18:06
TEDGlobal 2010

Gero Miesenboeck: Re-engineering the brain

ジェロ・マイセンブク:脳の革新

Filmed:

脳の働きを知るために、多くの科学者はそれぞれのニューロンの活動を記録するという膨大な課題を進めています。ジェロ博士は逆に考え、特定のニューロンを操作しそれらがどのような役割を持っているかを、ハエの光に対する感覚を使った驚くべき方法の数々で解明しようとしています。

- Optogeneticist
Using light and a little genetic engineering -- optogenetics -- Gero Miesenboeck has developed a way to control how living nerve cells work, and advanced understanding of how the brain controls behavior. Full bio

I have a doppelganger.
ここに私のドッペルゲンガーがいます。
00:15
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:18
Dr. Gero is a brilliant
ドクター・ゲロは素晴らしくも
00:21
but slightly mad scientist
少し狂気じみた科学者です。
00:24
in the "Dragonball Z: Android Saga."
ドラゴンボールZの人造人間編に登場します。
00:26
If you look very carefully,
よく見てみると、
00:29
you see that his skull has been replaced
彼の頭がい骨は
00:31
with a transparent Plexiglas dome
アクリルガラスのドームに付け替えられています
00:34
so that the workings of his brain can be observed
こうすることで脳の動きが観察できますし、
00:36
and also controlled with light.
光でコントロールすることもできます。
00:39
That's exactly what I do --
まさしくこれが私がやっていること…
00:42
optical mind control.
光でマインドコントロールすることです。
00:44
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:46
But in contrast to my evil twin
しかし世界征服を望む
00:48
who lusts after world domination,
この双子の兄弟と違って、
00:50
my motives are not sinister.
私の野望は邪悪なものではありません。
00:53
I control the brain
脳をコントロールすることによって
00:56
in order to understand how it works.
どのように動くかを理解するのです。
00:58
Now wait a minute, you may say,
ちょっと待てよ、とあなたは言うかもしれません
01:00
how can you go straight to controlling the brain
理解することもしないで、
01:02
without understanding it first?
どのようにコントロールするのか?
01:05
Isn't that putting the cart before the horse?
客車を馬の前に置くようなものではないか?
01:07
Many neuroscientists agree with this view
多くの神経学者はこの考えに賛成しており、
01:11
and think that understanding will come
理解するためには、
01:14
from more detailed observation and analysis.
詳細な観察と分析が必要と考えている。
01:17
They say, "If we could record the activity of our neurons,
彼らは、「もしニューロンの活動を記録できれば、
01:20
we would understand the brain."
脳を理解できるだろう」と言っている。
01:24
But think for a moment what that means.
しかし、その意味を少し考えてください。
01:27
Even if we could measure
もし全ての細胞が
01:30
what every cell is doing at all times,
何をしているかを常に計測できたとしても、
01:32
we would still have to make sense
そのパターンが何であるかを
01:34
of the recorded activity patterns,
導き出さなければならない。
01:36
and that's so difficult,
それはとても難しく
01:38
chances are we'll understand these patterns
パターンを理解できたとしても、
01:40
just as little as the brains that produce them.
私たちの脳への理解と同じくらいのものでしょう。
01:42
Take a look at what brain activity might look like.
脳の活動がどんなものかご覧に入れましょう。
01:45
In this simulation, each black dot
このシミュレーションでは、一つの黒い点が
01:48
is one nerve cell.
一つの神経細胞です。
01:50
The dot is visible
黒い点は、
01:52
whenever a cell fires an electrical impulse.
細胞が電気信号を発生させるときのみ見えます。
01:54
There's 10,000 neurons here.
ここには1万個のニューロンがあります。
01:56
So you're looking at roughly one percent
それは、大体1%くらい
01:58
of the brain of a cockroach.
ゴキブリの脳の。
02:00
Your brains are about 100 million times
皆さんの脳はこれの約1億倍
02:04
more complicated.
複雑です。
02:07
Somewhere, in a pattern like this,
このようなパターンは、
02:09
is you,
あなたにも言えることです、
02:11
your perceptions,
あなたの知覚だったり、
02:13
your emotions, your memories,
感情、記憶
02:15
your plans for the future.
将来の展望がこれらのパターンなのです。
02:18
But we don't know where,
しかしパターンの解読方法を知らないがために
02:20
since we don't know how to read the pattern.
これらが保存されている場所を私たちは知りえません。
02:22
We don't understand the code used by the brain.
脳が使っている暗号を私たちは知りません。
02:25
To make progress,
前進するためには、
02:28
we need to break the code.
暗号を解読しなければなりません。
02:30
But how?
どうやって?
02:32
An experienced code-breaker will tell you
暗号解読のエキスパートは、こう言います
02:35
that in order to figure out what the symbols in a code mean,
暗号の中のパターンを見つけるためには、
02:37
it's essential to be able to play with them,
それらを使ってみて、組みなおすことが
02:40
to rearrange them at will.
大切だ、と。
02:43
So in this situation too,
ここでも同じことが言えます。
02:45
to decode the information
このようなパターンに隠されている
02:47
contained in patterns like this,
情報を解読するためには、
02:49
watching alone won't do.
見ているだけではだめで、
02:51
We need to rearrange the pattern.
組みなおさなければいけない。
02:53
In other words,
別の言葉で言うと
02:55
instead of recording the activity of neurons,
ニューロンの活動を記録する代わりに、
02:57
we need to control it.
制御しなければならない。
02:59
It's not essential that we can control
必ずしも全ての
03:01
the activity of all neurons in the brain, just some.
ニューロンを制御する必要はない。少しでいい。
03:03
The more targeted our interventions, the better.
ターゲットは絞れるだけ絞ったほうがいいです。
03:06
And I'll show you in a moment
今お見せするのは、
03:08
how we can achieve the necessary precision.
どのようにターゲットを絞ったかです。
03:10
And since I'm realistic, rather than grandiose,
私は壮大なことより現実的なことを好むので、
03:13
I don't claim that the ability to control the function of the nervous system
神経系統を制御することで瞬く間に
03:16
will at once unravel all its mysteries.
全ての謎が明らかになるとは言いません。
03:19
But we'll certainly learn a lot.
それでも私たちは多くを学ぶことができます。
03:22
Now, I'm by no means
介入が大きな影響力を
03:27
the first person to realize
持っていると気づいたのは
03:29
how powerful a tool intervention is.
もちろん私が最初ではありません。
03:31
The history of attempts
神経系の機能に対する
03:34
to tinker with the function of the nervous system
さまざまな試みは
03:36
is long and illustrious.
古くから有名です。
03:38
It dates back at least 200 years,
少なくとも200年さかのぼって、
03:40
to Galvani's famous experiments
ガルバーニの有名な実験は
03:43
in the late 18th century and beyond.
18世紀以前の話です。
03:45
Galvani showed that a frog's legs twitched
ガルバーニは蛙の腰神経を
03:49
when he connected the lumbar nerve
電極につなげることで
03:52
to a source of electrical current.
脚がケイレンすることを示したのです。
03:54
This experiment revealed the first, and perhaps most fundamental,
この実験は最初でもっとも基本的な
03:57
nugget of the neural code:
神経コードの大事な部分、
04:00
that information is written in the form
情報は電気信号によって伝えられている
04:02
of electrical impulses.
ということを明らかにしました。
04:04
Galvani's approach
ガルバーニのとった方法、
04:08
of probing the nervous system with electrodes
電極で神経系を明らかにしようというのは
04:10
has remained state-of-the-art until today,
今日でも先端をいっています、
04:12
despite a number of drawbacks.
様々な欠点があるにもかかわらず。
04:15
Sticking wires into the brain is obviously rather crude.
ワイヤを脳に挿すのはどう見ても残酷です。
04:18
It's hard to do in animals that run around,
動き回る動物にやるのは困難ですし、
04:21
and there is a physical limit
同時に挿せる
04:23
to the number of wires
ワイヤの数も
04:25
that can be inserted simultaneously.
限られてきます。
04:27
So around the turn of the last century,
20世紀も終わりのころ、
04:30
I started to think,
私はこう考えました。
04:32
"Wouldn't it be wonderful if one could take this logic
もしこのロジックを逆に
04:34
and turn it upside down?"
してみたらどうだろう、と。
04:37
So instead of inserting a wire
脳の一部にワイヤを
04:39
into one spot of the brain,
挿す代わりに、
04:41
re-engineer the brain itself
脳自体を作ってしまおう、
04:44
so that some of its neural elements
ある数の神経細胞を
04:46
become responsive to diffusely broadcast signals
フラッシュのような拡散する刺激を受けたときに
04:49
such as a flash of light.
反応するように。
04:52
Such an approach would literally, in a flash of light,
この試みはまさしくフラッシュのように
04:55
overcome many of the obstacles to discovery.
様々な障害を取り払ってくれました。
04:58
First, it's clearly a non-invasive,
一つ目は、ワイヤがないために
05:01
wireless form of communication.
脳を侵さないこと。
05:04
And second, just as in a radio broadcast,
二つ目は、ラジオのブロードキャスト放送のように
05:07
you can communicate with many receivers at once.
一度に多くのものとコミュニケーションができること。
05:09
You don't need to know where these receivers are,
どこに受信者がいるか分からなくても大丈夫です。
05:12
and it doesn't matter if these receivers move --
そして、受信者が動いても大丈夫、ちょうど
05:15
just think of the stereo in your car.
車のステレオと同じように。
05:17
It gets even better,
さらなる長所として、
05:20
for it turns out that we can fabricate the receivers
DNAに組み込まれているものから受信機を
05:23
out of materials that are encoded in DNA.
作れることが明らかになりました。
05:26
So each nerve cell
つまり、DNAで正しく
05:29
with the right genetic makeup
構成されている神経細胞であれば、
05:31
will spontaneously produce a receiver
受信機を自発的に生成し、
05:33
that allows us to control its function.
私たちが制御することができます。
05:36
I hope you'll appreciate
このシンプルさに秘められた
05:39
the beautiful simplicity
美しさを理解していただけると
05:41
of this concept.
幸いです。
05:43
There's no high-tech gizmos here,
ハイテクな機械は何もありません、
05:45
just biology revealed through biology.
生態が生物学で明らかになっただけです。
05:47
Now let's take a look at these miraculous receivers up close.
それでは、この奇跡的な受信機を間近で見てみましょう。
05:51
As we zoom in on one of these purple neurons,
これらの紫色のニューロンに近づいていくと、
05:54
we see that its outer membrane
細胞膜が微小な穴で
05:57
is studded with microscopic pores.
覆われているのが見えます。
05:59
Pores like these conduct electrical current
このような穴が電流を伝え、
06:01
and are responsible
神経系統の
06:03
for all the communication in the nervous system.
全てのコミュニケーションの鍵となっています。
06:05
But these pores here are special.
しかし、これらの穴は特別なものです。
06:07
They are coupled to light receptors
これらはあなたの目と同じように、
06:09
similar to the ones in your eyes.
光の受容体と対になっていて、
06:11
Whenever a flash of light hits the receptor,
光が受容体に当たると
06:14
the pore opens, an electrical current is switched on,
穴が開き電流が伝えられ、
06:16
and the neuron fires electrical impulses.
ニューロンが電気信号を発信します。
06:19
Because the light-activated pore is encoded in DNA,
光で活性化するニューロンはDNAに組み込まれているため、
06:22
we can achieve incredible precision.
奇跡的な精度を導き出せます。
06:25
This is because,
なぜなら、
06:28
although each cell in our bodies
私たちの体の各細胞は
06:30
contains the same set of genes,
同じ遺伝情報を持っていますが、
06:32
different mixes of genes get turned on and off
細胞によって活性化している箇所が違うために
06:34
in different cells.
起こります。
06:36
You can exploit this to make sure
これを利用して、あるニューロンだけを
06:38
that only some neurons
光で活性化するようにして、
06:40
contain our light-activated pore and others don't.
他のものはしないようにできます。
06:42
So in this cartoon, the bluish white cell
この漫画では、左上の青みがかった
06:45
in the upper-left corner
白い細胞は
06:47
does not respond to light
光に反応しません。
06:49
because it lacks the light-activated pore.
なぜなら光で活性化する穴が欠如しているからです。
06:51
The approach works so well
この試みは成功し、
06:54
that we can write purely artificial messages
直接脳に人工的な文字を
06:56
directly to the brain.
書くこともできます。
06:58
In this example, each electrical impulse,
この例では、それぞれの電気信号や
07:00
each deflection on the trace,
その跡の偏差は
07:02
is caused by a brief pulse of light.
ちょっとした光が引き起こしています。
07:05
And the approach, of course, also works
この方法は、動いたり
07:08
in moving, behaving animals.
行動している動物にも効果的です。
07:10
This is the first ever such experiment,
これは、ある意味ガルバーニの実験を
07:13
sort of the optical equivalent of Galvani's.
光(レーザー)で行った最初の実験といえます。
07:15
It was done six or seven years ago
これは6、7年前に私のところの
07:18
by my then graduate student, Susana Lima.
大学院生であったスザーナ・リナによって行われました。
07:20
Susana had engineered the fruit fly on the left
スザーナは左側のミバエの脳を
07:23
so that just two out of the 200,000 cells in its brain
20万個の細胞のうち2個だけが光に反応するように
07:26
expressed the light-activated pore.
遺伝子操作で作りかえました。
07:30
You're familiar with these cells
これらがあの馴染み深い
07:33
because they are the ones that frustrate you
叩こうとするときにあなたをイライラさせる
07:35
when you try to swat the fly.
原因となっている細胞達です。
07:37
They trained the escape reflex that makes the fly jump into the air
これらがハエの反射運動を引き起こし、私たちが身構えたときには
07:39
and fly away whenever you move your hand in position.
飛びさってしまうように仕向けているのです。
07:42
And you can see here that the flash of light has exactly the same effect.
この実験では、フラッシュが同じ現象を引き起こしています。
07:46
The animal jumps, it spreads its wings, it vibrates them,
飛び跳ねて羽を広げ、それをふるわせていますが、
07:49
but it can't actually take off
ガラスの板に挟まれているために
07:52
because the fly is sandwiched between two glass plates.
実際には飛び立てません。
07:54
Now to make sure that this was no reaction of the fly
ハエが光を見ているためにこの現象が起こっているわけではないと
07:58
to a flash it could see,
証明するために、
08:00
Susana did a simple
スザーナはシンプルですが
08:03
but brutally effective experiment.
とても有効な実験手段をとりました。
08:05
She cut the heads off of her flies.
ハエの頭を落としてしまうのです。
08:07
These headless bodies can live for about a day,
頭がない状態でもおよそ1日は生きることができます。
08:11
but they don't do much.
大したことはできませんが。
08:14
They just stand around
ただ動き回って、
08:16
and groom excessively.
過剰に身繕いをします。
08:19
So it seems that the only trait that survives decapitation is vanity.
首が落ちた後に残ったのは"見え"だけのようです。
08:22
(Laughter)
(笑い)
08:25
Anyway, as you'll see in a moment,
いずれにせよお見せするとおり、
08:30
Susana was able to turn on the flight motor
スザーナはハエの脊髄神経から
08:32
of what's the equivalent of the spinal cord of these flies
飛行を司っている部分を制御することに成功し、
08:35
and get some of the headless bodies
頭がないハエを実際に
08:38
to actually take off and fly away.
飛ばしてみせたのです。
08:40
They didn't get very far, obviously.
遠くに行けないのは当然ですが。
08:47
Since we took these first steps,
最初の一歩を私たちが始めたことにより、
08:50
the field of optogenetics has exploded.
光遺伝子学の分野が急成長しました。
08:52
And there are now hundreds of labs
今では数百の研究所が
08:55
using these approaches.
この実験方法を採用しています。
08:57
And we've come a long way
ガルバーニやスザーナが
08:59
since Galvani's and Susana's first successes
動物のケイレンや飛行などの最初の成功を収めてから
09:01
in making animals twitch or jump.
長い道を歩んできました。
09:04
We can now actually interfere with their psychology
彼らの心理学に対して少し難解な方法で
09:06
in rather profound ways,
アプローチしてみましょう。
09:09
as I'll show you in my last example,
この最後の例でお見せするのは
09:11
which is directed at a familiar question.
よく耳にする質問である
09:13
Life is a string of choices
人生とは次になすべきことを
09:16
creating a constant pressure to decide what to do next.
常に決め続けさせられた選択の積み重ねである、というものからです。
09:19
We cope with this pressure by having brains,
私たちはこういったプレッシャーに対して脳を使って対処します。
09:23
and within our brains, decision-making centers
この脳の中で決定の鍵を握るところを
09:26
that I've called here the "Actor."
私はアクターと呼んでいます。
09:29
The Actor implements a policy that takes into account
アクターはその時に私たちが置かれている状況や
09:33
the state of the environment
環境を基にした
09:36
and the context in which we operate.
行動を可能にします。
09:38
Our actions change the environment, or context,
自分の行動が環境や状況を変えて、
09:41
and these changes are then fed back into the decision loop.
さらにそれらがフィードバックされ、行動が決定されるというループができます。
09:44
Now to put some neurobiological meat
この神経生物学の議論を
09:48
on this abstract model,
抽象的なモデルに当てはめてみましょう。
09:51
we constructed a simple one-dimensional world
私たちお得意のミバエを使い、
09:53
for our favorite subject, fruit flies.
一次元の世界を作ってみました。
09:55
Each chamber in these two vertical stacks
この垂直に立っている二列のケースそれぞれには
09:58
contains one fly.
一匹ずつハエが入っています。
10:00
The left and the right halves of the chamber
それぞれの部屋の右半分と左半分は
10:02
are filled with two different odors,
それぞれ別の匂いで満たされています。
10:05
and a security camera watches
そしてハエが行ったり来たりするのを
10:07
as the flies pace up and down between them.
監視カメラが見ています。
10:09
Here's some such CCTV footage.
これが監視カメラがとらえた映像です。
10:12
Whenever a fly reaches the midpoint of the chamber
ハエは部屋の真ん中に来たとき、
10:14
where the two odor streams meet,
違う匂いの狭間で
10:17
it has to make a decision.
決断をしなければなりません。
10:19
It has to decide whether to turn around
向きを変えて今来た道を戻り
10:21
and stay in the same odor,
同じ匂いに留まるか、
10:23
or whether to cross the midline
真ん中を越えて
10:25
and try something new.
新しいものに挑むか。
10:27
These decisions are clearly a reflection
この決定はアクターが作り出した
10:29
of the Actor's policy.
行動方針に従います。
10:32
Now for an intelligent being like our fly,
このハエのような知的生物の行動方針は
10:36
this policy is not written in stone
明文化されているものではなく、
10:39
but rather changes as the animal learns from experience.
経験から学習し変化していくものです。
10:42
We can incorporate such an element
この適応性を私たちのモデルに
10:45
of adaptive intelligence into our model
取り入れるときには
10:47
by assuming that the fly's brain
アクターとは異なるグループの細胞、
10:50
contains not only an Actor,
「クリティック」というアクターがした
10:52
but a different group of cells,
選択に対してフィードバックをする
10:54
a "Critic," that provides a running commentary
ものが脳内にあると
10:56
on the Actor's choices.
仮定しています。
10:59
You can think of this nagging inner voice
あなたは途絶えることのないこの内なる声、
11:01
as sort of the brain's equivalent
まるで脳内の教会を
11:04
of the Catholic Church,
思い浮かべることができるでしょう、もし
11:06
if you're an Austrian like me,
あなたが私と同じオーストリア人か、
11:08
or the super-ego, if you're Freudian,
フロイト派の超自我、もしくは
11:11
or your mother, if you're Jewish.
ユダヤ人であればお母さんを想像してください。
11:14
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:16
Now obviously,
クリティックが
11:20
the Critic is a key ingredient
私たちの知性の鍵と
11:22
in what makes us intelligent.
なっていることは明らかです。
11:25
So we set out to identify
そこで私たちはハエの脳で
11:27
the cells in the fly's brain
クリティックの役目を果たしている
11:29
that played the role of the Critic.
細胞を特定しようとしました。
11:31
And the logic of our experiment was simple.
実験方法は単純です。
11:33
We thought if we could use our optical remote control
光でクリティックの細胞を遠隔制御して
11:36
to activate the cells of the Critic,
活性化することができれば、
11:39
we should be able, artificially, to nag the Actor
人為的にアクターの行動方針を変えることが
11:42
into changing its policy.
できるはずと考えたのです。
11:45
In other words,
言い換えると、
11:47
the fly should learn from mistakes
ハエは自分がした間違いから学習
11:49
that it thought it had made
しているはずですが、
11:51
but, in reality, it had not made.
実際には経験していないのです。
11:53
So we bred flies
私たちは
11:56
whose brains were more or less randomly peppered
光で制御できる細胞を無規則で脳にちりばめた
11:58
with cells that were light addressable.
ハエを育てました。
12:01
And then we took these flies
これらのハエを使い、
12:03
and allowed them to make choices.
選択をさせました。
12:05
And whenever they made one of the two choices,
2つの選択肢から1つ、
12:07
chose one odor,
どちらかの匂いを選ぶと、
12:09
in this case the blue one over the orange one,
このケースではオレンジ色ではなく青色の方です、
12:11
we switched on the lights.
光をつけます、
12:13
If the Critic was among the optically activated cells,
光で活性化する細胞の中にクリティックが含まれていれば、
12:15
the result of this intervention
こん介入行動によって
12:18
should be a change in policy.
行動方針が変わるはずです。
12:20
The fly should learn to avoid
ハエは光で刺激を受けた方の
12:23
the optically reinforced odor.
匂いを避けるはずです。
12:25
Here's what happened in two instances:
例を2つ紹介します。
12:27
We're comparing two strains of flies,
2系統のハエを比べています、
12:30
each of them having
いずれも
12:33
about 100 light-addressable cells in their brains,
光で制御できる細胞がおよそ100個脳内にあります。
12:35
shown here in green on the left and on the right.
右と左に緑色に見えるものです。
12:37
What's common among these groups of cells
これらのグループに共通しているのは、
12:40
is that they all produce the neurotransmitter dopamine.
いずれも神経伝達物質ドーパミンを生成することです。
12:43
But the identities of the individual
しかしドーパミンを生成する
12:46
dopamine-producing neurons
ニューロンの性質は
12:48
are clearly largely different on the left and on the right.
右と左で明らかに大きく異なります。
12:50
Optically activating
光でこれら100個かそこらの
12:53
these hundred or so cells
細胞を活性化することで
12:55
into two strains of flies
二種類のハエの間には
12:57
has dramatically different consequences.
劇的な違いがうまれます。
12:59
If you look first at the behavior
右側のハエの行動を
13:01
of the fly on the right,
最初に見ると、
13:03
you can see that whenever it reaches the midpoint of the chamber
ハエが部屋の真ん中、二つの匂いが混じっているところに
13:05
where the two odors meet,
たどり着くと、
13:08
it marches straight through, as it did before.
今までと同じようにまっすぐ進みます。
13:10
Its behavior is completely unchanged.
行動は全く変わりません。
13:13
But the behavior of the fly on the left is very different.
しかし、左側のハエは全く違う行動をとります。
13:15
Whenever it comes up to the midpoint,
真ん中までくると
13:18
it pauses,
立ち止まり、
13:21
it carefully scans the odor interface
あたかも周りの環境を探り出すかのように
13:23
as if it was sniffing out its environment,
綿密に匂いを分析し、
13:25
and then it turns around.
そして振り返ります。
13:27
This means that the policy that the Actor implements
これらの結果はアクターが作った行動方針が
13:29
now includes an instruction to avoid the odor
部屋の右半分に満たされている匂いを
13:32
that's in the right half of the chamber.
避けるように仕向けているからです。
13:34
This means that the Critic
左側のハエではクリティックが
13:37
must have spoken in that animal,
機能しており、
13:39
and that the Critic must be contained
ドーパミンが生成したニューロンに
13:41
among the dopamine-producing neurons on the left,
クリティックが含まれているはずですが、
13:43
but not among the dopamine producing neurons on the right.
右側のハエのドーパミンが生成したニューロンには含まれていないということです。
13:46
Through many such experiments,
幾多のこのような実験を繰り返し、
13:49
we were able to narrow down
クリティックの所在を
13:52
the identity of the Critic
12個までに
13:54
to just 12 cells.
絞り込みました。
13:56
These 12 cells, as shown here in green,
これらの12個の細胞、緑色のところは、
13:58
send the output to a brain structure
出力情報を脳機構の
14:01
called the "mushroom body,"
キノコ体と呼ばれるところ、
14:03
which is shown here in gray.
この灰色のところ、に送ります。
14:05
We know from our formal model
理論的なモデルから
14:07
that the brain structure
脳機構の中で
14:09
at the receiving end of the Critic's commentary is the Actor.
クリティックの出力を受けるのはアクターと分かっているので、
14:11
So this anatomy suggests
この分析が示すところは
14:14
that the mushroom bodies have something to do
キノコ体は行動の選択に何かしら
14:16
with action choice.
関係があるということです。
14:19
Based on everything we know about the mushroom bodies,
キノコ体について分かっていることを考えると
14:21
this makes perfect sense.
完全に筋が通ります。
14:23
In fact, it makes so much sense
実際、あまりにも綺麗に筋が通っているので、
14:25
that we can construct an electronic toy circuit
電気回路でハエの行動を模倣する
14:27
that simulates the behavior of the fly.
おもちゃを作ることができます。
14:30
In this electronic toy circuit,
この電気回路のおもちゃは
14:33
the mushroom body neurons are symbolized
キノコ体のニューロンは
14:36
by the vertical bank of blue LEDs
板の真ん中に垂直な青色LEDの
14:38
in the center of the board.
かたまりで表されています。
14:41
These LED's are wired to sensors
これらのLEDはセンサーにつながっており
14:44
that detect the presence of odorous molecules in the air.
空気中の匂い分子の存在を感知します。
14:46
Each odor activates a different combination of sensors,
それぞれの匂いはそれぞれ違うパターンのセンサーを活性化させ
14:50
which in turn activates
それはキノコ体の中の
14:53
a different odor detector in the mushroom body.
それぞれ異なる匂い検知器官を活性化させます。
14:55
So the pilot in the cockpit of the fly,
ハエの操縦席ではアクターという
14:58
the Actor,
パイロットが
15:00
can tell which odor is present
どの匂いがあるのかを
15:02
simply by looking at which of the blue LEDs lights up.
どの青色LEDが光っているかを見ることで認識することができます。
15:04
What the Actor does with this information
アクターが個の情報を基に何をするかは
15:09
depends on its policy,
行動方針によって変わり、
15:11
which is stored in the strengths of the connection,
匂い検知器官とハエの回避行動を起こしている
15:13
between the odor detectors
伝達細胞の結びつきの強さが
15:15
and the motors
その方針の
15:17
that power the fly's evasive actions.
より所になっています。
15:19
If the connection is weak, the motors will stay off
もし結びつきが弱ければ伝達細胞は動かず、
15:22
and the fly will continue straight on its course.
ハエはそのまま直進します。
15:24
If the connection is strong, the motors will turn on
結びつきが強ければ伝達細胞が動き、
15:27
and the fly will initiate a turn.
ハエは今来た道を戻ります。
15:30
Now consider a situation
次のような状況を考えてみましょう。
15:33
in which the motors stay off,
伝達細胞が動かないまま
15:35
the fly continues on its path
まっすぐ進むと、
15:37
and it suffers some painful consequence
痛みを伴う結果が待っている、
15:40
such as getting zapped.
例えば叩かれるような。
15:42
In a situation like this,
このような状況では、
15:44
we would expect the Critic to speak up
クリティックは行動方針を変えるよう
15:46
and to tell the Actor
アクターに働きかけると
15:48
to change its policy.
予想しました。
15:50
We have created such a situation, artificially,
この状況をフラッシュをたくことで人為的に
15:52
by turning on the critic with a flash of light.
作り出しました。
15:55
That caused a strengthening of the connections
そしてこれは現在活性化している匂い検知器官と
15:58
between the currently active odor detector
伝達細胞の結びつきを強める
16:01
and the motors.
結果となりました。
16:04
So the next time
つまり次に
16:06
the fly finds itself facing the same odor again,
ハエが同じ匂いと出くわしたとき、
16:08
the connection is strong enough to turn on the motors
結びつきは伝達器官を動かし、
16:11
and to trigger an evasive maneuver.
回避行動をとります。
16:14
I don't know about you,
私はあなたのことを知りませんが、
16:19
but I find it exhilarating to see
心理学の抽象的な
16:22
how vague psychological notions
概念が消え失せ、
16:25
evaporate and give rise
精神を実態的、
16:28
to a physical, mechanistic understanding of the mind,
機能的に理解することがとても楽しいことを発見しました。
16:30
even if it's the mind of the fly.
たとえハエの精神だとしても。
16:33
This is one piece of good news.
これはよいニュースの一つです。
16:36
The other piece of good news,
もう一つのよいニュースは、
16:39
for a scientist at least,
少なくとも科学者にとっては、
16:41
is that much remains to be discovered.
まだまだ未知の領域があるということです。
16:43
In the experiments I told you about,
前述した実験で、
16:46
we have lifted the identity of the Critic,
クリティックの所在はつかめましたが、
16:48
but we still have no idea
クリティックがどのように
16:51
how the Critic does its job.
動いているかはまだ分かりません。
16:53
Come to think of it, knowing when you're wrong
考えてみると、先生やお母さんの助言無しでは
16:55
without a teacher, or your mother, telling you,
自分の間違いに気づくことは
16:57
is a very hard problem.
とても難しいことです。
17:00
There are some ideas in computer science
コンピュータサイエンスや人工知能の
17:02
and in artificial intelligence
中にはこれらの解決策の
17:04
as to how this might be done,
糸口がありますが、
17:06
but we still haven't solved
生物同士の
17:08
a single example
接触から生じる
17:10
of how intelligent behavior
知的行動に関しては、
17:12
springs from the physical interactions
何一つ証明が
17:15
in living matter.
できていません。
17:17
I think we'll get there in the not too distant future.
それらが解決されるのもそう遠くないと思っています。
17:19
Thank you.
ありがとう
17:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:24
Translated by Shogo Kobayashi
Reviewed by Lace Nguyen

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Gero Miesenboeck - Optogeneticist
Using light and a little genetic engineering -- optogenetics -- Gero Miesenboeck has developed a way to control how living nerve cells work, and advanced understanding of how the brain controls behavior.

Why you should listen

Gero Miesenboeck is pioneering the field of optogenetics: genetically modifying nerve cells to respond to light. By flashing light at a modified neuron in a living nervous system, Miesenboeck and his collaborators can mimic a brain impulse -- and then study what happens next. Optogenetics will allow ever more precise experiments on living brains, allowing us to gather better evidence on how electrical impulses on tissue translate into actual behavior and thoughts.

In one experiment, done at Yale, he and his team engineered fruit flies to be light-sensitive in the neural area responsible for escape response. Then the flies were beheaded; fruit flies can live for a day without their heads, but they don't move. When the modified cells were flashed with light, though, the headless flies flew. Miesenboeck had successfully simulated an order from a brain that wasn't even there anymore.

Miesenboeck's current research at Oxford's growing department of neurobiology focuses on the nerve cell networks that underpin what animals perceive, remember and do. In one recent experiment, he used optogenetics to implant an unpleasant memory in a fruit fly, causing it to "remember" to avoid a certain odor as it traveled around. He and his team were able, in fact, to find the fly's specific 12-neuron brain circuit that govern memory formation.

More profile about the speaker
Gero Miesenboeck | Speaker | TED.com