20:56
TED2002

Robert Full: Robots inspired by cockroach ingenuity

ロバート・フル: ゴキブリの仕組みに学んだロボット

Filmed:

昆虫や動物は素晴らしい能力を進化させてきました。しかし、ロバート・フルは動物の性能は過剰だと言います。コツは必要なものだけコピーすること。人の技術が自然から学ぶ方法をお見せします。

- Biologist
Robert Full studies cockroach legs and gecko feet. His research is helping build tomorrow's robots, based on evolution's ancient engineering. Full bio

Welcome. If I could have the first slide, please?
ようこそ
1枚目のスライドをお願いします
00:19
Contrary to calculations made by some engineers, bees can fly,
力学的な計算に反して
ハチは飛び
00:33
dolphins can swim, and geckos can even climb
イルカは泳ぎ ヤモリは
どんな滑らかな壁でも登れます
00:38
up the smoothest surfaces. Now, what I want to do, in the short time I have,
これから皆さんにはー
00:45
is to try to allow each of you to experience
自然のデザインを紐解く
楽しさを味わっていただきます
00:51
the thrill of revealing nature's design.
自然のデザインを紐解く
楽しさを味わっていただきます
00:55
I get to do this all the time, and it's just incredible.
私の研究する驚異的な世界の
01:01
I want to try to share just a little bit of that with you in this presentation.
ごく一部を ここで
ご紹介したいと思います
01:03
The challenge of looking at nature's designs --
自然のデザインを学ぶ目的は --
01:09
and I'll tell you the way that we perceive it, and the way we've used it.
その方法や用途は
後ほどお話ししますが --
01:11
The challenge, of course, is to answer this question:
ここで考えるべき問題はー
01:15
what permits this extraordinary performance of animals
何が動物にすばらしい運動能力を与え
01:17
that allows them basically to go anywhere?
所構わず動き回ることを
可能にしているのか?
01:20
And if we could figure that out, how can we implement those designs?
それをどうすれば応用できるのか?
ということです
01:23
Well, many biologists will tell engineers, and others,
生物学の観点から考えると
01:30
organisms have millions of years to get it right;
この能力は
生物が数百万年かけて完成させた
01:33
they're spectacular; they can do everything wonderfully well.
実に素晴らしい 優秀なものです
01:36
So, the answer is bio-mimicry: just copy nature directly.
だったら自然の生き物を
そのままコピーすればいいじゃないか
01:39
We know from working on animals that the truth is
でも動物を調べてみると
01:43
that's exactly what you don't want to do -- because evolution works
コピーが答えではないとわかります
「十分なところで止めておく」のが―
01:48
on the just-good-enough principle, not on a perfecting principle.
進化の原理であり
完全を目指すものではないからです
01:52
And the constraints in building any organism, when you look at it,
自然が作り上げた生物の制約は
厳しいこともわかりました
01:55
are really severe. Natural technologies have incredible constraints.
自然はものすごい制約下の技術です
01:59
Think about it. If you were an engineer and I told you
もしあなたがエンジニアで
車を作れと言われたとします
02:04
that you had to build an automobile, but it had to start off to be this big,
でも 最初はこのくらいに小さく
02:07
then it had to grow to be full size and had to work every step along the way.
徐々にステップを経て
大きなものに成長させろとか
02:12
Or think about the fact that if you build an automobile, I'll tell you that you also -- inside it --
そんな車ができたとしても
さらにその内部に
02:16
have to put a factory that allows you to make another automobile.
新しい車を作る工場を組み込めと言われたら
02:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:24
And you can absolutely never, absolutely never, because of history
こんな事を何の土台もなしに
02:26
and the inherited plan, start with a clean slate.
一からやるなんて無理なのです
02:30
So, organisms have this important history.
生物にはその土台があります
02:34
Really evolution works more like a tinkerer than an engineer.
進化はエンジニアというより
小さな改良を加える職人なのです
02:37
And this is really important when you begin to look at animals.
これは 生物に目を向ける上で
重要なことです
02:42
Instead, we believe you need to be inspired by biology.
コピーではなく 生物学から
ヒントを得ることが必要なのです
02:45
You need to discover the general principles of nature,
自然界の基本原理を解明しー
02:52
and then use these analogies when they're advantageous.
それが有用であれば
利用するのです
02:56
This is a real challenge to do this, because animals,
生物の仕組みは非常に複雑なので
大変難しい仕事です
03:02
when you start to really look inside them -- how they work --
生物の仕組みは非常に複雑なので
大変難しい仕事です
03:05
appear hopelessly complex. There's no detailed history
生物のデザイン過程の
記録などありません
03:08
of the design plans, you can't go look it up anywhere.
生物のデザイン過程の
記録などありません
03:12
They have way too many motions for their joints, too many muscles.
関節の動きや筋肉も 非常に複雑です
03:15
Even the simplest animal we think of, something like an insect,
昆虫のような単純な生物でさえ
03:19
and they have more neurons and connections than you can imagine.
ものすごく複雑な
神経回路を持っています
03:22
How can you make sense of this? Well, we believed --
この様なものを どう理解するか?
ここで仮説を立てました
03:25
and we hypothesized -- that one way animals could work simply,
「動物の動きを可能にしているのはー
03:30
is if the control of their movements
動作の制御機能が 体そのものに
組み込まれているからではないか」
03:35
tended to be built into their bodies themselves.
動作の制御機能が 体そのものに
組み込まれているからではないか」
03:38
What we discovered was that two-, four-, six- and eight-legged animals
そして 2本 4本 6本 8本足の
動物が移動する時に
03:44
all produce the same forces on the ground when they move.
地面に働きかける力は全て
同じであることを発見しました
03:51
They all work like this kangaroo, they bounce.
このカンガルーのように
跳ぶのです
03:54
And they can be modeled by a spring-mass system that we call the spring mass system
バネ質量系でモデル化できるので
そう呼んでいますが
03:58
because we're biomechanists. It's actually a pogo stick.
簡単に言えばホッピング遊具のような
04:02
They all produce the pattern of a pogo stick. How is that true?
バネ付きの棒でピョンピョン
跳んでいるようなものです
04:05
Well, a human, one of your legs works like two legs of a trotting dog,
人間の1本の脚の働きは
犬の2本の脚を統合したもの
04:09
or works like three legs, together as one, of a trotting insect,
昆虫の3本の脚
04:15
or four legs as one of a trotting crab.
カニの4本の脚と同じ働きをします
04:19
And then they alternate in their propulsion,
これらの脚から交互に
推進力を得ていますが
04:21
but the patterns are all the same. Almost every organism we've looked at this way
そのパターンは
我々の研究した動物のほとんどで同じでした
04:25
-- you'll see next week, I'll give you a hint,
実は 来週に公開予定の論文では
04:30
there'll be an article coming out that says that really big things
ティラノサウルスのような巨大な動物は
04:32
like T. rex probably couldn't do this, but you'll see that next week.
このような動きが出来なかったと書きました
04:35
Now, what's interesting is the animals, then -- we said -- bounce along
動物の垂直方向に飛び跳ねる動きを
04:39
the vertical plane this way, and in our collaborations with Pixar,
発見したわけですが
ピクサーのプロジェクトに関わり
04:41
in "A Bug's Life," we discussed the
『バグズ・ライフ』に登場する
04:44
bipedal nature of the characters of the ants.
二足歩行のアリの動きについて
話し合ったときに
04:46
And we told them, of course, they move in another plane as well.
もちろん他に 水平方向の動きもあると言うと
04:49
And they asked us this question. They say, "Why model
なぜ 水平方向での動きがあると
分かっていながら
04:51
just in the sagittal plane or the vertical plane,
垂直方向の動きしか
04:54
when you're telling us these animals are moving
モデル化しないのか?ときかれました
04:56
in the horizontal plane?" This is a good question.
これは良い質問です
04:58
Nobody in biology ever modeled it this way.
生物界では まだ誰も
この様なモデルを作っていなかったので
05:01
We took their advice and we modeled the animals moving
指摘を受けて 水平方向においても
動物の動きをモデル化しました
05:04
in the horizontal plane as well. We took their three legs,
3本の脚を
05:08
we collapsed them down as one.
1本にまとめて
05:11
We got some of the best mathematicians in the world
プリンストン大の著名な数学者の
05:12
from Princeton to work on this problem.
助けを得て
05:15
And we were able to create a model
上下だけでなく同時に
左右にも弾むように動く
05:17
where animals are not only bouncing up and down,
上下だけでなく同時に
左右にも弾むように動く
05:20
but they're also bouncing side to side at the same time.
動物のモデルを 作成することができました
05:21
And many organisms fit this kind of pattern.
このパターンは多くの生物に見られます
05:25
Now, why is this important to have this model?
なぜ これに注目するかというと
05:27
Because it's very interesting. When you take this model
その理由は 面白い事に
このモデルは
05:29
and you perturb it, you give it a push,
物にぶつかった時の様に
押してみたりすると
05:32
as it bumps into something, it self-stabilizes, with no brain
脳や反射神経がなくてもー
05:35
or no reflexes, just by the structure alone.
体の構造だけで バランスを
回復することができるからです
05:39
It's a beautiful model. Let's look at the mathematics.
素晴らしいモデルです
では 数式を見てみましょう
05:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:48
That's enough!
やめておきましょう!(笑)
05:50
(Laughter)
やめておきましょう!(笑)
05:51
The animals, when you look at them running,
動物が走るときには
05:55
appear to be self-stabilizing like this,
バネのような脚を使って
バランスを取っているようです
05:57
using basically springy legs. That is, the legs can do
バネのような脚を使って
バランスを取っているようです
06:00
computations on their own; the control algorithms, in a sense,
つまり 脚自体が計算を行っており
06:03
are embedded in the form of the animal itself.
制御アルゴリズムが
体の形状に組み込まれているのです
06:06
Why haven't we been more inspired by nature and these kinds of discoveries?
なぜこのような発見が今まで
見過ごされていたのでしょう?
06:09
Well, I would argue that human technologies are really different from
人と自然の技術は
かなり異なったものです
06:16
natural technologies, at least they have been so far.
人と自然の技術は
かなり異なったものです
06:20
Think about the typical kind of robot that you see.
典型的なロボットを考えてください
06:23
Human technologies have tended to be large, flat,
人間の作る技術は通常
06:28
with right angles, stiff, made of metal. They have rolling devices
ごつく 平面的で 角張り
硬い金属でできてます
06:31
and axles. There are very few motors, very few sensors.
車輪で移動し
モーターやセンサーの数は限られています
06:36
Whereas nature tends to be small, and curved,
一方自然の方は どちらかというと
繊細で 曲線的であり
06:39
and it bends and twists, and has legs instead, and appendages,
柔軟性があり
脚が付いていて
06:44
and has many muscles and many, many sensors.
非常に多くの
筋肉やセンサーがある
06:47
So it's a very different design. However, what's changing,
全く異なったデザインなのです
06:50
what's really exciting -- and I'll show you some of that next --
でも ここでお見せするように
06:54
is that as human technology takes on more of the characteristics
最近は 人の技術が
自然のものに似てきたので
06:56
of nature, then nature really can become a much more useful teacher.
自然からもっと学ぶ事ができるはずです
06:59
And here's one example that's really exciting.
ここに面白い例があります
07:05
This is a collaboration we have with Stanford.
スタンフォード大学との共同研究ですがー
07:07
And they developed this new technique, called Shape Deposition Manufacturing.
同大学の開発したシェイプ・デポジション
(形成積層)製造技術を使ったものです
07:09
It's a technique where they can mix materials together and mold any shape
異なる素材を組み合わせて
好きな形を作り
07:13
that they like, and put in the material properties.
素材の特性を埋め込めます
07:17
They can embed sensors and actuators right in the form itself.
これでセンサーと作動装置を
形状自体に組み込むことができます
07:21
For example, here's a leg: the clear part is stiff,
例えばこの脚では 透明の部分は硬く
07:24
the white part is compliant, and you don't need any axles there or anything.
白い部分は柔軟性があるので
軸などなしに
07:29
It just bends by itself beautifully.
丁度良い具合に曲がります
07:32
So, you can put those properties in. It inspired them to show off
こうした特性を応用して
スプロールというロボットを作製しました
07:35
this design by producing a little robot they named Sprawl.
こうした特性を応用して
スプロールというロボットを作製しました
07:38
Our work has also inspired another robot, a biologically inspired bouncing robot,
これに触発されて
ミシガン大学とマギル大学が
07:44
from the University of Michigan and McGill
これに触発されて
ミシガン大学とマギル大学が
07:48
named RHex, for robot hexapod, and this one's autonomous.
自律型の六本足のロボット
RHexを作製しました
07:50
Let's go to the video, and let me show you some of these animals moving
これからビデオで 動物の動きと
07:58
and then some of the simple robots
私たちの研究を応用した
08:01
that have been inspired by our discoveries.
ロボットをお見せします
08:03
Here's what some of you did this morning, although you did it outside,
今朝 同じようなことをされた方も
08:06
not on a treadmill.
おられると思います
08:10
Here's what we do.
これは研究の様子です
08:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:15
This is a death's head cockroach. This is an American cockroach
米国に生息するドクロゴキブリです
皆さんの台所にはいませんよね
08:17
you think you don't have in your kitchen.
米国に生息するドクロゴキブリです
皆さんの台所にはいませんよね
08:22
This is an eight-legged scorpion, six-legged ant, forty-four-legged centipede.
8本足のサソリ 6本足のアリ
44本足のムカデは
08:23
Now, I said all these animals are sort of working like pogo sticks --
全てホッピングのような動きをします
08:30
they're bouncing along as they move. And you can see that
全てホッピングのような動きをします
08:33
in this ghost crab, from the beaches of Panama and North Carolina.
このスナガニも同様です
08:37
It goes up to four meters per second when it runs.
秒速4mで走っていますが
08:40
It actually leaps into the air, and has aerial phases
脚が地面から離れ
馬が駆けているように見えます
08:43
when it does it, like a horse, and you'll see it's bouncing here.
脚が地面から離れ
馬が駆けているように見えます
08:46
What we discovered is whether you look at the leg of a human
ここでわかったことはー
08:50
like Richard, or a cockroach, or a crab, or a kangaroo,
ヒトやゴキブリ
カニやカンガルーにおいても
08:53
the relative leg stiffness of that spring is the same for everything we've seen so far.
相対的な脚のバネの硬さは
全ての動物で同じだったということです
08:59
Now, what good are springy legs then? What can they do?
脚のバネに何の意味があるのでしょうか?
09:04
Well, we wanted to see if they allowed the animals
これが動物の安定性や機動性に
09:06
to have greater stability and maneuverability.
役に立つのかを調べることにしました
09:08
So, we built a terrain that had obstacles three times the hip height
そこで対象の動物の腰よりも
3倍高い障害物を用意しました
09:11
of the animals that we're looking at.
そこで対象の動物の腰よりも
3倍高い障害物を用意しました
09:15
And we were certain they couldn't do this. And here's what they did.
これは無理だろうと思っていましたがー
09:16
The animal ran over it and it didn't even slow down!
乗り越えました
しかも速度が全然落ちません!
09:20
It didn't decrease its preferred speed at all.
乗り越えました
しかも速度が全然落ちません!
09:23
We couldn't believe that it could do this. It said to us
できるとは思ってませんでした
09:25
that if you could build a robot with very simple, springy legs,
これからわかることは
簡単な脚のバネがあればー
09:28
you could make it as maneuverable as any that's ever been built.
従来よりも機動性の良い
ロボットができるということです
09:33
Here's the first example of that. This is the Stanford
最初の例はスタンフォード大学が
09:39
Shape Deposition Manufactured robot, named Sprawl.
シェイプ・デポジション造形技術を用いて
作製したものです
09:41
It has six legs -- there are the tuned, springy legs.
このスプロールというロボットには
調整された弾性のある脚が6本あり
09:44
It moves in a gait that an insect uses, and here it is
昆虫のように動きます
09:50
going on the treadmill. Now, what's important about this robot,
他のロボットと比べて重要な点は
09:53
compared to other robots, is that it can't see anything,
何も見えず何も感じず
脳がないにも関わらず
10:00
it can't feel anything, it doesn't have a brain, yet it can maneuver
何も見えず何も感じず
脳がないにも関わらず
10:03
over these obstacles without any difficulty whatsoever.
障害物を難なく越えられることです
10:09
It's this technique of building the properties into the form.
これが特性を形状に組み込む技術です
10:15
This is a graduate student. This is what he's doing to his thesis project --
この大学院生は 自分の卒論プロジェクトに
ひどいことをしていますが
10:19
very robust, if a graduate student
非常にしっかりしています
10:22
does that to his thesis project.
非常にしっかりしています
10:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:26
This is from McGill and University of Michigan. This is the RHex,
これはマギル大学と
ミシガン大学が作製したRHex
10:27
making its first outing in a demo.
初の試験走行にお出かけです
10:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:34
Same principle: it only has six moving parts,
可動部は6つのモーターだけですが
10:38
six motors, but it has springy, tuned legs. It moves in the gait of the insect.
調整された弾性のある脚で
昆虫の様に歩きます
10:43
It has the middle leg moving in synchrony with the front,
真ん中の脚は前脚と
反対側の後脚に合わせて動き
10:49
and the hind leg on the other side. Sort of an alternating tripod,
脚が交互に出る
三脚のようなものです
10:53
and they can negotiate obstacles just like the animal.
動物と同様に障害物を
乗り越えることができます
10:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:01
(Voice: Oh my God.)
(声:すごい)
11:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:08
Robert Full: It'll go on different surfaces -- here's sand --
この足は未完成ですが
砂の上でも大丈夫です
11:13
although we haven't perfected the feet yet, but I'll talk about that later.
この足は未完成ですが
砂の上でも大丈夫です
11:15
Here's RHex entering the woods.
森の中へ入って行く RHex
11:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:23
Again, this robot can't see anything, it can't feel anything,
このロボットは
見ることも感じることもありません
11:38
it has no brain. It's just working with a tuned mechanical system,
脳を持たず
機械的な構造だけで動いているのです
11:42
with very simple parts, but inspired from the fundamental dynamics of the animal.
その構造は非常にシンプルですが
動物の基本的な力学を応用したものです
11:48
(Voice: Ah, I love him, Bob.) RF: Here's it going down a pathway.
(声:ああ いいね)
道を下っているところです
11:58
I presented this to the jet propulsion lab at NASA, and they said
NASAのジェット推進研究所に
これを見せたところ
12:06
that they had no ability to go down craters to look for ice,
脚が付いたロボットは
複雑すぎるためー
12:09
and life, ultimately, on Mars. And he said --
火星で氷や生命を探すのは
無理だと言われました
12:13
especially with legged-robots, because they're way too complicated.
火星で氷や生命を探すのは
無理だと言われました
12:17
Nothing can do that. And I talk next. I showed them this video
そこで再度RHexをシンプルにして
このビデオを見せました
12:19
with the simple design of RHex here. And just to convince them
そこで再度RHexをシンプルにして
このビデオを見せました
12:24
we should go to Mars in 2011, I tinted the video orange
2011年の火星探索に採用されるよう
映像をオレンジ色に着色して
12:27
just to give them the sense of being on Mars.
火星に行った感じを出してみました
12:31
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:35
Another reason why animals have extraordinary performance,
動物が素晴らしい能力を持ち
12:43
and can go anywhere, is because they have an effective interaction
様々なところを動き回れる
もう1つの理由は
12:46
with the environment. The animal I'm going to show you,
環境との相互作用の利用です
12:49
that we studied to look at this, is the gecko.
この研究に用いたのはヤモリです
12:52
We have one here and notice its position. It's holding on.
ここに一匹います
しっかり張り付いていますね
12:56
Now I'm going to challenge you. I'm going show you a video.
ここでクイズです
ビデオを見てください
13:03
One of the animals is going to be running on the level,
一方は平面を走る様子ですが
13:06
and the other one's going to be running up a wall. Which one's which?
もう一方は壁を駆け上っています
どっちがどっちか分かりますか?
13:08
They're going at a meter a second. How many think the one on the left
秒速1mで走っています
左側が壁を登っていると思う人は?
13:12
is running up the wall?
秒速1mで走っています
左側が壁を登っていると思う人は?
13:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:19
Okay. The point is it's really hard to tell, isn't it? It's incredible,
全然見分けがつかないですよね
学生たちもわかりませんでした
13:23
we looked at students do this and they couldn't tell.
全然見分けがつかないですよね
学生たちもわかりませんでした
13:28
They can run up a wall at a meter a second, 15 steps per second,
秒速1mで壁を登り
1秒間に15歩進みますが
13:30
and they look like they're running on the level. How do they do this?
どちらも平地を走っているようです
どうやっているのでしょうか?
13:33
It's just phenomenal. The one on the right was going up the hill.
驚くべき能力です ちなみに
右側のヤモリが壁を登っています
13:37
How do they do this? They have bizarre toes. They have toes
どういう原理かというと
ヤモリの足指が変わっているんです
13:43
that uncurl like party favors when you blow them out,
パーティーで使う吹き戻しみたいに
まっすぐに伸びてー
13:47
and then peel off the surface, like tape.
表面からテープのようにはがれます
13:51
Like if we had a piece of tape now, we'd peel it this way.
表面からテープのようにはがれます
13:54
They do this with their toes. It's bizarre! This peeling inspired
足の指でそんなことやるなんて
不思議ですよね
13:56
iRobot -- that we work with -- to build Mecho-Geckos.
iRobot社はこれを応用し
『Mecho-Geckos(メッコーゲッコー)』を作製
14:03
Here's a legged version and a tractor version, or a bulldozer version.
脚がついたものと
トラクター版のブルドーザー型です
14:06
Let's see some of the geckos move with some video,
ビデオでヤモリの動きを見た後に
ロボットの動きも見てください
14:13
and then I'll show you a little bit of a clip of the robots.
ビデオでヤモリの動きを見た後に
ロボットの動きも見てください
14:15
Here's the gecko running up a vertical surface. There it goes,
垂直面を駆け上がるヤモリです
14:18
in real time. There it goes again. Obviously, we have to slow this down a little bit.
もう一度見ましょう
スローにしないとダメですね
14:21
You can't use regular cameras.
普通のカメラは使えません
毎秒1000フレームでないと見えません
14:28
You have to take 1,000 pictures per second to see this.
普通のカメラは使えません
毎秒1000フレームでないと見えません
14:30
And here's some video at 1,000 frames per second.
これが毎秒1000フレームの映像です
14:33
Now, I want you to look at the animal's back.
このヤモリの背中を見てください
14:36
Do you see how much it's bending like that? We can't figure that out --
曲がっているのが見えますか?
これが何故できるのかわかっていません
14:38
that's an unsolved mystery. We don't know how it works.
曲がっているのが見えますか?
これが何故できるのかわかっていません
14:41
If you have a son or a daughter that wants to come to Berkeley,
もし皆さんの ご子息が
私の研究所に来てくれたら
14:44
come to my lab and we'll figure this out. Okay, send them to Berkeley
それも解明されるでしょう
バークレーでの勉強を勧めて下さい
14:47
because that's the next thing I want to do. Here's the gecko mill.
これはヤモリのランニングマシーンです
14:51
(Laughter)
これはヤモリのランニングマシーンです
14:54
It's a see-through treadmill with a see-through treadmill belt,
マシーンもベルトも透明なので
14:55
so we can watch the animal's feet, and videotape them
ベルトの反対側から足の動きを観察し
14:58
through the treadmill belt, to see how they move.
ビデオに録画することもできます
15:01
Here's the animal that we have here, running on a vertical surface.
このヤモリは垂直の壁を駆け上っています
15:04
Pick a foot and try to watch a toe, and see if you can see what the animal's doing.
足指に注目して
ヤモリが何をしているか見て下さい
15:08
See it uncurl and then peel these toes.
足指を伸ばして剥がしていますね
15:14
It can do this in 14 milliseconds. It's unbelievable.
かかった時間は0.014秒
驚異的な速さです
15:16
Here are the robots that they inspire, the Mecho-Geckos from iRobot.
それを応用したのが
iRobot社のメッコーゲッコー
15:23
First we'll see the animals toes peeling -- look at that.
まずヤモリの足の指が
はがれる様子を見てください
15:27
And here's the peeling action of the Mecho-Gecko.
そしてこちらが メッコーゲッコー
15:32
It uses a pressure-sensitive adhesive to do it.
これには感圧接着剤が使われています
15:36
Peeling in the animal. Peeling in the Mecho-Gecko --
ヤモリとメッコーゲッコー
15:39
that allows them climb autonomously. Can go on the flat surface,
これによって壁や天井などの
平面を自律的に登ることができます
15:42
transition to a wall, and then go onto a ceiling.
これによって壁や天井などの
平面を自律的に登ることができます
15:45
There's the bulldozer version. Now, it doesn't use pressure-sensitive glue.
これはブルドーザー型
動物の方は感圧接着剤を使っていません
15:48
The animal does not use that.
ヤモリは これを使っていません
15:54
But that's what we're limited to, at the moment.
しかしこれが現時点での限界です
15:56
What does the animal do? The animal has weird toes.
ヤモリはどうしているかというと
15:58
And if you look at the toes, they have these little leaves there,
足指には小さなひだが沢山あり
16:03
and if you blow them up and zoom in, you'll see
拡大してみると
ひだに細い筋が見えます
16:07
that's there's little striations in these leaves.
拡大してみると
ひだに細い筋が見えます
16:09
And if you zoom in 270 times, you'll see it looks like a rug.
270倍に拡大して見ると
絨毯のように見えます
16:12
And if you blow that up, and zoom in 900 times,
900倍では細かい毛が見られ
16:19
you see there are hairs there, tiny hairs. And if you look carefully,
900倍では細かい毛が見られ
16:22
those tiny hairs have striations. And if you zoom in on those 30,000 times,
よく見ると毛にも筋があります
さらに30,000倍に拡大すると
16:27
you'll see each hair has split ends.
枝毛になっているのが見えます
16:33
And if you blow those up, they have these little structures on the end.
さらに拡大すると
枝毛はヘラのような形に見えます
16:36
The smallest branch of the hairs looks like spatulae,
さらに拡大すると
枝毛はヘラのような形に見えます
16:41
and an animal like that has one billion of these nano-size split ends,
このナノサイズの枝毛を
ヤモリは10億本持っていて
16:43
to get very close to the surface. In fact, there's the diameter of your hair --
物の表面につくことができます
人の毛の直径はこれだけですがー
16:50
a gecko has two million of these, and each hair has 100 to 1,000 split ends.
ヤモリ1匹に200万本の毛があり
1本の毛先が100から1000本に分かれています
16:55
Think of the contact of that that's possible.
これがくっつくのを想像してください
17:01
We were fortunate to work with another group
幸運にもスタンフォード大の研究者たちが
17:04
at Stanford that built us a special manned sensor,
特殊なセンサーを作ってくれたので
17:06
that we were able to measure the force of an individual hair.
これで1本の毛の力を測定できました
17:08
Here's an individual hair with a little split end there.
これは 枝毛のある1本の毛ですが
17:11
When we measured the forces, they were enormous.
この毛の力を測ると
とても強いことが分かりました
17:16
They were so large that a patch of hairs about this size --
このくらいの面積にある毛だけで
17:18
the gecko's foot could support the weight of a small child,
ヤモリの足は小さな子どもくらいの重量 --
17:21
about 40 pounds, easily. Now, how do they do it?
20kgほどを簡単に支えられるのです
その仕組みは?
17:25
We've recently discovered this. Do they do it by friction?
これは最近解明されました
摩擦でしょうか?
17:29
No, force is too low. Do they do it by electrostatics?
いいえ 力が弱すぎます
では静電気でしょうか?
17:33
No, you can change the charge -- they still hold on.
違います
電荷を変えても ひっついています
17:36
Do they do it by interlocking? That's kind of a like a Velcro-like thing.
マジックテープのように
絡まり合うのでしょうか?
17:38
No, you can put them on molecular smooth surfaces -- they don't do it.
違います それでは
スベスベな面には張り付けません
17:41
How about suction? They stick on in a vacuum.
吸盤のようなものでしょうか?
真空の環境でも くっつきます
17:44
How about wet adhesion? Or capillary adhesion?
ぬれた物をくっつける
界面張力でしょうか?
17:48
They don't have any glue, and they even stick under water just fine.
糊を分泌するわけでもないのに
ヤモリは水中でくっつきます
17:51
If you put their foot under water, they grab on.
糊を分泌するわけでもないのに
ヤモリは水中でくっつきます
17:54
How do they do it then? Believe it or not, they grab on
では このひっくつ力は何でしょう?
17:56
by intermolecular forces, by Van der Waals forces.
なんと分子間力
ファンデルワールス力です
18:00
You know, you probably had this a long time ago in chemistry,
昔 化学の授業でやりましたよね
2つの原子が近づくとー
18:04
where you had these two atoms, they're close together,
昔 化学の授業でやりましたよね
2つの原子が近づくとー
18:06
and the electrons are moving around. That tiny force is sufficient
電子分布による小さな力が集まって
18:08
to allow them to do that because it's added up so many times
吸着できるまでの力になります
18:11
with these small structures.
それが この小さな構造で起こっているのです
18:14
What we're doing is, we're taking that inspiration of the hairs,
この毛を仕組みを使った製品を
18:17
and with another colleague at Berkeley, we're manufacturing them.
バークレーの同僚と共に開発しています
18:22
And just recently we've made a breakthrough, where we now believe
ごく最近 研究が飛躍的に進み
18:27
we're going to be able to create the first synthetic, self-cleaning,
初の合成自洗式
乾燥接着剤を開発できそうです
18:30
dry adhesive. Many companies are interested in this.
多くの企業が興味を示しています
18:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:40
We also presented to Nike even.
ナイキにも売り込みました
18:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:48
We'll see where this goes. We were so excited about this
どうなるか本当にわくわくしています
18:54
that we realized that that small-size scale --
ナノ・スケールの非常に小さい世界では
18:57
and where everything gets sticky, and gravity doesn't matter anymore --
全てのものに吸着力が生まれ
重力を克服するのです
19:00
we needed to look at ants and their feet, because
アリの足も研究しました
19:03
one of my other colleagues at Berkeley has built a six-millimeter silicone
バークレーの同僚が
6ミリの半導体ロボットを作ったのですが
19:06
robot with legs. But it gets stuck. It doesn't move very well.
しかしつっかえてしまって
うまく動けません
19:11
But the ants do, and we'll figure out why, so that ultimately
問題なく動き回るアリの原理を解明し
19:14
we'll make this move. And imagine: you're going to be able
これが動けるようにする予定です
19:17
to have swarms of these six-millimeter robots available to run around.
皆さんも たくさんの小さいロボットを
動かせるようになるのを想像して下さい
19:20
Where's this going? I think you can see it already.
この研究がどこに行き着くのでしょう?
19:25
Clearly, the Internet is already having eyes and ears,
すでにインターネットは
ウェブカムなどの目と耳がありますが
19:28
you have web cams and so forth. But it's going to also have legs and hands.
将来は 手と足も付くのではないでしょうか
19:32
You're going to be able to do programmable
このようなロボットに指示を与えて
19:36
work through these kinds of robots, so that you can run,
いろいろな事が行えるようになり
好きな所を走ったり
19:38
fly and swim anywhere. We saw David Kelly is at the beginning of that with his fish.
泳いだり 飛ぶ事ができるでしょう
デイビッド・ケリーの魚ロボットが良い例です
19:42
So, in conclusion, I think the message is clear.
最後にメッセージがあります
19:51
If you need a message, if nature's not enough, if you care about
自然は それ自体大切なものですが
19:53
search and rescue, or mine clearance, or medicine,
捜索救助や地雷除去 医療など
様々な問題に取り組むには
19:57
or the various things we're working on, we must preserve
捜索救助や地雷除去 医療など
様々な問題に取り組むには
19:59
nature's designs, otherwise these secrets will be lost forever.
自然のデザインを保護すべきです
そうしないと秘密が永遠に失われます
20:03
Thank you.
ありがとうございました (拍手)
20:07
(Applause)
ありがとうございました (拍手)
20:08
Translated by Hidehito Sumitomo
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Robert Full - Biologist
Robert Full studies cockroach legs and gecko feet. His research is helping build tomorrow's robots, based on evolution's ancient engineering.

Why you should listen

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Full is fascinated by the motion of creatures like cockroaches, crabs and geckos having many legs, unusual feet or talented tails. He has led an effort to demonstrate the value of learning from Nature by the creating interdisciplinary collaborations of biologists, engineers, mathematicians and computer scientists from academia and industry. He founded CiBER, the Center for interdisciplinary Bio-inspiration in Education and Research, and the Poly-PEDAL Laboratory, which studies the Performance, Energetics and Dynamics of Animal Locomotion (PEDAL) in many-footed creatures (Poly).

His research shows how studying a diversity of animals leads to the discovery of general principles which inspire the design of novel circuits, artificial muscles, exoskeletons, versatile scampering legged search-and-rescue robots and synthetic self-cleaning dry adhesives based on gecko feet. He is passionate about discovery-based education leading to innovation -- and he even helped Pixar’s insect animations in the film A Bug's Life.

More profile about the speaker
Robert Full | Speaker | TED.com