sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2009

Rob Hopkins: Transition to a world without oil

ロブ • ホプキンス: 脱石油世界への移行

July 24, 2009

ロブ・ホプキンス氏は世界の石油が尽きようとしていると警告しています。その解決策として彼が提案するのは、移行政策というユニークなアイデアです。政策の狙いは化石燃料に一切頼らないシステムやコミュニティー造りであり、そのために石油のない生活に備え、贅沢から脱する必要性を訴えます。

Rob Hopkins - Resilience leader
Rob Hopkins is the founder of the Transition movement, a radically hopeful and community-driven approach to creating societies independent of fossil fuel. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
As a culture, we tell ourselves lots of stories
文化の特性として 私たちはよく物語を使って
00:18
about the future,
将来のことを語り合います
00:21
and where we might move forward from this point.
どんな将来が待っているのかを語り合うのです
00:23
Some of those stories are that
物語によっては 誰か一人が
00:25
somebody is just going to sort everything out for us.
全員の代わりに問題を解決してくれたり
00:27
Other stories are that everything is on the verge of unraveling.
あるいは世界の崩壊寸前を予言するものもあります
00:30
But I want to tell you a different story here today.
私が今日お話しする物語はそれとは違います
00:34
Like all stories, it has a beginning.
このようにしてこの物語は始まります
00:36
My work, for a long time, has been involved in education,
私が長く携わってきた仕事は教育関係で
00:39
in teaching people practical skills
人々に実用的なスキルを教えてきました
00:42
for sustainability,
特に持続可能な活動に焦点を置いて
00:44
teaching people how to take responsibility
我々はどうすれば 責任をもって
00:46
for growing some of their own food,
自分たちの食糧を栽培できるのか
00:48
how to build buildings using local materials,
地域の材料で建物を建てられるのか
00:50
how to generate their own energy, and so on.
自分たちでエネルギーを作れるか などです
00:52
I lived in Ireland, built the first straw-bale houses in Ireland,
アイルランドに住んでいた時に
国内最初のわら俵の家を建てました
00:55
and some cob buildings and all this kind of thing.
トウモロコシの穂軸でも家を建てました
00:59
But all my work for many years was focused
しかし 私の活動の全てが同じ理論を出発点としています
01:02
around the idea that sustainability
それは 持続可能な活動とは
01:05
means basically looking at
基本的にはグローバル化した経済の
01:07
the globalized economic growth model,
成長モデルを分析して
01:09
and moderating what comes in at one end,
一方で投入される量を抑え
01:12
and moderating the outputs at the other end.
また他方で産出する量も抑えることです
01:14
And then I came into contact with a way of looking at things
ある時 これを根本的に変える
01:17
which actually changed that profoundly.
新しい視点に出会ったのです
01:20
And in order to introduce you to that,
それを本日ご紹介するわけですが
01:22
I've got something here that I'm going to unveil,
そのカギとなるある物をまずお見せします
01:24
which is one of the great marvels of the modern age.
ここにありますのは 現代社会の奇跡の一つで
01:26
And it's something so astounding and so astonishing
あまりにも素晴らしく驚嘆すべきもので
01:29
that I think maybe as I remove this cloth
この布をめくると同時に 皆さんが圧倒されて
01:31
a suitable gasp of amazement might be appropriate.
息を飲む音が聞こえてくるのではないかと思っています
01:34
If you could help me with that it would be fantastic.
どうぞ 遠慮なく驚きの声をお聞かせください
01:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:44
This is a liter of oil.
これは 1リットルの石油です
01:45
This bottle of oil,
このボトルに入っている石油は
01:48
distilled over a hundred million years of geological time,
1億年以上もの地質学的時間と古代の太陽光で
01:51
ancient sunlight,
できた結晶です
01:54
contains the energy equivalent of about five weeks
これを人間の肉体労働力に換算すると
01:56
hard human manual labor --
5週間分のエネルギー量になります
01:58
equivalent to about 35 strong people
または 35人の力持ちが
02:01
coming round and working for you.
仕事を手助けしに来てくれるのを想像してください
02:05
We can turn it into a dazzling array of materials,
石油から多くの見事な素材を作り出すことができます
02:08
medicine, modern clothing,
薬品、衣服、ノートパソコン
02:12
laptops, a whole range of different things.
実に多様な物を作り出せます
02:14
It gives us an energy return that's unimaginable, historically.
歴史的に 想像を超えたエネルギーを供給してくれました
02:18
We've based the design of our settlements,
私たちの村落のデザインも
02:23
our business models, our transport plans,
ビジネスや交通の設計も 石油を前提にしています
02:25
even the idea of economic growth, some would argue,
経済成長の理論も 石油が永続するという前提のもと
02:27
on the assumption that we will have this in perpetuity.
成り立っているのだと主張する人もいます
02:30
Yet, when we take a step back,
しかし ふと立ち止まって
02:34
and look over the span of history,
歴史をふり返ってみると
02:37
at what we might call the petroleum interval,
石油時代と呼んできた時代は実は
02:39
it's a short period in history
とても短い間でしかないことに気付かされます
02:42
where we've discovered this extraordinary material,
その短期間で 石油という強力な資源を発見し
02:44
and then based a whole way of life around it.
私達の生活を石油に依存させてきたのです
02:47
But as we straddle the top of this energy mountain, at this stage,
しかし 今はこのエネルギーの山の頂上で
大見え張って立っていますが
02:50
we move from a time where our economic success,
私達の社会経済や 個人の能力と幸福を
02:54
our sense of individual prowess and well-being
最大にするためには より多くを
02:57
is directly linked to how much of this we consume,
消費すればよかった時代は終わりを告げます
03:00
to a time when actually our degree of oil dependency
これからは 石油への依存度がそのまま
03:04
is our degree of vulnerability.
私達の弱さを表す時代になります
03:07
And it's increasingly clear that we
今日ますますはっきり分かってきているのは
03:09
aren't going to be able to rely on the fact that
石油が際限なく利用できるという考えからは
03:11
we're going to have this at our disposal forever.
近いうちに脱しないといけないということです
03:13
For every four barrels of oil that we consume,
私たちが今日4バレルの石油を消費している間に
03:16
we only discover one.
発見される石油は1バレルのみです
03:18
And that gap continues to widen.
しかもこの差は広がりつつあります
03:20
There is also the fact that the amount of energy
さらには掘り出した石油から最終的に
03:22
that we get back from the oil that we discover is falling.
生み出せるエネルギー量は減少傾向にあります
03:24
In the 1930s we got 100 units of energy back
1930年代には 堀出すためのエネルギー投入量に対して
03:27
for every one that we put in to extract it.
その100倍のエネルギーを生み出すことができました
03:30
Completely unprecedented, historically.
過去にこのような前例はありません
03:33
Already that's fallen to about 11.
現在はこの比が11倍まで低下しました
03:35
And that's why, now,
このような背景があって 今日では
03:37
the new breakthroughs, the new frontiers
石油を掘り出すための新しいフロンティアが
03:39
in terms of oil extraction are scrambling about in Alberta,
アルバータや海底などの地域にまで
03:41
or at the bottom of the oceans.
競い合うようにして広がっているのです
03:44
There are 98 oil-producing nations in the world.
世界には98の産油国があります
03:46
But of those, 65 have already passed their peak.
しかしそのうちの65国は既に絶頂期を越えています
03:49
The moment when the world on average passes this peak,
同様に世界平均がピークを過ぎる日がいつ来てしまうのか
03:52
people wonder when that's going to happen.
人々は心配しています
03:55
And there is an emerging case
現実にその日が
03:57
that maybe that was what happened last July
来てしまったのが去年の7月だったかもしれません
03:58
when the oil prices were so high.
石油価格が高騰したときです
04:00
But are we to assume that the same brilliance
かつて 我々のすばらしい才能
04:02
and creativity and adaptability
想像力と適応力で
04:04
that got us up to the top of that energy mountain in the first place
エネルギー量の絶頂期まで登りつめましたが
04:06
is somehow mysteriously going to evaporate
エネルギーがなくなっていく現在の状況で
04:09
when we have to design a creative way back down the other side?
あの時と同じ才能が花開かず
我々は無力に立ちすくむだけなのでしょうか
04:12
No. But the thinking that we have to come up with
そんなことはありません 
重要なことは 政策を立てる時に
04:16
has to be based on a realistic assessment
現実的な現状分析をもとに
04:19
of where we are.
アイデアを育てるということです
04:22
There is also the issue of climate change,
気候変動という問題もまた
04:24
is the other thing that underpins this transition approach.
私の考える
もう一つの移行政策の軸となるものです
04:26
But the thing that I notice, as I talk to climate scientists,
気象学者の話を聞いて気づくのは
04:28
is the increasingly terrified look they have in their eyes,
新しいデータを入手するたびに 彼らの目に映る
04:31
as the data that's coming in,
恐怖の念が段々強くなっていることです
04:34
which is far ahead of what the IPCC are talking about.
しかもそのデータというのは
IPCCが発表した物よりも最新のデータなのです
04:36
So the IPCC said
つまり IPCCの発表では
04:40
that we might see significant breakup
最悪のシナリオとして北極の氷が
04:42
of the arctic ice in 2100, in their worst case scenario.
2100年までに大規模に解けてしまうということでしたが
04:44
Actually, if current trends continue,
実は 今の状況が続いた場合
04:47
it could all be gone in five or 10 years' time.
今後5 - 10年間で全て消えてしまう可能性があるのです
04:50
If just three percent of the carbon locked up in the arctic permafrost
北極の永久凍土層に含まれている炭素がたった3%でも
04:52
is released as the world warms,
地球温暖化とともに大気に放出されれば
04:56
it would offset all the savings that we need to make,
気候変動を回避するために 今後40年間で
04:58
in carbon, over the next 40 years to avoid runaway climate change.
削減しなくてはいけない炭素量を相殺してしまいます
05:00
We have no choice other than deep and urgent decarbonization.
すると徹底的な二酸化炭素削減策を選ぶ他ありません
05:03
But I'm always very interested to think about
私がいつも考えとして興味を持っているのは
05:08
what might the stories be
我々の何世代か後の人々が
05:10
that the generations further down the slope from us
現在の私たちのことを
05:12
are going to tell about us.
どのように物語るかということです
05:15
"The generation that lived at the top of the mountain,
「山の頂上で暮らしていて 来る日も来る日も浮かれ騒ぎ
05:17
that partied so hard, and so abused its inheritance."
遺産を乱用してしまった世代」でしょうか
05:20
And one of the ways I like to do that
これを想像する時に私がするのは
05:25
is to look back at the stories people used to tell
私たちの前の世代の物語を振り返ることです
05:27
before we had cheap oil, before we had fossil fuels,
安い石油も 化石燃料もなかった時代に
05:29
and people relied on their own muscle, animal muscle energy,
自分たちの力 あるいは動物の力を利用し
05:32
or a little bit of wind, little bit of water energy.
ほんの少しの風力と水力を利用していた世代です
05:35
We had stories like "The Seven-League Boots":
当時は「七里靴」などの物語がありました
05:38
the giant who had these boots, where, once you put them on,
それは巨人が履く靴の話で
05:41
with every stride you could cover seven leagues, or 21 miles,
たった一歩で35キロも進める靴です
05:43
a kind of travel completely unimaginable
無限に使える燃料がない時代では
05:47
to people without that kind of energy at their disposal.
想像の世界の中だけの話でした
05:49
Stories like The Magic Porridge Pot,
「魔法の鍋」という物語もありました
05:52
where you had a pot where if you knew the magic words,
魔法の言葉ひとつで 好きなだけの量の
05:55
this pot would just make as much food as you liked,
おかゆを作り出してくれる鍋です
05:57
without you having to do any work,
自分は何もしなくていい
06:00
provided you could remember the other magic word to stop it making porridge.
忘れてはいけないのは 作るのを止める魔法の言葉です
06:02
Otherwise you'd flood your entire town with warm porridge.
それがないと 町中がかゆであふれてしまいます
06:05
There is the story of "The Elves and the Shoemaker."
「靴職人と小人たち」という物語もありました
06:09
The people who make shoes go to sleep, wake up in the morning,
靴職人が 夜寝ている間に
06:12
and all the shoes are magically made for them.
小人が靴を作っておいてくれるのです
06:14
It's something that was unimaginable to people then.
すべて 現実には考えられないことでした
06:16
Now we have the seven-league boots
今日では 七里靴として
06:19
in the form of Ryanair and Easyjet.
安い航空会社があります
06:22
We have the magic porridge pot
魔法の鍋のような
06:25
in the form of Walmart and Tesco.
スーパーが存在します
06:27
And we have the elves in the form of China.
小人の代わりに中国という「製造工場」があります
06:29
But we don't appreciate what an astonishing
私たちは 昔ならとても驚くべきことを
06:32
thing that has been.
当たり前だと感じているのです
06:36
And what are the stories that we tell ourselves now,
そして今 これからどこに向かおうかと考えて
06:38
as we look forward about where we're going to go.
自らに どんな物語を語れるでしょうか?
06:40
And I would argue that there are four. There is the idea of business as usual,
4つ考えられるでしょう
まず このままの平常業務です
06:43
that the future will be like the present, just more of it.
今と同じように未来も続くと考えていくのです
06:46
But as we've seen over the last year, I think that's an idea
でも去年一年を振り返ると この物語には
06:49
that is increasingly coming into question.
疑問に思うところもあります
06:51
And in terms of climate change,
気候変動に関しては
06:53
is something that is not actually feasible.
実際 良い方向には向かっていないのです
06:55
There is the idea of hitting the wall,
壁に激突するという考えもあります
06:59
that actually somehow everything is so fragile
世界の全ては脆弱で
07:01
that it might just all unravel and collapse.
ばらばらに崩壊してしまうという見方です
07:04
This is a popular story in some places.
こういう見方が幅を利かせている地域もあります
07:06
The third story is the idea that technology can solve everything,
三番目の話は 技術が解決の鍵になり
07:09
that technology can somehow get us through this completely.
私たちが世界崩壊を切り抜ける切り札になるということです
07:12
And it's an idea that I think is very prevalent at these TED Talks,
これはTEDのスピーチでよく話題になります
07:16
the idea that we can invent our way out of a profound
深刻な経済状況や エネルギー危機から
07:20
economic and energy crisis,
抜け出す方法が見つかるだとか
07:23
that a move to a knowledge economy
知識経済への移行で このエネルギー危機を
07:25
can somehow neatly sidestep those energy constraints,
回避しようだとか
07:27
the idea that we'll discover some fabulous new source of energy
あるすばらしいエネルギー源を見つけ
07:30
that will mean we can sweep all concerns
それがエネルギー安全保障についての
07:33
about energy security to one side,
懸念を拭い去り
07:35
the idea that we can step off neatly
私たちが完全に再生可能な世界に
07:38
onto a completely renewable world.
歩みを進められるだとか
07:40
But the world isn't Second Life.
でも この世は仮想現実ではありません
07:42
We can't create new land and new energy systems at the click of a mouse.
マウスをクリックして新しい土地や
エネルギーシステムを生み出せる訳ではないのです
07:44
And as we sit, exchanging free ideas with each other,
そして 私たちが座って
自由に意見を交わしている間にも
07:48
there are still people mining coal
石炭を採掘して
07:51
in order to power the servers, extracting the minerals
コンピューターサーバーの電力を供給したり
07:53
to make all of those things.
産業用の鉱物を採掘している人がいるのです
07:55
The breakfast that we eat as we sit down
メールをチェックしながら
07:57
to check our email in the morning
食べる朝食も
07:59
is still transported at great distances,
遠くから運ばれてくるのです
08:01
usually at the expense of the local, more resilient
これはかつて 私たちを支えていた
08:03
food systems that would have supplied that in the past,
地元産でより強靭な食料システムを
損ねました
08:05
which we've so effectively devalued and dismantled.
地元産の食料はまったく顧みられず
崩壊させられたのです
08:08
We can be astonishingly inventive and creative.
私たち人類は驚くほど創造力に富み
発明の才能があります
08:12
But we also live in a world with very real constraints and demands.
同時に現実的なさまざまな制約と要請のある
世界に住んでいます
08:15
Energy and technology are not the same thing.
エネルギーと技術は同じものではありません
08:19
What I'm involved with is the transition response.
私がかかわっている政策は
移行政策なのです
08:22
And this is really about looking the challenges
移行政策において
私たちは自分たちが直面している
08:24
of peak oil and climate change square in the face,
石油時代のピーク越えや気候変動という問題に
08:27
and responding with a creativity and an adaptability
本当に必要な独創性や適応力
08:29
and an imagination that we really need.
そして想像力で応えるのです
08:32
It's something which has spread incredibly fast.
この政策は
信じられないほど速く広がっていきます
08:35
And it is something which has several characteristics.
そしてこの政策には
いくつかの特性があります
08:38
It's viral. It seems to spread under the radar very, very quickly.
人々に伝染し
レーダーをかなりのスピードでくぐりぬけ
08:40
It's open source. It's something which everybody who's involved with it
あらゆる人が共有し
この政策に関わる全ての人が
08:45
develops and passes on as they work with it.
連携して発展させ
伝えていくものです
08:49
It's self-organizing. There is no great central organization
これは自立した政策で
中央の組織が推し進めているのではありません
08:53
that pushes this; people just pick up an idea
人々が考え
その理論に基づいて運営し
08:56
and they run with it, and they implement it where they are.
現状から実践的な行動に移すのです
08:58
It's solutions-focused. It's very much looking at what people can do
解決策に焦点を当てながら
09:01
where they are, to respond to this.
現状において
本当に何ができるかに目をむけ対処するのです
09:04
It's sensitive to place and to scale.
取り組む地域や規模によってこの政策は変わります
09:07
Transitional is completely different.
移行政策には様々な形態があります
09:09
Transition groups in Chile, transition groups in the U.S., transition groups here,
チリ、アメリカ、そしてこの地域の移行政策グループ
09:11
what they're doing looks very different in every place that you go to.
場所によって異なった活動をしています
09:15
It learns very much from its mistakes.
各グループは失敗から多くを学び
09:18
And it feels historic. It tries to create a sense
歴史的に重要な活動と感じ
09:20
that this is a historic opportunity
今までにない驚くべき仕事をする
09:23
to do something really extraordinary.
歴史に残る機会だという意識を生み出すのです
09:25
And it's a process which is really joyful.
これは本当に喜びの多い活動です
09:27
People have a huge amount of fun doing this,
大いに楽しんで活動し
09:29
reconnecting with other people as they do it.
他の人々とつながりを持てます
09:31
One of the things that underpins it is this idea of resilience.
この活動の軸となっているのが
強靭さという考え方です
09:34
And I think, in many ways, the idea of resilience
いろいろな点でこの理論は
09:37
is a more useful concept than the idea of sustainability.
持続可能な活動よりも有益なのです
09:40
The idea of resilience comes from the study of ecology.
強靭性はエコロジーの研究に基づき
09:44
And it's really about how systems,
私たちの社会制度や住居が いかにして
09:46
settlements, withstand shock from the outside.
外部からの衝撃に持ちこたえるか
ということを扱います
09:49
When they encounter shock from the outside
外部からの衝撃に直面しても
09:52
that they don't just unravel and fall to pieces.
簡単に壊れて粉々にくだけはしません
09:54
And I think it's a more useful concept than sustainability, as I said.
重ねて言いますが持続可能な活動よりも
有益な概念なのです
09:56
When our supermarkets have only two or three days' worth of food in them
スーパーマーケットに
一度に数日分の食料しか置けない場合
10:00
at any one time, often sustainability tends to focus on
持続可能な活動では次の点に注目します
10:04
the energy efficiency of the freezers
冷蔵庫のエネルギー効率や
10:07
and on the packaging that the lettuces are wrapped up in.
レタスが包まれている包装に目を向けるのです
10:09
Looking through the lens of resilience,
強靭性というレンズを通して見ると
10:12
we really question how we've let ourselves get into a situation
私たちはかなり外部の影響を受けやすい状況に
10:14
that's so vulnerable.
自らを追い込んでしまっていると言えるのです
10:18
Resilience runs much deeper:
強靭性の考えをもっと掘り下げられます
10:20
it's about building modularity into what we do,
行動規範に独立性を導入し
10:22
building surge breakers into how we organize the basic things that support us.
私たちを支える基本的な秩序構造の中に
緩衝材の役目を構築することです
10:24
This is a photograph of the Bristol and District
これは1897年に撮影された
10:29
Market Gardeners Association, in 1897.
ブリストル地区市場向け農園経営者協会の写真です
10:31
This is at a time when the city of Bristol,
ブリストル市は
10:35
which is quite close to here,
ここからかなり近く
10:37
was surrounded by commercial market gardens,
そのころは市場向け農園がいたる所にあり
10:39
which provided a significant amount of the food
非常に多くの農産物をブリストル市民に供給し
10:41
that was consumed in the town, and created a lot of employment for people, as well.
人々はそれらを消費しまた多くの雇用も生み出しました
10:44
There was a degree of resilience, if you like, at that time,
そのころは言ってみればある程度
強靭性があったとみられます
10:48
which we can now only look back on with envy.
今は羨望のまなざしでその頃を振り返るだけです
10:51
So how does this transition idea work?
それではこの理論は
どう展開するのでしょう?
10:55
So basically, you have a group of people who are excited by the idea.
基本的には
この政策に賛同する人々とグループを作り活動します
10:57
They pick up some of the tools that we've developed.
彼らは私たちが開発したツールを活用して
11:00
They start to run an awareness-raising program
意識改革プログラムを開始するのです
11:03
looking at how this might actually work in the town.
地域で本当にうまく進んでいくかどうか状況を見ます
11:05
They show films, they give talks, and so on.
映画の上映や 講演会などもあります
11:08
It's a process which is playful and creative
これは楽しく創造的な作業です
11:10
and informative.
そして得るところが多い作業です
11:13
Then they start to form working groups, looking at different aspects of this,
それからいくつかの作業グループを作り
様々な面から移行政策を進め
11:15
and then from that, there emerge a whole lot of projects
そこから移行政策自体が支持し可能にする
11:18
which then the transition project itself
多くのプロジェクトが
11:21
starts to support and enable.
始まるのです
11:23
So it started out with some work I was involved in in Ireland,
アイルランドでの私の関わった活動が最初で
11:28
where I was teaching, and has since spread.
そこで私が教え
そこから広まっていきました
11:30
There are now over 200 formal transition projects.
今公式な移行政策のプロジェクトが
200以上あります
11:32
And there are thousands of others who are at what we call the mulling stage.
そして何千ものグループが
いわゆる検討段階に入っています
11:35
They are mulling whether they're going to take it further.
彼らは更に推し進めていくか検討中です
11:39
And actually a lot of them are doing huge amounts of stuff.
そして彼らの多くは
本当に非常に多くの活動をしています
11:41
But what do they actually do? You know, it's a kind of nice idea,
実際何をするのか
理論は良いですが
11:44
but what do they actually do on the ground?
実際現場では何をやっているのでしょう?
11:46
Well, I think it's really important to make the point that actually
この組織だけで全ての活動をしているわけではない
11:48
you know, this isn't something which is going to do everything on its own.
と言っておいたほうが良いようですね
11:52
We need international legislation from Copenhagen and so on.
私たちの活動には
コペンハーゲン合意などの国際立法が必要です
11:55
We need national responses. We need local government responses.
国民や、地方政府からの反応も必要です
11:59
But all of those things are going to be much easier
でもこれら全てが
これからはもっと容易になるでしょう
12:02
if we have communities that are vibrant and coming up with ideas
もし地域に活気があり 考えを出し合い
12:05
and leading from the front, making unelectable policies electable,
先頭で指揮を取り 向こう5年から10年をかけて
12:08
over the next 5 to 10 years.
見込みがない政策を 実現可能にしましょう
12:11
Some of the things that emerge from it are local food projects,
地域食料のプロジェクトは
こんな活動から生まれました
12:13
like community-supported agriculture schemes,
地域密着型農業プログラムや
12:16
urban food production, creating local food directories, and so on.
都市型の食糧生産
地域の食糧供給者名簿などがあります
12:18
A lot of places now are starting to set up their own energy companies,
多くの地域で
地域のエネルギー供給会社を設立し
12:22
community-owned energy companies,
地域がこのエネルギー会社を所有し
12:25
where the community can invest money into itself,
地域がこの会社に投資し
12:27
to start putting in place
私たちが必要とする
12:29
the kind of renewable energy infrastructure that we need.
再生エネルギーの供給基盤を整備します
12:31
A lot of places are working with their local schools.
多くの地域が
その地域の学校と協力して活動しています
12:33
Newent in the Forest of Dean: big polytunnel they built for the school;
ニューエントでは
学校に長いビニールハウスを作り
12:36
the kids are learning how to grow food.
子供たちは食物の育て方を学んでいます
12:38
Promoting recycling, things like garden-share,
コミュニティーガーデンのような
リサイクル活動を進め
12:40
that matches up people who don't have a garden
植物を育てたいけれど畑を持たない人々と
12:43
who would like to grow food, with people who have gardens they aren't using anymore.
使わない畑を所有している人々の
ニーズをつき合わせるのです
12:45
Planting productive trees throughout urban spaces.
街に多くの利益を生む木を植えたりもしています
12:48
And also starting to play around with the idea of
そして 代替通貨の導入も
12:51
alternative currencies.
検討しています
12:53
This is Lewes in Sussex,
こちらはサセックス州のルイスです
12:55
who have recently launched the Lewes Pound,
最近 ルイスポンドを導入しました
12:57
a currency that you can only spend within the town,
ルイスポンドは ルイス内でのみ使える通貨で
13:00
as a way of starting to cycle money within the local economy.
地域内で経済を循環させるのです
13:02
You take it anywhere else, it's not worth anything.
この通貨は 他の場所では
全く無価値です
13:05
But actually within the town you start to create these economic
でもルイスの中ではかなり効果的に
13:07
cycles much more effectively.
経済を循環させることができるのです
13:10
Another thing that they do is what we call an energy descent plan,
またいわゆる 低エネルギー化計画もあります
13:13
which is basically to develop a plan B for the town.
これは基本的に第二の計画です
13:15
Most of our local authorities, when they sit down to plan
私たちの行政の大部分は腰を下ろして
13:18
for the next five, 10, 15, 20 years of a community,
地域の10年、15年、20年先のことを計画する時
13:21
still start by assuming that there will be more energy,
まだ未来にエネルギーが残っていて
13:24
more cars, more housing,
もっと多くの車や家があり
13:27
more jobs, more growth, and so on.
多くの仕事や経済成長を
仮定しています
13:29
What does it look like if that's not the case? And how can we embrace that
もし そうならなかったら?
どのようにしてこの事実を受け入れ
13:31
and actually come up with something that was actually more likely
どのようにして人々を本当に支える計画を
13:34
to sustain everybody?
考えられるでしょうか
13:36
As a friend of mine says, "Life is a series of things you're not quite ready for."
「人生は予期せぬことの連続だよ」と
私の友人が言うように
13:38
And that's certainly been my experience with transition.
移行政策においても私は同じ経験をしています
13:43
From three years ago, it just being an idea,
3年前にこの理念が生まれ
13:45
this has become something that has virally swept around the world.
ウィルスのように
あっという間に世界中に広がりました
13:47
We're getting a lot of interest from government. Ed Miliband,
政府からも注目を集めています
13:51
the energy minister of this country, was invited to come to our recent conference
私たちの最近の会議では
エネルギー・気候変動大臣のエド・ミリバンドが
13:53
as a keynote listener.
基調講演を「聴く」ようにと招かれました
13:57
Which he did --
彼は実際に参加し
13:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:01
(Applause) --
(拍手)
14:02
and has since become a great advocate of the whole idea.
氏は以来この計画全体を支持しています
14:05
There are now two local authorities in this country
この国で2つの地方議会は
14:09
who have declared themselves transitional local authorities,
移行政策をとると宣言しています
14:12
Leicestershire and Somerset. And in Stroud,
レイシェスターシェアとサマセット州です
14:14
the transition group there, in effect, wrote the local government's food plan.
そしてストラウドの移行政策のグループは
事実上その自治体の食糧計画を立てました
14:16
And the head of the council said,
地方議会の議長は
次のように言いました
14:21
"If we didn't have Transition Stroud, we would have to invent
「移行政策がなかったら 私たちは
14:23
all of that community infrastructure for the first time."
ストラウドの基盤をゼロから
築かなければならなかったでしょう」
14:25
As we see the spread of it, we see national hubs emerging.
移行政策が広まった今
国内で政策の拠点が現れ始めてます
14:29
In Scotland, the Scottish government's climate change fund
スコットランドでは
政府の気候変動対策基金が
14:32
has funded Transition Scotland
スコットランド移行政策グループに資金を投入しています
14:35
as a national organization supporting the spread of this.
これは国の組織が活動の拡大を支えている例です
14:37
And we see it all over the place as well now.
現在全世界でも同様の動きが見られます
14:40
But the key to transition is thinking not that we have to change everything now,
しかし移行政策への鍵は
今全てを変えなくてはいけないと考えるのではなく
14:43
but that things are already inevitably changing,
状況はすでに変わってきていると考えることです
14:46
and what we need to do is to work creatively with that,
そして私たちがしなければならないことは
独創的にその活動に取り組み
14:49
based on asking the right questions.
正しく問うことです
14:52
I think I'd like to just return at the end
最後に 物語のお話に
14:55
to the idea of stories.
戻りたいと思います
14:57
Because I think stories are vital here.
なぜなら物語は
とても大切だからです
14:59
And actually the stories that we tell ourselves,
そして実際 自らが語る物語には
15:01
we have a huge dearth of stories about how to move forward creatively from here.
現状からどのように創造的に前進すべきかということが
大きく欠けているのです
15:03
And one of the key things that transition does
移行政策における重点の一つは
15:08
is to pull those stories out of what people are doing.
人々の活動から物語を引き出すことです
15:10
Stories about the community that's produced
例えば 地域内で使える21ポンド紙幣を作った
15:12
its own 21 pound note, for example,
自治体についての話や
15:15
the school that's turned its car park into a food garden,
駐車場を食糧用の畑に作り変えた学校
15:18
the community that's founded its own energy company.
エネルギー会社を設立した自治体の話です
15:21
And for me, one of the great stories recently
最近はこんな大事な物語がありました
15:24
was the Obamas digging up the south lawn of the White House
オバマ大統領の家族が
ホワイトハウスの南側の芝地を掘り起こし
15:26
to create a vegetable garden. Because the last time that was done,
家庭菜園を作りました
15:29
when Eleanor Roosevelt did it,
かつてルーズベルト大統領夫人が
ホワイトハウスに家庭菜園を作ったときには
15:31
it led to the creation of 20 million vegetable gardens across the United States.
アメリカ中に
200万もの家庭菜園ができたのです
15:33
So the question I'd like to leave you with, really,
ですから 皆さんへの問いかけは
15:38
is -- for all aspects of the things that your community needs
成長するためにあなたの地域社会が必要としている
15:40
in order to thrive,
あらゆる側面に対するものです
15:44
how can it be done in such a way
強靭性も構築しながら
15:46
that drastically reduces its carbon emissions,
二酸化炭素排出量を大幅に削減するやり方とは
15:48
while also building resilience?
どのようなものでしょうか
15:51
Personally, I feel enormously grateful
個人的には
安く石油が手に入る時代に―
15:53
to have lived through the age of cheap oil.
生きていることに
大いに感謝しています
15:55
I've been astonishingly lucky, we've been astonishingly lucky.
私たちはとても幸せです
15:58
But let us honor what it has bought us,
でも石油がもたらしたものを受け入れた上で
16:02
and move forward from this point.
ここから前進しましょう
16:04
Because if we cling to it, and continue to assume
なぜなら 石油にすがりつき
石油が―
16:06
that it can underpin our choices,
私たちの選択の軸になるものだと
考え続けるのなら
16:08
the future that it presents to us is one which is really unmanageable.
やがて訪れる未来は
本当に手のつけられないものになるでしょう
16:11
And by loving and leaving all that oil has done for us,
そして石油がもたらしたことと
石油時代がもたらしたこと全てを
16:14
and that the Oil Age has done for us,
慈しみながらも後にして
16:17
we are able to then begin the creation
より強靭で より豊かな
16:19
of a world which is more resilient,
世界を創造していくこと
16:21
more nourishing,
そしてお互いにより調和し
技術を重ね、結びつきが強くなる
16:24
and in which, we find ourselves fitter, more skilled
世界を創っていくことが
16:26
and more connected to each other.
可能になります
16:29
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
16:31
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:33
Translator:Mutsuko Kobayashi
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Rob Hopkins - Resilience leader
Rob Hopkins is the founder of the Transition movement, a radically hopeful and community-driven approach to creating societies independent of fossil fuel.

Why you should listen

Rob Hopkins leads a vibrant new movement of towns and cities that utilize local cooperation and interdependence to shrink their ecological footprints. In the face of climate change he developed the concept of Transition Initiatives -- communities that produce their own goods and services, curb the need for transportation and take other measures to prepare for a post-oil future. While Transition shares certain principles with greenness and sustainability, it is a deeper vision concerned with re-imagining our future in a self-sufficient way and building resiliency.

Transforming theory to action, Hopkins is also the co-founder and a resident of the first Transition Initiative in the UK, in Totnes, Devon. As he refuses to fly, it is from his home in Totnes that he offers help to hundreds of similar communities that have sprung up around the world, in part through his blog, transitionculture.org.

Hopkins, who's trained in ecological design, wrote the principal work on the subject, Transition Handbook: From Oil Dependency to Local Resilience, a 12-step manual for a postcarbon future. Find notes and slides from his TEDTalk here >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.