sponsored links
TED2010

Catherine Mohr: The tradeoffs of building green

キャサリン・モーア「地球に優しい建築」

February 13, 2010

TED Uでキャサリン・モーアが、簡潔で、おもしろく、たくさんのデータを使って講演しました。環境に優しい家を新築したときのマニアックな選択について、誇張ではなく実際のエネルギー値を示して説明しています。どの選択が一番重要なのでしょう?皆さんの予想とは違っていますよ。

Catherine Mohr - Roboticist
Catherine Mohr works on surgical robots and robotic surgical procedures, using robots to make surgery safer -- and to go places where human wrists and eyes simply can't. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
First of all, I'm a geek.
さて 私はギークです
00:16
I'm an organic food-eating,
有機食品を食べることや
00:19
carbon footprint-minimizing, robotic surgery geek.
二酸化炭素排出量の最小化や ロボット外科手術に傾倒しています
00:21
And I really want to build green,
ぜひ 地球に優しいものをつくりたいのですが
00:24
but I'm very suspicious
実践方法の説明というのは いつも
00:27
of all of these well-meaning articles,
善意に基づいてはいますが
00:29
people long on moral authority
道徳的理由に重きをおいて
00:31
and short on data,
データを軽んじているので
00:33
telling me how to do these kinds of things.
とても疑わしく思えるのです
00:35
And so I have to figure this out for myself.
だから 自分で検討するしかありません
00:37
For example: Is this evil?
例えば これは悪い事でしょうか?
00:39
I have dropped a blob of organic yogurt
自己実現を果たした幸せな地元の牛から作られた --
00:42
from happy self-actualized local cows
有機ヨーグルトを
00:45
on my counter top,
調理台に少し落としちゃった
00:47
and I grab a paper towel and I want to wipe it up.
紙タオルをつかんで ふきたいけど
00:49
But can I use a paper towel? (Laughter)
紙タオルを使ってもいいのかしら?(笑)
00:52
The answer to this can be found in embodied energy.
その答えは内包エネルギーにあります
00:55
This is the amount of energy that goes into
紙タオルを作るのにかかった --
00:58
any paper towel or embodied water,
エネルギーや水のことです
01:00
and every time I use a paper towel,
紙タオルを使うたびに
01:02
I am using this much
仮想的には このくらい
01:04
virtual energy and water.
水とエネルギーを使っています
01:06
Wipe it up, throw it away.
拭いたら 捨てるものです
01:08
Now, if I compare that to a cotton towel
これに対して 1000回使える --
01:10
that I can use a thousand times,
木綿のタオルなら
01:13
I don't have a whole lot of embodied energy
ヨーグルトの付いたタオルを洗うまでは
01:15
until I wash that yogurty towel.
内包エネルギー量が比較的少ないのです
01:18
This is now operating energy.
こちらは運用エネルギーを示しています
01:20
So if I throw my towel in the washing machine,
タオルを洗濯機にかければ
01:23
I've now put energy and water
エネルギーと水を
01:25
back into that towel ...
タオルに費やすことになります
01:27
unless I use a front-loading, high-efficiency washing machine, (Laughter)
前入れ方式の省エネ洗濯機なら
01:29
and then it looks a little bit better.
少しは ましですね
01:31
But what about a recycled paper towel
その半分の大きさの
01:34
that comes in those little half sheets?
再生紙タオルはどうかしら?
01:36
Well, now a paper towel looks better.
紙タオルの方が良さそうですね
01:38
Screw the paper towels. Let's go to a sponge.
紙タオルは さておき スポンジは?
01:40
I wipe it up with a sponge, and I put it under the running water,
スポンジでふいて 流水にさらすと
01:42
and I have a lot less energy and a lot more water.
エネルギーは激減し 水は激増しました
01:45
Unless you're like me and you leave the handle
でも 私みたいに
01:47
in the position of hot even when you turn it on,
「温水」のまま蛇口を開ければ
01:49
and then you start to use more energy.
エネルギーが増え始めます
01:51
Or worse, you let it run until it's warm
さらに タオルを洗う前に
01:53
to rinse out your towel.
温まるまで流しっぱなしにしたら
01:55
And now all bets are off.
もう 台無しです
01:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:59
So what this says is that
つまり 時として
02:01
sometimes the things that you least expect --
最適化しようとしていた どんな要素よりも
02:03
the position in which you put the handle --
蛇口の位置みたいな
02:06
have a bigger effect than any of those other things
意外な要素の方が
02:08
that you were trying to optimize.
大きな影響を与えるのです
02:10
Now imagine someone as twisted as me
次に 私みたいな変わり者が
02:12
trying to build a house.
家を建てようとしている としましょう
02:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:16
That's what my husband and I are doing right now.
今 夫と家を建築中で どのくらいエコにできるか
02:19
And so, we wanted to know, how green could we be?
知りたいと思っていました
02:22
And there's a thousand and one articles out there
エコ実践時のトレードオフについて
02:24
telling us how to make all these green trade-offs.
説明する記事はたくさんありますが
02:26
And they are just as suspect
ささいな要素の最適化を勧めて
02:28
in telling us to optimize these little things around the edges
重要な問題を見逃しているような
02:30
and missing the elephant in the living room.
傾向があります
02:33
Now, the average house
平均的な家には
02:35
has about 300 megawatt hours
300メガワット時の内包エネルギーが
02:37
of embodied energy in it;
含まれています
02:40
this is the energy it takes to make it --
建築に費やしたエネルギーのことです
02:42
millions and millions of paper towels.
何百万枚もの紙タオルを作れる量です
02:44
We wanted to know how much better we could do.
これを どこまで改善できるか知りたいと思いました
02:46
And so, like many people,
多くの人と同じように 敷地に
02:49
we start with a house on a lot,
家が建っているところから始まります
02:51
and I'm going to show you a typical construction on the top
上の数値は 一般的な建築の場合で
02:53
and what we're doing on the bottom.
下の数値は 我が家の場合です
02:55
So first, we demolish it.
最初に 家を取り壊します
02:57
It takes some energy, but if you deconstruct it --
エネルギーを費やしますが 分解して
02:59
you take it all apart, you use the bits --
バラバラにして 残がいを再利用すれば
03:02
you can get some of that energy back.
ある程度エネルギーを取り戻せます
03:04
We then dug a big hole
次に 大きな穴を掘って
03:06
to put in a rainwater catchment tank
雨水タンクを設置しました
03:08
to take our yard water independent.
庭用に水を独立してためるためです
03:10
And then we poured a big foundation
次に 大きな基礎を構築して
03:12
for passive solar.
太陽熱を単純利用できるようにしました
03:14
Now, you can reduce the embodied energy
飛散灰を多く含んだコンクリートを使うと
03:16
by about 25 percent
内包エネルギー量を
03:18
by using high fly ash concrete.
25パーセントほど減らせます
03:20
We then put in framing.
次に 骨組みを構築しました
03:23
And so this is framing -- lumber,
この骨組みは 木材や
03:25
composite materials --
複合材料ですから
03:27
and it's kind of hard to get the embodied energy out of that,
内包エネルギーを戻すのは大変ですが
03:29
but it can be a sustainable resource
FSCの認証を受けた木材なら
03:32
if you use FSC-certified lumber.
環境に優しい資源だといえます
03:34
We then go on to
この建築にあたって 初めて
03:37
the first thing that was very surprising.
本当にビックリしたのですが
03:39
If we put aluminum windows in this house,
アルミ窓を使うと
03:41
we would double the energy use right there.
それだけでエネルギー消費量が倍になるのです
03:44
Now, PVC is a little bit better,
PVCなら少しは良いのですが
03:47
but still not as good as the wood that we chose.
私たちが選んだ木材には及びません
03:49
We then put in plumbing,
次に 配管や 電気系統や
03:52
electrical and HVAC,
空調システムを設置して
03:54
and insulate.
断熱材を取り付けます
03:56
Now, spray foam is an excellent insulator -- it fills in all the cracks --
発泡系断熱材は高性能で すき間を全て埋められますが
03:58
but it is pretty high embodied energy,
内包エネルギー量がかなり高いので
04:01
and, sprayed-in cellulose or blue jeans
セルロースやジーンズの繊維を吹きつける方が
04:04
is a much lower energy alternative to that.
エネルギーを減らせます
04:07
We also used straw bale
書斎の充てん材には
04:09
infill for our library,
わらの束を使いました
04:11
which has zero embodied energy.
わらの内包エネルギーはゼロです
04:13
When it comes time to sheetrock,
石こうボードには
04:15
if you use EcoRock it's about a quarter
EcoRockを使えば 内包エネルギーが
04:17
of the embodied energy of standard sheetrock.
一般的な石こうボードの 4分の1になります
04:19
And then you get to the finishes,
次は いよいよ仕上げです
04:22
the subject of all of those "go green" articles,
「エコ」をうたった記事でよく取り上げられていますが
04:24
and on the scale of a house
家屋ぐらいの規模では
04:27
they almost make no difference at all.
ほとんど影響はありません
04:28
And yet, all the press is focused on that.
なのにマスコミは重要視しています
04:31
Except for flooring.
ただし床は例外です
04:33
If you put carpeting in your house,
カーペットの内包エネルギーは
04:35
it's about a tenth of the embodied energy of the entire house,
家全体の10分の1ほどを占めますが
04:37
unless you use concrete or wood
コンクリートか木材に代えれば
04:40
for a much lower embodied energy.
内包エネルギーは かなり減ります
04:42
So now we add in the final construction energy, we add it all up,
残りの建築エネルギーを追加して 合計すると
04:44
and we've built a house for less than half
我が家の内包エネルギーは
04:47
of the typical embodied energy for building a house like this.
同じような家を普通に建てた場合の 半分以下になります
04:49
But before we pat ourselves
でも
04:52
too much on the back,
自画自賛する前に考えてみると
04:54
we have poured 151 megawatt hours
既に家があったのに
04:56
of energy into constructing this house
この家を建築するため
04:59
when there was a house there before.
151メガワット時を消費したのです
05:01
And so the question is:
そこで疑問がわきます
05:03
How could we make that back?
どうすれば それを取り戻せるでしょうか?
05:05
And so if I run my new energy-efficient house forward,
エネルギー効率の良い新しい家での これからの暮らしを
05:07
compared with the old, non-energy-efficient house,
エネルギー効率の悪い古い家と比べてみると
05:10
we make it back in about six years.
6年で元を取れます
05:13
Now, I probably would have upgraded the old house
ただし 古い家を改良すれば
05:16
to be more energy-efficient,
エネルギー効率が高まります
05:18
and in that case,
その場合と比べると
05:20
it would take me more about 20 years to break even.
元をとるまで20年ほど かかります
05:22
Now, if I hadn't paid attention to embodied energy,
内包エネルギーを考慮しなければ
05:26
it would have taken us
改良した家と比べると
05:28
over 50 years to break even
元を取るのに
05:30
compared to the upgraded house.
50年以上かかります
05:32
So what does this mean?
これに どんな意味があるのでしょう?
05:34
On the scale of my portion of the house,
我が家ぐらいの規模では
05:36
this is equivalent to about
一年に運転で使うエネルギー量と
05:39
as much as I drive in a year,
ほぼ同じで
05:41
it's about five times as much
完全にベジタリアンになった場合の
05:43
as if I went entirely vegetarian.
5倍くらいの量です
05:45
But my elephant in the living room flies.
ただし 飛行機に乗るのは問題です
05:47
Clearly, I need to walk home from TED.
明らかにTEDから歩いて帰らないといけません
05:50
But all the calculations
私のブログに内包エネルギーの
05:53
for embodied energy are on the blog.
計算値が載っています
05:56
And, remember, it's sometimes the things that you are not expecting
覚えておいてほしいのですが 意外な要素が
05:58
to be the biggest changes that are.
一番大きな効果をもたらすことがあるのです
06:01
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました(拍手)
06:04
Translator:Stuart Ayre
Reviewer:Satoshi Tatsuhara

sponsored links

Catherine Mohr - Roboticist
Catherine Mohr works on surgical robots and robotic surgical procedures, using robots to make surgery safer -- and to go places where human wrists and eyes simply can't.

Why you should listen

Catherine Mohr began her career as an engineer, working for many years with Paul MacCready at AeroVironment to develop alternative-energy vehicles and high-altitude aircraft. Her midcareer break: medical school, where she invented a brilliantly simple device, the LapCap, that makes laproscopic surgeries safer.

Mohr now oversees the development of next-generation surgical robots and robotic procedures, as the director of medical research at Intuitive Surgical Inc., where she's the clinical design leader for the DaVinci Surgical Robotic system. She also works at Stanford's School of Medicine, where she studies simulation-based teaching methods to teach clinical skills to budding doctors. And she's a senior scientific advisor to the GlobalSolver Foundation, an innovative funding and study group that looks at ways to match up scientists and money to help the world's oceans.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.