21:00
TEDSalon NY2013

Bob Mankoff: Anatomy of a New Yorker cartoon

ボブ・マンコフ: 『ニューヨーカー』のマンガの分析

Filmed:

『ニューヨーカー』の編集部には毎週1000通のマンガが舞いこみます。その中から採用されるのは17枚ほどしかありません。この爆笑ものの、テンポのよい、深い洞察に満ちた講演で、この雑誌で長年マンガエディターを務める自称「ユーモアアナリスト」のボブ・マンコフが『ニューヨーカー』の「アイデア図」に描かれる笑いを解剖し、何がおもしろく何がそうでないのか、その理由を話します。

- Cartoon editor
Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker, as well as an accomplished cartoonist in his own right. Full bio

I'm going to be talking about designing humor,
これからユーモアのつくり方について
お話ししましょう
00:12
which is sort of an interesting thing, but it goes
これは興味深いことですが
00:14
to some of the discussions about constraints,
それに関わる制約や
00:16
and how in certain contexts, humor is right,
なぜユーモアが状況によって笑えたり
00:20
and in other contexts it's wrong.
笑えないかについてもお話しします
00:22
Now, I'm from New York,
さて 私はニューヨークの人間なので
00:24
so it's 100 percent satisfaction here.
これは100%面白い
00:27
Actually, that's ridiculous, because when it comes to humor,
でも 実際ありえないことです
ユーモアというものは
00:30
75 percent is really absolutely the best you can hope for.
75%も面白いと言えば
最高といったところだからです
00:34
Nobody is ever satisfied 100 percent with humor
100%ユーモアに満足する人などいません
00:37
except this woman.
この人以外は
00:42
(Video) Woman: (Laughs)
(笑い声)
00:45
Bob Mankoff: That's my first wife.
最初の妻です
01:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:03
That part of the relationship went fine.
この辺りは 二人うまくいったのですがね
01:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:08
Now let's look at this cartoon.
さて このマンガを見てみましょう
01:12
One of the things I'm pointing out is that
ここで 重要なのは
01:15
cartoons appear within the context
これらのマンガは『ニューヨーカー』のページ上で
01:17
of The New Yorker magazine,
読者の目に入るということです
01:19
that lovely Caslon type, and it seems
このエレガントな書体に囲まれて
01:21
like a fairly benign cartoon within this context.
このページ上では
特に問題もないマンガに思えます
01:23
It's making a little bit fun of getting older,
老いることを少々からかったもので
01:26
and, you know, people might like it.
大方皆が楽しめるものでしょう
01:28
But like I said, you cannot satisfy everyone.
しかし 先ほど言ったように
全員を満足させるのは無理です
01:30
You couldn't satisfy this guy.
この男性はだめでした
01:33
"Another joke on old white males. Ha ha. The wit.
「また老人ネタのジョークか
笑えるね
01:35
It's nice, I'm sure to be young and rude,
年寄りを馬鹿にして楽しいだろう
01:38
but some day you'll be old, unless you drop dead as I wish."
でも 君だっていつか歳をとるんだ 
途中で死ななければいいけどね
01:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:43
The New Yorker is rather a sensitive environment,
『ニューヨーカー』では気をつけないと
01:47
very easy for people to get their nose out of joint.
簡単に読者の気分を損ねることになります
01:50
And one of the things that you realize
お分かりいただけると思いますが
01:53
is it's an unusual environment.
これは特殊な環境なんです
01:56
Here I'm one person talking to you.
今 ここでは皆さんは私の話を聞いて
01:58
You're all collective. You all hear each other laugh and know each other laugh.
集団ですから 周りの笑い声から
皆笑っているのが分かります
02:00
In The New Yorker, it goes out to a wide audience,
『ニューヨーカー』の場合
雑誌は様々な読者の手に渡り
02:04
and when you actually look at that,
ひとりで読んでいても
02:08
and nobody knows what anybody else is laughing at,
他の誰が何を見て
笑っているかわかりません
02:10
and when you look at that the subjectivity involved in humor
それを考えると
ユーモア解釈に関わる読者の主観が
02:13
is really interesting.
実に興味深いものになります
02:17
Let's look at this cartoon.
こちらのマンガを見てみましょう
02:18
"Discouraging data on the antidepressant."
「抗ウツ剤についての悲しいデータ」
02:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:22
Indeed, it is discouraging.
本当にこれは悲しいことです
02:24
Now, you would think, well, look,
さて この会場では これを見て
02:27
most of you laughed at that.
ほとんど全員が笑っていますね
02:29
Right? You thought it was funny.
皆 面白いと感じたわけです
02:31
In general, that seems like a funny cartoon,
一般的には これは笑えるマンガです
02:32
but let's look what online survey I did.
でも オンライン調査の
結果を見てみましょう
02:34
Generally, about 85 percent of the people liked it.
面白いと答えたのは
全体の約85%
02:37
A hundred and nine voted it a 10, the highest. Ten voted it one.
109人が最高評価の10を
10人が1をつけました
02:39
But look at the individual responses.
ただ個々の反応を見てください
02:43
"I like animals!!!!!" Look how much they like them.
「動物大好き!!!!!」 
この動物への愛情を見てください
02:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:47
"I don't want to hurt them. That doesn't seem very funny to me."
「動物を虐待したくない
これは面白いとは思えない」
02:51
This person rated it a two.
この人は2をつけました
02:54
"I don't like to see animals suffer -- even in cartoons."
「動物が苦しむのは見たくない―
たとえマンガであっても」
02:56
To people like this, I point out we use anesthetic ink.
このような人には 麻酔インクで印刷
していると伝えます
03:00
Other people thought it was funny.
他の人々はこれを面白いと思いました
03:05
That actually is the true nature of the distribution of humor
これがユーモアの分布の本質で
03:07
when you don't have the contagion of humor.
ユーモアがうまく拡散しないときには
こうなります
03:10
Humor is a type of entertainment.
ユーモアは一種の娯楽です
03:14
All entertainment contains a little frisson of danger,
あらゆる娯楽には
ちょっとしたスリルが伴います
03:16
something that might happen wrong,
何か良くないことが起こるかもしれない
03:20
and yet we like it when there's protection.
それでも安全策があれば楽しめます
03:22
That's what a zoo is. It's danger. The tiger is there.
動物園も同じです 危険です
トラがすぐそこにいるのです
03:24
The bars protect us. That's sort of fun, right?
檻があるから 安心して楽しめますね?
03:27
That's a bad zoo.
こんな動物園はつまらない
03:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:33
It's a very politically correct zoo, but it's a bad zoo.
動物愛好家には良い動物園ですが
行ってもおもしろくありません
03:35
But this is a worse one.
でも これはもっとひどい
03:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:42
So in dealing with humor in the context of The New Yorker,
『ニューヨーカー』の環境で
ユーモアを扱う時
03:45
you have to see, where is that tiger going to be?
トラをどこに置くか
考える必要があります
03:50
Where is the danger going to exist?
危険をどこに仕組み
03:52
How are you going to manage it?
どうやってコントロールするか?
03:54
My job is to look at 1,000 cartoons a week.
私の仕事は毎週
1000枚のマンガを審査することです
03:56
But The New Yorker only can take 16 or 17 cartoons,
『ニューヨーカー』に載せられるのは
16枚か17枚
04:00
and we have 1,000 cartoons.
でも 全部で1000もあるのです
04:05
Of course, many, many cartoons must be rejected.
もちろん沢山のマンガを
ボツにしなくてはなりません
04:06
Now, we could fit more cartoons in the magazine
雑誌から記事を減らしたら
04:09
if we removed the articles.
もっとマンガを載せられるのですが
04:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:14
But I feel that would be a huge loss,
しかし それは大きな損失になるでしょう
04:18
one I could live with, but still huge.
耐えられはしますが 大きな損失です
04:23
Cartoonists come in through the magazine every week.
毎週 新しい漫画家が作品を送ってきます
04:27
The average cartoonist who stays with the magazine
本誌に投稿を続ける漫画家は
04:30
does 10 or 15 ideas every week.
週に10から15のアイデアを送ってきますが
04:32
But they mostly are going to be rejected.
そのほとんどがボツになります
04:34
That's the nature of any creative activity.
それが創造活動というものです
04:37
Many of them fade away. Some of them stay.
多くの人が去り 一部が残ります
04:40
Matt Diffee is one of them.
マット・ディフィーはその一人です
04:44
Here's one of his cartoons.
これは彼の作品です
04:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:47
Drew Dernavich. "Accounting night at the improv."
ドリュー・ダーナビッチ
「会計士の即興コメディー」
04:53
"Now is the part of the show when we ask the audience
「さあ ここで聴衆のみなさんには
04:56
to shout out some random numbers."
適当な数字を叫んでもらいましょう」
04:58
Paul Noth. "He's all right. I just wish he were a little more pro-Israel."
ポール・ノス「彼は良さそうだ
もう少しイスラエル寄りなら良いのだが」
05:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:07
Now I know all about rejection,
ボツになる苦しみはよくわかります
05:12
because when I quit -- actually, I was booted out of -- psychology school
心理学の勉強をあきらめ―
正確には学校から追い出されて
05:14
and decided to become a cartoonist, a natural segue,
マンガ家になろうと決めたとき
自然な流れでしたが
05:18
from 1974 to 1977 I submitted 2,000 cartoons to The New Yorker,
1974から1977年の間に
2000枚のマンガを『ニューヨーカー』に送り
05:22
and got 2,000 cartoons rejected by The New Yorker.
全部ボツにされました
こんなボツの通知を 何枚も受け取りましたが―
05:27
At a certain point, this rejection slip, in 1977 --
(残念ながら 採用となりませんでした
投稿ありがとうございました)
05:31
[We regret that we are unable to use the enclosed material. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to consider it.] —
(残念ながら 採用となりませんでした
投稿ありがとうございました)
05:36
magically changed to this.
1977年に突然こんなのを受け取ったのです
05:37
[Hey! You sold one. No shit! You really sold a cartoon to the fucking New Yorker magazine.]
(おぃ!採用だぜ まじで あんたのマンガが
あの『ニューヨーカー』に載るんだぜ)
05:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:42
Now of course that's not what happened,
もちろん実際は違いますが
05:44
but that's the emotional truth.
気持ちとしてはこのような感じです
05:47
And of course, that is not New Yorker humor.
もちろん 『ニューヨーカー』のユーモアとも違います
05:51
What is New Yorker humor?
『ニューヨーカー』のユーモアとは?
05:54
Well, after 1977, I broke into The New Yorker and started selling cartoons.
1977年にマンガが『ニューヨーカー』に
掲載されるようになり
05:55
Finally, in 1980, I received the revered
1980年には おそれおおくも
06:00
New Yorker contract,
『ニューヨーカー』と契約を結びました
06:03
which I blurred out parts because it's none of your business.
中身はぼかしてあります
皆さんには関係ありませんからね
06:05
From 1980. "Dear Mr. Mankoff, confirming the agreement
1980年にもらった契約書です
「マンコフ様
06:09
there of -- " blah blah blah blah -- blur --
この度は―なんとかかんとか―
06:13
"for any idea drawings."
アイデアスケッチについて
契約を結びます」
06:15
With respect to idea drawings, nowhere in the contract
この「アイデアスケッチ」ですが
契約のどこにも
06:19
is the word "cartoon" mentioned.
「マンガ」という言葉は見当たりません
06:22
The word "idea drawings," and that's the sine qua non of New Yorker cartoons.
実は「アイデアスケッチ」なしに
『ニューヨーカー』のマンガはありえません
06:24
So what is an idea drawing? An idea drawing is something
では アイデアスケッチとは何でしょうか?
06:29
that requires you to think.
それは見る人に考えさせるものです
06:33
Now that's not a cartoon. It requires thinking
これはマンガとは違います
06:36
on the part of the cartoonist and thinking on your part
マンガ家の思考に
あなたの考えが合わさって
06:39
to make it into a cartoon.
初めてマンガになるのです
06:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:44
Here are some, generally you get my cast of cartoon mind.
これを見れば私のいうマンガが
どういうものかわかるでしょう
06:50
"There is no justice in the world. There is some justice in the world. The world is just."
「世界は不公平だ
この世界は正しいとも言える
この世界はすばらしい」
06:55
This is What Lemmings Believe.
これは「レミングの考え」です (笑)
07:01
(Laughter)
これは「レミングの考え」です (笑)
07:03
The New Yorker and I, when we made comments,
『ニューヨーカー』と私はコメントをつけました
07:09
the cartoon carries a certain ambiguity about what it actually is.
マンガはその意味に曖昧さを残しているものです
07:12
What is it, the cartoon? Is it really about lemmings?
このマンガの意味は? 
レミングについてのものか?
07:17
No. It's about us.
いいえ 私たちについてです
07:19
You know, it's my view basically about religion,
例えば 宗教についての私の基本的な考えは
07:21
that the real conflict and all the fights between religion
宗教間の紛争や論争は全て
07:24
is who has the best imaginary friend.
誰の空想上の友達が一番か
という争いだと思うのです
07:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:32
And this is my most well-known cartoon.
これが私の最も有名なマンガです
07:37
"No, Thursday's out. How about never — is never good for you?"
「いいえ 木曜日はだめです
どうでしょう―いっそ会わないというのは?」
07:39
It's been reprinted thousands of times, totally ripped off.
何千回もコピーされました 勝手にね
07:43
It's even on thongs,
女性の下着にまで
07:45
but compressed to "How about never — is never good for you?"
「どうでしょう―いっそ会わないというのは?」
この部分だけでしたが
07:48
Now these look like very different forms of humor
これらは全く違う形のユーモアに見えますが
07:54
but actually they bear a great similarity.
実は非常に似通っています
07:58
In each instance, our expectations are defied.
どちらも私たちの期待を裏切ります
08:00
In each instance, the narrative gets switched.
どちらもストーリーが予期せぬ展開をします
08:05
There's an incongruity and a contrast.
不一致と対比があるのです
08:08
In "No, Thursday's out. How about never — is never good for you?"
「木曜日はだめです どうでしょう―
いっそ会わないというのは?」の中では
08:11
what you have is the syntax of politeness
慇懃さと無礼さが同じ文の中に
08:14
and the message of being rude.
同居しています
08:16
That really is how humor works. It's a cognitive synergy
これがユーモアのしくみです
相容れない2つのものを
08:19
where we mash up these two things which don't go together
まぜあわせるという認識の相乗効果で
08:22
and temporarily in our minds exist.
一時的に読者の頭の中に存在させるのです
08:26
He is both being polite and rude.
彼は慇懃であり無礼なのです
08:28
In here, you have the propriety of The New Yorker
ここには『ニューヨーカー』の誠実さと
08:31
and the vulgarity of the language.
言葉の失礼さがあります
08:34
Basically, that's the way humor works.
これがユーモアのしくみです
08:36
So I'm a humor analyst, you would say.
私はユーモアアナリストだといえますね
08:38
Now E.B. White said, analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog.
E.B.ホワイトは ユーモアの分析は
カエルの解剖のようなものだと言いました
08:41
Nobody is much interested, and the frog dies.
あまり意味のない事をやって
カエルを殺すだけです
08:44
Well, I'm going to kill a few, but there won't be any genocide.
私も何匹かは殺しますが
大量虐殺はしません
08:47
But really, it makes me —
でも結果として ―
08:52
Let's look at this picture. This is an interesting picture,
この絵を見てください
08:54
The Laughing Audience.
笑う観客
08:56
There are the people, fops up there,
大勢の人と しゃれた男が上にいますね
08:58
but everybody is laughing, everybody is laughing
全員が笑っています 全員
08:59
except one guy.
たった一人を除いて
09:02
This guy. Who is he? He's the critic.
この男です 誰なのか? 批判者です
09:05
He's the critic of humor,
ユーモアを批判する人です
09:09
and really I'm forced to be in that position,
私はこの立場にいなければならないのです
09:12
when I'm at The New Yorker, and that's the danger
『ニューヨーカー』にいると危ないのがこれです
09:15
that I will become this guy.
この男のようになってしまうのです
09:18
Now here's a little video made by Matt Diffee, sort of
マット・ディフィー作の短編ビデオがあります
09:23
how they imagine if we really exaggerated that.
大げさにするとこんな感じになります
09:26
(Video) Bob Mankoff: "Oooh, no.
ボブ・マンコフ「あーだめだ」
09:30
Ehhh.
うえぇ
09:33
Oooh. Hmm. Too funny.
おぉ うーん 面白すぎる
09:36
Normally I would but I'm in a pissy mood.
普段ならいいけど 今イライラしているんだ
09:45
I'll enjoy it on my own. Perhaps.
ひとりで楽しむとするか たぶんね
09:49
No. Nah. No.
だめ これも だめ
09:52
Overdrawn. Underdrawn.
やりすぎ 出来が悪すぎ
09:55
Drawn just right, still not funny enough.
絵はいいが面白さが足りない
09:58
No. No.
だめ だめ
10:01
For God's sake no, a thousand times no.
ありえない 全くだめだ
10:04
(Music)
(音楽)
10:08
No. No. No. No. No. [Four hours later]
だめ だめ だめ だめ だめ [4時間後]
10:11
Hey, that's good, yeah, whatcha got there?
おや これはいいぞ 何持ってきたんだ?
10:17
Office worker: Got a ham and swiss on rye?BM: No.
同僚「ライ麦パンのハムチーズサンド?」
ボブ・マンコフ「いいや」
10:21
Office worker: Okay. Pastrami on sourdough?BM: No.
同僚「そうか パストラミサンド?」
ボブ「いいや」
10:23
Office worker: Smoked turkey with bacon?BM: No.
同僚「スモークターキーとベーコンサンド?」
ボブ「いいや」
10:26
Office worker: Falafel?BM: Let me look at it.
同僚「ファラフェル?」
ボブ「ちょっと見せてくれ」
10:28
Eh, no.
あぁ いや
10:30
Office worker: Grilled cheese?BM: No.
同僚「グリルチーズサンド?」
ボブ「いいや」
10:31
Office worker: BLT?BM: No.
同僚「BLTか?」
ボブ「ちがう」
10:33
Office worker: Black forest ham and mozzarella with apple mustard?BM: No.
同僚「ハムとモッツァレラとアップルマスタードサンド?」
ボブ「いいや」
10:34
Office worker: Green bean salad?BM: No.
同僚「インゲンサラダ?」
ボブ「いいや」
10:36
(Music)
(音楽)
10:39
No. No.
だめ だめ
10:41
Definitely no. [Several hours after lunch]
全くだめ [ランチから数時間後]
10:43
(Siren)
(サイレン)
10:46
No. Get out of here.
だめだ さっさと行ってくれ
11:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:11
That's sort of an exaggeration of what I do.
私の仕事を誇張したものですが
11:12
Now, we do reject, many, many, many cartoons,
確かにたくさんのマンガをボツにします
11:16
so many that there are many books called "The Rejection Collection."
数が多すぎて
「ボツコレクション」なる本が多く出るほどです
11:19
"The Rejection Collection" is not quite New Yorker kind of humor.
「ボツコレクション」は 『ニューヨーカー』には
少々そぐわないタイプのユーモアです
11:22
And you might notice the bum on the sidewalk here
歩道のホームレスにお気づきでしょうか
11:26
who is boozing and his ventriloquist dummy is puking.
飲んだくれて 腹話術の人形が吐いています
11:29
See, that's probably not going to be New Yorker humor.
これは『ニューヨーカー』の
ユーモアにはならないでしょうね
11:33
It's actually put together by Matt Diffee, one of our cartoonists.
実はこれは 本誌の漫画家
マット・ディフィーの編集したものです
11:35
So I'll give you some examples of rejection collection humor.
ボツコレクションのユーモアをいくつかご紹介しましょう
11:38
"I'm thinking about having a child."
「子どもが欲しいんだ」
11:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:46
There you have an interesting -- the guilty laugh,
興味深い―ためらいのある笑いですね
11:51
the laugh against your better judgment.
良識に反した笑いです
11:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:58
"Ass-head. Please help."
「何もシリません お助けを」
12:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:04
Now, in fact, within a context of this book,
この本が意図する
12:06
which says, "Cartoons you never saw and never will see
「『ニューヨーカー』では
絶対お目にかかれないマンガ」
12:10
in The New Yorker," this humor is perfect.
という意味ではこのユーモアは完璧です
12:13
I'm going to explain why.
ご説明しましょう
12:16
There's a concept about humor about it being
ユーモアのコンセプトには
12:17
a benign violation.
無害な違反という考えがあります
12:19
In other words, for something to be funny, we've got to think
つまり 何かが面白くあるためには
12:21
it's both wrong and also okay at the same time.
間違ってはいるが 許されることが必要です
12:23
If we think it's completely wrong, we say, "That's not funny."
完全に間違っている場合には
「それはだめだ」と私たちは言うでしょう
12:27
And if it's completely okay, what's the joke? Okay?
完全に許されるものには
何がおかしいのか?ということになりますね
12:30
And so, this benign, that's true of "No, Thursday's out. How about never — is never good for you?"
「木曜日はだめです どうでしょう」は無害です
でも「いっそ会わないというのは?」は失礼です
12:34
It's rude. The world really shouldn't be that way.
ありえない組み合わせなのですが
12:39
Within that context, we feel it's okay.
この場面においては
これで良いと感じるわけです
12:41
So within this context, "Asshead. Please help"
このコレクションの中では
「何もシリません お助けを」
12:44
is a benign violation.
これは許される違反です
12:47
Within the context of The New Yorker magazine ...
でも これをニューヨーカーに載せるとなると...
12:49
"T-Cell Army: Can the body's immune response
「T細胞の軍隊:体の免疫反応はガン治癒に有用か?」
12:54
help treat cancer?" Oh, goodness.
おやまあ
12:57
You're reading about this smart stuff,
こんな難い記事を
13:01
this intelligent dissection of the immune system.
免疫システムの知性あふれる分析を読んでいて
13:05
You glance over at this, and it says,
ふと目をやると なんと
13:09
"Asshead. Please help"? God.
「何もシリません お助けを」ですって?
13:13
So there the violation is malign. It doesn't work.
この違反は許されません
うまくいきませんね
13:18
There is no such thing as funny in and of itself.
どんな場面でも面白いなどというものはありません
13:22
Everything will be within the context and our expectations.
全ては状況に左右され
私たちの想定内のものなのです
13:25
One way to look at it is this.
ひとつの見方はこうです
13:29
It's sort of called a meta-motivational theory about how we look,
これは私たちの見方による
動機付けのようなもので
13:33
a theory about motivation and the mood we're in
モチベーションと気分の問題です
13:37
and how the mood we're in determines the things we like
自分の気分によって
好き嫌いが左右される
13:39
or dislike.
というものです
13:42
When we're in a playful mood, we want excitement.
遊び心があるときは刺激を求めます
13:44
We want high arousal. We feel excited then.
ドキドキさせられることに
楽しみを感じます
13:48
If we're in a purposeful mood, that makes us anxious.
同じものでも真面目なムードでは
不安を招きます
13:51
"The Rejection Collection" is absolutely in this field.
「ボツコレクション」は間違いなく
この部類のマンガです
13:54
You want to be stimulated. You want to be aroused.
刺激を受けたい時があります
13:59
You want to be transgressed.
違反してはみだしたいのです
14:02
It's like this, like an amusement park.
こんな感じ 遊園地のようなものです
14:06
Voice: Here we go. (Screams)
声:いくぞ(歓声)
14:11
He laughs. He is both in danger and safe,
彼は笑っています 危険であり安全な場所にいて
14:20
incredibly aroused. There's no joke. No joke needed.
強い刺激をうけているのです
ジョークはいりません 必要ないのです
14:24
If you arouse people enough and get them stimulated enough,
人は刺激され 興奮状態になると
14:27
they will laugh at very, very little.
何にでも笑い出します
14:30
This is another cartoon from "The Rejection Collection."
これは「ボツコレクション」の別のマンガです
14:32
"Too snug?"
「きつすぎる?」
14:35
That's a cartoon about terrorism.
これはテロについてのマンガです
14:39
The New Yorker occupies a very different space.
『ニューヨーカー』の雰囲気は独特です
14:41
It's a space that is playful in its own way, and also purposeful,
独自の遊び心もあれば 真面目でもある
14:45
and in that space, the cartoons are different.
その様な場に載せるマンガは
独特なものになります
14:48
Now I'm going to show you cartoons The New Yorker did
『ニューヨーカー』が9/11直後に出した
マンガをお見せしましょう
14:52
right after 9/11, a very, very sensitive area when humor could be used.
ユーモアにするには非常にデリケートな領域です
14:54
How would The New Yorker attack it?
『ニューヨーカー』はどうしたのか?
14:59
It would not be with a guy with a bomb saying, "Too snug?"
爆弾をもった男が「きつすぎる?」と
いうわけにはいきません
15:00
Or there was another cartoon I didn't show because
お見せしなかった別のマンガもあります
15:05
actually I thought maybe people would be offended.
気を悪くする人がいるかと思ったので
15:07
The great Sam Gross cartoon, this happened
すばらしいサム・グロスのマンガで
15:11
after the Muhammad controversy where it's Muhammad in heaven,
ムハンマドの議論のあとに出されました
ムハンマドは天国にいて
15:15
the suicide bomber is all in little pieces,
自爆者がこまぎれになっており
15:19
and he's saying to the suicide bomber,
ムハンマドが自爆者に言うのです
15:21
"You'll get the virgins when we find your penis."
「きみのペニスを見つけたら乙女が待ってるよ」
15:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:27
Better left undrawn.
絵にしないほうがいいでしょう
15:31
The first week we did no cartoons.
テロの起きた週はマンガの掲載は
休みました
15:34
That was a black hole for humor, and correctly so.
ユーモアの出る幕ではなく
実にそうでした
15:37
It's not always appropriate every time.
いつもユーモアが良いわけではありません
15:40
But the next week, this was the first cartoon.
しかし翌週には最初のマンガを載せました
15:43
"I thought I'd never laugh again. Then I saw your jacket."
「二度と笑えるとは思わなかった
あなたの服を見るまでは」
15:46
It basically was about, if we were alive,
これはつまり 生きていれば
15:51
we were going to laugh. We were going to breathe.
笑うこともあるし 息もする
15:54
We were going to exist. Here's another one.
存在していくということです
これは別のマンガです
15:56
"I figure if I don't have that third martini, then the terrorists win."
「3杯目のマティーニを飲まなきゃ
テロリストの勝ちだと気づいたんだ」
15:58
These cartoons are not about them. They're about us.
これらはテロ犯についてではなく
私たちについての話です
16:03
The humor reflects back on us.
ユーモアが私たちの姿を反映しているのです
16:07
The easiest thing to do with humor, and it's perfectly legitimate,
もっとも簡単なユーモアは
正当なものではありますが
16:09
is a friend makes fun of an enemy.
味方が敵をからかうものです
16:13
It's called dispositional humor.
傾向性のユーモアといわれます
16:17
It's 95 percent of the humor. It's not our humor.
ユーモアの95%はこれです
私たちのものとは違います
16:19
Here's another cartoon.
もう1つお見せしましょう
16:22
"I wouldn't mind living in a fundamentalist Islamic state."
「イスラム原理主義者の国に住みたいものだね」
16:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:28
Humor does need a target.
ユーモアにはターゲットが必要です
16:37
But interestingly, in The New Yorker, the target is us.
興味深いことに
『ニューヨーカー』のターゲットは私たちです
16:42
The target is the readership and the people who do it.
ターゲットとは読者であり ユーモアの作り手です
16:46
The humor is self-reflective
ユーモアは自己の反映で
16:48
and makes us think about our assumptions.
自分の思いこみについて考えさせてくれます
16:51
Look at this cartoon by Roz Chast, the guy reading the obituary.
ロズ・チェイストのマンガをご覧ください
男性が死亡記事を読んでいます
16:53
"Two years younger than you, 12 years older than you,
「2歳年下 12歳年上
16:57
three years your junior, your age on the dot,
3年後輩 ぴったり同い年
17:00
exactly your age."
まさしく同い年」
17:03
That is a deeply profound cartoon.
これは非常に深いマンガです
17:05
And so The New Yorker is also trying to, in some way,
『ニューヨーカー』はある意味で
17:09
make cartoons say something besides funny
マンガに面白さだけでなく
私たち自身について
17:13
and something about us. Here's another one.
語らせているのです
もうひとつ お見せしましょう
17:17
"I started my vegetarianism for health reasons,
「健康のためにベジタリアンなったの
17:19
Then it became a moral choice, and now it's just to annoy people."
それから道徳的な選択としてね
今はただ人をいらつかせたいからよ」
17:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:25
"Excuse me — I think there's something wrong with this
「すみません ―
これちょっとおかしいと思うんです
17:30
in a tiny way that no one other than me would ever be able to pinpoint."
わたし以外 絶対指摘できないような
細かいことなんですけど」
17:33
So it focuses on our obsessions, our narcissism,
これは他の誰でもなく
私たちのこだわり ナルシシズム
17:39
our foils and our foibles, really not someone else's.
欠点やうぬぼれをあらわしています
17:43
The New Yorker demands
『ニューヨーカー』は読者に
17:47
some cognitive work on your part,
なんらかの知的作業を求めているのです
17:50
and what it demands is what Arthur Koestler,
ユーモア 芸術 科学の関係について
17:53
who wrote "The Act of Creation" about the relationship
アーサー・ケストラーが「創造活動の理論」に
書いたような
17:55
between humor, art and science,
二元結合と呼ぶものを求めているのです
17:58
is what's called bisociation.
二元結合と呼ぶものを求めているのです
18:01
You have to bring together ideas from different frames of reference,
違う枠組みからアイデアを組み合わせて
18:03
and you have to do it quickly to understand the cartoon.
しかも素早くしないとマンガは理解できません
18:06
If the different frames of reference don't come together
違う枠組み同士を0.5秒以内に
18:09
in about .5 seconds, it's not funny,
組みあわせられなければ
面白さはないのです
18:12
but I think they will for you here.
これはわかりやすいものです
18:14
Different frames of reference.
違う枠組みです
18:16
"You slept with her, didn't you?"
「彼女と寝たんでしょ」
18:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:21
"Lassie! Get help!!"
「ラッシー!誰か呼んで!!」
18:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:28
It's called French Army Knife.
これは「フレンチアーミーナイフ」
18:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:35
And this is Einstein in bed. "To you it was fast."
これはアインシュタインの寝室です
「あなたにとっては一瞬だったのね」
18:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:44
Now there are some cartoons that are puzzling.
ちょっと難しいマンガもあります
18:51
Like, this cartoon would puzzle many people.
これは解りにくいでしょう
18:55
How many people know what this cartoon means?
このマンガの意味を
どれくらいの人がわかるでしょうか
18:59
The dog is signaling he wants to go for a walk.
犬が散歩に行きたいという
サインを出しています
19:03
This is the signal for a catcher to walk the dog.
キャッチャーは
バッターを「歩かせろ」というサインをしています
19:07
That's why we run a feature in the cartoon issue every year
毎年マンガ特集をするのはこのためです
19:13
called "I Don't Get It: The New Yorker Cartoon I.Q. Test."
「意味不明 : ニューヨーカーのマンガ IQテスト」
19:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:19
The other thing The New Yorker plays around with
もうひとつ『ニューヨーカー』が好きなのが
19:21
is incongruity, and incongruity, I've shown you,
場違いさです
お見せしたとおり
19:23
is sort of the basis of humor.
ユーモアの基本になるものです
19:25
Something that's completely normal or logical isn't going to be funny.
あまりにも当然で論理的なものは
おもしろくありません
19:27
But the way incongruity works is, observational humor
場違いが機能するのは 観察に基づく
19:30
is humor within the realm of reality.
現実の範囲内のユーモアです
19:34
"My boss is always telling me what to do." Okay?
「上司がいつも あれこれ指示するんだ」
19:37
That could happen. It's humor within the realm of reality.
これはありえることです
現実の範囲内のユーモアです
19:42
Here, cowboy to a cow:
ここでは カウボーイが牛に言っています
19:45
"Very impressive. I'd like to find 5,000 more like you."
「すばらしい あなたの様な方を
あと5000頭くらい欲しいですね」
19:47
We understand that. It's absurd. But we're putting the two together.
これは理解できます むちゃくちゃですが
ふたつをつなぎあわせることができます
19:52
Here, in the nonsense range:
これはもうナンセンスです
19:55
"Damn it, Hopkins, didn't you get yesterday's memo?"
「ホプキンズ君 困るな  
連絡事項はきちんと読んでくれないと」
19:59
Now that's a little puzzling, right? It doesn't quite come together.
これはちょっと難しいですね
うまくつながりません
20:04
In general, people who enjoy more nonsense,
一般的にナンセンスを楽しむ人は
20:08
enjoy more abstract art,
より抽象的な芸術が好きです
20:11
they tend to be liberal, less conservative, that type of stuff.
保守的よりもリベラルなタイプです
20:13
But for us, and for me, helping design the humor,
しかし私たち 私にとって
ユーモアをつくる手助けをするとき
20:16
it doesn't make any sense to compare one to the other.
それぞれを比較しても意味はありません
20:20
It's sort of a smorgasbord that's made all interesting.
いろいろあるから面白いんです
20:22
So I want to sum all this up with a caption to a cartoon,
このマンガのキャプションで
今日の話をまとめたいと思います
20:27
and I think this sums up the whole thing, really,
『ニューヨーカー』のマンガについて
20:31
about The New Yorker cartoons.
うまくまとめていると思います
20:34
"It sort of makes you stop and think, doesn't it."
「立ち止まって 考えさせられるよな」
20:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
20:39
And now, when you look at New Yorker cartoons,
ニューヨーカーのマンガを見るときには
20:43
I'd like you to stop and think a little bit more about them.
立ち止まって
すこし考えてみて頂きたいのです
20:45
Thank you.
ありがとう
20:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:48
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとう(拍手)
20:52
Translated by Mimoe Fukuya
Reviewed by Misaki Sato

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Bob Mankoff - Cartoon editor
Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker, as well as an accomplished cartoonist in his own right.

Why you should listen

Bob Mankoff has been the cartoon editor of The New Yorker since 1997. But his association with the magazine started many years before that, when he began submitting his own cartoons to the title in 1974. 2,000 rejections later, his first "idea drawing" was finally accepted and published, and in 1980, he accepted a contract to contribute cartoons on a regular basis. Since then, more than 800 of his cartoons have been published in the magazine.

These days, Mankoff is mainly responsible for helping to select from the 1000 cartoons the magazine receives each week, in order to select the "16 or 17" he says will actually make it into print.

Mankoff is also the author or editor of a number of books on cartoons and creativity, including The Naked Cartoonist: A New Way to Enhance Your Creativity, and The Complete Cartoons of The New Yorker, published in 2004 and which featured every cartoon published to that point since the magazine's debut in 1925.

 

More profile about the speaker
Bob Mankoff | Speaker | TED.com