sponsored links
TED2006

Al Gore: Averting the climate crisis

アル・ゴア 「気候危機の回避」

February 25, 2006

「不都合な真実」で見せたのと同じユーモアと人間味をもって、アル・ゴアは個人が気候変化に対してすぐにでもできる15項目を挙げています。ハイブリッドカーを買うというのもあれば、地球温暖化に対する新しくもっとホットなブランド名を考案するというのもあります。

Al Gore - Climate advocate
Nobel Laureate Al Gore focused the world’s attention on the global climate crisis. Now he’s showing us how we’re moving towards real solutions. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
どうもありがとう クリス このステージに立てる機会を
00:28
Thank you so much, Chris.
00:29
And it's truly a great honor
to have the opportunity
2度もいただけるというのは実に光栄なことで とてもうれしく思っています
00:33
to come to this stage twice;
I'm extremely grateful.
このカンファレンスには圧倒されっぱなしです 皆さんから―
00:36
I have been blown away by this conference,
00:39
and I want to thank all of you
for the many nice comments
前回の講演に対していただいた温かいコメントにお礼を申し上げたい
00:45
about what I had to say the other night.
心からそう思っています それというのも…ううっ…私には必要なものでしたから! (笑)
00:47
And I say that sincerely,
00:50
partly because (Mock sob)
00:52
I need that.
00:53
(Laughter)
00:59
Put yourselves in my position.
どうか私の立場で考えてみてください!
01:01
(Laughter)
8年間私はエアフォースツーで飛んでいました
01:08
I flew on Air Force Two for eight years.
01:10
(Laughter)
今では飛行機に乗るのに靴を脱いで
01:12
Now I have to take off my shoes
or boots to get on an airplane!
金属探知機を通らなきゃなりません! (笑) (拍手)
01:16
(Laughter)
01:18
(Applause)
私の立場がどんなものか分るように 短い話をお聞かせしましょう
01:25
I'll tell you one quick story
01:27
to illustrate what
that's been like for me.
01:30
(Laughter)
本当にあった話です…細かい部分まで本当です
01:31
It's a true story --
every bit of this is true.
ティッパーと私が…ああっ…ホワイトハウスを…(笑)…去った後
01:34
Soon after Tipper and I left the --
(Mock sob) White House --
01:38
(Laughter)
01:40
we were driving from our home
in Nashville to a little farm we have
私たちはナッシュビルの自宅から ナッシュビルの東50マイルのところに持っている
01:45
50 miles east of Nashville.
小さな農場へと向かっていました…
自分で運転をして
01:48
Driving ourselves.
01:50
(Laughter)
あなた方には小さなことに思えるでしょうが…(笑)
01:52
I know it sounds like
a little thing to you, but --
01:55
(Laughter)
バックミラーを見たとき 急にあることに気づきました
02:01
I looked in the rear-view mirror
02:06
and all of a sudden it just hit me.
付いてくる車列は もはやいないのです
02:09
There was no motorcade back there.
02:11
(Laughter)
幻肢痛というのを聞いたことはありますか? (笑)
02:14
You've heard of phantom limb pain?
02:16
(Laughter)
レンタルしたフォード トーラスに乗っていました
02:21
This was a rented Ford Taurus.
02:25
(Laughter)
02:27
It was dinnertime,
夕食時で 食べる場所を探し始めました
02:29
and we started looking for a place to eat.
州間高速道路40号線を走っていました 出口238のテネシー州レバノンで下り
02:33
We were on I-40.
02:34
We got to Exit 238, Lebanon, Tennessee.
レストランを探し “ショーニーズ”を見つけました
02:38
We got off the exit,
we found a Shoney's restaurant.
ご存じない方のために言っておくと 安いファミリーレストランチェーンです
02:41
Low-cost family restaurant chain,
for those of you who don't know it.
02:46
We went in and sat down at the booth,
and the waitress came over,
中に入ってテーブルにつきました やってきたウェートレスが
とても驚いていました…ティッパーを見て (笑)
02:51
made a big commotion over Tipper.
02:53
(Laughter)
02:55
She took our order, and then went
to the couple in the booth next to us,
注文を取ったあと 彼女は隣のテーブルのカップルのところに行き
声をひそめたので 何を言うのか聞こうと私は神経を集中させました
02:59
and she lowered her voice so much,
03:01
I had to really strain to hear
what she was saying.
彼女は囁きました 「ねえ 前副大統領のアル ゴアと奥さんのティッパーよ」
03:04
And she said "Yes, that's former
Vice President Al Gore
03:06
and his wife, Tipper."
それに対して男が言いました 「彼も長い道のりをやって来たんだろうね」 (笑)
03:08
And the man said,
03:10
"He's come down a long way, hasn't he?"
03:12
(Laughter)
03:17
(Applause)
そのあと一連の出来事が引き続いて起きました
03:21
There's been kind
of a series of epiphanies.
03:24
(Laughter)
次の日のことです これも100%本当の話です
03:26
The very next day,
continuing the totally true story,
私はG5でスピーチを行うため アフリカのナイジェリアにあるラゴスに飛びました
03:29
I got on a G-V to fly to Africa
to make a speech in Nigeria,
エネルギーについて話すことになっていました
03:35
in the city of Lagos,
on the topic of energy.
このスピーチの始めに 私は前の日にナッシュビルであったことを
03:39
And I began the speech
by telling them the story
03:42
of what had just happened
the day before in Nashville.
話しました
今話したのとちょうど同じようにです
03:45
And I told it pretty much the same way
I've just shared it with you:
03:49
Tipper and I were driving ourselves,
ティッパーと私が自分たちで運転して安いレストランチェーンの
03:51
Shoney's, low-cost
family restaurant chain,
ショーニーズに行き 男がこう言ったと みんな笑いました
03:53
what the man said -- they laughed.
03:55
I gave my speech, then went back
out to the airport to fly back home.
それからスピーチを済ませて 空港に戻り 帰途につきました
機内で眠っているうち 飛行機は真夜中に給油のため
03:59
I fell asleep on the plane
04:01
until, during the middle
of the night, we landed
アゾレス諸島に着陸しました
04:03
on the Azores Islands for refueling.
私は目を覚まして 扉が開いたので新鮮な空気を吸いに外に出ました
04:06
I woke up, they opened the door,
I went out to get some fresh air,
見ると1人の男が滑走路を走っていました
04:09
and I looked, and there was a man
running across the runway.
手に持った紙を振りながら 叫んでいました
04:12
And he was waving a piece
of paper, and he was yelling,
「ワシントンに連絡を! ワシントンに連絡を!」 私は思いました―
04:15
"Call Washington! Call Washington!"
04:20
And I thought to myself,
in the middle of the night,
「大西洋の真ん中で 真夜中だというのに
ワシントンに何の問題があるというんだ?」
04:23
in the middle of the Atlantic,
04:24
what in the world could be
wrong in Washington?
それから―
問題ならたくさんあったのを思い出しました (笑)
04:26
Then I remembered
it could be a bunch of things.
04:29
(Laughter)
それは実のところ私のスタッフが取り乱していたのでした
04:34
But what it turned out to be,
04:36
was that my staff was extremely upset
04:40
because one of the wire services
in Nigeria had already written a story
ナイジェリアの通信社がすでに私のスピーチを記事にしていて
04:46
about my speech,
04:47
and it had already been printed in cities
それが全米各地の新聞に載っていたのでした
04:49
all across the United States of America.
私はモントレーで読みました 記事はこうです
04:52
It was printed in Monterey, I checked.
04:53
(Laughter)
04:55
And the story began,
「アメリカの前副大統領アル ゴアは 昨日ナイジェリアで語った
04:58
"Former Vice President Al Gore
announced in Nigeria yesterday," quote:
“私と妻のティッパーは 安いファミリーレストランを開いた 名前はショーニーズ
05:02
'My wife Tipper and I have opened
a low-cost family restaurant'" --
05:06
(Laughter)
05:07
"'named Shoney's,
私たちは自分でやっている”」(笑)
05:09
and we are running it ourselves.'"
05:10
(Laughter)
私がアメリカの土を踏むよりも前に
05:14
Before I could get back to U.S. soil,
デイヴィッド レターマンとジェイ レノがもうネタにしていました
05:16
David Letterman and Jay Leno
had already started in on --
05:20
one of them had me
in a big white chef's hat,
私役の男が大きな白いシェフの帽子をかぶり
ティッパーが「バーガー1丁ポテト付きで!」と叫びます
05:23
Tipper was saying,
"One more burger with fries!"
05:26
(Laughter)
3日後 私は手書きの素敵な長文の手紙を 友人であり同僚でもある
05:27
Three days later,
05:28
I got a nice, long, handwritten letter
05:31
from my friend and partner
and colleague Bill Clinton, saying,
ビル クリントンから受け取りました 「レストランのこと聞いたよ おめでとう アル!」
05:34
"Congratulations
on the new restaurant, Al!"
(笑)
05:37
(Laughter)
私たちは互いの人生の成功を称え合いたいと思っています
05:43
We like to celebrate
each other's successes in life.
05:47
(Laughter)
情報生態学についてお話するつもりでいたのですが
05:53
I was going to talk
about information ecology.
しかし私はこれからたびたびTEDに戻ってこようと思っているので
05:55
But I was thinking that,
05:58
since I plan to make a lifelong habit
of coming back to TED,
このテーマについてはまたの機会にしようと思います (拍手)
06:01
that maybe I could talk
about that another time.
06:04
(Applause)
約束ですよ!
06:05
Chris Anderson: It's a deal!
06:07
(Applause)
多くの人からもっと詳しく聞かせてほしいと言われたことに焦点を絞ってお話しします
06:10
Al Gore: I want to focus
on what many of you have said
06:14
you would like me to elaborate on:
気候危機に対して私たちには何ができるのでしょうか? まず始めに
06:16
What can you do about the climate crisis?
06:21
I want to start with a couple of --
新しいスライドをお見せして それから4-5 枚だけおさらいをします
06:24
I'm going to show some new images,
06:27
and I'm going to recapitulate
just four or five.
では始めましょう スライドは講演するたびにアップデートしています
06:32
Now, the slide show.
06:34
I update the slide show
every time I give it.
いつも新たに学んだことがあり 新しい内容を付け加えています
06:37
I add new images,
06:39
because I learn more about it
every time I give it.
06:42
It's like beach-combing, you know?
浜辺で宝探しするようなものです 波が押し寄せ 引いていくたびに
06:44
Every time the tide comes in and out,
you find some more shells.
新しい貝殻がいくつか見つかります
この2日間の間にも 1月の気温の記録を新しく手に入れました
06:47
Just in the last two days, we got
the new temperature records in January.
アメリカのデータです 過去を通じての
06:53
This is just for
the United States of America.
06:56
Historical average
for Januarys is 31 degrees;
1月の平均気温は零下1度です 先月の平均気温は4度でした
06:59
last month was 39.5 degrees.
07:03
Now, I know that you wanted some more
bad news about the environment --
皆さんは環境に関する悪いニュースをもっと聞きたいですよね?
07:08
I'm kidding.
冗談です このスライドは前にもお見せしたものですが
07:10
But these are the recapitulation slides,
このあとの新しいスライドで 何ができるかについてお話します
07:13
and then I'm going to go into new
material about what you can do.
07:16
But I wanted to elaborate
on a couple of these.
まずはこのスライドをもう少し詳しく説明します
通常の経済活動によってアメリカが温暖化に及ぼす影響の予測です
07:19
First of all, this is where
we're projected to go
07:22
with the U.S. contribution
to global warming,
電気やその他のエネルギーの最終用途効率の改善は容易に行えます
07:24
under business as usual.
07:26
Efficiency in end-use electricity
and end-use of all energy
効率化と節約です
07:31
is the low-hanging fruit.
07:33
Efficiency and conservation --
it's not a cost; it's a profit.
これはコストではなく 利益になることです 符号が逆です
07:37
The sign is wrong.
07:40
It's not negative; it's positive.
マイナスではなく プラスなのです それ自体で割に合う投資なのです
07:42
These are investments
that pay for themselves.
07:45
But they are also very effective
in deflecting our path.
しかしこれは温暖化を緩和するための効果的な方法でもあります
乗用車やトラック…これについては前にもお話ししましたが
07:50
Cars and trucks -- I talked
about that in the slideshow,
全体の中で捉えてもらいたいのです
07:54
but I want you to put it in perspective.
07:57
It's an easy, visible target of concern --
これはわかりやすい対象であり 対策すべきですが
08:02
and it should be --
しかし乗用車やトラックよりも もっと大きな地球温暖化汚染が
08:03
but there is more global warming pollution
that comes from buildings
建物での消費に由来しています
08:08
than from cars and trucks.
乗用車やトラックは重要であり アメリカは世界でも最も規制が緩いので
08:10
Cars and trucks are very significant,
08:13
and we have the lowest
standards in the world.
対策を行うべきですが しかしこれはパズルの一部です
08:16
And so we should address that.
But it's part of the puzzle.
他の輸送機関の効率もまた 乗用車やトラックと同じように重要です
08:19
Other transportation efficiency
is as important as cars and trucks.
08:24
Renewables at the current levels
of technological efficiency
再生可能エネルギーは 現在の技術水準でも
十分大きな違いを生み出せます ビノッド(コースラ)やジョン ドーアその他
08:28
can make this much difference.
08:30
And with what Vinod, and John Doerr
and others, many of you here --
ここにいる多くの人々が 直接これに関わっています
08:36
there are a lot of people
directly involved in this --
このくさびの部分は 現在の予測よりももっと早く拡がるでしょう
08:39
this wedge is going to grow
much more rapidly
08:41
than the current projection shows it.
炭素の捕捉と隔離(CCS)は
08:43
Carbon Capture and Sequestration --
that's what CCS stands for --
キラーアプリになりそうです
08:49
is likely to become the killer app
that will enable us
これにより 化石燃料を安心して使い続けられるようになります
08:56
to continue to use fossil fuels
in a way that is safe.
まだそこまでは行っていませんが
09:04
Not quite there yet.
09:05
OK. Now, what can you do?
それでは私たちには何ができるのでしょうか? 家庭での排出量を減らしてください
09:11
Reduce emissions in your home.
ここでする支出は利益につながります
09:13
Most of these expenditures
are also profitable.
断熱 より良いデザイン そして できればグリーン電力を買うこと
09:18
Insulation, better design.
09:20
Buy green electricity where you can.
前にも述べた自動車ですが ハイブリッドカーを買うか 電車を使ってください
09:24
I mentioned automobiles -- buy a hybrid.
09:28
Use light rail.
もっと良い選択肢がないか検討してください 大切なことです
09:30
Figure out some of the other options
that are much better.
09:33
It's important.
環境問題を意識する消費者になってください 買うものすべてについて選択肢があります
09:35
Be a green consumer.
09:36
You have choices with everything you buy,
地球の気候危機に対する影響が
09:39
between things that have a harsh effect,
09:43
or a much less harsh effect
on the global climate crisis.
大きなものもあれば 小さなものもあります そのことを考えてください
09:49
Consider this:
カーボンニュートラルな生活をするという決断をしてください
09:51
Make a decision to live
a carbon-neutral life.
09:55
Those of you who are good at branding,
ブランディングが得意な方には
ぜひ助言と手助けをいただきたい
09:57
I'd love to get your advice and help
できるだけ多くの人に伝えるには どのように言ったらよいでしょう
10:00
on how to say this in a way
that connects with the most people.
10:06
It is easier than you think.
みんなが考えているよりも簡単なことなのです 本当に
10:08
It really is.
この中にもそういう決断をした人がたくさんいます
10:12
A lot of us in here
have made that decision,
10:15
and it is really pretty easy.
10:17
It means reduce
your carbon dioxide emissions
ご自分のするあらゆる選択を 炭酸ガス排出を減らすように行ってください
10:23
with the full range
of choices that you make,
そして完全に減らせなかった部分についてはカーボンオフセットを購入してください
10:26
and then purchase or acquire offsets
10:30
for the remainder that you have not
completely reduced.
これについては climatecrisis.net で詳しく解説しています
10:33
And what it means is elaborated
at climatecrisis.net.
10:40
There is a carbon calculator.
そこにカーボン カリキュレーターがあります パーティシパント プロダクションと
10:44
Participant Productions convened --
私自身も関わって 第一級のソフトウェア開発者たちが
10:47
with my active involvement --
10:50
the leading software writers in the world,
炭酸ガス排出量の計算という難解な科学に取り組み
10:53
on this arcane science
of carbon calculation,
10:56
to construct a consumer-friendly
carbon calculator.
一般消費者にも使いやすいカーボン カリキュレーターを作りました
11:01
You can very precisely calculate
what your CO2 emissions are,
自分のCO2 排出量を正確に算出することができます
11:07
and then you will be given
options to reduce.
そしてどう減らせるかの選択肢が示されます
11:10
And by the time the movie
comes out in May,
映画が公開される5月までには バージョン2.0にアップデートされ
11:13
this will be updated to 2.0,
クリックしてすぐオフセットを購入できるようになります
11:15
and we will have click-through
purchases of offsets.
次に 自分の会社をカーボンニュートラルにすることを考えてください 私たちの中の何人かは実際にやっていますが
11:19
Next, consider making
your business carbon-neutral.
11:23
Again, some of us have done that,
11:24
and it's not as hard as you think.
皆さんが考えるほど難しくはありません あらゆる新規開発に温暖化対策を組み込んでください
11:27
Integrate climate solutions
into all of your innovations,
あなたの分野がテクノロジーだろうと エンターテインメントだろうと
11:32
whether you are from the technology,
11:34
or entertainment, or design
and architecture community.
デザインとアーキテクチャだろうと
持続可能にするための投資をしてください マジョラ(カーター)がその話をしていました
11:37
Invest sustainably.
11:39
Majora mentioned this.
年間の成績に基づいて
11:42
Listen, if you have invested money
with managers who you compensate
管理者の報酬を払っているなら
11:48
on the basis of their annual performance,
11:51
don't ever again complain
about quarterly report CEO management.
四半期報告書について文句は言わないことです
11:57
Over time, people do
what you pay them to do.
人はやがてお金がもらえることをするようになります
12:01
And if they judge how much
they're going to get paid
自分のもらえるお金は短期的なリターンに基づいて決められていると
12:06
on your capital that they've invested,
12:09
based on the short-term returns,
彼らが判断すれば 短期的な判断がされるようになります
12:11
you're going to get short-term decisions.
12:15
A lot more to be said about that.
これについてはもっと言うべきことがあります
12:17
Become a catalyst of change.
変化の触媒になってください 他の人たちに教えてください 学んでください 話してください
12:19
Teach others, learn about it,
talk about it.
映画が公開されます 2日前にご覧に入れたスライドショーを
12:24
The movie is a movie version
of the slideshow
映画にしたものですが とても面白い内容になっています 5月に公開されます
12:27
I gave two nights ago,
except it's a lot more entertaining.
12:31
And it comes out in May.
12:34
Many of you here have the opportunity
to ensure that a lot of people see it.
その映画を見るように 多くの人に働きかけてください
誰かをナッシュビルに派遣してください 選りすぐった人を
12:39
Consider sending somebody to Nashville.
12:44
Pick well.
このスライドの解説ができるように私がトレーニングします
12:46
And I am personally going to train people
to give this slideshow --
12:50
re-purposed, with some
of the personal stories obviously replaced
個人的な部分は当然一般的なものに差し替えます
12:55
with a generic approach,
スライドだけでなく 何を意味するのか それがどう繋がるのかということも
12:57
and it's not just the slides,
it's what they mean.
13:00
And it's how they link together.
あちこちから推薦されて集まった人たちを相手に
13:01
And so I'm going to be conducting
a course this summer
この夏 セミナーを行う予定です
13:06
for a group of people that are
nominated by different folks
13:10
to come and then give it en masse,
そして彼らがアメリカ中のコミュニティーで講演をします
13:12
in communities all across the country,
スライドショーは毎週アップデートし
13:14
and we're going to update the slideshow
for all of them every single week,
最新で正確なものにします
13:19
to keep it right on the cutting edge.
ローレンス レッシグと協力し
13:22
Working with Larry Lessig, it will be,
somewhere in that process,
ツールや 著作権を整備して
13:26
posted with tools
and limited-use copyrights,
若い人たちがリミックスし 自分のやり方でやれるようにします
13:31
so that young people can remix it
and do it in their own way.
(拍手)
13:36
(Applause)
政治には近寄るななんて 誰が言ったんでしょう?
13:39
Where did anybody get the idea
13:41
that you ought to stay
arm's length from politics?
あなた方の中の共和党員を民主党員にしようというのではありません
13:43
It doesn't mean
that if you're a Republican,
13:45
that I'm trying to convince you
to be a Democrat.
私たちは共和党員も必要としています これはずっと超党派の問題でした
13:48
We need Republicans as well.
13:50
This used to be a bipartisan issue,
私は中にいてそのことを良く知っています 政治に積極的になってください
13:52
and I know that
in this group it really is.
13:54
Become politically active.
民主主義が本来の形で機能するように
13:56
Make our democracy work the way
it's supposed to work.
CO2 排出や地球温暖化汚染を抑制し 取引するというアイデアを支持してください
13:59
Support the idea of capping
carbon dioxide emissions --
14:05
global warming pollution --
and trading it.
理由はこうです アメリカが世界のシステムの外にいるなら
14:07
Here's why: as long as the United States
is out of the world system,
クローズドシステムにはなりません
14:11
it's not a closed system.
14:13
Once it becomes a closed system,
with U.S. participation,
アメリカの参加によって 世界がクローズドシステムになったなら
14:17
then everybody
who's on a board of directors --
取締役会に入っている人は
…この中で会社の取締役会に入っている人はどれくらいいますか?
14:19
how many people here
serve on the board of directors
14:22
of a corporation?
クローズドシステムになったなら 炭酸ガス排出の削減と取引によって収入を最大化するように
14:25
Once it's a closed system,
14:26
you will have legal liability
if you do not urge your CEO
CEO を説得しないと あなた方が法的な責任を問われます
14:32
to get the maximum income from reducing
and trading the carbon emissions
私たちにそれができたなら マーケットはこの問題を解決するように動きます
14:37
that can be avoided.
14:38
The market will work
to solve this problem --
14:43
if we can accomplish this.
この春に始まる啓蒙キャンペーンに手を貸してください
14:47
Help with the mass persuasion campaign
that will start this spring.
14:50
We have to change the minds
of the American people.
アメリカの人々の考えを変える必要があります
14:53
Because presently, the politicians
do not have permission
現在政治家には必要なことを行うための権限がないのです
14:55
to do what needs to be done.
現代的な国において 富と権力の間の調停は
14:58
And in our modern country, the role
of logic and reason no longer includes
15:03
mediating between wealth and power
the way it once did.
もはや論理や理性の役割ではなくなっています
15:06
It's now repetition of short, hot-button,
30-second, 28-second television ads.
今では30秒ほどの短くて繰り返されるテレビCMがものを言います
私たちはそういうCMをたくさん買う必要があります
15:12
We have to buy a lot of those ads.
多くの人が指摘してくれたように 地球温暖化のイメージを変えましょう
15:15
Let's re-brand global warming,
as many of you have suggested.
15:19
I like "climate crisis"
instead of "climate collapse,"
気候崩壊より 気候危機の方が いいと思います
繰り返しますが ブランディングが上手な方 ぜひ助けてください
15:22
but again, those of you
who are good at branding,
15:24
I need your help on this.
ある科学者が私に言ったことですが 我々が今直面している問題は
15:26
Somebody said the test
we're facing now, a scientist told me,
拇指対向と大脳新皮質という組み合わせが
15:30
is whether the combination
of an opposable thumb
生き残れるかということなのです
15:33
and a neocortex is a viable combination.
15:36
(Laughter)
本当にそうです 前回も言いましたが もう一度繰り返します これは政治問題ではありません
15:38
That's really true.
15:42
I said the other night,
and I'll repeat now:
15:46
this is not a political issue.
15:48
Again, the Republicans here --
this shouldn't be partisan.
ここにいる共和党員の方 これは党利の話ではありません
あなた方の中には私たち民主党の人間より影響力のある人たちがいます
15:54
You have more influence
than some of us who are Democrats do.
これは機会なのです これだけでなく ここにあるアイデアを繋げ
15:58
This is an opportunity.
15:59
Not just this, but connected
to the ideas that are here,
16:04
to bring more coherence to them.
もっと一貫したものにしましょう
私たちはひとつです
16:07
We are one.
どうもありがとうございました
16:08
Thank you very much, I appreciate it.
16:11
(Applause)
(スタンディングオベーション)
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Al Gore - Climate advocate
Nobel Laureate Al Gore focused the world’s attention on the global climate crisis. Now he’s showing us how we’re moving towards real solutions.

Why you should listen

Former Vice President Al Gore is co-founder and chairman of Generation Investment Management. While he’s is a senior partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, and a member of Apple, Inc.’s board of directors, Gore spends the majority of his time as chair of The Climate Reality Project, a nonprofit devoted to solving the climate crisis.

He is the author of the bestsellers Earth in the Balance, An Inconvenient Truth, The Assault on Reason, Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis, and most recently, The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change. He is the subject of the Oscar-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth and is the co-recipient, with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 for “informing the world of the dangers posed by climate change.”

Gore was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1976, 1978, 1980 and 1982 and the U.S. Senate in 1984 and 1990. He was inaugurated as the 45th Vice President of the United States on January 20, 1993, and served eight years.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.