sponsored links
TEDSalon Berlin 2014

Kenneth Cukier: Big data is better data

ケネス・ツーケル: ビックデータはより良いデータ

June 23, 2014

自動運転車は始まったばかりです。ビックデータが牽引する技術やデザインの未来はどうなるのでしょうか?ワクワクする科学的なトークで、ケネス・ツーケルは機械学習や人間の知識などの今後を検証します。

Kenneth Cukier - Data Editor of The Economist
Kenneth Cukier is the Data Editor of The Economist. From 2007 to 2012 he was the Tokyo correspondent, and before that, the paper’s technology correspondent in London, where his work focused on innovation, intellectual property and Internet governance. Kenneth is also the co-author of Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think with Viktor Mayer-Schönberger in 2013, which was a New York Times Bestseller and translated into 16 languages. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
America's favorite pie is?
アメリカで人気のパイと言えば?
00:12
Audience: Apple.
Kenneth Cukier: Apple. Of course it is.
聴衆:「アップルパイ」
もちろん アップルパイですよね
00:16
How do we know it?
どうして分かるのでしょうか?
00:20
Because of data.
データがあるからです
00:21
You look at supermarket sales.
スーパーの売上げを考えてみましょう
00:24
You look at supermarket
sales of 30-centimeter pies
30cmの冷凍パイの売上げについてです
00:26
that are frozen, and apple wins, no contest.
アップルパイが断トツ1位です
00:29
The majority of the sales are apple.
売上げの大部分がアップルパイです
00:33
But then supermarkets started selling
ところが スーパーが小さな
00:38
smaller, 11-centimeter pies,
11cmセンチのパイを売り始めると
00:41
and suddenly, apple fell to fourth or fifth place.
突然 アップルパイは
4、5番目に転落しまいました
00:43
Why? What happened?
なぜでしょうか?
何が起こったのでしょうか?
00:48
Okay, think about it.
考えてみてください
00:50
When you buy a 30-centimeter pie,
30cmのパイを買う時は
00:53
the whole family has to agree,
家族全員の希望に沿うパイを選びます
00:57
and apple is everyone's second favorite.
アップルパイは家族の第二希望なのです
00:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:03
But when you buy an individual 11-centimeter pie,
でも 個人用の11cmのパイを買う時は
01:05
you can buy the one that you want.
自分が欲しいパイを買います
01:09
You can get your first choice.
自分の第一希望を買えるのです
01:12
You have more data.
データがたくさんあると
01:16
You can see something
データが少ない時には
01:18
that you couldn't see
分からなかったことが
01:20
when you only had smaller amounts of it.
分かってくるのです
01:21
Now, the point here is that more data
つまり より多くのデータがあると
01:25
doesn't just let us see more,
多くが見えるだけでなく
01:27
more of the same thing we were looking at.
見ていたことからも多くが分かるのです
01:29
More data allows us to see new.
データが多いほど
新しいことが分かってきます
01:31
It allows us to see better.
より良い見方や
01:35
It allows us to see different.
違う見方ができるようになります
01:38
In this case, it allows us to see
この例で 分かることは
01:42
what America's favorite pie is:
「アメリカで人気のパイは
01:45
not apple.
アップルパイではない」ということです
01:48
Now, you probably all have heard the term big data.
皆さんは「ビッグデータ」という言葉を
お聞きになられたことがあるでしょう
01:50
In fact, you're probably sick of hearing the term
もしかしたら 耳にタコがでくるくらい
01:54
big data.
お聞きになっているかもしれません
01:56
It is true that there is a lot of hype around the term,
ビッグデータは
誇大宣伝されている部分もあり
01:58
and that is very unfortunate,
非常に残念なことです
02:01
because big data is an extremely important tool
なぜなら ビッグデータは
社会の進歩に欠かせない
02:03
by which society is going to advance.
非常に重要なツールだからです
02:06
In the past, we used to look at small data
昔は 少ないデータから
02:10
and think about what it would mean
世界を理解しようと
02:14
to try to understand the world,
考えてきました
02:15
and now we have a lot more of it,
現在は 以前では考えられなかった程の
02:17
more than we ever could before.
大量のデータがあるのです
02:19
What we find is that when we have
大量のデータがあると
02:22
a large body of data, we can fundamentally do things
データ量が少なかった時に
不可能だったことが
02:23
that we couldn't do when we
only had smaller amounts.
根本的に可能になる
ということが分かってきました
02:26
Big data is important, and big data is new,
ビッグデータは重要で 新しいものです
02:29
and when you think about it,
ビックデータについて考えてみると
02:32
the only way this planet is going to deal
地球規模の課題について-
02:34
with its global challenges —
食糧問題や医療の供給
02:36
to feed people, supply them with medical care,
エネルギーや電力の供給などに
02:38
supply them with energy, electricity,
対処する唯一の方法であり
02:41
and to make sure they're not burnt to a crisp
地球温暖化の影響で
02:44
because of global warming —
カリカリに焼けることがないように
02:46
is because of the effective use of data.
データを効率的に使うことが必要なのです
02:47
So what is new about big
data? What is the big deal?
ビッグデータの新しいモノとは何で
重大事とは何でしょうか?
02:51
Well, to answer that question, let's think about
その問いに答えるために
02:55
what information looked like,
情報がどのようなもので
02:58
physically looked like in the past.
過去には 物理的にどう映っていたのかを
考えてみましょう
03:00
In 1908, on the island of Crete,
1908年 クレタ島で
03:03
archaeologists discovered a clay disc.
考古学者が粘土の円盤を発見しました
03:06
They dated it from 2000 B.C., so it's 4,000 years old.
4.000年前の紀元前2,000年のものです
03:11
Now, there's inscriptions on this disc,
この円盤には文字が書かれていますが
03:15
but we actually don't know what it means.
実質的には 解読できません
03:17
It's a complete mystery, but the point is that
完全に謎なのですが
03:18
this is what information used to look like
4,000年前の情報がどんなもの
03:21
4,000 years ago.
だったのかを言いたいのです
03:22
This is how society stored
これが 社会が情報を保管して
03:25
and transmitted information.
伝えたやり方です
03:27
Now, society hasn't advanced all that much.
さて 社会はそれほど進歩しませんでした
03:31
We still store information on discs,
今でもディスクに情報を保管しています
03:35
but now we can store a lot more information,
でも 以前よりもずっと大量の情報を
03:38
more than ever before.
保管できるのです
03:41
Searching it is easier. Copying it easier.
検索やコピーも より簡単です
03:43
Sharing it is easier. Processing it is easier.
共有や処理も より簡単です
03:46
And what we can do is we can reuse this information
情報を収集する時
03:49
for uses that we never even imagined
かつては想像だにしなかった
03:52
when we first collected the data.
情報の再利用もできるのです
03:54
In this respect, the data has gone
この点において データは
03:57
from a stock to a flow,
固定的なモノから流動的なモノへ
03:59
from something that is stationary and static
変化のない静的なモノから
04:03
to something that is fluid and dynamic.
変わりやすくダイナミックスなモノへと
変化しているのです
04:07
There is, if you will, a liquidity to information.
いうなれば
情報には流動性があります
04:10
The disc that was discovered off of Crete
クレタ島で発見された
04:14
that's 4,000 years old, is heavy,
4,000年前の円盤は重く
04:18
it doesn't store a lot of information,
情報はたくさん書かれていませんし
04:22
and that information is unchangeable.
書き変えることはできないのです
04:24
By contrast, all of the files
対照的に エドワード・スノーデンが
04:27
that Edward Snowden took
アメリカの国家安全保障局から
04:31
from the National Security
Agency in the United States
持ち出したファイルはすべて
04:33
fits on a memory stick
指の爪サイズの
04:35
the size of a fingernail,
USBに保存でき
04:38
and it can be shared at the speed of light.
光速で共有できるのです
04:41
More data. More.
データは膨れ上がっています
04:45
Now, one reason why we have
so much data in the world today
さて 今日の世界に大量のデータがあるのは
04:51
is we are collecting things
常時 情報を集めているモノを
04:53
that we've always collected information on,
収集しているからです
04:54
but another reason why is we're taking things
別の理由は 常に情報を含みつつも
04:57
that have always been informational
データ形式にレンダレングされていない
05:00
but have never been rendered into a data format
ものを集めているからです
05:03
and we are putting it into data.
そしてデータに置き換えます
05:05
Think, for example, the question of location.
例として 場所について考えてみましょう
05:08
Take, for example, Martin Luther.
マーティン・ルターを例に挙げます
05:11
If we wanted to know in the 1500s
1,500年代に
05:13
where Martin Luther was,
マーティン・ルターの居場所を知りたいのなら
05:15
we would have to follow him at all times,
常に彼の後をついて行き
05:18
maybe with a feathery quill and an inkwell,
羽ペンとインク入れを持ち運び
05:20
and record it,
居場所を記録しなければなりません
05:22
but now think about what it looks like today.
でも 今日ではどうでしょうか
05:23
You know that somewhere,
電気通信業者のデータペースにより
05:26
probably in a telecommunications carrier's database,
居場所が分かります
05:28
there is a spreadsheet or at least a database entry
常に あなたの居場所に関する情報を
05:30
that records your information
記録するスプレッドシートや
05:33
of where you've been at all times.
データベースへの登録などがあります
05:35
If you have a cell phone,
携帯電話を持っているなら
05:37
and that cell phone has GPS,
but even if it doesn't have GPS,
GPS機能があります
GPS機能のない機種でも
05:39
it can record your information.
あなたの情報を記録できるのです
05:42
In this respect, location has been datafied.
つまり 場所はデータ化されるのです
05:44
Now think, for example, of the issue of posture,
別の例として 姿勢について考えてみましょう
05:48
the way that you are all sitting right now,
今皆さん全員座っておられますが
05:53
the way that you sit,
あなたの座り方
05:54
the way that you sit, the way that you sit.
あなたの座り方 あなたの座り方
05:56
It's all different, and it's a function of your leg length
全て異なります
足の長さや
05:59
and your back and the contours of your back,
背中や背中の曲線などが違います
06:01
and if I were to put sensors,
maybe 100 sensors
今皆さんが座られている椅子に
06:03
into all of your chairs right now,
100個のセンサーを付けるなら
06:05
I could create an index that's fairly unique to you,
あなた独自の座り方の特徴を
06:07
sort of like a fingerprint, but it's not your finger.
指ではないですが 指紋のように
分類できるのです
06:11
So what could we do with this?
これで何ができるのでしょうか?
06:15
Researchers in Tokyo are using it
東京の研究者は
06:18
as a potential anti-theft device in cars.
これを車の盗難防止装置
として使えると考えています
06:21
The idea is that the carjacker sits behind the wheel,
運転席に車泥棒が座るという発想により
06:25
tries to stream off, but the car recognizes
防犯につなげようとしています
06:28
that a non-approved driver is behind the wheel,
認証されていないドライバーが
運転席に座ると
06:30
and maybe the engine just stops, unless you
「自分は認証されたドライバーである」
06:32
type in a password into the dashboard
と伝えるために
ダッシュボードにパスワードを入力しないと
06:35
to say, "Hey, I have authorization to drive." Great.
エンジンが始動しないかもしれません
素晴らしいですね
06:38
What if every single car in Europe
ヨーロッパで全ての車が
この技術を搭載すると
06:42
had this technology in it?
どうなるのでしょうか?
06:45
What could we do then?
その時 何ができるのでしょうか?
06:46
Maybe, if we aggregated the data,
おそらく データを収集すると
06:50
maybe we could identify telltale signs
車の事故が 次の5秒で起こることを
06:52
that best predict that a car accident
ピタリと言い当てることが
06:56
is going to take place in the next five seconds.
できるかもしれません
06:58
And then what we will have datafied
そして ドライバーの疲労を
07:04
is driver fatigue,
データ化し
07:07
and the service would be when the car senses
車がドライバーの姿勢が悪くなってきたと
07:09
that the person slumps into that position,
感じたら 自動的に
内部アラームを設定します
07:11
automatically knows, hey, set an internal alarm
ハンドルを振動させたり
07:14
that would vibrate the steering wheel, honk inside
「起きてください
07:18
to say, "Hey, wake up,
道路にもっと注意を向けましょう」と
07:20
pay more attention to the road."
言葉で教えてくれます
07:22
These are the sorts of things we can do
暮らしの様々な側面をデータ化すると
07:24
when we datafy more aspects of our lives.
私たちのできることを分類できます
07:26
So what is the value of big data?
つまり ビックデータの価値とは
何でしょうか?
07:29
Well, think about it.
考えてみてください
07:32
You have more information.
あなたは より多くの情報を持っており
07:35
You can do things that you couldn't do before.
以前にはできなかったことが
できるのです
07:37
One of the most impressive areas
このコンセプトが生じる
07:40
where this concept is taking place
最も印象的な領域の1つが
07:42
is in the area of machine learning.
機械学習の領域です
07:44
Machine learning is a branch of artificial intelligence,
機械学習とは 人口知能に含まれ
07:47
which itself is a branch of computer science.
コンピュータ・サイエンスの1つです
07:50
The general idea is that instead of
その概念は コンピュータに
07:53
instructing a computer what do do,
何をするかを教える代わりに
07:55
we are going to simply throw data at the problem
単純に問題となるデータを投げると
07:57
and tell the computer to figure it out for itself.
コンピュータが独自に解明してくれるのです
08:00
And it will help you understand it
その起源を辿ると
08:03
by seeing its origins.
分かりやすいでしょう
08:05
In the 1950s, a computer scientist
1950年代 アーサー・サミュエルという
08:08
at IBM named Arthur Samuel liked to play checkers,
IBMのコンピュータ科学者は
チェッカーが好きでした
08:11
so he wrote a computer program
コンピュータ・プログラムを書き
08:14
so he could play against the computer.
彼はコンピュータと対戦しました
08:16
He played. He won.
彼は対戦して 勝ちました
08:18
He played. He won.
彼は対戦して 勝ちました
08:21
He played. He won,
彼は対戦して 勝ちました
08:23
because the computer only knew
コンピュータが正式なルールしか
08:26
what a legal move was.
知らなかったからです
08:28
Arthur Samuel knew something else.
アーサー・サミュエルは
すごいことを知っていました
08:30
Arthur Samuel knew strategy.
彼は 戦略を知っていました
08:32
So he wrote a small sub-program alongside it
彼はサブプログラムを作成して
08:37
operating in the background, and all it did
バックグラウンドで走らせました
08:39
was score the probability
サブプログラムは 一手ごとに
08:41
that a given board configuration would likely lead
その盤面の配置から
08:43
to a winning board versus a losing board
勝つ確率と負ける確率を
08:46
after every move.
記録したのです
08:49
He plays the computer. He wins.
彼はコンピュータと対戦して 勝ちました
08:51
He plays the computer. He wins.
彼はコンピュータと対戦して 勝ちました
08:54
He plays the computer. He wins.
彼はコンピュータと対戦して 勝ちました
08:57
And then Arthur Samuel leaves the computer
そして アーサー・サミュエルは
09:01
to play itself.
コンピュータ自体が
ゲームをするようにしました
09:03
It plays itself. It collects more data.
コンピュータは独自にゲームをし
より多くのデータを集めました
09:05
It collects more data. It increases
the accuracy of its prediction.
より多くのデータを集めると
予測の精度も上がります
09:09
And then Arthur Samuel goes back to the computer
そしてアーサー・サミュエルは
09:13
and he plays it, and he loses,
コンピュータの所へ戻り
対戦して 負けました
09:15
and he plays it, and he loses,
彼は対戦して 負けました
09:17
and he plays it, and he loses,
彼は対戦して 負けました
09:19
and Arthur Samuel has created a machine
アーサー・サミュエルは
教えたタスクで
09:21
that surpasses his ability in a task that he taught it.
彼の能力を凌ぐ
コンピュータを作りあげました
09:24
And this idea of machine learning
機械学習という発想は
09:30
is going everywhere.
どこにでもあります
09:33
How do you think we have self-driving cars?
自動運転車はどのように
作られたと思いますか?
09:37
Are we any better off as a society
ソフトウェアに
全道路法規を記入すると
09:40
enshrining all the rules of the road into software?
より豊かな社会なのでしょうか?
09:42
No. Memory is cheaper. No.
いいえ  記憶装置は安価?
いいえ
09:45
Algorithms are faster. No. Processors are better. No.
アルゴリズムがより速い? いいえ
プロセッサがより良い? いいえ
09:48
All of those things matter, but that's not why.
それらはすべて重要ですが
それが理由ではありません
09:52
It's because we changed the nature of the problem.
問題の性質を変えているからです
09:55
We changed the nature of the problem from one
私たちの言わんとすることを-
09:58
in which we tried to overtly and explicitly
例えば
「自動車の周辺には多くの情報があり
09:59
explain to the computer how to drive
皆さんは それを理解しています
10:02
to one in which we say,
信号機についても理解しています
10:04
"Here's a lot of data around the vehicle.
信号機は赤で青ではないので
10:05
You figure it out.
停止する必要があり
10:07
You figure it out that that is a traffic light,
前進できません」ということを
10:09
that that traffic light is red and not green,
コンピュータに明確に
10:11
that that means that you need to stop
説明しようと試みていた
10:13
and not go forward."
問題の性質を変えてしまいました
10:15
Machine learning is at the basis
機械学習は 私たちが
10:18
of many of the things that we do online:
ネット上で行う多くの事の
根底となっています
10:19
search engines,
例えば 検索エンジン
10:21
Amazon's personalization algorithm,
Amazonのパーソナライズ・アルゴリズム
10:23
computer translation,
自動翻訳
10:27
voice recognition systems.
音声認識などです
10:29
Researchers recently have looked at
最近 研究者は生検や
10:34
the question of biopsies,
ガンの生検について
10:36
cancerous biopsies,
研究しており
10:40
and they've asked the computer to identify
細胞が実際ガンに冒されているか
10:42
by looking at the data and survival rates
どうかを調べるために
10:45
to determine whether cells are actually
データや生存率を使って
10:47
cancerous or not,
コンピュータに
特定させようとしています
10:52
and sure enough, when you throw the data at it,
案の定 データを入力すると
10:54
through a machine-learning algorithm,
機会学習のアルゴリズム経由で
10:56
the machine was able to identify
コンピュータは12個の兆候を
10:58
the 12 telltale signs that best predict
特定することで
11:00
that this biopsy of the breast cancer cells
乳ガン細胞の生検結果はガンであると
11:02
are indeed cancerous.
ビタリと予測します
11:06
The problem: The medical literature
問題は 医学文献が
11:09
only knew nine of them.
9個しか兆候を知らなかったことです
11:11
Three of the traits were ones
特性のうち 3個は
11:14
that people didn't need to look for,
探す必要がないものでしたが
11:16
but that the machine spotted.
コンピュータは見つけました
11:19
Now, there are dark sides to big data as well.
さて ビックデータにも負の側面があります
11:24
It will improve our lives, but there are problems
私たちの暮らしを向上させますが
11:30
that we need to be conscious of,
意識しなければならない
問題もあります
11:32
and the first one is the idea
最初の問題は
11:35
that we may be punished for predictions,
『マイノリティ・リポート』のように
11:38
that the police may use big data for their purposes,
警察が目的のためにビックデータを使って
11:40
a little bit like "Minority Report."
予測に基づいて
罰するかもしれないということです
11:44
Now, it's a term called predictive policing,
さて 予測警備とか
11:47
or algorithmic criminology,
アルゴリズム的犯罪学
という用語です
11:49
and the idea is that if we take a lot of data,
例えば 過去の犯罪がどこで起こったか
11:51
for example where past crimes have been,
というデータがたくさんあると
11:53
we know where to send the patrols.
パトロールすべき所が分かる
という考え方です
11:56
That makes sense, but the problem, of course,
その通りですが もちろん問題もあります
11:58
is that it's not simply going to stop on location data,
場所のデータだけで止まらず
12:00
it's going to go down to the level of the individual.
個人レベルにまで下りていってしまうことです
12:05
Why don't we use data about the person's
個人の高校の成績証明書のデータを
12:08
high school transcript?
使うのはどうでしょうか?
12:10
Maybe we should use the fact that
失業しているのかどうか
12:12
they're unemployed or not, their credit score,
信用情報
ネットサーフィンの行動パターン
12:14
their web-surfing behavior,
夜更かしするのかどうか などを
12:16
whether they're up late at night.
使うかもしれません
12:17
Their Fitbit, when it's able
to identify biochemistries,
Fitbit による生化学情報を得れば
12:19
will show that they have aggressive thoughts.
使用者が積極的な考え方をしていることさえ分かります
12:22
We may have algorithms that are likely to predict
私たちの行動を予測し得る
12:27
what we are about to do,
アルゴリズムがあり
12:29
and we may be held accountable
実際に私たちが行動する前に
12:31
before we've actually acted.
責任を負うことになるかもしれません
12:32
Privacy was the central challenge
スモールデータの時代では
12:34
in a small data era.
プライバシーが中心的な課題でしたが
12:36
In the big data age,
ビックデータの時代では
12:39
the challenge will be safeguarding free will,
課題は 自由意思や道徳基準の選択
12:41
moral choice, human volition,
人間の決断力や行為主体性などを
12:46
human agency.
保護することです
12:49
There is another problem:
ビックデータに職を奪われるという
12:54
Big data is going to steal our jobs.
別の問題もあります
12:56
Big data and algorithms are going to challenge
ビックデータやアルゴリズムは
13:00
white collar, professional knowledge work
20世紀に 工場の自動化や
13:03
in the 21st century
組立ラインが
13:06
in the same way that factory automation
ブルーカラーに対抗したように
13:08
and the assembly line
21世紀には
ホワイトカラーや専門職に
13:10
challenged blue collar labor in the 20th century.
対抗することになるでしょう
13:13
Think about a lab technician
顕微鏡を使って
13:16
who is looking through a microscope
ガン生検を調べて
13:18
at a cancer biopsy
ガンであるかどうかを決める
13:19
and determining whether it's cancerous or not.
検査技師について考えてみましょう
13:21
The person went to university.
その検査技師は大学教育を受けました
13:23
The person buys property.
不動産物件を買ったり
13:25
He or she votes.
投票したり
13:27
He or she is a stakeholder in society.
社会への出資者でもあります
13:29
And that person's job,
そして 検査技師の仕事とは
13:32
as well as an entire fleet
同じような専門職の一群と同様に
13:34
of professionals like that person,
同じような専門職の一群と同様に
13:35
is going to find that their jobs are radically changed
仕事内容が根本的に変わったり
13:37
or actually completely eliminated.
完全に無くなったりします
13:40
Now, we like to think
短い一時的な混乱の後
13:43
that technology creates jobs over a period of time
長年に渡って
テクノロジーが仕事を作ってきた
13:44
after a short, temporary period of dislocation,
ことについて考えてください
13:47
and that is true for the frame of reference
私たちが暮らす枠組み
13:51
with which we all live, the Industrial Revolution,
産業革命-は真実で
13:53
because that's precisely what happened.
まさに起こったことです
13:55
But we forget something in that analysis:
しかし その分析で
忘れていることがあります
13:57
There are some categories of jobs
それはなくなり  
二度と戻ってこなかった
13:59
that simply get eliminated and never come back.
職種があるということです
14:01
The Industrial Revolution wasn't very good
産業革命は あまり有難くないものでした
14:05
if you were a horse.
あなたが馬であれば
14:07
So we're going to need to be careful
ですから 注意深く ビックデータを取扱い
14:11
and take big data and adjust it for our needs,
私たちのニーズ
非常に人間的なニーズのために
14:13
our very human needs.
調整していく必要があります
14:16
We have to be the master of this technology,
私たちは この技術の召使ではなく
14:19
not its servant.
所有者にならなければなりません
14:21
We are just at the outset of the big data era,
ビックデータの時代は
始まったばかりなので
14:23
and honestly, we are not very good
正直言って 今集められた全データに
14:26
at handling all the data that we can now collect.
私たちは あまりうまく対処できていません
14:29
It's not just a problem for
the National Security Agency.
国家安全保障局だけの
問題ではありません
14:33
Businesses collect lots of
data, and they misuse it too,
企業も多くのデータを集め
乱用しています
14:37
and we need to get better at
this, and this will take time.
うまく使えるようになるには 時間がかかります
14:40
It's a little bit like the challenge that was faced
原始人と火が直面していた課題に
14:43
by primitive man and fire.
ちょっと似ています
14:45
This is a tool, but this is a tool that,
これはツールですが
14:48
unless we're careful, will burn us.
注意しないと
私たちを焼いてしまうツールなのです
14:50
Big data is going to transform how we live,
ビックデータは
生き方や働き方や考え方を
14:56
how we work and how we think.
変えていくことでしょう
14:59
It is going to help us manage our careers
私たちのキャリアを管理して
15:01
and lead lives of satisfaction and hope
満足して希望が持て
幸福で健康な暮らしに
15:03
and happiness and health,
導くことでしょう
15:07
but in the past, we've often
looked at information technology
しかし 過去に
情報技術でよくあったように
15:10
and our eyes have only seen the T,
物理的なものであるT-
15:13
the technology, the hardware,
技術やハードウェアに
15:15
because that's what was physical.
目が行きがちになります
15:17
We now need to recast our gaze at the I,
明確でない部分があるものの
15:19
the information,
いくつかの点において
15:22
which is less apparent,
かなり重要である I-
15:24
but in some ways a lot more important.
情報に再び着目する必要があります
15:25
Humanity can finally learn from the information
世界や私たちの居場所を理解するために
15:29
that it can collect,
時代を超えた冒険の一端として
15:33
as part of our timeless quest
集めた情報から
15:35
to understand the world and our place in it,
人間性がついに学べるのです
15:37
and that's why big data is a big deal.
そのことがビックデータが
重大事な理由なのです
15:40
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:46
Translator:Masako Kigami
Reviewer:Micky Hida

sponsored links

Kenneth Cukier - Data Editor of The Economist
Kenneth Cukier is the Data Editor of The Economist. From 2007 to 2012 he was the Tokyo correspondent, and before that, the paper’s technology correspondent in London, where his work focused on innovation, intellectual property and Internet governance. Kenneth is also the co-author of Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think with Viktor Mayer-Schönberger in 2013, which was a New York Times Bestseller and translated into 16 languages.

Why you should listen

As Data Editor of The Economist and co-author of Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think, Kenneth Cukier has spent years immersed in big data, machine learning -- and the impact of both. What's the future of big data-driven technology and design? To find out, watch this talk.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.