sponsored links
TEDWomen 2010

Naomi Klein: Addicted to risk

ナオミ・クライン:リスク依存症

December 8, 2010

このスピーチの前にジャーナリストのナオミ・クラインは、BPによる危険な原油開拓が招いた惨事がどのような結果をもたらしたかをメキシコ湾で追っている調査船に同乗していました。私たちの社会は新しいエネルギー、新しい金融商品を求めて過度に大きなリスクの中毒になっています。その結果、私たちは度々後始末をさせられます。クラインは問います。「代替策はないのでしょうか?」

Naomi Klein - Author, Activist
In her latest work, Naomi Klein wonders: What makes our culture so prone to the reckless high-stakes gamble, and why are women so frequently called upon to clean up the mess? Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I just did something I've never done before.
わたしは最近 初めての経験をしました
00:15
I spent a week at sea on a research vessel.
調査船の上で一週間を過ごしたのです
00:18
Now I'm not a scientist,
私は科学者ではありませんが
00:21
but I was accompanying a remarkable scientific team
メキシコ湾でBPが流出させた原油の
00:23
from the University of South Florida
移動経路を追跡調査している
00:26
who have been tracking the travels of BP's oil
南フロリダ大学の優秀な科学者のチームに
00:28
in the Gulf of Mexico.
同行していました
00:31
This is the boat we were on, by the way.
これが私たちが乗っていた調査船です
00:33
The scientists I was with
科学者たちが調査していたのは
00:36
were not studying the effect of the oil and dispersants on the big stuff --
原油や分散剤が
00:38
the birds, the turtles,
鳥・カメ・イルカといった
00:41
the dolphins, the glamorous stuff.
大きな生物に与える影響ではありません
00:43
They're looking at the really little stuff
彼らの調査対象は非常に小さな生物です
00:45
that gets eaten by the slightly less little stuff
それらは小さな生物に捕食され
00:48
that eventually gets eaten by the big stuff.
それがさらに大きな生き物に食べられます
00:51
And what they're finding
ほんの微量の原油や分散剤でも
00:54
is that even trace amounts of oil and dispersants
植物性プランクトンには非常に有害であることが
00:56
can be highly toxic to phytoplankton,
調査で判明しました
00:59
which is very bad news,
これはとても厄介な問題です
01:01
because so much life depends on it.
なぜなら非常に多くの生命が影響を受けるからです
01:03
So contrary to what we heard a few months back
つまり 数か月前にささやかれていた
01:06
about how 75 percent of that oil
「流出した原油の75%は魔法のように消え去った」
01:08
sort of magically disappeared
「元々心配する必要はなかった」
01:10
and we didn't have to worry about it,
というコメントに反して
01:12
this disaster is still unfolding.
この惨事は現在も
01:14
It's still working its way up the food chain.
食物連鎖の上位に向かって展開中なのです
01:17
Now this shouldn't come as a surprise to us.
特段驚くことでもないでしょうが
01:20
Rachel Carson --
レイチェル・カーソン
01:23
the godmother of modern environmentalism --
現代の環境保護主義の先駆者は
01:25
warned us about this very thing
1962年にまさにこのことを
01:27
back in 1962.
警告していました
01:29
She pointed out that the "control men" --
彼女の指摘はこうでした
01:31
as she called them --
彼女の呼ぶ「支配者」は
01:33
who carpet-bombed towns and fields
街や農場にDDTのような有毒の殺虫剤をばらまき
01:35
with toxic insecticides like DDT,
鳥を殺すのではなく
01:37
were only trying to kill the little stuff, the insects,
虫のような小さな生物を殺そうとしている
01:40
not the birds.
と言います
01:43
But they forgot this:
しかし彼らが忘れていることがありました
01:45
the fact that birds dine on grubs,
鳥は幼虫を食べるということです
01:47
that robins eat lots of worms
コマドリはDDTが染みこんだ虫を
01:49
now saturated with DDT.
たくさん食べ
01:51
And so, robin eggs failed to hatch,
その結果 コマドリの卵は孵化に失敗し
01:54
songbirds died en masse,
鳴き鳥は一斉に死に
01:57
towns fell silent.
街は静まり返る
01:59
Thus the title "Silent Spring."
ゆえに『沈黙の春』という題名なのです
02:01
I've been trying to pinpoint
なぜメキシコ湾が私の頭から離れないのか
02:05
what keeps drawing me back to the Gulf of Mexico,
ずっとその理由を探っていました
02:07
because I'm Canadian,
というのも 私はカナダ人なので
02:09
and I can draw no ancestral ties.
先祖からのつながりもないからです
02:11
And I think what it is
その理由はおそらく
02:13
is I don't think we have fully come to terms
私たちの理解が不十分なのだと思います
02:15
with the meaning of this disaster,
この惨事の意味することや
02:18
with what it meant to witness a hole
世界にぶち開けられた穴を
02:21
ripped in our world,
目撃することの意味
02:24
with what it meant to watch the contents of the Earth
その穴から地球の中身が流出する映像を
02:26
gush forth on live TV,
何か月もの間 ずっと
02:29
24 hours a day,
ライブ映像で目の当たりにしてきた
02:31
for months.
この意味を理解しているのでしょうか?
02:33
After telling ourselves for so long
長い間 私たちは自らの発明品や技術が
02:35
that our tools and technology can control nature,
自然を管理できると自らに言い聞かせてきましたが
02:38
suddenly we were face-to-face
自らの弱点や
02:41
with our weakness,
管理能力の欠如に
02:43
with our lack of control,
突然 直面しました
02:45
as the oil burst out
トップハットや トップキルのような
02:47
of every attempt to contain it --
あらゆる封じ込め作戦もむなしく
02:49
"top hats," "top kills"
原油流出は止まりませんでした
02:52
and, most memorably, the "junk shot" --
中でも印象的だったのはジャンクショットです
02:54
the bright idea
廃タイヤやゴルフボールを
02:56
of firing old tires and golf balls
原油の流出する穴に投入するという
02:58
down that hole in the world.
「素晴らしい」アイデアです
03:01
But even more striking
しかし噴出する原油の力よりも
03:03
than the ferocious power emanating from that well
さらに注目すべきは
03:05
was the recklessness
この事態を引き起こすことになった
03:08
with which that power was unleashed --
BPの向こう見ずな態度です
03:10
the carelessness, the lack of planning
慎重さを欠く姿勢と
03:12
that characterized the operation
計画性の欠如は
03:15
from drilling to clean-up.
採掘から浄化までの過程に現れています
03:17
If there is one thing
BPの事故への対応から
03:20
BP's watery improv act made clear,
明らかになったことがあるとすれば
03:22
it is that, as a culture,
大切でかけがえのないものを
03:25
we have become far too willing to gamble
賭けて ギャンブルをすることが
03:27
with things that are precious
私たちの文化の一部に
03:29
and irreplaceable,
なってしまったということです
03:31
and to do so without a back-up plan,
それは代替策も
03:33
without an exit strategy.
出口戦略もないギャンブルです
03:36
And BP was hardly
BPの原油流出事故は
03:38
our first experience of this in recent years.
近年見られる無謀な賭けの一例にすぎません
03:40
Our leaders barrel into wars,
戦争を推奨する際 リーダーたちは
03:42
telling themselves happy stories
「楽勝だ」「戦勝パレードが待ってるぞ」
03:44
about cakewalks and welcome parades.
と楽観的に語りかけますが
03:46
Then, it is years of deadly damage control,
その後何年も被害対策に追われます
03:49
Frankensteins of sieges and surges
包囲攻撃・反逆・暴動の鎮圧
03:52
and counter-insurgencies,
全て自分でまいた種です
03:55
and once again, no exit strategy.
しかも出口戦略がないのです
03:57
Our financial wizards routinely fall victim
経済の専門家は 似たような自信過剰の
04:00
to similar overconfidence,
犠牲になることがよくあります
04:03
convincing themselves that the latest bubble
「今回のバブルは新しい市場形態で
04:05
is a new kind of market --
決して衰えることはない」と
04:07
the kind that never goes down.
自らに言い聞かせました
04:09
And when it inevitably does,
そして必然的に経済の衰退が起きたとき
04:11
the best and the brightest
最良策として実行された
04:13
reach for the financial equivalent of the junk shot --
経済版の「ジャンクショット」は
04:15
in this case, throwing massive amounts
巨額の公的資金を
04:17
of much-needed public money
全く異なる類の「穴」を防ぐために
04:19
down a very different kind of hole.
投入するというものでした
04:21
As with BP, the hole does get plugged,
BPの原油流出事故では穴は塞がりました
04:24
at least temporarily,
少なくとも一時的には
04:26
but not before
しかし非常に大きなつけを
04:28
exacting a tremendous price.
払うことになりました
04:30
We have to figure out
なぜこうした事を起こるがままにするのか
04:32
why we keep letting this happen,
考えなければなりません
04:34
because we are in the midst
私たちはかけがえのないものを賭けた
04:36
of what may be our highest-stakes gamble of all --
ギャンブルをしているからです
04:38
deciding what to do, or not to do,
気候変動について
04:41
about climate change.
何をすべきか 何をしないべきかというギャンブルです
04:43
Now as you know,
現在 ご存じの通り
04:45
a great deal of time is spent,
国内外において
04:47
in this country and around the world,
膨大な時間が
04:49
inside the climate debate,
気候変動の議論に割かれています
04:51
on the question of, "What if the IPC scientists
「もしIPCCの科学者が間違っていたら?」
04:53
are all wrong?"
という疑問について
04:56
Now a far more relevant question --
今ではより核心を突いた疑問があがっています
04:58
as MIT physicist Evelyn Fox Keller puts it --
MITの自然科学者エブリン・フォックス・ケラーは
05:00
is, "What if those scientists are right?"
「IPCCの科学者がみな正しかったら?」と問います
05:03
Given the stakes, the climate crisis
つまり気候変化の危機においては
05:08
clearly calls for us to act
私たちは予防の原則に従って
05:10
based on the precautionary principle --
行動することが求められています
05:12
the theory that holds
なぜなら人間の健康と環境が
05:15
that when human health and the environment
大きなリスクに曝されている時
05:17
are significantly at risk
かつ潜在的な被害が
05:19
and when the potential damage is irreversible,
取り返しのつかないものである時
05:21
we cannot afford to wait
私たちは科学的に完璧な正確さを
05:24
for perfect scientific certainty.
待っている余裕はありません
05:26
Better to err on the side of caution.
予防の段階で失敗する方がましです
05:28
More overt, the burden of proving
さらに明白な事は ある方法の安全性を
05:31
that a practice is safe
証明するためにかかる負担は
05:33
should not be placed on the public that would be harmed,
被害を受ける可能性のある一般市民ではなく
05:35
but rather on the industry that stands to profit.
むしろそれによって利益を得る産業に負わせるべきです
05:38
But climate policy in the wealthy world --
しかし富める世界では
05:42
to the extent that such a thing exists --
そんな世界が存在する限りは
05:44
is not based on precaution,
気候政策は予防という観点に基づいていません
05:47
but rather on cost-benefit analysis --
むしろ費用対効果の分析に基づいており
05:49
finding the course of action that economists believe
経済専門家が
05:52
will have the least impact
最もGDPへの影響が少ないと
05:54
on our GDP.
信じる方法を模索するのです
05:56
So rather than asking, as precaution would demand,
なので予防という観点に基づいて
05:58
what can we do as quickly as possible
「起こりうる惨事を回避するために
06:01
to avoid potential catastrophe,
今何ができるか?」と問うのではなく
06:03
we ask bizarre questions like this:
次のような奇妙な問いかけをします
06:06
"What is the latest possible moment we can wait
「排出量削減が絶対必要になるまでに
06:09
before we begin seriously lowering emissions?
どれ位の猶予期間があるだろうか?」
06:12
Can we put this off till 2020,
「2020年までは大丈夫?」
06:15
2030, 2050?"
「では2030年? 2050年は?」
06:17
Or we ask,
もしくはこんな問いかけです
06:20
"How much hotter can we let the planet get
「あとどれくらい地球が暑くなっても
06:22
and still survive?
生き延びられるだろうか?」
06:24
Can we go with two degrees, three degrees, or --
「2℃か? 3℃か?」
06:26
where we're currently going --
「それともすでに達しつつあるように
06:28
four degrees Celsius?"
4℃か?」
06:30
And by the way,
ところで
06:32
the assumption that we can safely control
この素晴らしく複雑な地球の気候システムを
06:34
the Earth's awesomely complex climate system
私たちが サーモスタットのように簡単に
06:36
as if it had a thermostat,
管理し 温度調節ができると
06:39
making the planet not too hot, not too cold,
考えるのは ある意味で
06:41
but just right -- sort of Goldilocks style --
ゴルディロックスみたいな
06:44
this is pure fantasy,
単なる幻想にすぎません
06:47
and it's not coming from the climate scientists.
そうした考え方は気候科学者によるものではなく
06:49
It's coming from the economists
機械論的な考え方を
06:52
imposing their mechanistic thinking
科学にも当てはめようとする
06:54
on the science.
経済学者によるものです
06:56
The fact is that we simply don't know
実際には
06:58
when the warming that we create
私たちが生み出した温暖化が
07:00
will be utterly overwhelmed
いつフィードバックループによって
07:02
by feedback loops.
完全にやられてしまうかは分かりません
07:04
So once again,
ですので もう一度問いたいのです
07:06
why do we take these crazy risks
なぜ私たちは大切なものに対して
07:08
with the precious?
こうした常軌を逸したリスクをとるのでしょうか
07:10
A range of explanations
色々な理由が
07:12
may be popping into your mind by now,
みなさんの頭に浮かんだかもしれません
07:14
like "greed."
例えば 強欲です
07:16
This is a popular explanation, and there's lots of truth to it,
これは多分に真実を含んでいる よく言われる理由です
07:18
because taking big risks, as we all know,
なぜなら大きなリスクをとることは
07:21
pays a lot of money.
ご存じの通り 多くのお金を使うからです
07:24
Another explanation that you often hear for recklessness
その他 無謀さの原因として
07:26
is hubris.
よく耳にするのが 傲慢さです
07:28
And greed and hubris
強欲と傲慢さは
07:30
are intimately intertwined
無謀さを説明する際には
07:32
when it comes to recklessness.
親密に結びついています
07:34
For instance, if you happen to be a 35-year-old banker
例えば あなたが運よく35歳の銀行員で
07:36
taking home 100 times more
脳外科医よりも100倍も多い報酬を
07:39
than a brain surgeon,
もらっていたとすれば
07:41
then you need a narrative,
あなたは説明を必要とします
07:43
you need a story
その格差をよしとするための
07:45
that makes that disparity okay.
物語です
07:47
And you actually don't have a lot of options.
どんな物語が可能か 実際には多くの選択肢はありません
07:49
You're either an incredibly good scammer,
まず 驚異的に凄腕の詐欺師であるという物語です
07:52
and you're getting away with it -- you gamed the system --
システムを巧みに操作し罰を逃れる詐欺師です
07:55
or you're some kind of boy genius,
もしくは世界でも類をみないような
07:57
the likes of which the world has never seen.
天才少年であるという物語です
07:59
Now both of these options -- the boy genius and the scammer --
天才少年と詐欺師 いずれにおいても
08:02
are going to make you vastly overconfident
あなたは非常に自信過剰になり
08:05
and therefore more prone
将来さらに大きなリスクをとる傾向が
08:07
to taking even bigger risks in the future.
高まるでしょう
08:09
By the way, Tony Hayward, the former CEO of BP,
ところでBPの前CEOの
08:13
had a plaque on his desk
トニー・ヘイワード氏の机には
08:16
inscribed with this inspirational slogan:
次のようなスローガンが刻まれた盾がありました
08:18
"What would you attempt to do
「失敗することがないと分かっていれば
08:20
if you knew you could not fail?"
何に挑戦するだろうか?」
08:22
Now this is actually a popular plaque,
こうした盾は やり手の集団には
08:25
and this is a crowd of overachievers,
実際によくあるものです
08:28
so I'm betting that some of you have this plaque.
みなさんの中にもこうした盾を持っている方がいらっしゃるでしょう
08:30
Don't feel ashamed.
恥じる必要はありません
08:33
Putting fear of failure out of your mind
例えばトライアスロンのトレーニングや
08:35
can be a very good thing
TEDトークの準備をする時には
08:37
if you're training for a triathlon
失敗に対する恐怖を克服することは
08:39
or preparing to give a TEDTalk,
時にとても良いことです
08:41
but personally, I think people with the power
しかし 個人的には
08:44
to detonate our economy and ravage our ecology
経済を大破させたり 環境を破壊するような力を
08:46
would do better having
もっている人々はむしろ
08:49
a picture of Icarus hanging from the wall,
壁にイカロスの絵を壁に掲げるべきだと思います
08:51
because -- maybe not that one in particular --
これと同じ物でなくてもよいですが
08:53
but I want them thinking about the possibility of failure
彼らに考えて欲しいことは
08:56
all of the time.
失敗の可能性は常にあるということです
08:59
So we have greed,
私たちは強欲で
09:01
we've got overconfidence/hubris,
自信過剰 そして傲慢になりました
09:03
but since we're here at TEDWomen,
しかし 今このTEDWomenにおいて
09:05
let's consider one other factor
社会的な無謀さの解決に
09:07
that could be contributing in some small way
いくらか貢献しうる もう一つ別の点に
09:09
to societal recklessness.
目を向けてみましょう
09:11
Now I'm not going to belabor this point,
今この点について深入りしませんが
09:15
but studies do show that, as investors,
研究で次のことが示されています
09:17
women are much less prone
投資の際 無謀なリスクを取る傾向は
09:19
to taking reckless risks than men,
男性よりも女性の方が低いということです
09:21
precisely because, as we've already heard,
その理由は ご存じのように
09:24
women tend not to suffer from overconfidence
女性は男性のようには
09:26
in the same way that men do.
自信過剰になりにくいからです
09:29
So it turns out
なので 男性よりも低い賃金であることと
09:31
that being paid less and praised less
褒められることが少ないことに
09:33
has its upsides --
利点があることが判明しました
09:35
for society at least.
少なくとも社会にとっては有益です
09:37
The flipside of this
逆の側面として
09:39
is that constantly being told
常日頃 「才能がある」
09:41
that you are gifted, chosen
「生まれながらのリーダーだ」
09:43
and born to rule
「選ばれし者だ」と言われることは
09:45
has distinct societal downsides.
社会的には明らかにマイナス効果です
09:47
And this problem -- call it the "perils of privilege" --
この「特権に潜む危険」とでも呼べる問題が
09:50
brings us closer, I think,
私たちを集団的な無謀さの根源へと
09:53
to the root of our collective recklessness.
近づけていると思います
09:55
Because none of us -- at least in the global North --
なぜなら 北半球にいる人は
09:58
neither men nor women,
女性でも男性でも
10:00
are fully exempt from this message.
この問題を避けることはできません
10:02
Here's what I'm talking about.
私が言いたいのはこういうことです
10:05
Whether we actively believe them
積極的に信じるか
10:07
or consciously reject them,
意識的に拒否するかはともかく
10:09
our culture remains in the grips
私たちの文化は
10:11
of certain archetypal stories
他者や自然に対して優位に立っているという
10:13
about our supremacy
ある種の虚構の物語に
10:15
over others and over nature --
がんじがらめなままです
10:17
the narrative of the newly discovered frontier
新しく発見した開拓地と
10:19
and the conquering pioneer,
それを切り開いた開拓者の物語
10:22
the narrative of manifest destiny,
明示された運命という物語
10:24
the narrative of apocalypse and salvation.
黙示録と救済の物語です
10:26
And just when you think these stories are fading into history,
こうした物語は過去のものとなり
10:28
and that we've gotten over them,
乗り越えたものと思ったまさにその時と
10:30
they pop up in the strangest places.
物語は意外な場所に現れます
10:32
For instance, I stumbled across this advertisement
例えば 私はカンザスシティ空港の
10:35
outside the women's washroom
女性用トイレを出た所で
10:37
in the Kansas City airport.
こんな広告に出くわしました
10:39
It's for Motorola's new Rugged cell phone,
これはモトローラ社の新しい携帯電話の広告で
10:41
and yes, it really does say,
本当にこう書いてあるのです
10:43
"Slap Mother Nature in the face."
「母なる自然を引っ叩け」
10:45
And I'm not just showing it to pick on Motorola --
私はモトローラを批判するために
10:47
that's just a bonus.
これを見せているわけではありません
10:49
I'm showing it because --
私がこれを見せる理由は
10:51
they're not a sponsor, are they? --
彼らはスポンサーではありませんよね?
10:53
because, in its own way,
なぜなら ある意味でこれは
10:55
this is a crass version
荒っぽい形をとった
10:57
of our founding story.
私たちの始まりの物語だからです
10:59
We slapped Mother Nature around and won,
私たちは母なる自然を引っ叩き 勝利しました
11:01
and we always win,
常に勝利を収めました
11:03
because dominating nature is our destiny.
なぜなら 自然を支配することは私たちの運命だからです
11:05
But this is not the only fairytale we tell ourselves about nature.
自然に関して 自らに語り聞かせているおとぎ話はこれだけではなく
11:08
There's another one, equally important,
もう一つ 同じくらい重要なおとぎ話があります
11:11
about how that very same Mother Nature
それは まさに同じ母なる自然が
11:14
is so nurturing and so resilient
養育力があり たくましいために
11:16
that we can never make a dent in her abundance.
その潤沢さには大した影響を与えられないという物語です
11:19
Let's hear from Tony Hayward again.
トニー・ヘイワード氏の発言をもう一度聞いてみましょう
11:22
"The Gulf of Mexico is a very big ocean.
「メキシコ湾はとても大きな海だ
11:24
The amount of oil and dispersants that we are putting into it
我々が流した油と分散剤の量は
11:27
is tiny in relation to the total water volume."
海の全体水量においてはとても小さなものだ」
11:30
In other words, the ocean is big;
つまりこういうことです
11:33
she can take it.
「海は大きい だから 受け入れられる」
11:35
It is this underlying assumption of limitlessness
私たちが無謀なリスクをとることができるのも
11:38
that makes it possible
基本的に自然が無限であると
11:41
to take the reckless risks that we do.
思い込んでいるからです
11:43
Because this is our real master-narrative:
なぜなら これが物語を支配している語りだからです
11:46
however much we mess up,
「どれだけめちゃくちゃにしようとも
11:49
there will always be more --
水も土地も
11:51
more water, more land,
未開拓の資源も
11:53
more untapped resources.
常に残されている」
11:56
A new bubble will replace the old one.
「新たなバブルは過去のバブルにとって代わる」
11:58
A new technology will come along
「新たな技術が生まれて
12:00
to fix the messes we made with the last one.
過去の技術がやらかした失敗を直してくれる」
12:02
In a way, that is the story
ある意味で これは
12:05
of the settling of the Americas,
アメリカ大陸への移住の物語です
12:07
the supposedly inexhaustible frontier
ヨーロッパ人が開拓地は尽きることがないと信じて
12:09
to which Europeans escaped.
向かったアメリカ大陸の物語です
12:11
And it's also the story of modern capitalism,
また同時に これは近代資本主義の物語でもあります
12:14
because it was the wealth from this land
というのも 私たちの経済システムを生み出したのは
12:17
that gave birth to our economic system,
この土地から生まれた富であり
12:19
one that cannot survive without perpetual growth
その経済システムは
12:22
and an unending supply
永続的に成長し 未開拓分野を供給し続けなければ
12:25
of new frontiers.
機能し続けることができません
12:27
Now the problem is
問題は その物語は
12:29
that the story was always a lie.
いつも嘘だったということです
12:31
The Earth always did have limits.
地球には限界があります 私たちはそれが
12:33
They were just beyond our sights.
見えていなかったにすぎません
12:35
And now we are hitting those limits
そして今 複数の面において
12:37
on multiple fronts.
そうした限界に達しつつあります
12:39
I believe that we know this,
私たちはそのことは分かっているはずです
12:42
yet we find ourselves trapped in a kind of narrative loop.
しかし同じ物語の繰り返しから抜け出せずにいるのです
12:44
Not only do we continue to tell and retell
同じような退屈な物語を
12:47
the same tired stories,
何度も繰り返し
12:50
but we are now doing so
語り続けているだけでなく
12:52
with a frenzy and a fury
集団で熱狂して
12:54
that, frankly, verges on camp.
語っているのです
12:56
How else to explain the cultural space
でなければ どうやってサラ・ペイリンの
12:59
occupied by Sarah Palin?
支配する文化的空間を説明できるでしょうか
13:02
Now on the one hand,
神は私たちが搾取できるように
13:04
exhorting us to "drill, baby, drill,"
地下に資源を用意してくれたのだからと
13:06
because God put those resources into the ground
「もっともっと掘りましょう」と
13:08
in order for us to exploit them,
私たちに熱心に勧める一方で
13:11
and on the other, glorying in the wilderness
彼女が出演する
13:14
of Alaska's untouched beauty
人気のリアリティー番組では
13:17
on her hit reality TV show.
アラスカの無垢で美しい自然をアピールします
13:19
The twin message is as comforting as it is mad.
この相反するメッセージは狂気的ですが安心感を与えます
13:22
Ignore those creeping fears
「ついに限界に達してしまったのではないかと
13:25
that we have finally hit the wall.
沸いてくる不安は無視しましょう」
13:27
There are still no limits.
「限界なんてまだないのです」
13:29
There will always be another frontier.
「常に新たな開拓地があるのです」
13:31
So stop worrying and keep shopping.
「だから悩むのは止めて 買い物を続けよう」
13:34
Now, would that this were just about
これはサラ・ペイリンと
13:37
Sarah Palin and her reality TV show.
彼女のリアリティー番組だけの話でしょうか?
13:39
In environmental circles,
環境系の集まりでよく耳にするのは
13:41
we often hear that, rather than shifting to renewables,
再生可能なものにシフトするよりも
13:43
we are continuing with business as usual.
今まで通りビジネスを続けようというものです
13:46
This assessment, unfortunately,
この評価は残念ながら
13:49
is far too optimistic.
あまりに楽観的すぎます
13:51
The truth is that we have already exhausted
実際には入手が容易な化石燃料の大半を
13:53
so much of the easily accessible fossil fuels
使い尽くしてしまったため
13:56
that we have already entered
よりリスクの高いビジネスの時代
13:59
a far riskier business era,
究極のエネルギーの時代に
14:01
the era of extreme energy.
突入してしまったということです
14:04
So that means drilling for oil in the deepest water,
それはつまり 氷で覆われた北極海のような最深部からも
14:06
including the icy Arctic seas,
石油を採掘することを意味します
14:09
where a clean-up may simply be impossible.
もしそこから流出すれば 浄化できないでしょう
14:11
It means large-scale hydraulic fracking for gas
もしくは それまで見たことが無かったような
14:14
and massive strip-mining operations for coal,
天然ガスを得るための大規模水圧破砕や
14:17
the likes of which we haven't yet seen.
石炭を得るための大規模な露天採鉱を意味します
14:19
And most controversially, it means the tar sands.
そして最も論争を呼んでいるオイルサンドです
14:22
I'm always surprised by how little
カナダ人以外にアルバータの
14:25
people outside of Canada
オイルサンドを知る人がほとんどいないことに
14:27
know about the Alberta Tar Sands,
私はいつも驚かされます
14:29
which this year are projected to become
オイルサンドは今年
14:31
the number one source of imported oil
アメリカが輸入する石油の量で
14:33
to the United States.
一位になると見込まれている資源です
14:36
It's worth taking a moment to understand this practice,
この仕組みについて少し説明したいと思います
14:38
because I believe it speaks to recklessness
なぜなら他の何よりも
14:41
and the path we're on
無謀さと私たちの進む方向について
14:43
like little else.
説明してくれるからです
14:45
So this is where the tar sands live,
ここがオイルサンドのある場所です
14:47
under one of the last magnificent
最後に残された雄大な北方林の
14:50
Boreal forests.
下に眠っています
14:52
The oil is not liquid.
オイルサンドは液体ではないため
14:54
You can't just drill a hole and pump it out.
ただ穴を掘って汲み上げることはできません
14:56
Tar sand's oil is solid,
オイルサンドの油は
14:58
mixed in with the soil.
砂に混じっている個体です
15:00
So to get at it,
なので 油を採るためには
15:02
you first have to get rid of the trees.
まず木を切り倒さなければなりません
15:04
Then, you rip off the topsoil
それから表土を剥がして
15:07
and get at that oily sand.
油を含んだ砂にたどりつくのです
15:09
The process requires a huge amount of water,
これには大量の水が必要です
15:12
which is then pumped into massive toxic tailing ponds.
使用済みの水は巨大で有毒な尾鉱池に注ぎこまれます
15:15
That's very bad news for local indigenous people
これは下流に住む先住民にとって
15:19
living downstream
非常に厄介な問題を含んでいます
15:22
who are reporting alarmingly high cancer rates.
彼らは驚くほど高い確率でガンを発症しています
15:24
Now looking at these images,
この写真を見ただけでは
15:27
it's difficult to grasp the scale of this operation,
この事業の規模は的確に把握し難いですが
15:29
which can already be seen from space
宇宙からでも見えますし
15:32
and could grow to an area the size of England.
イングランドの大きさまで広がることもありえます
15:35
I find it helps actually
土砂を運搬するダンプカーが目安になります
15:38
to look at the dump trucks that move the earth,
これまでで造られた中でも
15:40
the largest ever built.
最大クラスのダンプカーです
15:42
That's a person down there by the wheel.
タイヤの前にいるのが人間です
15:44
My point is that
これは石油の掘削でも
15:46
this is not oil drilling.
採鉱でもなく 地球の表面を
15:48
It's not even mining.
剥がしているということを
15:50
It is terrestrial skinning.
私はお伝えしたいのです
15:52
Vast, vivid landscapes
広大で 鮮やかな風景が
15:54
are being gutted,
ぼろぼろに破壊され
15:56
left monochromatic gray.
色彩のない灰色だけが残されます
15:58
Now I should confess that as [far as] I'm concerned
実は この方法が二酸化炭素を一切排出しないならば
16:00
this would be an abomination
この話をするのは恥ずかしいのではと
16:03
if it emitted not one particle of carbon.
心配していました
16:05
But the truth is that, on average,
しかし実のところ
16:07
turning that gunk into crude oil
この原油製造法は
16:10
produces about three times more greenhouse gas pollution
カナダの従来の方法と比較して
16:13
than it does to produce conventional oil
平均で3倍もの
16:16
in Canada.
温室効果ガスを排出します
16:18
How else to describe this,
これを集団の狂気という他に
16:20
but as a form of mass insanity?
表現できるでしょうか
16:22
Just when we know we need to be learning
この地球上でどう生活するかを
16:25
to live on the surface of our planet,
学ぶ必要性を自覚しながら
16:28
off the power of sun, wind and waves,
太陽・風力・水力エネルギーを差し置いて
16:30
we are frantically digging
狂ったように
16:33
to get at the dirtiest,
考えられる限り 最も汚れていて
16:35
highest-emitting stuff imaginable.
排出量の高いものを掘っているのです
16:37
This is where our story of endless growth
これが終わりのない成長という物語が
16:40
has taken us,
最終的にたどり着いた場所です
16:42
to this black hole at the center of my country --
私の国の中心に位置するこのブラックホールへと
16:44
a place of such planetary pain
噴出したBPの油井のように
16:47
that, like the BP gusher,
ずっと見ているには耐えられない
16:49
one can only stand to look at it for so long.
地球が苦しんでいる場所へと
16:51
As Jared Diamond and others have shown us,
ジャレド・ダイアモンドや他の人々が言うように
16:55
this is how civilizations commit suicide,
これは文明による自殺行為です
16:58
by slamming their foot on the accelerator
ブレーキを踏むべき
17:01
at the exact moment
まさにその時に
17:04
when they should be putting on the brakes.
勢いよくアクセルを踏んでいるのです
17:06
The problem is that our master-narrative
問題は 私たちの「支配的な語り」は
17:08
has an answer for that too.
これに対しても答えを用意していることです
17:11
At the very last minute, we are going to get saved
『Rapture』のように
17:13
just like in every Hollywood movie,
ハリウッド映画にはよくあることですが
17:16
just like in the Rapture.
最終局面で救われるという答えです
17:18
But, of course, our secular religion is technology.
しかし当然ながら 私たちの現実の宗教はテクノロジーです
17:21
Now, you may have noticed
最近こうした見出しを
17:24
more and more headlines like these.
よく目にするようになったかもしれません
17:27
The idea behind this form of "geoengineering" as it's called,
こうした地球工学の背景にある考えは
17:29
is that, as the planet heats up,
地球が温かくなれば
17:32
we may be able to shoot sulfates and aluminum particles
硫酸やアルミニウムの粒子を
17:34
into the stratosphere
成層圏に撃ち込み
17:37
to reflect some of the sun's rays
太陽光線を反射させて
17:39
back to space,
宇宙に戻すことで
17:41
thereby cooling the planet.
地球を冷却できるというものです
17:43
The wackiest plan -- and I'm not making this up --
私の脚色ではありませんが
17:46
would put what is essentially a garden hose
最も奇抜な計画は庭用のホースを
17:48
18-and-a-half miles high into the sky,
地上30km地点に風船で吊り上げ
17:51
suspended by balloons,
固定し そこから
17:54
to spew sulfur dioxide.
二酸化硫黄をまくというものです
17:56
So, solving the problem of pollution with more pollution.
汚染の問題をさらなる汚染で解決する
17:58
Think of it as the ultimate junk shot.
究極の「ジャンクショット」です
18:01
The serious scientists involved in this research
この研究に真剣に関わる科学者たちは
18:05
all stress that these techniques
この手法は完全に立証された訳ではないと
18:07
are entirely untested.
強調します
18:09
They don't know if they'll work,
効果が有るのかどうかも
18:11
and they have no idea
どんな恐ろしい副作用が生じるのかも
18:13
what kind of terrifying side effects they could unleash.
分かっていません
18:15
Nevertheless, the mere mention of geoengineering
にも関わらず 地球工学と聞いただけで
18:18
is being greeted in some circles,
歓迎する人々もいます
18:21
particularly media circles,
特にメディアに携わる人々です
18:23
with a relief tinged with euphoria.
「非常出口が見つかった」
18:25
An escape hatch has been reached.
「新しい開拓地が見つかった」
18:27
A new frontier has been found.
更には「今のライフスタイルを
18:29
Most importantly,
変える必要がないんだ」と言い
18:31
we don't have to change our lifestyles after all.
陶酔感と共に安堵します
18:33
You see, for some people,
聖衣を着た人を救世主と
18:35
their savior is a guy in a flowing robe.
思う人もいれば
18:37
For other people, it's a guy with a garden hose.
ホースを持つ人をそうだと思う人もいるでしょう
18:39
We badly need some new stories.
私たちは新しい物語を心の底から必要とします
18:43
We need stories that have different kinds of heroes
私たちには新しいタイプのヒーローが登場する物語が必要です
18:46
willing to take different kinds of risks --
異なる種類のリスクをとれるヒーローです
18:49
risks that confront recklessness head on,
向かう先にある無謀さに立ち向かい
18:52
that put the precautionary principle into practice,
予防原則を実行に移せる
18:54
even if that means through direct action --
たとえ直接的な行動が必要だとしても
18:57
like hundreds of young people willing to get arrested,
それは何百人もの若者が逮捕されようとも
19:00
blocking dirty power plants
汚い権力による設備を阻止しようとしたり
19:02
or fighting mountaintop-removal coal mining.
山頂で炭鉱の撤廃のために闘ったりするような行動です
19:04
We need stories
終わりのない成長という
19:07
that replace that linear narrative of endless growth
一方通行の物語ではなく
19:09
with circular narratives
自分の行動のつけは
19:12
that remind us
自分にふりかかることを自覚させてくれる
19:14
that what goes around comes around.
循環型の物語が必要です
19:16
That this is our only home.
地球は私たちが住めるたった一つの場所であり
19:18
There is no escape hatch.
非常出口はないのです
19:20
Call it karma, call it physics,
それは宿命であり
19:22
action and reaction, call it precaution --
作用と反作用の力学であり 予防原則です
19:25
the principle that reminds us
生命はどんな利益よりも
19:28
that life is too precious to be risked
尊いものであり
19:30
for any profit.
リスクにさらすことはできないという原則です
19:32
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
19:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:36
Translator:Yuki Sato
Reviewer:Takahiro Shimpo

sponsored links

Naomi Klein - Author, Activist
In her latest work, Naomi Klein wonders: What makes our culture so prone to the reckless high-stakes gamble, and why are women so frequently called upon to clean up the mess?

Why you should listen

In the January 31, 2011, edition of The Nation, Naomi Klein reports from one of the highest-profile failures of 2010: the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. And what she finds is a cascade of unintended consequences arising from a massive corporate risk.

In her 2007 book The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Naomi Klein makes the case that corporations (and capitalism-friendly governments) not only profit from disaster and conflict, but actively work to exploit countries in crisis. The “shock doctrine,” as Klein defines it, falls into place after a terrorist attack, a killer hurricane, a regime change—when corporate interests swoop in on a disoriented people to rewrite the rules in favor of commerce and globalization. In her deeply historical, carefully sourced book, Klein shows the link between commerce and crisis. The Shock Doctrine was adapted into a feature-length documentary by Michael Winterbottom; it premiered at the Sundance in 2010.

Klein’s previous book, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, took on the creeping influence of megabrands on culture and government—with arguments so persuasive that the book earned a point-by-point rebuttal from Nike. She is a regular columnist for Nation and the Guardian, and is now working on a book on the idea of ecological debt. You can follow her on Twitter: @NaomiAKlein

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.