에 들어있다. 니콜라스 크리스타키스는 행복에서 비만까지 이르는 다양한 특질들이 어떻게 사람들 사이에서 전파되는가에 대한 분석을 통해서, 여러분들의 연결망 속 위치가 어떻게 스스로도 알아차리지 못한 방식으로 삶에 영향을 줄 수 있는지 보여준다.

- Physician, social scientist
Nicholas Christakis explores how the large-scale, face-to-face social networks in which we are embedded affect our lives, and what we can do to take advantage of this fact. Full bio

For me, this story begins about 15 years ago,
제게 있어서, 이 이야기는 15년 전에 시작했죠,
00:16
when I was a hospice doctor at the University of Chicago.
시카고 대학에서 호스피스(임종간호) 담당의사로 있을 때였습니다.
00:19
And I was taking care of people who were dying and their families
죽어가고 있는 환자들 그리고 그들의 가족을 돌보는 일이었죠.
00:22
in the South Side of Chicago.
시카고 남부 지역에서 말이죠.
00:25
And I was observing what happened to people and their families
저는 말기 질환을 앓는 사람 그리고 가족들이
00:27
over the course of their terminal illness.
겪는 것들의 과정을 관찰 했습니다.
00:30
And in my lab, I was studying the widower effect,
연구실에서, 저는 "과부 효과"를 연구 했었습니다.
00:33
which is a very old idea in the social sciences,
사회과학에서는 매우 오래 된 발상인데,
00:35
going back 150 years,
150년은 됐죠.
00:37
known as "dying of a broken heart."
"상심해서 죽는 것"으로 흔히 알려져 있습니다.
00:39
So, when I die, my wife's risk of death can double,
그러니까 예를 들어, 제가 죽으면 바로 그 첫 해에
00:41
for instance, in the first year.
제 아내도 죽을 위험이 두배가 됩니다.
00:44
And I had gone to take care of one particular patient,
제가 맡았던 어떤 환자가 있었는데,
00:46
a woman who was dying of dementia.
치매로 죽어가는 여성이였습니다.
00:49
And in this case, unlike this couple,
이 커플과는 달리, 이 경우는
00:51
she was being cared for
그녀의 딸이 그녀를
00:53
by her daughter.
돌보고 있었습니다.
00:55
And the daughter was exhausted from caring for her mother.
딸은 어머니를 간호하느라 녹초가 되었죠.
00:57
And the daughter's husband,
그리고 딸의 남편은,
01:00
he also was sick
그 역시 상태가 좋지 않았습니다.
01:02
from his wife's exhaustion.
부인이 늘 녹초가 되어 있으니 말이죠.
01:05
And I was driving home one day,
한 때 제가 집으로 가고 있던 도중,
01:07
and I get a phone call from the husband's friend,
그 남편의 친구로부터 전화를 받았습니다.
01:09
calling me because he was depressed
그는 친구에게 일어나고 있는 일들 때문에
01:12
about what was happening to his friend.
우울함을 느껴 저에게 전화를 한 것이였죠.
01:14
So here I get this call from this random guy
그러니까, 제가 받은 것은 임의의 어떤 남자의 전화였습니다.
01:16
that's having an experience
그가 일정한 사회적 거리에 놓인
01:18
that's being influenced by people
사람들로부터 영향을 받은
01:20
at some social distance.
어떤 경험을 토로하는 것이었죠.
01:22
And so I suddenly realized two very simple things:
그 때 저는 갑자기 두가지 매우 간단한 것을 깨달았습니다.
01:24
First, the widowhood effect
첫째, 과부 효과는
01:27
was not restricted to husbands and wives.
그저 남편, 아내에게만 일어나는 것이 아닙니다.
01:29
And second, it was not restricted to pairs of people.
그리고 둘째, 두 사람 사이의 관계에서만 일어나는 것도 아닙니다.
01:32
And I started to see the world
그리고 저는 세상을
01:35
in a whole new way,
전혀 새로운 방식으로 보기 시작했습니다.
01:37
like pairs of people connected to each other.
사람들이 쌍으로 서로 연결 되어있는 것처럼 말이죠.
01:39
And then I realized that these individuals
그리고 쌍으로 된 이 개인들은
01:42
would be connected into foursomes with other pairs of people nearby.
주변의 다른 한 쌍과 엮여, 4인조로 연결된다는 것을 깨달았죠.
01:44
And then, in fact, these people
그리고 사실 이 사람들은
01:47
were embedded in other sorts of relationships:
다른 종류의 관계에도 "배태"되어(embedded: 포함되어 연동됨) 있습니다.
01:49
marriage and spousal
결혼 및 시댁/처가 관계,
01:51
and friendship and other sorts of ties.
친분, 그리고 기타 여러가지 것들 말이죠.
01:53
And that, in fact, these connections were vast
게다가 사실 이 연결들은 거대하며,
01:55
and that we were all embedded in this
우리는 누구나 이런 폭넓은 여러 연결관계들 속에
01:58
broad set of connections with each other.
깊숙히 배태되어 있습니다.
02:00
So I started to see the world in a completely new way
그러니까, 저는 완전히 새로운 방식으로 세상을 바라보기 시작했고
02:03
and I became obsessed with this.
그 발상에 집착하게 되었습니다.
02:06
I became obsessed with how it might be
우리가 이런 사회연결망에
02:08
that we're embedded in these social networks,
어떻게 해서 배태되어 있으며,
02:10
and how they affect our lives.
그런 것이 어떻게 우리의 삶에 영향을 주는지에 대한 집착이죠.
02:12
So, social networks are these intricate things of beauty,
그러니까 사회연결망은 이런 복잡하고 아름다운 것들이며,
02:14
and they're so elaborate and so complex
너무나 정교하고 복잡하며
02:17
and so ubiquitous, in fact,
어디에서나 찾아볼 수 있기에
02:19
that one has to ask what purpose they serve.
그런 것들이 대체 무엇을 위해 존재하는지 물어볼 필요가 있습니다.
02:21
Why are we embedded in social networks?
우리는 왜 사회연결망 속에 들어가 있을까요?
02:24
I mean, how do they form? How do they operate?
즉, 어떻게 그들이 형성되고, 어떻게 작동하는걸까요?
02:26
And how do they effect us?
그리고 어떻게 우리에게 영향을 줄까요?
02:28
So my first topic with respect to this,
이것에 관한 제 첫 번째 소재는,
02:30
was not death, but obesity.
죽음이 아니라, 비만이었습니다.
02:33
It had become trendy
언젠가 갑자기, 비만이 전염병처럼 확산중이라고
02:36
to speak about the "obesity epidemic."
거론하는 것이 유행이 되었죠.
02:38
And, along with my collaborator, James Fowler,
그래서 제 공동 연구가인 James Fowler와 함께
02:40
we began to wonder whether obesity really was epidemic
비만이 정말로 전염성이 있는지, 사람에게서 사람으로
02:43
and could it spread from person to person
퍼지는 것인지 궁금해하기 시작했습니다
02:46
like the four people I discussed earlier.
제가 이전에 이야기 했던 그 4인조처럼 말이죠.
02:48
So this is a slide of some of our initial results.
이것은 최초 연구결과 몇가지입니다.
02:51
It's 2,200 people in the year 2000.
2000년도, 2,200명의 사람들이죠.
02:54
Every dot is a person. We make the dot size
모든 점은 각각 사람 한 명입니다. 우리는 각 점의 크기를
02:57
proportional to people's body size;
사람들의 신체사이즈에 비례하게 만들었습니다.
02:59
so bigger dots are bigger people.
즉 큰 점은 큰 사람을 나타내죠.
03:01
In addition, if your body size,
게다가 만약 신체 사이즈,
03:04
if your BMI, your body mass index, is above 30 --
BMI(체질량지수)가 30 이상이거나
03:06
if you're clinically obese --
임상적으로 비만진단을 받은 경우라면
03:08
we also colored the dots yellow.
점에 노란 색도 입혔습니다.
03:10
So, if you look at this image, right away you might be able to see
이 이미지를 보시면 바로 보이실 겁니다.
03:12
that there are clusters of obese and
이미지 속에 비만 그리고
03:14
non-obese people in the image.
비만이 아닌 사람들의 군집이 있다는 것을 말이죠.
03:16
But the visual complexity is still very high.
하지만 시각적 복잡성은 여전히 매우 높습니다.
03:18
It's not obvious exactly what's going on.
무슨 일이 일어나고 있는 중인지 명백하지 않지요.
03:21
In addition, some questions are immediately raised:
게다가, 곧바로 몇가지 질문거리가 생깁니다.
03:24
How much clustering is there?
어느 정도까지 군집화가 되어있는가?
03:26
Is there more clustering than would be due to chance alone?
그냥 우연히 발생할 수 있는 경우보다 더 강력한 군집이 존재하는 것인가?
03:28
How big are the clusters? How far do they reach?
군집들의 크기는 또 어느 정도인가? 얼마나 넓게 퍼져있는가?
03:31
And, most importantly,
그리고, 가장 중요한 질문으로,
03:33
what causes the clusters?
무엇이 그런 군집을 발생시키는가?
03:35
So we did some mathematics to study the size of these clusters.
그래서 이 군집들의 크기를 측정하기 위해 수학 작업을 좀 했습니다.
03:37
This here shows, on the Y-axis,
여기서 Y축이 나타내는 것은
03:40
the increase in the probability that a person is obese
누군가가 만약 사회적으로 접촉하는 이가 비만일 경우
03:42
given that a social contact of theirs is obese
그 사람 역시 비만일 확률의 증가분입니다.
03:45
and, on the X-axis, the degrees of separation between the two people.
그리고 X 축은 두 사람 사이의 분리 단계를 나타냅니다.
03:47
On the far left, you see the purple line.
가장 왼쪽에 있는 보라색 막대를 보시죠.
03:50
It says that, if your friends are obese,
이것이 나타내는 바는, 만약 친구들이 비만이면
03:52
your risk of obesity is 45 percent higher.
여러분이 비만일 위험이 45%나 더 높다는 것이죠.
03:54
And the next bar over, the [red] line,
그리고 다음 막대인 주황색은
03:57
says if your friend's friends are obese,
만약 친구의 친구가 비만이면
03:59
your risk of obesity is 25 percent higher.
여러분의 비만 위험이 25% 더 높다는 말입니다.
04:01
And then the next line over says
그리고 다음은
04:03
if your friend's friend's friend, someone you probably don't even know, is obese,
친구의 친구의 친구, 아마도 전혀 모르는 사람일 그 사람이 비만이면
04:05
your risk of obesity is 10 percent higher.
여러분이 비만 위험이 10% 더 높다는 것입니다.
04:08
And it's only when you get to your friend's friend's friend's friends
친구의 친구의 친구의 친구 정도로 분리되어 있을 때 비로소
04:11
that there's no longer a relationship
그 사람의 신체사이즈와 여러분 신체사이즈 사이에
04:14
between that person's body size and your own body size.
더 이상 관계가 없습니다.
04:16
Well, what might be causing this clustering?
음, 무엇이 이런 군집을 발생시킬까요?
04:20
There are at least three possibilities:
적어도 3가지 가능성이 있습니다.
04:23
One possibility is that, as I gain weight,
하나의 가능성은, 제 몸무게가 증가하면서
04:25
it causes you to gain weight.
그것이 여러분의 몸무게도 늘도록 만든다는 것입니다.
04:27
A kind of induction, a kind of spread from person to person.
일종의 유도 작용, 사람들 사이에 일어나는 일종의 전파 과정이죠.
04:29
Another possibility, very obvious, is homophily,
또 다른 가능성은 당연하게도 동질성입니다.
04:32
or, birds of a feather flock together;
유유상종이라는 말이죠.
04:34
here, I form my tie to you
이 경우 제가 여러분과 연결을 형성하는 이유는
04:36
because you and I share a similar body size.
여러분과 제가 비슷한 신체사이즈를 지녔기 때문입니다.
04:38
And the last possibility is what is known as confounding,
마지막 가능성은 교란변인이라고도 알려져있는데,
04:41
because it confounds our ability to figure out what's going on.
우리들이 현상을 이해하는 능력을 교란시키기 때문입니다.
04:43
And here, the idea is not that my weight gain
이런 경우는, 제 몸무게 상승이
04:46
is causing your weight gain,
여러분의 몸무게 상승을 일으키거나
04:48
nor that I preferentially form a tie with you
혹은 제가 여러분과 같은 신체사이즈를 지녔기에
04:50
because you and I share the same body size,
여러분을 선호하는 쪽으로 연결을 형성한 것이 아닙니다.
04:52
but rather that we share a common exposure
그보다는 저와 여러분이, 동시에 몸무게를 줄어들게 만드는
04:54
to something, like a health club
예를 들어 헬스 클럽 같은
04:56
that makes us both lose weight at the same time.
동일한 조건에 노출되었기 때문입니다.
04:59
When we studied these data, we found evidence for all of these things,
이 자료를 연구하면서, 3가지 모두에 대한 모든 증거를 찾았습니다.
05:02
including for induction.
유도 작용도 포함해서 말이죠.
05:05
And we found that if your friend becomes obese,
발견한 바에 따르면, 만약 친구가 비만이 되면
05:07
it increases your risk of obesity by about 57 percent
같은 기간동안
05:09
in the same given time period.
여러분이 비만이 될 위험도 57% 가량 증가합니다.
05:12
There can be many mechanisms for this effect:
이 효과에 대한 많은 메카니즘이 존재할 수 있습니다.
05:14
One possibility is that your friends say to you something like --
하나의 가능성은 여러분의 친구가 이런 식으로 나오는 것입니다.
05:17
you know, they adopt a behavior that spreads to you --
그러니까, 그들이 어떤 행동방식을 취하고는 여러분에게까지 전파하는 식이죠.
05:19
like, they say, "Let's go have muffins and beer,"
예를 들자면, "같이 머핀과 맥주나 먹자."
05:22
which is a terrible combination. (Laughter)
최악의 조합이죠.
05:25
But you adopt that combination,
하지만 여러분은 이 조합을 수용하고
05:28
and then you start gaining weight like them.
이후 그들처럼 몸무게가 불기 시작합니다.
05:30
Another more subtle possibility
좀 더 미묘한 다른 가능성은
05:33
is that they start gaining weight, and it changes your ideas
그들이 몸무게가 불기 시작하면서, 여러분이 생각하는
05:35
of what an acceptable body size is.
적정 신체사이즈에 대한 관념이 변한다는 것입니다.
05:38
Here, what's spreading from person to person
이 경우 사람에서 사람으로 퍼지는 것은
05:40
is not a behavior, but rather a norm:
행동이 아니라 규범이죠.
05:42
An idea is spreading.
하나의 발상이 퍼져나가는 것입니다.
05:44
Now, headline writers
그런데 뉴스 헤드라인을 쓰는 기자들이
05:46
had a field day with our studies.
우리 연구에 아주 신이 났었죠.
05:48
I think the headline in The New York Times was,
제 기억에, 뉴욕타임즈 신문의 헤드라인은 이랬습니다:
05:50
"Are you packing it on?
"살이 붙고 계십니까?
05:52
Blame your fat friends." (Laughter)
뚱뚱한 친구들을 탓하세요."
05:54
What was interesting to us is that the European headline writers
흥미로운 것은, 유럽쪽 기자들은
05:57
had a different take: They said,
다르게 표현했죠. 그들의 경우는
05:59
"Are your friends gaining weight? Perhaps you are to blame."
"친구의 몸무게가 늘고 있습니까? 어쩌면 여러분 탓입니다."
06:01
(Laughter)
(웃음)
06:04
And we thought this was a very interesting comment on America,
저희들은 이것이 꽤 흥미로운 시사점을 준다고 생각했습니다. 미국에 대해,
06:09
and a kind of self-serving,
일종의 자기편의적인,
06:12
"not my responsibility" kind of phenomenon.
"그건 내 책임이 아냐" 같은 사고방식이 만연한 현상에 대해 말입니다.
06:14
Now, I want to be very clear: We do not think our work
분명하게 말해두고자 합니다. 저희들은 이 연구가
06:16
should or could justify prejudice
어떤 특정 신체사이즈의 소유자들에 대한 편견을
06:18
against people of one or another body size at all.
정당화할 수 있거나 혹은 그래야 한다고 생각하지 않습니다.
06:20
Our next questions was:
자, 우리의 다음 질문은 이것이었습니다.
06:24
Could we actually visualize this spread?
이런 확산과정을 시각화 할 수 있을까?
06:26
Was weight gain in one person actually spreading
특정인의 몸무게 증가가 실제로 다른 사람들의
06:29
to weight gain in another person?
몸무게 증가로 확산되고 있는 것일까?
06:31
And this was complicated because
이 과제는 매우 복잡했습니다. 왜냐하면
06:33
we needed to take into account the fact that the network structure,
연결망 구조, 즉 연결들의 구성방식이 시간의 흐름에 따라서
06:35
the architecture of the ties, was changing across time.
변화한다는 것을 고려할 필요가 있었기 때문이였죠.
06:38
In addition, because obesity is not a unicentric epidemic,
게다가 비만은 단일중심형 전염이 아니기 때문에
06:41
there's not a Patient Zero of the obesity epidemic --
비만 전염에는 "최초발병자"가 없습니다.
06:44
if we find that guy, there was a spread of obesity out from him --
그런 사람을 찾아내면, 그 사람에게서 비만이 퍼져나간 것이죠.
06:47
it's a multicentric epidemic.
하지만 비만은 다중심형 전염입니다.
06:50
Lots of people are doing things at the same time.
많은 사람들이 동시에 같은 것들을 합니다.
06:52
And I'm about to show you a 30 second video animation
이제 여러분께 30초짜리 애니메이션 영상을 보여드리고자 합니다.
06:54
that took me and James five years of our lives to do.
저와 제임스가 5년동안 만들어낸 것이죠.
06:57
So, again, every dot is a person.
다시금, 모든 점들은 각각 한 명의 사람입니다.
07:00
Every tie between them is a relationship.
그들 사이의 모든 연결은 하나의 관계입니다.
07:02
We're going to put this into motion now,
이제 움직임을 첨가해보도록 하겠습니다.
07:04
taking daily cuts through the network for about 30 years.
연결망의 모습을 하루 단위로 기록해서 30년간의 흐름을 모은 것입니다.
07:06
The dot sizes are going to grow,
점의 크기가 증가하는 것을 보실 것입니다.
07:09
you're going to see a sea of yellow take over.
노란색의 바다가 덮쳐오는 것을 보실 수 있습니다.
07:11
You're going to see people be born and die --
사람들이 태어나고 죽는 것을 보시게 됩니다.
07:14
dots will appear and disappear --
점은 나타나고 사라집니다.
07:16
ties will form and break, marriages and divorces,
연결이 형성되고 깨집니다. 결혼, 이혼,
07:18
friendings and defriendings.
친구 사귀기, 절교 등
07:21
A lot of complexity, a lot is happening
고작 이 30년 기간동안에
07:23
just in this 30-year period
복잡하고 많은 일들이 일어납니다.
07:25
that includes the obesity epidemic.
비만 전염을 포함해서 말이죠.
07:27
And, by the end, you're going to see clusters
끝부분에 가면 여러분은
07:29
of obese and non-obese individuals
비만인 사람들과 비만이 아닌 사람들로 각각 이루어진
07:31
within the network.
군집들이 네트워크 안에 생긴 것을 보실 수 있습니다.
07:33
Now, when looked at this,
이 데이타를 보고 나니
07:35
it changed the way I see things,
제가 사물을 바라보는 시각이 바뀌었습니다.
07:38
because this thing, this network
왜냐하면 이것, 이 연결망은
07:41
that's changing across time,
시간에 따라 바뀌면서도
07:43
it has a memory, it moves,
기억을 가지고 있고, 움직이고,
07:45
things flow within it,
그 속에서 여러가지 것들이 흘러갑니다.
07:48
it has a kind of consistency --
일종의 일관성이 있습니다.
07:50
people can die, but it doesn't die;
사람은 죽을 수 있습니다, 하지만 연결망은 죽지 않죠.
07:52
it still persists --
계속 이어집니다.
07:54
and it has a kind of resilience
게다가 시간이 경과해도 지속될 수 있도록 해주는
07:56
that allows it to persist across time.
일종의 회복탄력성도 있습니다.
07:58
And so, I came to see these kinds of social networks
그래서 저는 사회 연결망의 이런 신호들을
08:00
as living things,
생물들이라고 간주하게 되었습니다.
08:03
as living things that we could put under a kind of microscope
일종의 현미경 같은 것으로 관찰하며
08:05
to study and analyze and understand.
분석하며 이해할 수 있는 생물 말입니다.
08:08
And we used a variety of techniques to do this.
그렇게 하기 위해 다양한 기술을 사용했습니다.
08:11
And we started exploring all kinds of other phenomena.
그리고 온갖 다른 현상들도 탐구하기 시작했습니다.
08:13
We looked at smoking and drinking behavior,
그래서 저희들은 흡연과 음주 패턴,
08:16
and voting behavior,
선거 패턴,
08:18
and divorce -- which can spread --
이혼 (이것도 전파될 수 있습니다),
08:20
and altruism.
그리고 이타성 등도 살펴봤죠.
08:22
And, eventually, we became interested in emotions.
그리고 결국은 '감정'에 흥미를 가지게 되었습니다.
08:24
Now, when we have emotions,
우리는 감정을 품으면
08:28
we show them.
보여줍니다.
08:30
Why do we show our emotions?
왜 우리는 감정을 보여주는 것일까요?
08:32
I mean, there would be an advantage to experiencing
그러니까, 감정을 내적으로 경험하는 것에는
08:34
our emotions inside, you know, anger or happiness.
이점이 존재합니다. 아시다시피 분노, 행복 그런 것들 말입니다.
08:36
But we don't just experience them, we show them.
하지만 우리는 그것들을 단지 경험하고 그치지 않습니다, 보여주죠.
08:39
And not only do we show them, but others can read them.
우리가 보여줄 뿐만 아니라, 다른이들이 읽을 수도 있습니다.
08:41
And, not only can they read them, but they copy them.
그들은 감정을 읽을 수 있을 뿐만 아니라, 복사하기도 하죠.
08:44
There's emotional contagion
사람들 사이에 발생하는
08:46
that takes place in human populations.
감정 전염이라는 것이 존재합니다.
08:48
And so this function of emotions
이런 작용이 의미하는 바는
08:51
suggests that, in addition to any other purpose they serve,
기타 다른 목적도 있겠지만
08:53
they're a kind of primitive form of communication.
감정이라는 것이 일종의 원시적 의사소통수단이라는 점입니다.
08:55
And that, in fact, if we really want to understand human emotions,
그리고 사실 우리가 인간의 감정을 진심으로 이해하고 싶다면,
08:58
we need to think about them in this way.
바로 이런 방식으로 생각해야 한다는 것입니다.
09:01
Now, we're accustomed to thinking about emotions in this way,
자, 우리는 간단하고도 짧은 시간만에
09:03
in simple, sort of, brief periods of time.
이런 식으로 감정을 생각하는 것에 익숙합니다.
09:06
So, for example,
그러니까 예를 들어,
09:09
I was giving this talk recently in New York City,
최근 저는 뉴욕시에서 강연을 했습니다,
09:11
and I said, "You know when you're on the subway
그리고 말했죠. "아시다시피, 여러분이 전철에 있을 때
09:13
and the other person across the subway car
차량 맞은 편에 있는 다른 이가
09:15
smiles at you,
여러분께 미소를 지어주면
09:17
and you just instinctively smile back?"
여러분도 본능적으로 미소를 보내죠."
09:19
And they looked at me and said, "We don't do that in New York City." (Laughter)
그러자 청중들이 저를 보며 말하더군요. "뉴욕시에서는 그렇게 하지 않습니다."
09:21
And I said, "Everywhere else in the world,
저는 답했죠. "나머지 세상에서는 어디에서나
09:24
that's normal human behavior."
정상적인 인간행동입니다."
09:26
And so there's a very instinctive way
그러니까, 짧게 서로에게 감정을 보내는
09:28
in which we briefly transmit emotions to each other.
매우 본능적인 방식이 있는 셈입니다.
09:30
And, in fact, emotional contagion can be broader still.
게다가 사실 감정 전염이란 더욱 넓게 갈 수도 있습니다.
09:33
Like we could have punctuated expressions of anger,
폭동의 경우처럼,
09:36
as in riots.
분노의 표현이 강화되는 방식도 있겠죠.
09:39
The question that we wanted to ask was:
저희들이 제기하려던 질문은
09:41
Could emotion spread,
감정이라는 것이
09:43
in a more sustained way than riots, across time
폭동보다 더 지속적인 방식으로, 장시간에 걸쳐
09:45
and involve large numbers of people,
많은 이들을 엮으며 퍼져나갈 수 있을까 하는 것입니다.
09:48
not just this pair of individuals smiling at each other in the subway car?
앞서 말한, 서로 지하철에서 미소를 지은 두 사람 수준에 머물지 않고 말이죠.
09:50
Maybe there's a kind of below the surface, quiet riot
어쩌면 수면 아래에서 이루어지는 고요한 폭동 같은 것이 존재해서
09:53
that animates us all the time.
우리를 항상 움직이는 것일지도 모르죠.
09:56
Maybe there are emotional stampedes
어쩌면 사회연결망을 통해 퍼져나가는
09:58
that ripple through social networks.
감정의 쇄도 같은 것이 있을지도 모릅니다.
10:00
Maybe, in fact, emotions have a collective existence,
어쩌면 사실, 감정이라는 것이 애초에 집합적 차원으로도 존재하여
10:02
not just an individual existence.
그저 개인적 차원으로만 존재하는 것이 아닐 수도 있습니다.
10:05
And this is one of the first images we made to study this phenomenon.
이것이 이 현상을 연구한 첫번째 이미지중 하나입니다
10:07
Again, a social network,
다시금 사회연결망이 보이죠.
10:10
but now we color the people yellow if they're happy
이번에는 행복한 사람들에게 노란색을 입혔습니다.
10:12
and blue if they're sad and green in between.
만약 슬퍼하면 파란색, 중간이면 녹색입니다.
10:15
And if you look at this image, you can right away see
이 이미지를 보시면, 곧바로
10:18
clusters of happy and unhappy people,
행복한 사람들과 불행한 사람들의 군집을 보실 수 있습니다,
10:20
again, spreading to three degrees of separation.
이번에도 분리의 3단계까지 뻗어있죠.
10:22
And you might form the intuition
직감적으로 여러분은
10:24
that the unhappy people
불행한 사람들은
10:26
occupy a different structural location within the network.
연결망 안에서 다른 구조적 위치에 있다는 것을 알아차리실 것입니다.
10:28
There's a middle and an edge to this network,
연결망에는 중간과 가장자리가 있는데,
10:31
and the unhappy people seem to be
불행한 이들은
10:33
located at the edges.
가장자리에 위치한 것으로 보입니다.
10:35
So to invoke another metaphor,
다른 은유를 사용해보죠.
10:37
if you imagine social networks as a kind of
만약 사회연결망을
10:39
vast fabric of humanity --
사람들을 엮은 커다란 천이라고 상상해본다면
10:41
I'm connected to you and you to her, on out endlessly into the distance --
저는 여러분에게 연결되어 있고 여러분은 그녀에게, 그렇게 끝없이 갑니다.
10:43
this fabric is actually like
그런데 이 천은 사실은 마치
10:46
an old-fashioned American quilt,
구식 미국 퀼트(누비 천)와도 같죠.
10:48
and it has patches on it: happy and unhappy patches.
여러가지 천 조각이 붙어있습니다. 행복한 조각, 불행한 조각.
10:50
And whether you become happy or not
여러분이 행복해지거나 혹은 불행해지는 것은
10:53
depends in part on whether you occupy a happy patch.
여러분이 행복한 조각을 얻어내는가에 달려있죠.
10:55
(Laughter)
(웃음)
10:58
So, this work with emotions,
이 연구는
11:00
which are so fundamental,
감정이라는 매우 근본적인 것을 다뤘기 때문에
11:03
then got us to thinking about: Maybe
저희들은 어쩌면 인간 사회연결망의
11:05
the fundamental causes of human social networks
근본적인 발생원인들이란, 어떤 식으로든
11:07
are somehow encoded in our genes.
우리 유전자에 각인된 것이 아닐까 생각하게 되었습니다.
11:09
Because human social networks, whenever they are mapped,
왜냐하면 인간 사회연결망이란 지도를 그려볼 때마다
11:11
always kind of look like this:
항상 이런 모양이기 때문입니다.
11:14
the picture of the network.
연결망을 그린 모습입니다.
11:16
But they never look like this.
하지만 절대 이렇게는 나타나지 않습니다.
11:18
Why do they not look like this?
왜 이렇게는 나오지 않을까요?
11:20
Why don't we form human social networks
왜 우리는 인간 사회연결망을 만들때
11:22
that look like a regular lattice?
사회 조직를 형성하지 못할까요?
11:24
Well, the striking patterns of human social networks,
인간 사회연결망들의 놀라운 패턴과
11:26
their ubiquity and their apparent purpose
편재성, 겉으로 드러난 목적들을 보고 있으면
11:29
beg questions about whether we evolved to have
이런 질문을 할 수 밖에 없게 됩니다: 인류는 애초부터
11:32
human social networks in the first place,
사회연결망을 만들도록 진화해온 것일까요?
11:34
and whether we evolved to form networks
그리고 특정한 구조를 지닌
11:36
with a particular structure.
연결망을 만들도록 진화해온 것일까요?
11:38
And notice first of all -- so, to understand this, though,
무엇보다도 주목할 것은... 아 그보다 이것을 이해하기 위해,
11:40
we need to dissect network structure a little bit first --
우리는 연결망의 구조를 약간 쪼개봐야 합니다.
11:42
and notice that every person in this network
이 연결망에서 모든 이들은
11:45
has exactly the same structural location as every other person.
다른 모든 이들과 정확하게 동일한 구조적 위치를 지니고 있습니다.
11:47
But that's not the case with real networks.
하지만 현실세계의 연결망은 그렇지 않습니다.
11:50
So, for example, here is a real network of college students
예를 들어, 현실세계의 대학생 연결망이 여기 있습니다.
11:53
at an elite northeastern university.
북동부의 엘리트 대학이죠.
11:55
And now I'm highlighting a few dots.
이제 몇 개의 점들을 강조해보겠습니다.
11:58
If you look here at the dots,
여기 점들을 보시면서,
12:00
compare node B in the upper left
좌측상단의 노드 B와
12:02
to node D in the far right;
한참 오른쪽에 있는 노드 D를 비교해보십시오.
12:04
B has four friends coming out from him
B에게서는 4명의 친구들이 나와있죠.
12:06
and D has six friends coming out from him.
그리고 D는 6명의 친구가 나와있습니다.
12:08
And so, those two individuals have different numbers of friends.
이렇듯, 이 두 명은 서로 다른 수의 친구가 있죠.
12:11
That's very obvious, we all know that.
매우 명백합니다. 모두가 아는 것이죠.
12:14
But certain other aspects
하지만 사회연결망 구조의
12:16
of social network structure are not so obvious.
어떤 다른 측면들은 그렇게 명백하지 않습니다.
12:18
Compare node B in the upper left to node A in the lower left.
좌 상단에 있는 노드 B와 좌 하단에 있는 노드 A를 비교해보시죠.
12:20
Now, those people both have four friends,
이제 이들은 똑같이 4명의 친구가 있습니다,
12:23
but A's friends all know each other,
하지만 A의 친구들은 모두 서로를 알고,
12:26
and B's friends do not.
B의 친구들은 그렇지 않습니다.
12:28
So the friend of a friend of A's
이렇게 A의 친구의 친구들은
12:30
is, back again, a friend of A's,
다시금 A의 친구입니다.
12:32
whereas the friend of a friend of B's is not a friend of B's,
반면 B의 친구의 친구는, B의 친구가 아니라서
12:34
but is farther away in the network.
연결망 속에서 좀 더 멀리 있습니다.
12:36
This is known as transitivity in networks.
이것을 연결망의 "이행성"이라고 합니다.
12:38
And, finally, compare nodes C and D:
그리고 마지막으로, 노드 C와 노드 D를 비교해보죠.
12:41
C and D both have six friends.
C와 D는 둘 다 6명의 친구가 있습니다.
12:43
If you talk to them, and you said, "What is your social life like?"
만약 그들과 이야기를 나누며 "당신의 사회적인 삶은 어떻습니까?"라고 묻는다면
12:46
they would say, "I've got six friends.
그들은 "저는 6명의 친구가 있어요
12:49
That's my social experience."
그것이 제 사회적 경험입니다."라고 말할 것입니다.
12:51
But now we, with a bird's eye view looking at this network,
하지만 이 연결망을 조감도로 내려다보면,
12:53
can see that they occupy very different social worlds.
그들이 전혀 다른 사회 세계에 있다는 것을 볼 수 있습니다.
12:56
And I can cultivate that intuition in you by just asking you:
제가 이렇게 질문하면 여러분도 그런 직감이 생기실 것입니다:
12:59
Who would you rather be
여러분이라면 이 중 어떤 사람이 되고 싶으십니까...
13:01
if a deadly germ was spreading through the network?
...만약 치명적인 병균이 이 연결망을 통해 퍼지고 있다면?
13:03
Would you rather be C or D?
C가 되고 싶으십니까 D가 되고 싶으십니까?
13:05
You'd rather be D, on the edge of the network.
연결망의 가장자리에 위치한 D가 되고 싶으시겠죠.
13:08
And now who would you rather be
자 그럼 이번에는 누가 되고 싶으십니까...
13:10
if a juicy piece of gossip -- not about you --
...여러분에 관한 것이 아닌, 흥미로운 가십거리가
13:12
was spreading through the network? (Laughter)
이 연결망을 통해 퍼지고 있다면?
13:15
Now, you would rather be C.
이번에는 C가 되고 싶으시겠죠.
13:17
So different structural locations
이렇듯 사로 다른 구조적 위치는
13:19
have different implications for your life.
여러분의 삶에 서로 다른 의미를 줍니다.
13:21
And, in fact, when we did some experiments looking at this,
그리고 사실 저희들은 이것에 관한 몇몇 실험을 해봤죠.
13:23
what we found is that 46 percent of the variation
찾아낸 바에 따르면, 친구가 몇 명인가에 대한
13:26
in how many friends you have
차이 발생의 46%는
13:29
is explained by your genes.
유전에 의해 설명됩니다.
13:31
And this is not surprising. We know that some people are born shy
별로 놀라운 것은 아니죠. 알려져있듯 어떤 이들은 부끄러움을 타고 났습니다.
13:33
and some are born gregarious. That's obvious.
또 어떤 이들은 사교성을 타고 났죠. 명백한 일입니다.
13:36
But we also found some non-obvious things.
하지만 우리는 명백하지 않은 것들도 몇 가지 발견했습니다.
13:39
For instance, 47 percent in the variation
예를 들어, 여러분의 친구들이 서로를 알고 있는가에 대한
13:41
in whether your friends know each other
차이 발생의 47%가
13:44
is attributable to your genes.
여러분의 유전으로 인한 것입니다.
13:46
Whether your friends know each other
여러분의 친구들이 서로를 아는지 모르는지가
13:48
has not just to do with their genes, but with yours.
그들 자신의 유전자가 아니라, 바로 여러분의 유전자와 상관이 있다는 것입니다.
13:50
And we think the reason for this is that some people
저희 생각에 이런 현상의 이유는, 어떤 사람들은
13:53
like to introduce their friends to each other -- you know who you are --
자기 친구들을 서로에게 소개시켜 주는 것을 좋아하기 때문이라고 봅니다.
13:55
and others of you keep them apart and don't introduce your friends to each other.
반면 어떤 이들은 친구들을 서로 떼어놓고, 서로에게 소개시켜주지 않죠.
13:58
And so some people knit together the networks around them,
그렇기에 어떤 이들은 자기 주변 연결망을 만들어내며
14:01
creating a kind of dense web of ties
밀도 높게 연결관계들을 짜넣어
14:04
in which they're comfortably embedded.
그 속에 편안하게 스스로 들어가버리죠.
14:06
And finally, we even found that
그리고 마지막으로, 심지어
14:08
30 percent of the variation
사람들이 연결망의 중심에 있는지 가장자리에 있는지에 대한
14:10
in whether or not people are in the middle or on the edge of the network
차이 발생의 30%가
14:12
can also be attributed to their genes.
마찬가지로 유전에 의한 것일 수 있다는 점을 발견했습니다.
14:15
So whether you find yourself in the middle or on the edge
즉 여러분이 연결망 중심이나 가장자리에 위치해있는 상태도
14:17
is also partially heritable.
부분적으로는 대물림될 수 있습니다.
14:19
Now, what is the point of this?
자, 이런 연구의 핵심은 무엇일까요?
14:22
How does this help us understand?
어떻게 이해에 도움을 줄까요?
14:25
How does this help us
어떻게 이런 것들이
14:27
figure out some of the problems that are affecting us these days?
오늘날 우리에게 영향을 주는 몇몇 문제들을 이해하는 것에 도움을 줄까요?
14:29
Well, the argument I'd like to make is that networks have value.
제가 주장하고자 하는 것은, 연결망이 가치를 지닌다는 것입니다.
14:33
They are a kind of social capital.
일종의 사회적 자본입니다.
14:36
New properties emerge
우리가 사회연결망 속에 배태되어 있기에
14:39
because of our embeddedness in social networks,
새로운 속성들이 창발합니다.
14:41
and these properties inhere
그리고 그런 속성들은
14:43
in the structure of the networks,
연결망의 구조 속에서 존재하게 됩니다.
14:46
not just in the individuals within them.
오직 연결망에 들어있는 개인들 뿐만이 아니라 말이죠.
14:48
So think about these two common objects.
다음 두가지 평범한 물질들을 생각해보세요.
14:50
They're both made of carbon,
둘다 탄소로 만들어졌습니다.
14:52
and yet one of them has carbon atoms in it
그러나 하나는 탄소 원자들이
14:54
that are arranged in one particular way -- on the left --
어떤 특정한 방식으로 배열되어 있습니다. 왼쪽에 있는 것은
14:57
and you get graphite, which is soft and dark.
흑연입니다. 부드럽고 검죠.
15:00
But if you take the same carbon atoms
하지만 같은 탄소 원자들을
15:03
and interconnect them a different way,
다른 방법으로 상호연결한다면,
15:05
you get diamond, which is clear and hard.
다이아몬드가 나옵니다. 투명하고 단단하죠.
15:07
And those properties of softness and hardness and darkness and clearness
부드럽고 단단하고 검고 투명한 성질들은
15:10
do not reside in the carbon atoms;
탄소 원자에 담겨 있는 것이 아닙니다.
15:13
they reside in the interconnections between the carbon atoms,
탄소 원자들간의 상호연결에 담겨 있습니다.
15:15
or at least arise because of the
혹은 적어도
15:18
interconnections between the carbon atoms.
탄소 원자들간의 상호연결 때문에 발생합니다.
15:20
So, similarly, the pattern of connections among people
비슷한 식으로, 사람들 사이의 연결 패턴은
15:22
confers upon the groups of people
사람들의 집단에
15:25
different properties.
다른 성질을 부여해줍니다.
15:28
It is the ties between people
사람들 사이의 연결이 바로
15:30
that makes the whole greater than the sum of its parts.
전체를 부분의 합보다 크게 만들어주는 것이죠.
15:32
And so it is not just what's happening to these people --
그렇기 때문에, 우리들에게 영향을 주는 것은 단지
15:35
whether they're losing weight or gaining weight, or becoming rich or becoming poor,
이 사람들에게 일어나는 일들 자체, 그러니까 그들이 몸무게가 늘어나고 줄어들고
15:38
or becoming happy or not becoming happy -- that affects us;
재산이 늘고 줄고 행복해지고 불행해지는 그런 것들 뿐만이 아닙니다.
15:41
it's also the actual architecture
우리를 둘러싸고 있는
15:44
of the ties around us.
연결고리들의 실제 구조 역시 우리에게 영향을 줍니다.
15:46
Our experience of the world
세상에 대한 우리의 경험은
15:48
depends on the actual structure
우리들이 그 속에서 살아가고 있는
15:50
of the networks in which we're residing
연결망의 실제 구조에 의존합니다.
15:52
and on all the kinds of things that ripple and flow
또한 그 연결망을 통해서 흘러다니는
15:54
through the network.
모든 것들에도 의존합니다.
15:57
Now, the reason, I think, that this is the case
제가 이렇게 생각하는 이유는,
16:00
is that human beings assemble themselves
사람들은 서로 모여서
16:03
and form a kind of superorganism.
일종의 초개체를 형성하기 때문입니다.
16:05
Now, a superorganism is a collection of individuals
초개체는 개체들의 집합체인데
16:09
which show or evince behaviors or phenomena
개체들에 대한 연구로는 환원할 수 없는
16:12
that are not reducible to the study of individuals
행동과 현상들을 보여줍니다.
16:15
and that must be understood by reference to,
집합체를 참조하고
16:18
and by studying, the collective.
연구함으로써 이해해야하죠.
16:20
Like, for example, a hive of bees
예를 들어,
16:22
that's finding a new nesting site,
새로운 보금자리를 찾는 벌떼,
16:25
or a flock of birds that's evading a predator,
혹은 천적을 피하는 새떼,
16:28
or a flock of birds that's able to pool its wisdom
혹은 태평양 한 가운데에 있는
16:30
and navigate and find a tiny speck
작은 섬을 향해가기 위해
16:33
of an island in the middle of the Pacific,
함께 지혜를 모아낼 수 있는 새떼,
16:35
or a pack of wolves that's able
또는 더 큰 사냥감을 쓰러트리는
16:37
to bring down larger prey.
늑대떼들이 있죠.
16:39
Superorganisms have properties
초유기체는 각 개체를 연구하는 것으로는
16:42
that cannot be understood just by studying the individuals.
이해할 수 없는 속성들을 지니고 있습니다.
16:44
I think understanding social networks
저는 사회연결망을 이해하고
16:47
and how they form and operate
그들이 어떻게 형성되고 작동하는지 이해하는 것이,
16:49
can help us understand not just health and emotions
단지 건강과 감정 뿐만 아니라
16:51
but all kinds of other phenomena --
온갖 종류의 다른 현상들도 이해할 수 있도록 도와준다고 봅니다.
16:54
like crime, and warfare,
범죄나 복지,
16:56
and economic phenomena like bank runs
집단적 예금인출사태나
16:58
and market crashes
시장 붕괴 같은 경제 현상,
17:00
and the adoption of innovation
혁신의 수용과정,
17:02
and the spread of product adoption.
제품의 수용 확산 같은 것들 말입니다.
17:04
Now, look at this.
자, 이것을 보세요.
17:06
I think we form social networks
제 생각에, 우리가 사회연결망을 형성하는 이유는
17:09
because the benefits of a connected life
연결된 삶이 주는 이점이
17:11
outweigh the costs.
들어가는 비용보다 크기 때문입니다.
17:13
If I was always violent towards you
만약 제가 여러분들에게 난폭하게 굴거나
17:16
or gave you misinformation
혹은 거짓 정보를 주거나,
17:18
or made you sad or infected you with deadly germs,
슬프게 하거나, 전염병을 옮기거나 하면,
17:20
you would cut the ties to me,
여러분은 저와 연결고리를 자르실 것입니다.
17:23
and the network would disintegrate.
연결망은 분해되겠죠.
17:25
So the spread of good and valuable things
그렇기에, 사회연결망을 지속시키고 가꾸기 위해서는
17:27
is required to sustain and nourish social networks.
선하며 가치있는 것들의 확산이 필요합니다.
17:30
Similarly, social networks are required
비슷하게도, 선하며 가치있는 것들을 확산하기 위해서도
17:34
for the spread of good and valuable things,
사회연결망이 필요합니다.
17:36
like love and kindness
사랑, 친절,
17:39
and happiness and altruism
행복, 이타성,
17:41
and ideas.
아이디어 같은 것들 말이죠.
17:43
I think, in fact, that if we realized
저는 사실 우리들이
17:45
how valuable social networks are,
사회연결망이 얼마나 가치있는 것인지 깨닫게 되면
17:47
we'd spend a lot more time nourishing them and sustaining them,
그것들을 지속시키고 가꾸는 일에 훨씬 더 많은 시간을 보낼 것이라고 봅니다.
17:49
because I think social networks
왜냐하면 사회연결망은
17:52
are fundamentally related to goodness.
근본적으로 선함과 연관이 있기 때문입니다.
17:54
And what I think the world needs now
그리고 저는 세계가 현재 필요로 하는 것은
17:57
is more connections.
더욱 많은 연결이라 생각합니다.
17:59
Thank you.
감사합니다.
18:01
(Applause)
(박수)
18:03
Translated by Sun Phil Ka
Reviewed by Nakho Kim

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Nicholas Christakis - Physician, social scientist
Nicholas Christakis explores how the large-scale, face-to-face social networks in which we are embedded affect our lives, and what we can do to take advantage of this fact.

Why you should listen

People aren't merely social animals in the usual sense, for we don't just live in groups. We live in networks -- and we have done so ever since we emerged from the African savannah. Via intricately branching paths tracing out cascading family connections, friendship ties, and work relationships, we are interconnected to hundreds or even thousands of specific people, most of whom we do not know. We affect them and they affect us.

Nicholas Christakis' work examines the biological, psychological, sociological, and mathematical rules that govern how we form these social networks, and the rules that govern how they shape our lives. His work shows how phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, emotions, ideas, germs, and altruism can spread through our social ties, and how genes can partially underlie our creation of social ties to begin with. His work also sheds light on how we might take advantage of an understanding of social networks to make the world a better place.

At Yale, Christakis is a Professor of Social and Natural Science, and he directs a diverse research group in the field of biosocial science, primarily investigating social networks. His popular undergraduate course "Health of the Public" is available as a podcast. His book, Connected, co-authored with James H. Fowler, appeared in 2009, and has been translated into 20 languages. In 2009, he was named by Time magazine to its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, and also, in 2009 and 2010, by Foreign Policy magazine to its list of 100 top global thinkers

More profile about the speaker
Nicholas Christakis | Speaker | TED.com