English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2005

Ross Lovegrove: Organic design, inspired by nature

ロス・ラブグローブ: 自然からインスピレーションを受けた有機的なデザイン

Filmed
Views 1,084,498

デザイナーであるロス・ラブグローブが、不要なものはすべて排除するというデザイン思想について詳しく語り、Ty Nantのウォーター・ボトルやGoチェアなど、彼の非凡な作品について考察します。

- Industrial designer
Known as "Captain Organic," Ross Lovegrove embraces nature as the inspiration for his "fat-free" design. Each object he creates -- be it bottle, chair, staircase or car -- is reduced to its essential elements. His pieces offer minimal forms of maximum beauty. Full bio

My name is Lovegrove. I only know nine Lovegroves,
私はラブグローブと申します
私と姓の同じ知人は9人しかおらず
00:25
two of which are my parents.
しかも うち2人は私の両親です
00:28
They are first cousins, and you know what happens when, you know --
その上 両親はいとこ同士 そういうとき
どういうことが起きるか お分かりですね?
00:30
so there's a terribly weird freaky side to me,
そんなわけで 私には 奇妙で型破りな 面があり―
00:35
which I'm fighting with all the time. So to try and get through today,
常にそんな自分と戦っています
今日のこのプレゼンをやり終えるために―
00:40
I've kind of disciplined myself with an 18-minute talk.
18分の話をするための鍛錬として
トイレに行くのを
00:44
I was hanging on to have a pee.
我慢してみました
00:48
I thought perhaps if I was hanging on long enough,
なんとか長時間我慢できたら
00:49
that would guide me through the 18 minutes.
この18分も耐えられるかもしれないと思ったのです
00:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:54
Okay. I am known as Captain Organic,
では 始めましょう
私は有機的デザインの主導者として知られていますが
00:56
and that's a philosophical position as well as an aesthetic position.
これは 私の哲学的
そして美学的立場を言い表しています
01:02
But today what I'd like to talk to you about is that love of form
しかし今日お話ししようと思っているのは
形に対する愛―
01:07
and how form can touch people's soul and emotion.
そして いかに形が 人の魂や
感情に触れるかということです
01:11
Not very long ago, not many thousands of years ago,
われわれ 人間が洞窟に住んでいたのは
何千年も前というわけではなく
01:17
we actually lived in caves,
さほど昔ではありません
01:22
and I don't think we've lost that coding system.
人間はまだ当時のDNAを
失っていないと思っています
01:24
We respond so well to form,
我々人間は 形にとてもよく反応しますが
01:28
but I'm interested in creating intelligent form.
私の関心は
知的な形の創造にあります
01:31
I'm not interested at all in blobism
私はブロビズムには全く興味がなく―
01:33
or any of that superficial rubbish that you see coming out as design.
デザインという名の下 制作される
うわべだけのガラクタにも興味がありません
01:35
These -- this artificially induced consumerism -- I think it's atrocious.
こういうこと― つまり人工的に誘発された消費主義は
ガラクタだと思います
01:40
My world is the world of people like
私は 例えば アモリー・ロビンスや-
01:45
Amory Lovins, Janine Benyus, James Watson.
ジャニン・ベニュス、ジェームズ・ワトソンなどと
同じ世界に属しています
01:47
I'm in that world, but I work purely instinctively.
そのような世界に属する一方
私は 純粋に本能的に仕事をします
01:52
I'm not a scientist. I could have been, perhaps,
私は 科学者ではありません
なっていたかもしれませんが-
01:55
but I work in this world where I trust my instincts.
しかし私は 己の本能を信じる
この世界で仕事をしています
01:58
So I am a 21st-century translator of technology
言ってみれば
私は 技術というものの21世紀型の翻訳者です
02:01
into products that we use everyday and relate beautifully and naturally with.
技術を 美しく かつ自然に関係をもてるような
生活用品に翻訳するのです
02:08
And we should be developing things --
したがって 我々がなすべきことは―
02:13
we should be developing packaging for ideas which elevate people's perceptions
大地から掘り起こしたものに対する人々の認識と ―
02:15
and respect for the things that we dig out of the earth
敬意を高めるアイデアを
パッケージとして開発し
02:20
and translate into products for everyday use.
生活用品として 翻訳することです
02:24
So, the water bottle.
さて 水のボトルです
02:26
I'll begin with this concept of what I call DNA.
私は DNAと名付けたコンセプトから始めました
02:28
DNA: Design, Nature, Art. These are the three things that condition my world.
DNAとは 私の世界の条件づける3つの要素
デザイン、ネイチャー、アートの略です
02:31
Here is a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci,
これは 500年前の レオナルド・ダ・ビンチの素描で
02:36
500 years ago, before photography.
写真が発明される前の作品です
02:39
It shows how observation, curiosity and instinct work to create amazing art.
この作品は 観察、 好奇心 そして本能が協働しあうと
感嘆すべき作品が生みだされることを示しています
02:41
Industrial design is the art form of the 21st century.
工業デザインは
21世紀の美術形態です
02:50
People like Leonardo -- there have not been many --
レオナルドのような人は
そう多くはいなかったと思いますが
02:52
had this amazingly instinctive curiosity.
驚嘆するほど本能的好奇心をもっていました
私も 同じような立場から-
02:56
I work from a similar position.
デザインします
03:00
I don't want to sound pretentious saying that,
自惚れていると思われたくはないのですが
03:01
but this is my drawing made on a digital pad a couple of years ago --
これは 数年前 私がディジタルパッドで
描いた素描です
03:03
well into the 21st century, 500 years later.
500年後の 21世紀に入りだいぶ経った頃です
03:07
It's my impression of water.
これは 私が水から受けた印象です
03:10
Impressionism being the most valuable art form on the planet as we know it:
ご周知のとおり 印象派は この地球で
とても高価な美術形態で
03:13
100 million dollars, easily, for a Monet.
モネは 1億ドルをゆうに超えます
03:16
I use, now, a whole new process.
数年前 私はプロセスを発明しなおし
今はそれを使っています
03:18
A few years ago I reinvented my process to keep up with people like
グレッグ・リン、 トム・メイン -
03:21
Greg Lynn, Tom Main, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas --
ザハ・ハディッド、 レム・コールハースらに
遅れをとるまいと思ったのです
03:23
all these people that I think are persevering and pioneering
彼らはみな 形を生み出す方法について
03:27
with fantastic new ideas of how to create form.
まったく新しい 素晴らしいアイデアを
粘り強く開拓してきた人たちです
03:30
This is all created digitally.
これは 全てディジタル技術で作りました
03:34
Here you see the machining, the milling of a block of acrylic.
これは アクリル・ブロックを
フライス加工しているところです
03:36
This is what I show to the client to say, "That's what I want to do."
これは 私のアイデアを
クライアントに示すためのものです
03:39
At that point, I don't know if that's possible at all.
この時点では そもそも実現可能か分かりません
03:42
It's a seductor, but I just feel in my bones that that's possible.
クライアントを引きつけるために作ったものですが
直感的に 可能だと確信するのです
03:45
So we go. We look at the tooling. We look at how that is produced.
それで採用を決め
どのように加工 製造するか検討します
03:51
These are the invisible things that you never see in your life.
これは日常 目にすることのない部分で
03:55
This is the background noise of industrial design.
工業デザインの背景雑音といってもよいでしょう
03:57
That is like an Anish Kapoor flowing through a Richard Serra.
これは アニッシュ・カプーアがリチャード・セラに
合流したようなものです
04:00
It is more valuable than the product in my eyes. I don't have one.
私にとって これには製品よりも価値があるのです
04:04
When I do make some money, I'll have one machined for myself.
自分用のがないので
お金が入ったら 1つ加工してもらいます
04:07
This is the final product. When they sent it to me, I thought I'd failed.
これが最終的な製品です
受け取ったとき失敗したと思いました
04:10
It felt like nothing. It has to feel like nothing.
何もないように感じたのです
ただ そうでなければならなかった
04:14
It was when I put the water in that I realized that I'd put a skin on water itself.
水を注いでみて 私は水に皮膚を与えたのだ
と理解しました
04:17
It's an icon of water itself,
このボトルは 水そのものを象徴しており―
04:21
and it elevates people's perception of contemporary design.
現代的なデザインというものに対する
人々の認識を高めてくれます
04:23
Each bottle is different, meaning the water level will give you a different shape.
ボトルはひとつひとつ違います
つまり 中の水の量により全く違う形に見えます
04:27
It's mass individualism from a single product. It fits the hand.
これは 1つの製品による 大量生産可能な個人主義です
手の収まりもいい
04:31
It fits arthritic hands. It fits children's hands.
関節炎の手 子供の手にもよく収まります
04:35
It makes the product strong, the tessellation.
このモザイク状の形は強度を増します
04:37
It's a millefiori of ideas.
アイデアのミッレフィオーリです
04:39
In the future they will look like that, because we need to move away
将来 ボトルの外見は こうなるでしょう
なぜなら今使用しているポリマーを
04:42
from those type of polymers and use that for medical equipment
生活により重要な 医療機器などに
04:46
and more important things, perhaps, in life.
使用しなければならなくなるでしょうから
04:48
Biopolymers, these new ideas for materials,
あと10年もすればバイオポリマーという
新素材に絡むアイデアが
04:51
will come into play in probably a decade.
関与してくるでしょう
04:54
It doesn't look as cool, does it?
前のに比べ あまり格好良くないでしょう?
04:56
But I can live up to that. I don't have a problem with that.
しかし 私は対応できます
これで問題ありません
04:58
I design for that condition, biopolymers. It's the future.
私は そのような前提条件 つまり
バイオポリマーを使う将来に向けデザインします
05:01
I took this video in Cape Town last year.
このビデオは昨年ケープタウンで撮ったもので
05:06
This is the freaky side coming out.
私の変わり者の面が現れています
05:08
I have this special interest in things like this which blow my mind.
私は このような 驚嘆させられるものに
特に興味をもっています
05:10
I don't know whether to, you know, drop to my knees, cry;
私は一体どうすべきなのか―
跪き 嗚咽すべきなのか
05:14
I don't know what I think. But I just know that nature improves
何を考えたらいいのか まるでわからなくなります
私が唯一わかるのは―
05:17
with ever-greater purpose that which once existed,
自然というものは 過去のものよりもさらに大きな
目的に向かって進化を遂げるもので
05:25
and that strangeness is a consequence of innovative thinking.
奇妙さは その革新的思考の結果であるということです
05:30
When I look at these things, they look pretty normal to me.
このようなものを見ても
私の眼にはふつうに見えます
05:33
But these things evolved over many years, and now what we're trying to do --
しかしこれは長年にわたる進化の結果なのです
なのに 私たちは
05:36
I get three weeks to design a telephone.
3週間で電話をデザインしようとしている
05:39
How the hell do I do a telephone in three weeks,
3週間でどうやってデザインする?
05:41
when you get these things that take hundreds of million years to evolve?
生物の進化には何億年もかかるというのに―
どうやって
05:43
How do you condense that?
それを短縮する?
05:47
It comes back to instinct.
そこで 本能に再び戻るのです
05:48
I'm not talking about designing telephones that look like that,
私が話したいのは 電話や建築の
05:50
and I'm not looking at designing architecture like that.
見かけ上のデザインではありません
05:52
I'm just interested in natural growth patterns,
私の関心は 自然の成長パターンにあり
05:55
and the beautiful forms that only nature really creates.
そして 自然だけが作り出せる美しいフォルムにあります
05:57
How that flows through me and how that comes out
それがどのように私の中を流れ出るのか
06:02
is what I'm trying to understand.
それを理解しようと努めています
06:04
This is a scan through the human forearm. It's then blown up through
これは 人間の前腕部のスキャン画像を
ラピッドプロトタイピングで拡大し
06:06
rapid prototyping to reveal the cellular structure. I have these in my office.
細胞構造を明らかにしたものです
私の事務所にもあります
06:10
My office is a mixture of the Natural History Museum and a NASA space lab.
私の事務所は 自然史博物館と
NASAのスペースラボを混ぜたような場所です
06:15
It's a weird, kind of freaky place.
奇妙な 型破りな場所です
06:20
This is one of my specimens.
これは 私の見本の一つです
06:23
This is made -- bone is made from a mixture of inorganic minerals and polymers.
これ つまり骨は 無機物であるミネラルと
ポリマーの混合物でできています
06:25
I studied cooking in school for four years, and in that experience,
私は 4年間調理学校に通ったことがあります
その時の経験で 家政学は
06:33
which was called "domestic science," it was a bit of a cheap trick
ドメスティック サイエンスと呼ばれていて
06:38
for me to try and get a science qualification.
サイエンスの資格をとるための
ちょっとした裏技として通い
06:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:43
Actually, I put marijuana in everything I cooked -- (Laughter)
実際 私が作った料理には
みんなマリファナを入れました(笑)
06:45
-- and I had access to all the best girls. It was fabulous.
素敵な女の子たちもいたし 素晴らしかった
06:49
All the guys in the rugby team couldn't understand, but anyway --
ラグビーチームのやつらは
理解できなかったようです―とにかく
06:51
this is a meringue. This is another sample I have.
これは メレンゲ 別の見本です
06:54
A meringue is made exactly the same way, in my estimation, as a bone.
私の推定では メレンゲは
骨と全く同じ成分でできています
06:56
It's made from polysaccharides and proteins.
メレンゲは多糖類とタンパク質からできています
07:00
If you pour water on that, it dissolves.
水をかけると 溶けます
07:04
Could we be manufacturing from foodstuffs in the future?
将来 私たちは 食べものから
ものを作るようになるんでしょうか?
07:06
Not a bad idea. I don't know. I need to talk to Janine
悪い考えではないですね ジャニーヌや―
07:10
and a few other people about that, but I believe instinctively
ほかの何人かに聞いてみる必要がありますが
私は本能的に-
07:12
that that meringue can become something, a car -- I don't know.
メレンゲは 別のものにもなると思います
例えば自動車? どうでしょう
07:16
I'm also interested in growth patterns:
私は 成長パターンにも興味があります
07:20
the unbridled way that nature grows things so you're not restricted by form at all.
形にまったく束縛されずに
自然が自由にものを育てるパターンに
07:22
These interrelated forms, they do inspire everything I do
このような互いに関連し合った形が
私の仕事すべてにインスピレーションを与えます
07:29
although I might end up making something incredibly simple.
ただ 最終的にはとてもシンプルなものになるかも知れません
07:33
This is a detail of a chair that I've designed in magnesium.
これは マグネシウムを使用してデザインした
椅子の細部です
07:36
It shows this interlocution of elements and the beauty of kind of engineering
これは 要素間の対話 そして技術の美しさ
07:40
and biological thinking, shown pretty much as a bone structure.
さらに生物学的な考え方を
骨の構造として表現したものです
07:45
Any one of those elements you could sort of hang on the wall as some kind of art object.
この部品はどれを取っても 壁にかければ
オブジェになります
07:49
It's the world's first chair made in magnesium.
これは 世界初のマグネシウム製の椅子です
07:53
It cost 1.7 million dollars to develop. It's called "Go" by Bernhardt, USA.
開発には 170万ドルかかりました
これはBernhardtの「Go」という作品です
07:56
It went into Time magazine in 2001
この椅子は 2001年にタイム誌の―
08:01
as the new language of the 21st century.
21世紀の新しい言語として掲載されました
08:05
Boy. For somebody growing up in Wales in a little village, that's enough.
ウェールズの小さな村で育った私にとっては
身に余る光栄でした
08:07
It shows how you make one holistic form, like the car industry,
自動車業界のように―
まず ホリスティックな形をひとつ作り
08:12
and then you break up what you need.
そして必要なものを分解していく
08:15
This is an absolutely beautiful way of working.
これこそ 真に美しく―
08:17
It's a godly way of working.
そして神聖な仕事のやり方です
08:19
It's organic and it's essential.
有機的 かつ本質的です
08:21
It's an absolutely fat-free design, and when you look at it,
余計なものは全て排除したデザインで
08:24
you see human beings. Bless you.
見ると人間の姿が浮かびます
(聴衆のくしゃみに対し)お大事に
08:26
When that moves into polymers, you can change the elasticity, the fluidity of the form.
ポリマーを使い始めると
形に異なった弾性や流動性を与えることができます
08:29
This is an idea for a gas-injected, one-piece polymer chair.
これは ガス圧入法による
一体成形のポリマー製の椅子です
08:35
What nature does is it drills holes in things. It liberates form.
自然は まず物に穴を穿ち
形を束縛から解き放ちます
08:39
It takes away anything extraneous. That's what I do.
そして 不要な部分を取り除きます
それが私のすることです
08:43
I make organic things which are essential.
私は 本質的かつ有機的なものを作ります
08:46
I don't -- and they look funky too -- but
私の椅子も風変わりではありますが
わざと風変わりなものを
08:48
I don't set out to make funky things because I think that's an absolute disgrace.
作ろうとはしません
それは極めて恥ずべきことと思うのです
08:51
I set out to look at natural forms.
私は まず自然に存在する形を観察します
08:54
If you took the idea of fractal technology further, take a membrane,
フラクタル技術の考え方を応用して
膜を取り上げてみましょう
08:57
shrinking it down constantly like nature does --
それを 自然のやり方と同じように
ずっと縮小していくと―
09:01
that could be a seat for a chair;
椅子の座面として使えるかも
09:04
it could be a sole for a sports shoe;
スポーツシューズの靴底や
09:05
it could be a car blending into seats.
または 座席と融合した車には どうでしょう
09:07
Wow. Let's go for it. That's the kind of stuff.
素晴らしい やってみましょう
それが私の目指すものです
09:10
This is what exists in nature. Observation now allows us to
これが 自然の中に存在するものなのです
私たちは 観察を通じて―
09:13
bring that natural process into the design process every day. That's what I do.
自然のプロセスを デザインのプロセスとして
日々取り込むことが可能になりました
09:17
This is a show that's currently on in Tokyo.
これは 現在 東京で開催されているショーです
09:22
It's called "Superliquidity." It's my sculptural investigation.
これは 「超流動」という作品で 私の彫刻による探求です
09:25
It's like 21st-century Henry Moore. When you see a Henry Moore
これは ヘンリー・ムーアの21世紀的表現です
ヘンリー・ムーアを見ると―
09:28
still, your hair stands up. There's some amazing spiritual connect.
今でもゾクッとします
素晴らしい 魂のつながりを感じます
09:32
If he was a car designer, phew, we'd all be driving one.
もし ムーアが車をデザインしたら
みな彼の車に乗っていることでしょう
09:37
In his day, he was the highest taxpayer in Britain.
当時 ムーアは イギリス一の高額納税者でした
09:41
That is the power of organic design.
それが 有機的なデザインの力です
09:44
It contributes immensely to our sense of being,
そのようなデザインは 私たちの存在感や
09:47
our sense of relationships with things,
自分とモノの関係をどのように捉えるか
09:53
our sensuality and, you know, the sort of --
私たちの官能 そして 何と言うべきか―
09:55
even the sort of socio-erotic side, which is very important.
ソシオエロチックな面―とても大事です―
に絶大な影響力を持っています
09:57
This is my artwork. This is all my process.
これが私の作品です
これが 私のプロセスのすべてです
10:01
These actually are sold as artwork.
実際に芸術作品として販売しています
10:04
They're very big prints. But this is how I get to that object.
非常に大きなプリントですが
このようにして私はものを理解します
10:06
Ironically, that object was made by the Killarney process,
皮肉なことに このオブジェは
キラーニー加工により制作しました
10:10
which is a brand-new process here for the 21st century,
これは21世紀に登場した加工法です
10:14
and I can hear Greg Lynn laughing his socks off as I say that.
話しながら グレッグ・リンの爆笑している
姿が眼に浮かびます
10:16
I'll tell you about that later.
それについては後で話します
10:19
When I look into these data images, I see new things.
このようなデータ画像をじっと見ていると
新しいものが見えてきます
10:21
I'm self -- it's self-inspired. Diatomic structures, radiolaria,
私 いやそれは それ自体からインスピレーションを
受けます 昔は観察不能だった―
10:27
the things that we couldn't see but we can do now --
二原子構造や放散虫類は 今は観察できます
10:31
these, again, are cored out. They're made virtually from nothing.
中身はこれもまた空洞で
実質的に「無」で構成されています
10:33
They're made from silica. Why not structures from cars like that?
これは シリカからできています
なぜ車に このような構造を持たせないのでしょう?
10:36
Coral, all these natural forces, take away what they don't need
サンゴのように 自然の力は
不必要なものをすべて取り去り
10:41
and they deliver maximum beauty.
そして 究極の美を実現します
10:46
We need to be in that realm. I want to do stuff like that.
我々はそのような領域にいなければなりません
そういうことを成し遂げたいのです
10:49
This is a new chair which should come on the market in September.
これは 9月に発売予定の新しい椅子です
10:53
It's for a company called Moroso in Italy.
イタリアのMoroso社向けに作りました
10:56
It's a gas-injected polymer chair.
これは ガス圧入によるポリマーの椅子です
10:58
Those holes you see there are very filtered-down,
これらの孔は 二原子構造の端部を―
11:00
watered-down versions of the extremity of the diatomic structures.
高度に単純化し 希釈したバージョンであると言えます
11:03
It goes with the flow of the polymer and you'll see --
この椅子は ポリマーの流動性と良く合います
11:07
there's an image coming up right now that shows the full thing.
今から お見せする写真が 全体像です
11:10
It's great to have companies in Italy who support this way of dreaming.
このような夢を支持してくれる会社が
イタリアに存在するのは 素晴らしいことです
11:13
If you see the shadows that come through that,
椅子を通して見える影―
11:17
they're actually probably more important than the product,
それは 製品そのものより重要かも知れません
11:19
but it's the minimum it takes.
しかし 最小限の必要な部分です
11:21
The coring out of the back lets you breathe.
背に孔を開けることで 風通しになります
11:23
It takes away any material you don't need
不必要な材料はすべて取り除きますが
11:25
and it actually garners flexure too, so --
たわみも吸収します
11:27
I was going to break into a dance then.
当時 私は踊り出してしまうところでした
11:31
This is some current work I'm doing.
これは 現在私が製作中の作品のひとつです
11:34
I'm looking at single-surface structures and how they flow --
1つの表面だけをもつ構造
そしてそれがどのように流れるか
11:36
how they stretch and flow. It's based on furniture typologies,
伸び 流れるかを考えています
家具の類型学を基にしてはいますが
11:39
but that's not the end motivation. It's made from aluminum,
それが最終的なモチベーションではありません
これはアルミニウム製ですが
11:43
as opposed to aluminium, and it's grown.
その性質に相反して 育ったのです
11:50
It's grown in my mind, and then it's grown in terms of
私の頭の中で育ち 私が模索した
11:53
the whole process that I go through.
プロセス全体において育ったのです
11:56
This is two weeks ago in CCP in Coventry, who build parts for Bentleys and so on.
2週間前 ベントレーのパーツを作っている
コヴェントリーのCCPで撮影したものです
11:59
It's being built as we speak,
この話をしている間にも製造されていて
12:04
and it will be on show in Phillips next year in New York.
来年 NYで開催されるPhillipsのショーに
展示します
12:06
I have a big show with Phillips Auctioneers.
Phillips Auctioneersで大きなショーをやります
12:09
When I see these animations, oh Jesus, I'm blown away.
このようなアニメを見ると まったく脱帽します
12:12
This is what goes on in my studio everyday. I walk -- I'm traveling. I come back.
普段 私はスタジオでいつもこんな感じです
歩き ぶらつき 戻ってきます
12:15
Some guy's got that on a computer -- there's this like, oh my goodness.
誰かがこれをコンピュータ上でやりました
驚きです
12:19
So I try to create this energy of invention every day in my studio.
発明のためのエネルギーをスタジオで
生みだそうと毎日試みます
12:22
This kind of effervescent, fully charged sense of soup that delivers ideas.
アイデアの源の「スープ」のような 活気に満ちた
エネルギーにあふれた感覚です
12:26
Single-surface products. Furniture's a good one.
表面を1つしかもたない製品
家具はいい例でしょう
12:33
How you grow legs out of a surface.
表面から脚をどうやって生やすか
12:37
I would love to build this one day, and perhaps I'd like to build it also
いつか作ってみたいと思います
例えば―
12:40
out of flour, sugar, polymer, wood chips --
小麦粉、砂糖、ポリマー、ウッド・チップ
などの材料や 髪の毛を使って
12:42
I don't know, human hair. I don't know. I'd love a go at that.
どうでしょう  やってみたいですね
12:47
I don't know. If I just got some time.
わかりません 時間があったらやってみます
12:49
That's the weird side coming out again,
また私の奇妙な面が現れてきました
12:51
and a lot of companies don't understand that.
この面は 多くの企業に理解されません
12:53
Three weeks ago I was with Sony in Tokyo. They said, "Give us the dream.
3週間前 東京のソニーを訪ね
こう頼まれました 「我が社に夢をくれるかい―
12:55
What is our dream? How do we beat Apple?"
Appleを超える方法を教えてくれ」
12:59
I said, "Well you don't copy Apple, that's for sure."
私は「むろんAppleの真似はダメです」
13:01
I said, "You get into biopolymers." They looked straight through me.
と答え そして こう言いました
「バイオポリマー素材はいかがでしょう」
13:03
What a waste. Anyway. (Laughter)
まるで無視でした
なんという無駄でしょう とにかく(笑)
13:08
No, it's true. Fuck 'em. Fuck 'em. You know, I mean.
いや これは本当です
くそくらえ ソニー くそくらえです
13:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:14
I'm delivering; they're not taking. I've had this image 20 years.
夢を届けたが 受け取らなかった
20年前から持っているこの写真ー
13:16
I've had this image of a water droplet for 20 years sitting on a hot bed.
20年前から加熱した表面に
水滴が乗っています
13:19
That is an image of a car for me.
これは 私にとって車のイメージです
13:23
That's the car of the future. It's a water droplet.
これ つまり 水滴は 将来の車です
車については―
13:25
I've been banging on about this like I can't believe.
とても長い間 ずっと
考えてきました
13:27
Cars are all wrong.
車はすべて間違っています
13:29
I'm going to show you something a bit weird now.
これから 少々奇妙なものを見せようと思います
13:31
They laughed everywhere over the world I showed this.
見せると 世界のどこでも 笑いが起きます
13:33
The only place that didn't laugh was Moscow.
モスクワだけが例外でしたが
13:35
Its cars are made from 30,000 components.
この車は 3万個のパーツからできています
13:37
How ridiculous is that? Couldn't you make that from 300?
ばかばかしい?
300個のパーツでできるでしょう
13:40
It's got a vacuum-formed, carbon-nylon pan. Everything's holistically integrated.
カーボンナイロンの真空形成による皿状ボディーです
全てがホリスティックに統合され
13:46
It opens and closes like a bread bin.
パンのケースのように開け閉めします
13:50
There is no engine. There's a solar panel on the back,
エンジンはなく後ろに太陽光パネルがあり
13:52
and there are batteries in the wheels.
車輪の中にバッテリーが内蔵されています
13:54
They're fitted like Formula One. You take them off your wall.
車輪はF1のようにはめます
壁から外し
13:56
You plug them in. Off you jolly well go.
はめて それで出発となります
13:58
A three-wheeled car: slow, feminine, transparent,
この車は 三輪で 遅く 女性らしく 透明
14:00
so you can see the people in there. You drive different.
だから 中が見える
運転も変わります
14:04
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:06
You see that thing. You do.
あれも見えるでしょう そう 見えます
14:07
You do and not anaesthetized, separated from life.
見えますが 麻痺していない
日常から切り離されています
14:09
There's a hole at the front, and there's a reason for that.
前部には穴が開いている
これには わけがあります
14:12
It's a city car. You drive along. You get out.
これは 都市向けの車なのです
運転して 降り
14:15
You drive on to a proboscis. You get out. It lifts you up.
「鼻」のところに車を寄せ 降りると
「鼻」が車を持ち上げ―
14:19
It presents the solar panel to the sun,
太陽光パネルになります
14:24
and at night it's a street lamp.
夜には街灯になります
14:26
(Applause)
(喝采)
14:28
That's what happens if you get inspired by the street lamp first,
最初に街灯からインスピレーションを受けて
14:32
and then do the car second. These bubbles --
車をデザインするとこうなります
14:34
I can see these bubbles with these hydrogen packages,
このバブルには水素パッケージが入っていて
人工知能制御で―
14:36
floating around on the ground driven by AI.
ふわふわと地面を漂う
そんな様子が目に浮かびます
14:39
When I showed this in South Africa,
これを南アフリカで見せたら
14:44
everybody after was going, "Yeah, hey, car on a stick. Like this."
みんなこう言いました
「棒に車がのってる こんな風に」
14:45
Can you imagine? A car on a stick.
想像できますか? 棒にのっている車を
14:48
If you put it next to contemporary architecture,
現代建築の隣に置くと
14:51
it feels totally natural to me.
私にはとても自然に感じられます
14:54
And that's what I do with my furniture.
家具も同様に扱います
14:56
I'm not putting Charles Eames' furniture in buildings anymore.
イームズの家具を配置したりするのは なしです
14:57
Forget that. We move on.
忘れて下さい 前進するのです
14:59
I'm trying to build furniture that fits architecture.
私は 建築にあった家具や―
15:01
I'm trying to build transportation systems.
交通システムを作ろうとしています
15:03
I work on aircraft for Airbus, the whole thing --
エアバス向けに航空機の仕事をしたり
15:05
I do all this sort of stuff trying to force these natural,
そのように私のやるすべてが
自然からインスピレーションを受けた夢を―
15:07
inspired-by-nature dreams home. I'm going to finish on two things.
あるべきところに戻す試みなのです
2つの話で終えたいと思います
15:11
This is the steriolithography of a staircase.
これは ステレオリソグラフィーによる階段です
15:14
It's a little bit of a dedication to James, James Watson.
これは 少しだけ
ジェームズ・ ワトソンへの献辞としてです
15:17
I built this thing for my studio.
これはスタジオ用に―
15:22
It cost me 250,000 dollars to build this.
製作しましたが25万ドルかかりました
15:23
Most people go and buy the Aston Martin. I built this.
普通ならアストン・マーチンを買いに行くでしょうね
私はこれを作った
15:27
This is the data that goes with that. Incredibly complex.
これはそれに伴うデータで
非常に複雑なものです
15:31
Took about two years, because I'm looking for fat-free design.
約2年間かかりました 余分なものを
すべて排除したデザインを追究したためです
15:34
Lean, efficient things. Healthy products.
スリムで 効率のよい 健康的な作品です
15:38
This is built by composites. It's a single element
これは 複合材でできています
これは一つの要素が―
15:42
which rotates around to create a holistic element,
らせんを描くことで ホリスティックな要素を構成しています
15:45
and this is a carbon-fiber handrail
これは 炭素繊維で出来た手すりで-
15:48
which is only supported in two places.
2箇所でしか支えられていません
15:50
Modern materials allow us to do modern things.
最新の材料を使えば 最新のことが可能です
15:52
This is a shot in the studio.
これは スタジオで取った写真です
15:54
This is how it looks pretty much every day.
たいてい毎日 こんな風に見えます
15:56
You wouldn't want to have a fear of heights coming down it.
降りるときは 高所恐怖症でないほうがいいですね
15:59
There is virtually no handrail. It doesn't pass any standards.
手すりは皆無にひとしく
合格する規格はひとつとしてないでしょう
16:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:06
Who cares?
誰が知ったことか
16:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:10
Yeah, and it has an internal handrail which gives it it's strength. It's this holistic integration.
内側の手すりが強度を与え 
ホリスティックに統合されています
16:11
That's my studio. It's subterranean.
これは 私のスタジオの地下室です
16:14
It's in Notting Hill next to all the crap --
クズに隣接したノッティングヒルにあり―
16:17
you know, the prostitutes and all that stuff.
ご存知でしょう 売春婦などです
16:19
It's next to David Hockney's original studio.
ホックニーの最初のスタジオの隣にあります
16:21
It has a lighting system that changes throughout the day.
一日を通して変化する 照明システムがあります
16:23
My guys go out for lunch. The door's open. They come back in,
みんな外で昼を食べに行くと
ドアは開いていて
16:26
because it's normally raining, and they prefer to stay in.
大抵 雨が降っているので 戻ってきます
中のほうがいいようです
16:28
This is my studio. Elephant skull from Oxford University, 1988.
これがスタジオです
オックスフォード大学の1988年のゾウの頭蓋骨です
16:31
I bought that last year. They're very difficult to find.
昨年買いました
骨は探すのが大変です
16:35
I would -- if anybody's got a whale skeleton they want to sell me,
クジラの骸骨を売りたい人がいたら
売ってください
16:37
I'll put it in the studio.
スタジオに置きますから
16:40
So I'm just going to interject a little bit
これからビデオでお見せするものについて-
16:42
with some of the things that you'll see in the video.
少し話したいと思います
16:45
It's a homemade video, made it myself at three o'clock in the morning
これは 朝の3時にホームビデオで
私が撮影したものです
16:47
just to show you how my real world is. You never see that.
私の本当の世界をお見せしたかった
こんなもの 見られません
16:51
You never see architects or designers showing you their real world.
建築家やデザイナーが
本当の世界を見せることはないですから
16:54
This is called a "Plasnet."
これは 「プラズネット」という作品です
16:57
It's a bio-polycarbonate new chair I'm doing in Italy.
これは 今イタリアで新しくデザインしている
バイオ・ポリカーボネイト製の椅子
16:59
World's first bamboo bike with folding handlebars.
ハンドルが折りたたみ式の
世界初の竹製の自転車です
17:03
We should all be riding one of these.
みんな乗るべきです
17:06
As China buys all these crappy cars,
中国があれだけボロ車を買っているなら―
17:07
we should be riding things like this. Counterbalance.
私たちはこういったもの乗るべきなのです
釣り合いをとるために
17:09
Like I say, it's a cross between Natural History Museum and
すでに申し上げたように 自然史博物館と
17:14
a NASA laboratory. It's full of prototypes and objects.
NASAのラボの合いの子です
プロトタイプやオブジェが無数にあります
17:16
It's self-inspirational again. I mean, the rare times when I'm there,
それ自体からインスピレーションを得ます
珍しくいるときは―
17:21
I do enjoy it. And I get lots of kids coming --
楽しみます
子供たちもたくさん遊びに来ます
17:24
lots and lots of kids coming.
本当に大勢の子供が来ます
17:28
I'm a contaminator for all those children of investment bankers -- wankers.
私は 投資銀行のアホどもの
息子を「汚し」ます
17:30
This -- sorry -- (Laughter)
いや 失礼(笑)
17:35
-- that's a solar seed. It's a concept for new architecture.
これは ソーラー・シードです
新しい建築のコンセプトです
17:38
That thing on the top is the world's first solar-powered garden lamp --
上にあるのは 世界で初めて製造された
太陽光発電のガーデン ランプです
17:41
the first produced. Giles Revell should be talking here today --
ジャイルス・レヴェルが 今日ここに来て
話してくれるはずですが―
17:45
amazing photography of things you can't see.
肉眼では見えない素晴らしいものの写真です
17:49
The first sculptural model I made for that thing in Tokyo.
初めて製作した 東京のあの作品の彫刻によるモデルです
17:51
Lots of stuff. There's a little leaf chair -- that golden looking thing is called "Leaf."
いろいろあります リーフ・チェアも
あの小さな金色のものは
17:58
It's made from Kevlar.
「リーフ」といいます
ケブラー製です
18:01
On the wall is my book called "Supernatural,"
壁にあるのは
「スーパーナチュラル」という私が書いた本で
18:03
which allows me to remember what I've done, because I forget.
過去の忘れがちな仕事を思い出させます
18:06
There's an aerated brick I did in Limoges last year,
これは「建築の新しいセラミックスのコンセプト」に
出展した―
18:08
in Concepts for New Ceramics in Architecture.
昨年リモージュで製作した気泡性レンガです
18:11
[Unclear], working at three o'clock in the morning --
朝の3時には働いていますが―
18:17
and I don't pay overtime.
残業代は払いません
18:20
Overtime is the passion of design, so join the club or don't. (Laughter)
デザインへの情熱が残業代です
仲間に入るか、入らないか どちらかです(笑)
18:22
No, it's true. It's true. People like Tom and Greg --
本当です トムやグレッグ―我々は
18:29
we're traveling like you can't -- we fit it all in. I don't know how we do it.
到底可能とは思えないスケジュールで移動します
どうやっているのかよく分かりません
18:31
Next week I'm at Electrolux in Sweden,
来週は スウェーデンの Electroluxです
18:36
then I'm in Beijing on Friday. You work that one out.
金曜日には北京です
移動の調整がほんとうに大変です
18:38
And when I see Ed's photographs I think,
エドの写真を見ると―
18:41
why the hell am I going to China? It's true.
私は一体なぜ中国に行くんだろう と思います
いや 本当に
18:43
It's true. Because there's a soul in this whole thing.
本当です このすべてのものには魂があり―
18:46
We need to have a new instinct for the 21st century.
私たちは21世紀のために
新しい本能を持ち備える必要があり
18:49
We need to combine all this stuff.
これら全てを組み合わせる必要があります
18:53
If all the people who were talking over this period
このセッションで話をした人たちがみな
18:55
worked on a car together, it would be a joy, absolute joy.
一緒になって車を作ったら
なんという喜びでしょうか
18:57
So there's a new X-light system I'm doing in Japan.
日本でやる 新しいXライト システム(超軽量自転車)があり―
19:03
There's Tuareg shoes from North Africa. There's a Kifwebe mask.
北アフリカのトゥアレグの靴や
キフウエベの仮面があります
19:07
These are my sculptures.
これは私が製作した彫刻
19:12
A copper jelly mold.
銅でできたゼリー型
19:14
It sounds like some quiz show or something, doesn't it?
クイズショーか何かみたいですね
19:18
So, it's going to end.
そろそろ終わりにします
19:22
Thank you, James, for your great inspiration.
ジェームズ
インスピレーションをありがとう
19:26
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
19:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:36
Translated by Akiko Uchida
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Ross Lovegrove - Industrial designer
Known as "Captain Organic," Ross Lovegrove embraces nature as the inspiration for his "fat-free" design. Each object he creates -- be it bottle, chair, staircase or car -- is reduced to its essential elements. His pieces offer minimal forms of maximum beauty.

Why you should listen

Ross Lovegrove is truly a pioneer of industrial design. As founder of Studio X in the Notting Hill area of London, the Welsh-born designer has exuberantly embraced the potential offered by digital technologies. However, he blends his love of high tech with a belief that the natural world had the right idea all along: Many of his pieces are inspired by principles of evolution and microbiology.

Delightedly crossing categories, Lovegrove has worked for clients as varied as Apple, Issey Miyake, Herman Miller and Airbus, and in 2005 he was awarded the World Technology Award for design. His personal artwork has been exhibited at MoMA in New York, the Pompidou Centre in Paris and the Design Museum in London. Lovegrove's astonishing objects are the result of an ongoing quest to create forms that, as he puts it, touch people's soul.

More profile about the speaker
Ross Lovegrove | Speaker | TED.com