sponsored links
TED2006

Clifford Stoll: The call to learn

クリフォード・ストールがいろんなことを話します

February 28, 2006

クリフォード・ストールの暴走気味にエネルギッシュな講演では、逸話や批評や余談、おまけに科学実験まで飛び出して聞く者を虜にします。何にしても彼は、自らを「一度何かをやったなら別なことをしたくなる」科学者だと位置づけています。

Clifford Stoll - Astronomer, educator, skeptic
Astronomer Clifford Stoll helped to capture a notorious KGB hacker back in the infancy of the Internet. His agile mind continues to lead him down new paths -- from education and techno-skepticism to the making of zero-volume bottles. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm delighted to be here.
ここにいられることを とても喜んでいます
00:12
I'm honored by the invitation, and thanks.
招待していただいて光栄です どうもありがとう
00:14
I would love to talk about stuff that I'm interested in,
私は自分の興味あることについて話したいと思うのですが
00:17
but unfortunately, I suspect that what I'm interested in
あいにくと私が興味を持つことは
00:20
won't interest many other people.
他の人が興味を持たないようなことばかりです
00:22
First off, my badge says I'm an astronomer.
第一 私の肩書は天文学者です
00:25
I would love to talk about my astronomy,
天文学の研究についてお話ししたいところですが
00:27
but I suspect that the number of people who are interested in radiative transfer
「非灰色大気の放射伝達および
00:29
in non-gray atmospheres
木星の上層大気中における偏光」などー
00:32
and polarization of light in Jupiter's upper atmosphere
興味を持つ人の数は
00:34
are the number of people who'd fit in a bus shelter.
バス待合所に入りきるくらいでしょう
00:36
So I'm not going to talk about that.
だからこの話はしません
00:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:40
It would be just as much fun
1986年から1987年にかけて
00:42
to talk about some stuff that happened in 1986 and 1987,
ローレンスバークレー研究所のコンピュータに
00:44
when a computer hacker is breaking into our systems
ハッカーが侵入した時の話も
00:47
over at Lawrence Berkeley Labs.
面白いかもしれません
00:50
And I caught the guys,
私が連中を捕まえたのですが
00:52
and they turned out to be working for what was then the Soviet KGB,
彼らは当時ソビエトのKGBのために働いていて
00:54
and stealing information and selling it.
盗んだ情報を売っていたのでした
00:58
And I'd love to talk about that -- and it'd be fun --
その話だったら喜んでしますけど…
01:00
but, 20 years later ...
しかし20年たった今…コンピュータセキュリティは
01:04
I find computer security, frankly, to be kind of boring.
率直に言って退屈だと思います
01:07
It's tedious.
面倒くさいし…
01:09
I'm --
私は…
01:11
The first time you do something, it's science.
最初に何かをやれば それは科学です
01:12
The second time, it's engineering.
2番目なら工学と呼ばれます
01:16
A third time, it's just being a technician.
そのあとは単なる技術になります
01:19
I'm a scientist. Once I do something, I do something else.
私は科学者なので 一度何かをやったら そのあとは別なことをします
01:22
So, I'm not going to talk about that.
だからこの話はしません
01:25
Nor am I going to talk about what I think are obvious statements from my first book,
私は当たり前なことを最初の本の「インターネットはからっぽの洞窟」に書きましたが…
01:27
"Silicon Snake Oil," or my second book,
それとも2番目だったかな…
01:34
nor am I going to talk about
あの本に書いたことも話しません
01:38
why I believe computers don't belong in schools.
学校はコンピュータを使うべきでないことも
01:40
I feel that there's a massive and bizarre idea going around
学校にもっとコンピュータを導入すべきだという
01:43
that we have to bring more computers into schools.
おかしな考えが流布していますが
01:47
My idea is: no! No!
私の考えでは とんでもない!
01:51
Get them out of schools, and keep them out of schools.
学校から排除して 入れないようにすべきです
01:53
And I'd love to talk about this,
このことについて話したいとも思いますが
01:57
but I think the argument is so obvious to anyone who's hung around a fourth grade classroom
小学4年生の教室に出入りしている人間には明らかなことなので
01:59
that it doesn't need much talking about --
わざわざ話すこともないでしょう
02:04
but I guess I may be very wrong about that,
しかしこれに関しては あるいは他のことも
02:08
and everything else that I've said.
みんな間違っているかもしれません
02:10
So don't go back and read my dissertation.
だから私の書いたものを読んだりしないことです
02:11
It probably has lies in it as well.
きっと間違ってますから
02:13
Having said that, I outlined my talk about five minutes ago.
私は講演の概要を5分ほど前に書いておきました
02:15
(Laughter)
(手の平に書いたメモを見せる ― 笑)
02:19
And if you look at it over here,
これを見てもらうと
02:22
the main thing I wrote on my thumb was the future.
親指に書いたメイントピックは未来についてです
02:24
I'm supposed to talk about the future, yes?
未来について話すのはいいんだよね?
02:27
Oh, right. And my feeling is, asking me to talk about the future is bizarre,
私の感覚からすると この白髪頭の男に未来について聞くなんて
02:30
because I've got gray hair,
変な話だと思います
02:37
and so, it's kind of silly for me to talk about the future.
私が未来の話をするなんて馬鹿げています
02:39
In fact, I think that if you really want to know what the future's going to be,
実際 未来がどんな風になるか知りたければ
02:45
if you really want to know about the future,
未来について本当に知りたいなら
02:49
don't ask a technologist, a scientist, a physicist.
技術者とか科学者とか物理学者なんかに聞いちゃだめです
02:51
No! Don't ask somebody who's writing code.
コードを書くような人間には聞かないことです
02:55
No, if you want to know what society's going to be like in 20 years,
社会が20年後にどうなるか知りたければ
03:02
ask a kindergarten teacher.
幼稚園の先生に聞くことです
03:07
They know.
彼らは知っています
03:09
In fact, don't ask just any kindergarten teacher,
どの人でもいいわけではありません
03:12
ask an experienced one.
経験が長い人に聞いてください
03:15
They're the ones who know what society is going to be like in another generation.
彼らは この後の世代の社会がどうなるか 知っています
03:17
I don't. Nor, I suspect,
私は知りません
03:21
do many other people who are talking about what the future will bring.
将来どうなるとか話している人も 大方知らないだろうと思います
03:23
Certainly, all of us can imagine these cool new things
私たちは確かに 今後出てくる新しくてクールなものについて
03:26
that are going to be there.
想像することはできます
03:30
But to me, things aren't the future.
しかし 私に言わせるなら 未来とはモノの話ではありません
03:31
What I ask myself is, what's society is going to be like,
私が考えるのは 社会がどんな風になるかということです
03:35
when the kids today are phenomenally good at text messaging
今日の子供たちはテキストメッセージが驚くほど達者で
03:38
and spend a huge amount of on-screen time,
多くの時間を画面を見て過ごしますが
03:44
but have never gone bowling together?
誰かと一緒にボーリングに行ったりはしません
03:47
Change is happening, and the change that is happening
変化が起きています
03:53
is not one that is in software.
ソフトウェア以外のところで
03:56
But that's not what I'm going to talk about.
しかしその話はしません
03:59
I'd love to talk about it, it'd be fun,
きっと楽しいだろうから話したいんですが
04:00
but I want to talk about what I'm doing now. What am I doing now?
私が今やっていることについてお話します 私は今何をしているのか?
04:03
Oh -- the other thing that I think I'd like to talk about
そうだ もうひとつ話したいものが
04:06
is right over here. Right over here.
これ これ これ (薬指を示す ― 笑)
04:08
Is that visible? What I'd like to talk about is one-sided things.
見えますか? お話ししたいのは 片面しかないもののことです
04:12
I would dearly love to talk about
片面だけのものについて
04:18
things that have one side.
すごくお話ししたい
04:20
Because I love Mobius loops. I not only love Mobius loops,
メビウスの輪が好きなんです それだけじゃありません
04:23
but I'm one of the very few people,
実際にクラインの壺を作っている人間なんて
04:27
if not the only person in the world, that makes Klein bottles.
世界広しといえど あんまりいないでしょう
04:30
Right away, I hope that all of your eyes glaze over.
すぐには信じられないかもしれません
04:33
This is a Klein bottle.
これがクラインの壺です
04:36
For those of you in the audience who know,
ご存知の人はきっと
04:39
you roll your eyes and say, yup, I know all about it.
目を回して たまげたと言うでしょう
04:42
It's one sided. It's a bottle whose inside is its outside.
面が1つしかない 内側が外側な壺です
04:44
It has zero volume. And it's non-orientable.
容積がありません 向きがありません
04:46
It has wonderful properties.
素晴らしい性質があります
04:49
If you take two Mobius loops and sew their common edge together,
メビウスの帯の縁を貼り合わせると―
04:51
you get one of these, and I make them out of glass.
クラインの壺ができます 私はそれをガラスで作っています
04:53
And I'd love to talk to you about this,
これについてお話ししたいけど
04:56
but I don't have much in the way of ... things to say because --
あんまり話すことがありません…(クリスの飲みかけのペットボトルから飲む)
04:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:04
(Chris Anderson: I've got a cold.)
(クリス: 私は風邪引いてるよ)
05:06
However, the "D" in TED of course stands for design.
ところでTEDのDはもちろんデザインのDです
05:07
Just two weeks ago I made --
ほんの2週間前に
05:14
you know, I've been making small, medium and big Klein bottles for the trade.
売り物としてクラインの壺の小さいのと 中くらいのと 大きいのを作りました
05:16
But what I've just made --
これです
05:22
and I'm delighted to show you, first time in public here.
できたばかりのやつをお見せできるのはうれしい
05:26
This is a Klein bottle wine bottle,
これはクラインのワインボトルです
05:35
which, although in four dimensions
4次元では液体を保持することが
05:40
it shouldn't be able to hold any fluid at all,
できないのですが
05:43
it's perfectly capable of doing so
我々のいる宇宙は3次元しかないので
05:46
because our universe has only three spatial dimensions.
それができます
05:48
And because our universe is only three spatial dimensions,
3次元なので
05:50
it can hold fluids.
液体を入れられるんです
05:53
So it's highly -- that one's the cool one.
すごくクールでしょう
05:56
That was a month of my life.
1か月かかりました
06:01
But although I would love to talk about topology with you, I'm not going to.
トポロジーについてすごく話したいんですが その話はしません
06:06
(Laughter)
(ペットボトルから一口飲んでラベルを訝しげに見る ― 笑)
06:11
Instead, I'm going to mention my mom,
かわりに母のことを話します
06:17
who passed away last summer.
去年の夏に亡くなりました
06:22
Had collected photographs of me, as mothers will do.
母は ― 母親が皆そうするように ― 私の写真を集めていました
06:25
Could somebody put this guy up?
これを映してくれる?
06:28
And I looked over her album
母のアルバムを見ていたら
06:30
and she had collected a picture of me, standing --
私の写真がたくさんありました
06:34
well, sitting -- in 1969, in front of a bunch of dials.
1969年です たくさんのダイヤルの前に 座っています
06:37
And I looked at it, and said, oh my god,
これを見て 思わず叫びました
06:42
that was me, when I was working at the electronic music studio!
ああ 電子音楽スタジオで働いていたときのだ!
06:45
As a technician, repairing and maintaining
私は技術者として ニューヨーク州立大バッファロー校のー
06:47
the electronic music studio at SUNY Buffalo. And wow!
電子音楽スタジオで装置の修理や保守をしていました
06:51
Way back machine. And I said to myself, oh yeah!
ワオ! タイムマシンだ! なんてことだろう
06:55
And it sent me back.
昔に引き戻されました
07:01
Soon after that, I found in another picture that she had, a picture of me.
それから別な写真を見つけました
07:05
This guy over here of course is me.
こっちにいるのは もちろん私です
07:13
This man is Robert Moog,
こちらはロバート モーグ
07:17
the inventor of the Moog synthesizer,
モーグシンセサイザーの発明者です
07:19
who passed away this past August.
去年の8月に亡くなりました
07:21
Robert Moog was a generous, kind person, extraordinarily competent engineer.
ロバート モーグは心の広い親切な人で 非常に優れたエンジニアであり
07:26
A musician who took time from his life to teach me,
音楽家でした 大学生になったばかりの私に教えるため
07:31
a sophomore, a freshman at SUNY Buffalo.
時間を取ってくれました
07:37
He'd come up from Trumansburg to teach me
トルーマンズバーグから教えに来て
07:40
not just about the Moog synthesizer, but we'd be sitting there --
モーグシンセサイザーだけじゃありません ここに座って
07:45
I'm studying physics at the time. This is 1969, 70, 71.
当時は物理学を勉強していました 1969~71年のことです
07:49
We're studying physics, I'm studying physics,
物理学を勉強しました
07:52
and he's saying, "That's a good thing to do.
彼は言っていました「それはいいことだよ
07:54
Don't get caught up in electronic music if you're doing physics."
物理をやっているなら 電子音楽なんかにはまってちゃいけない」
07:56
Mentoring me. He'd come up and
私の師です
07:58
spend hours and hours with me.
やってきて 何時間も 私に付き合ってくれました
08:01
He wrote a letter of recommendation for me to get into graduate school.
大学院に入るための推薦状も書いてくれました
08:05
In the background, my bicycle.
向こうに写っているのは私の自転車です
08:08
I realize that this picture was taken at a friend's living room.
この写真が友達の部屋で撮ったものだと気づきました
08:10
Bob Moog came by and hauled a whole pile of equipment
ロバート モーグは私とグレッグ フリントに見せるため
08:13
to show Greg Flint and I things about this.
たくさんの装置を持って来ました
08:16
We sat around talking about Fourier transforms,
私たちは座ってフーリエ変換とか
08:18
Bessel functions, modulation transfer functions,
ベッセル関数とか 変調伝達関数とか
08:20
stuff like this.
そういったことについて話しました
08:23
Bob's passing this past summer has been a loss to all of us.
ロバートが去年の夏に亡くなったのは 我々みんなにとっての損失です
08:28
Anyone who's a musician has been profoundly influenced by Robert Moog.
現在の音楽家はすべてロバート モーグから大きな影響を受けています
08:31
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:36
And I'll just say what I'm about to do. What I'm about to do --
これからやることについてだけ話しましょう
08:38
I hope you can recognize that there's a distorted sine wave,
これがわかるといいのですが…歪んだ正弦波です
08:43
almost a triangular wave upon this Hewlett-Packard oscilloscope.
ほとんど三角波に近いのが ヒューレットパッカードのオシロスコープに表示されています
08:47
Oh, cool. I can get to this place over here, right?
いいぞ ここまで来ました (中指に書いた文字を示す)
08:53
Kids. Kids is what I'm going to talk about -- is that okay?
子供について 子供について話すのは構わない?
08:58
It says kids over here, that's what I'd like to talk about.
ほら ここで子供の話をすることになっています
09:00
I've decided that, for me at least,
それが話したいことです
09:04
I don't have a big enough head.
私の頭は十分に大きくありません
09:08
So I think locally and I act locally.
だから小さく考え 小さく行動します
09:13
I feel that the best way I can help out anything is to help out very, very locally.
私が何かをやる一番いい方法は すごく小さくやることです
09:16
So Ph.D. this, and degree there, and the yadda yadda.
だからこっちで博士号をやり あっちで学位をやり という具合
09:20
I was talking about this stuff to
1年ほど前 学校の先生たちに
09:25
some schoolteachers about a year ago.
こういった話をしました
09:29
And one of them, several of them would come up to me and say,
そうしたらその人たちが言ったのです
09:31
"Well, how come you ain't teaching?"
「だったら教えに来たらいいじゃないですか?」
09:33
And I said, "Well, I've taught graduate --
私は「教えていますよ
09:35
I've had graduate students, I've taught undergraduate classes."
大学院でも 学部でも教えています」と言いました
09:36
No, they said, "If you're so into kids and all this stuff,
「そうじゃなくて」と彼らは言います
09:39
how come you ain't over here on the front lines?
「子供に関心がおありなら 最前線にいらっしゃればいい
09:41
Put your money where you mouth is."
実際やってみればいいじゃないですか」
09:44
Is true. Is true. I teach eighth-grade science four days a week.
確かにその通りです 私は週4日 中学2年生に教えています
09:48
Not just showing up every now and then.
時々教えに行くというのではなく
09:54
No, no, no, no, no. I take attendance.
出勤しています
09:56
I take lunch hour. (Applause)
昼休みだってあります (拍手)
10:00
This is not -- no, no, no, this is not claps.
いやいや これは拍手してもらうことじゃありません
10:03
I strongly suggest that this is a good thing for each of you to do.
これはあなた方の1人ひとりがすべきことだと強く思います
10:06
Not just show up to class every now and then.
ときどき授業にやってくるというのではなく
10:10
Teach a solid week. Okay, I'm teaching three-quarters time, but good enough.
きっちり1週間教えるのです まあ4分の3ですが でも十分です
10:12
One of the things that I've done for my science students
私は理科の授業で言いました
10:16
is to tell them, "Look, I'm going to teach you college-level physics.
「君たちに大学のレベル物理を教える
10:18
No calculus, I'll cut out that.
解析を使わずに
10:21
You won't need to know trig.
三角関数は知らなくて大丈夫
10:23
But you will need to know eighth-grade algebra,
でも中学2年の代数は必要だよ
10:25
and we're going to do serious experiments.
そして本格的な実験をやる
10:28
None of this open-to-chapter-seven-and-do-all-the-odd-problem-sets.
第7章を開いてそこにあるヘンテコな問題を解きなさいなんて言わない
10:30
We're going to be doing genuine physics."
本物の物理学をやるんだ」
10:33
And that's one of the things I thought I'd do right now.
それが私の今やっていることの1つです
10:36
(High-pitched tone)
(高い電子音)
10:38
Oh, before I even turn that on,
このスイッチを入れる前に
10:41
one of the things that we did about three weeks ago in my class --
3週間ほど前教室でやったことですが…
10:43
this is through the lens, and one of the things we used a lens for
レンズを使って
10:47
was to measure the speed of light.
光の速さを測定したのです
10:49
My students in El Cerrito -- with my help, of course,
エルサリートの私の生徒たちは むろん私の手助けがあってのことですが
10:51
and with the help of a very beat up oscilloscope --
くたびれたオシロスコープを使い
10:54
measured the speed of light.
光の速さを測ったのです
10:57
We were off by 25 percent. How many eighth graders do you know of
25パーセントの誤差でです 光の速さを測った中学2年生を
10:58
who have measured the speed of light?
いったい何人知っていますか?
11:03
In addition to that, we've measured the speed of sound.
それにくわえて 私たちは音の速さも測りました
11:05
I'd love to measure the speed of light here.
ここで光の速さの測定をやりたくて
11:08
I was all set to do it and I was thinking, "Aw man,"
準備し始めました
11:10
I was just going to impose upon the powers that be,
ちょっとした工夫で
11:12
and measure the speed of light.
光の速さを
11:15
And I'm all set to do it. I'm all set to do it,
測ってやろうと 準備したんですが ここでやろうとすると
11:16
but then it turns out that to set up here, you have like 10 minutes to set up!
準備だけで10分かかってしまうのがわかりました!
11:20
And there's no time to do it.
そんな時間はありません
11:24
So, next time, maybe, I'll measure the speed of light!
もしかしたら次回やるかもしれません 光の速さです!
11:26
But meanwhile, let's measure the speed of sound!
しかしそれまでは 音の速さを測ることにしましょう!
11:28
Well, the obvious way to measure the speed of sound
音の速さを測る簡単な方法は
11:30
is to bounce sound off something and look at the echo.
音を何かに反射させて エコーを調べることです
11:32
But, probably -- one of my students, Ariel [unclear], said,
しかし…私の生徒のアリエルが言ったのです
11:35
"Could we measure the speed of light using the wave equation?"
「波の方程式を使って光の速さを測ることはできませんか?」
11:40
And all of you know the wave equation is
波の方程式では
11:43
the frequency times the wavelength of any wave ...
周波数かける波長が定数になることは みなさんご存知でしょう
11:45
is a constant. When the frequency goes up,
周波数が高くなれば 波長は短くなります
11:51
the wavelength comes down. Wavelength goes up,
波長が長くなれば 周波数は低くなります
11:54
frequency goes down. So, if we have a wave here --
だからここにある波は
11:57
over here, that's what's interesting --
…ここを映して…
12:02
as the pitch goes up, things get closer,
周波数が高くなると 狭くなります
12:06
pitch goes down, things stretch out.
周波数が低くなると 広くなります
12:09
Right? This is simple physics.
簡単な物理です
12:13
All of you know this from eighth grade, remember?
中学2年で習ったでしょう?
12:15
What they didn't tell you in physics -- in eighth-grade physics --
中学2年の物理で教えていないのは
12:18
but they should have, and I wish they had,
本当は教えるべきなんですが
12:22
was that if you multiply the frequency times the wavelength of sound
音や光の周波数と波長を掛け合わせると
12:25
or light, you get a constant.
定数になるということです
12:29
And that constant is the speed of sound.
その定数が音(あるいは光)の速さです
12:33
So, in order to measure the speed of sound,
だから音の速さを測ろうと思ったら
12:36
all I've got to do is know its frequency. Well, that's easy.
知る必要があるのは周波数ですが それは簡単です
12:39
I've got a frequency counter right here.
ここに周波数カウンタがあります
12:43
Set it up to around A, above A, above A. There's an A, more or less.
2つ上のAに設定することにしましょう
12:45
Now, so I know the frequency.
これで周波数はわかります
12:50
It's 1.76 kilohertz. I measure its wavelength.
1.76キロヘルツです その波長を測りましょう
12:55
All I need now is to flip on another beam,
もうひとつビームを出します
13:00
and the bottom beam is me talking, right?
下のビームは私の話している声です
13:03
So anytime I talk, you'd see it on the screen.
私がしゃべると 画面に出ます
13:06
I'll put it over here, and as I move this away from the source,
ここに置いて 音源から離していくと
13:11
you'll notice the spiral.
螺旋のように動いていくのがわかるでしょう
13:15
The slinky moves. We're going through different nodes of the wave,
動かして別な山に重ねます
13:20
coming out this way.
こんな風に
13:25
Those of you who are physicists, I hear you rolling your eyes,
物理の専門家が聞いていたら目を回すでしょうが
13:27
but bear with me. (Laughter)
ご勘弁ください (笑)
13:29
To measure the wavelength,
波長を測るには
13:31
all I need to do is measure the distance from here --
ここからここまでの距離を
13:34
one full wave -- over to here.
1つの波の長さを測ればいいのです
13:40
From here to here is the wavelength of sound.
ここからここまでが音の波の長さです
13:42
So, I'll put a measuring tape here, measuring tape here, move it back over to here.
巻尺を置いて ここからここまで動かします
13:45
I've moved the microphone 20 centimeters.
マイクを…20センチ動かしました
13:53
0.2 meters from here, back to here, 20 centimeters.
ここから ズズズズズズッ ここまで0.2メートルです
13:57
OK, let's go back to Mr. Elmo.
エルモのところに戻りましょう
14:04
And we'll say the frequency is 1.76 kilohertz, or 1760.
周波数は1.76キロヘルツ 1760ヘルツです
14:10
The wavelength was 0.2 meters.
波長は0.2メートル
14:17
Let's figure out what this is.
計算してみましょう
14:21
(Laughter) (Applause)
(計算尺を取り出す ー 笑 ー 拍手)
14:25
1.76 times 0.2 over here is 352 meters per second.
1.76かける0.2は ここ 352メートル毎秒です
14:33
If you look it up in the book, it's really 343.
本で調べたら 正確には343なんですが
14:40
But, here with kludgy material, and lousy drink --
このいい加減な道具立てと このまずい飲物で
14:46
we've been able to measure the speed of sound to --
音の速さを測ったんです 悪くないでしょう (笑)
14:48
not bad. Pretty good.
上出来です
14:53
All of which comes to what I wanted to say.
そして私の一番お話ししたかった話です
14:55
Go back to this picture of me a million years ago.
百万年前の私の写真に戻りましょう
15:00
It was 1971, the Vietnam War was going on,
これは1971年で ベトナム戦争の最中でした
15:05
and I'm like, "Oh my God!"
私は「ああ何て事!」と思いました
15:10
I'm studying physics: Landau, Lipschitz, Resnick and Halliday.
私は物理を勉強していました ランダウ-リプシッツに レズニック-ハリデイ
15:13
I'm going home for a midterm. A riot's going on on campus.
私は中間試験のため家に戻りました
15:16
There's a riot! Hey, Elmo's done: off.
キャンパスでは暴動が起きていました 暴動です! エルモはもういい
15:18
There's a riot going on on campus,
キャンパスでは暴動が続き
15:27
and the police are chasing me, right?
警察が私を追ってきました
15:29
I'm walking across campus. Cop comes and looks at me and says,
キャンパスを歩いていたら 警官が私を見て言いました
15:32
"You! You're a student."
「おい お前学生か!」
15:35
Pulls out a gun. Goes boom!
銃を取り出して ボンッ!
15:37
And a tear gas canister the size of a Pepsi can goes by my head. Whoosh!
ペプシ缶くらいの大きさの催涙弾が私の頭の横をかすめました プシューッ!
15:39
I get a breath of tear gas and I can't breathe.
催涙ガスを吸って 息ができなくなりました
15:43
This cop comes after me with a rifle.
警官はライフルを手に追いかけてきます
15:46
He wants to clunk me over the head!
頭をぶん殴るつもりでいるのです
15:48
I'm saying, "I got to clear out of here!"
「逃げなきゃ!」
15:50
I go running across campus quick as I can. I duck into Hayes Hall.
キャンパスを必死になって走り ヘイズホールにもぐりこみました
15:53
It's one of these bell-tower buildings.
鐘楼のついた建物です
15:59
The cop's chasing me.
警官は追いかけてきます
16:01
Chasing me up the first floor, second floor, third floor.
1階 2階 3階
16:03
Chases me into this room.
追ってきます
16:05
The entranceway to the bell tower.
鐘楼の入り口まで来ました
16:06
I slam the door behind me, climb up,
私はドアを閉めて上に登り
16:08
go past this place where I see a pendulum ticking.
振り子のところを通り過ぎました
16:10
And I'm thinking, "Oh yeah,
私は思いました
16:12
the square root of the length is proportional to its period." (Laughter)
ああ 長さの2乗根に周期は比例するんだ (笑)
16:14
I keep climbing up, go back.
私は登りつづけ
16:17
I go to a place where a dowel splits off.
文字盤の裏まで来ました
16:19
There's a clock, clock, clock, clock.
チック タック チック タック
16:21
The time's going backwards because I'm inside of it.
私は内側にいたので 時計は逆向きに進んでいます
16:22
I'm thinking of Lorenz contractions and Einsteinian relativity.
そしてローレンツ収縮とアインシュタインの相対論について考えました
16:24
I climb up, and there's this place, way in the back,
上っていき 奥まったところの
16:28
that you climb up this wooden ladder.
木製の梯子を登りました
16:31
I pop up the top, and there's a cupola.
一番上に出たら ドーム型の小塔でした
16:33
A dome, one of these ten-foot domes.
3メートルくらいのドームです
16:35
I'm looking out and I'm seeing the cops bashing students' heads,
私は外を眺め 警官が学生の頭を殴り
16:37
shooting tear gas, and watching students throwing bricks.
催涙弾を撃ち 学生がレンガを投げるのを見ました
16:40
And I'm asking, "What am I doing here? Why am I here?"
そして思いました 自分はここで何をしているんだろう? なぜここにいるんだろう?
16:42
Then I remember what my English teacher in high school said.
それから高校時代の英語の先生が言っていたことを思い出しました
16:45
Namely, that when they cast bells,
鐘を鋳造するときには
16:48
they write inscriptions on them.
銘を刻むのだと
16:52
So, I wipe the pigeon manure off one of the bells, and I look at it.
それで私は鐘からハトの糞をぬぐい取って 見てみました
16:55
I'm asking myself, "Why am I here?"
私はなぜここにいるのかと考えながら
16:59
So, at this time, I'd like to tell you the words inscribed
ヘイズホールの鐘楼の鐘に刻まれていた
17:02
upon the Hayes Hall tower bells:
言葉をお教えしましょう
17:06
"All truth is one.
「真実はひとつ
17:10
In this light, may science and religion endeavor here
真実の光のもと 我々の科学と信仰への努力が
17:15
for the steady evolution of mankind, from darkness to light,
人類に着実な進歩を もたらさんことを
17:21
from narrowness to broad-mindedness, from prejudice to tolerance.
闇から光へ 狭い心から広い心へ 偏見から寛容へ
17:25
It is the voice of life, which calls us to come and learn."
命の声が 集いて学べと 呼んでいる
17:33
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
17:41
Translator:Yasushi Aoki
Reviewer:Masahiro Kyushima

sponsored links

Clifford Stoll - Astronomer, educator, skeptic
Astronomer Clifford Stoll helped to capture a notorious KGB hacker back in the infancy of the Internet. His agile mind continues to lead him down new paths -- from education and techno-skepticism to the making of zero-volume bottles.

Why you should listen

When Clifford Stoll speaks, you can't help but listen. Full of restless energy, he jumps from one topic to the next, darting back and forth across the stage. You may not be sure where he's going, but the ride is always part of the adventure.

An astronomer (though his astronomy career took a turn when he noticed a bookkeeping error that ultimately led him to track down a notorious hacker), researcher and internationally recognized computer security expert -- who happens to be a vocal critic of technology -- Stoll makes a sharp, witty case for keeping computers out of the classroom. Currently teaching college-level physics to eighth graders at a local school, he stays busy in his spare time building Klein bottles.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.