sponsored links
Mission Blue Voyage

Roz Savage: Why I'm rowing across the Pacific

ロズ・サベージ:私が太平洋を漕いで横断する理由

April 8, 2010

2年前にロンドンでの高給職を辞め、海を手漕ぎボートで渡るようになったロズ・サベージさん。大西洋の単独横断をすでに果たしており、女性としては史上初の太平洋の単独横断のため、今週その3区目を漕ぎ始めたところです。なぜそんなことをしているのか?個人的な深い理由と、活動家としての切迫した理由の両方をこの講演でお聞き下さい。

Roz Savage - Ocean rower
Roz Savage gave up her life as a management consultant to row across the Atlantic in 2005. Her mission now is to row across the Pacific, from the West Coast to Australia, raising awareness along the way of plastic pollution, climate change and eco-heroism. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Hi, my name is Roz Savage
こんにちは ロズ・サベージです
00:16
and I row across oceans.
海を漕いで渡っています
00:18
Four years ago, I rowed solo across the Atlantic,
4年前には 大西洋を単独横断しました
00:21
and since then, I've done two out of three stages
その後 太平洋横断の3区間のうち
00:24
across the Pacific,
2区間を漕ぎ終えました
00:27
from San Francisco to Hawaii
サンフランシスコからハワイ
00:29
and from Hawaii to Kiribati.
そしてハワイからキリバスです
00:31
And tomorrow, I'll be leaving this boat
明日にはここを発って
00:33
to fly back to Kiribati
キリバスへ戻り
00:35
to continue with the third and final stage
太平洋横断の最終区間となる
00:37
of my row across the Pacific.
3区目を漕ぎ始める予定です
00:39
Cumulatively, I will have rowed
最終的には
00:42
over 8,000 miles,
海上1万2千キロ以上を
00:44
taken over three million oar strokes
全長7メートルの手漕ぎボートで
00:46
and spent more than 312 days alone
312日以上1人で 300万回以上漕いで
00:48
on the ocean on a 23 foot rowboat.
渡ることになります
00:51
This has given me a very
この経験で私の海との関わりは
00:55
special relationship with the ocean.
特別なものとなりました
00:57
We have a bit of a love/hate thing going on.
愛憎が少し入り混じっています
00:59
I feel a bit about it like I did about
以前教わった とても厳しい
01:01
a very strict math teacher that I once had at school.
数学の先生に対する思いに少し似ています
01:03
I didn't always like her, but I did respect her,
好きでなかったけれど 尊敬はしていて
01:06
and she taught me a heck of a lot.
とても多くのことを学びました
01:09
So today I'd like to share with you
そこで今日は私の海の冒険を
01:11
some of my ocean adventures
いくつか話したいと思います
01:13
and tell you a little bit about what they've taught me,
どんなことを学んだか そして
01:16
and how I think we can maybe take some of those lessons
今私たちが直面している環境問題に
01:18
and apply them to this environmental challenge
どのように応用できると思うか
01:21
that we face right now.
話したいと思います
01:23
Now, some of you might be thinking,
さて 皆さんの中には
01:26
"Hold on a minute. She doesn't look very much like an ocean rower.
「海を漕いで渡れるような人に見えないけど」
01:28
Isn't she meant to be about this tall
「このくらいの背たけで 幅がある
01:31
and about this wide
彼らみたいな人でないと駄目なのでは?」
01:33
and maybe look a bit more like these guys?"
と思っている人もいるでしょう
01:35
You'll notice, they've all got something that I don't.
私には無いものを彼らは持っています
01:38
Well, I don't know what you're thinking, but I'm talking about the beards. (Laughter)
何を考えてるんですか 私が言っているのは髭です
01:43
And no matter how long I've spent on the ocean,
どれだけ長く海上で過ごしても
01:47
I haven't yet managed to muster a decent beard,
さすがに髭は生えてきていません
01:49
and I hope that it remains that way.
これからも生えてこないことを願ってます
01:51
For a long time, I didn't believe that I could have a big adventure.
長い間 自分が大冒険できると思っていませんでした
01:54
The story that I told myself was
私が自分に言い聞かせていたのは
01:57
that adventurers looked like this.
冒険はこういうもので
01:59
I didn't look the part.
私には場違いだということでした
02:01
I thought there were them and there were us,
「あの人達」と「私達」は違って
02:03
and I was not one of them.
私は「あの人達」の仲間でないと
02:06
So for 11 years, I conformed.
それで11年の間 私は周りに順応していました
02:08
I did what people from my kind of background were supposed to do.
自分の経歴に相応した生活をして
02:11
I was working in an office in London
ロンドンのオフィスで経営コンサルタント
02:14
as a management consultant.
という仕事をしていました
02:17
And I think I knew from day one that it wasn't the right job for me.
向いた仕事でないと最初から分かっていた気がします
02:19
But that kind of conditioning
でもこのような心理的条件付けが
02:22
just kept me there for so many years,
何年も私を縛っていました
02:24
until I reached my mid-30s and I thought,
でも30代半ばに思いました
02:26
"You know, I'm not getting any younger.
「当たり前だけど これから年をとる一方だ
02:28
I feel like I've got a purpose in this life, and I don't know what it is,
人生には意味がある気がする 何かは分からないけど
02:31
but I'm pretty certain that management consultancy is not it.
経営コンサルティングじゃないのは確かだ」
02:34
So, fast forward a few years.
そして数年後には
02:39
I'd gone through some changes.
いくつか物事を変えていました
02:41
To try and answer that question of,
人生何をするべきかという
02:44
"What am I supposed to be doing with my life?"
疑問の答えを見つけるため
02:46
I sat down one day
ある日私は机に向かい
02:48
and wrote two versions of my own obituary,
自分の死亡告知を2通り書きました
02:50
the one that I wanted, a life of adventure,
1つは冒険的人生をもとにした理想のもの
02:53
and the one that I was actually heading for
もう1つはその時歩んでいた
02:56
which was a nice, normal, pleasant life,
快適で普通の悪くない人生
02:58
but it wasn't where I wanted to be by the end of my life.
でもそんな風に人生を終わらせたくありませんでした
03:01
I wanted to live a life that I could be proud of.
誇りに思える人生を送りたかったのです
03:04
And I remember looking at these two versions of my obituary
2通りの死亡告知を見ながら
03:07
and thinking, "Oh boy,
こう思ったのを覚えています
03:10
I'm on totally the wrong track here.
「私の進路は全く間違ってる
03:12
If I carry on living as I am now,
このまま行ったら
03:14
I'm just not going to end up where I want to be
理想の状況になんて
03:16
in five years, or 10 years,
5年経っても 10年経っても
03:18
or at the end of my life."
死に際になってもたどり着かない」
03:20
I made a few changes,
私はいくつか物事を改め
03:22
let go of some loose trappings of my old life,
過去の生活を捨て
03:24
and through a bit of a leap of logic,
ちょっと論理の飛躍もありますが
03:26
decided to row across the Atlantic Ocean.
ボートで大西洋横断することにしました
03:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:30
The Atlantic Rowing Race runs from the Canaries to Antigua,
大西洋手漕ぎボートレースは
03:32
it's about 3,000 miles,
カナリア諸島からアンティグアまで約5千キロです
03:34
and it turned out to be
これは実際やってみると
03:37
the hardest thing I had ever done.
今までで一番大変なことでした
03:39
Sure, I had wanted to get outside of my comfort zone,
確かに自分の安心領域から出たかったのですが
03:42
but what I'd sort of failed to notice was that
よく考えていなかったのは
03:45
getting out of your comfort zone is, by definition,
安心領域から出るのは当然
03:47
extremely uncomfortable.
とても居心地が悪いということでした
03:49
And my timing was not great either:
タイミングも良くありませんでした
03:53
2005, when I did the Atlantic,
私が大西洋を渡った2005年は
03:55
was the year of Hurricane Katrina.
ハリケーンのカトリーナの年で
03:57
There were more tropical storms in the North Atlantic
北大西洋では史上最多の
03:59
than ever before, since records began.
熱帯暴風雨を記録していました
04:02
And pretty early on,
そしてかなり最初のうちから
04:05
those storms started making their presence known.
暴風雨が襲うようになり
04:07
All four of my oars broke
大西洋半分も行かないうちに
04:11
before I reached halfway across.
オールが4本全部折れてしまいました
04:13
Oars are not supposed to look like this.
オールがこんな風になるなんて普通ありません
04:15
But what can you do? You're in the middle of the ocean.
でも海のど真ん中ではどうしようもない
04:18
Oars are your only means of propulsion.
オールは前進する唯一の道具です
04:20
So I just had to look around the boat
漕ぎ続ける為にはボートを見回して
04:22
and figure out what I was going to use
何を使ってオールを直すか
04:24
to fix up these oars so that I could carry on.
考えるしかありませんでした
04:26
So I found a boat hook and my trusty duct tape
そこでボートフックと丈夫なダクトテープを見つけ
04:28
and splintered the boat hook
ボートフックを添え木にして
04:31
to the oars to reinforce it.
オールを補強しました
04:33
Then, when that gave out,
それも壊れると
04:36
I sawed the wheel axles off my spare rowing seat
予備の舟漕ぎシートの車輪軸を
04:38
and used those.
切り落として使いました
04:41
And then when those gave out, I cannibalized one of the broken oars.
その次は 折れたオールの1本を解体して使いました
04:43
I'd never been very good at fixing stuff
昔の生活をしていた時は
04:46
when I was living my old life,
物の修理は得意でなかったのに
04:48
but it's amazing how resourceful you can become
海のど真ん中で 陸にたどり着くには
04:50
when you're in the middle of the ocean
漕ぐしかないとなったとき
04:53
and there's only one way to get to the other side.
いかに出来るようになるか 驚きます
04:55
And the oars kind of became a symbol
オールは 自分で思っていた限界を
04:57
of just in how many ways
いかに様々な工夫で乗り越えたかの
04:59
I went beyond what I thought were my limits.
シンボルのようなものになりました
05:02
I suffered from tendinitis on my shoulders
両肩の腱炎や海水でヒリヒリする
05:04
and saltwater sores on my bottom.
お尻にも耐えました
05:07
I really struggled psychologically,
精神的な苦しみもとても大きく
05:09
totally overwhelmed by the scale of the challenge,
このまま時速3キロで進むと
05:12
realizing that, if I carried on moving at two miles an hour,
5千キロには果てしない時間がかかると気付き
05:15
3,000 miles was going to
チャレンジの規模に
05:18
take me a very, very long time.
完全に圧倒されました
05:20
There were so many times
もう限界だと思ったことが
05:22
when I thought I'd hit that limit,
何度も何度もありました
05:24
but had no choice but to just carry on
でも続ける以外どうしようもありませんでした
05:26
and try and figure out how I was going to get to the other side
いかに正気のまま陸にたどり着くか
05:29
without driving myself crazy.
考えるしかありませんでした
05:31
And eventually after
そしてとうとう
05:33
103 days at sea,
103日を海上で過ごした後
05:35
I arrived in Antigua.
アンティグアにたどり着きました
05:37
I don't think I've ever felt so happy
それまでの人生でこれほど
05:39
in my entire life.
うれしかったことはありません
05:41
It was a bit like finishing a marathon
マラソンを完走して
05:43
and getting out of solitary confinement
独房から解放されて
05:45
and winning an Oscar all rolled into one.
さらにオスカーの受賞をしたような感じでした
05:47
I was euphoric.
幸福感いっぱいでした
05:50
And to see all the people coming out to greet me
大勢の人達が迎えて出て
05:52
and standing along the cliff tops and clapping and cheering,
崖の上から拍手喝采してくれるのを見て
05:54
I just felt like a movie star.
映画スターのような気分でした
05:57
It was absolutely wonderful.
ただもう最高でした
05:59
And I really learned then that, the bigger the challenge,
その時悟ったのは チャレンジが
06:01
the bigger the sense of achievement
大きければ大きい程 終わった時の
06:03
when you get to the end of it.
達成感も大きいということでした
06:05
So this might be a good moment to take a quick time-out
さて ここで少し時間をとって 皆さんが考えている
06:08
to answer a few FAQs about ocean rowing
海で漕ぐことに関するよくある質問に
06:11
that might be going through your mind.
答えておくといいかなと思います
06:14
Number one that I get asked: What do you eat?
一番よく聞かれる質問:何を食べるんですか?
06:16
A few freeze-dried meals, but mostly I try and eat
フリーズドライされた食事を少し でも大体
06:19
much more unprocessed foods.
努めてもっと加工されていない食品を食べます
06:22
So I grow my own beansprouts.
例えばもやしを育てたり
06:25
I eat fruits and nut bars,
乾燥フルーツとナッツバー
06:27
a lot of nuts.
たくさんのナッツを食べます
06:29
And generally arrive about 30 pounds lighter
そして15キロ近く痩せて
06:31
at the other end.
目的地にたどり着きます
06:33
Question number two: How do you sleep?
質問2:どうやって寝るんですか?
06:35
With my eyes shut. Ha-ha.
目をとじてです ははは
06:37
I suppose what you mean is:
寝ている間ボートはどうなるのか
06:40
What happens to the boat while I'm sleeping?
という意味だと思いますが
06:42
Well, I plan my route so that I'm drifting
事前に進路を計画して寝ている間に
06:44
with the winds and the currents while I'm sleeping.
風や海流で流されるようにします
06:46
On a good night, I think my best ever was 11 miles
運がいい時は一晩で進行方向に
06:48
in the right direction.
最高18キロ進んだことがありました
06:50
Worst ever, 13 miles in the wrong direction.
一番ひどかった時は反対方向に21キロでした
06:52
That's a bad day at the office.
職場での散々な1日という感じです
06:55
What do I wear?
何を着ていますか?
06:57
Mostly, a baseball cap,
ほとんどの場合 野球帽
06:59
rowing gloves and a smile -- or a frown,
ボート漕ぎ用手袋に笑顔または仏頂面
07:01
depending on whether I went backwards overnight --
前の晩に逆方向に行ったかにもよります
07:04
and lots of sun lotion.
日焼け止めもたっぷりです
07:07
Do I have a chase boat?
伴走ボートはあるのですか?
07:09
No I don't. I'm totally self-supporting out there.
ありません 海上では完全自立です
07:11
I don't see anybody for the whole time
海にいる間はずっと
07:14
that I'm at sea, generally.
誰にも会いません
07:16
And finally: Am I crazy?
そして最後に:気が狂ってませんか?
07:20
Well, I leave that one up to you to judge.
これは皆さんに判断してもらうことにします
07:23
So, how do you top rowing across the Atlantic?
では大西洋横断の次のチャレンジは?
07:26
Well, naturally, you decide to row across the Pacific.
太平洋を横断しようと思うのが普通です
07:29
Well, I thought the Atlantic was big,
でも大西洋は大きいと思いましたが
07:33
but the Pacific is really, really big.
太平洋はホントにものすごく大きいですね
07:35
I think we tend to do it a little bit of a disservice in our usual maps.
普通の地図はちょっと親切でないと思うんです
07:40
I don't know for sure that the Brits
イギリス人が本当にこの世界観を
07:43
invented this particular view of the world, but I suspect we might have done so:
作ったのか分かりませんが イギリスが中心になっているので
07:45
we are right in the middle,
そうじゃないかと思っています
07:48
and we've cut the Pacific in half
太平洋を切り離して
07:50
and flung it to the far corners of the world.
世界の両端に押しやってしまいましたが
07:52
Whereas if you look in Google Earth,
Google Earthで見ると
07:55
this is how the Pacific looks.
太平洋はこんな感じです
07:58
It pretty much covers half the planet.
地球のほぼ半分が太平洋なんです
08:00
You can just see a little bit of North America up here
北アメリカが少しここに見えます
08:03
and a sliver of Australia down there.
こちらがオーストラリアの端です
08:05
It is really big --
とてつもない広さです
08:08
65 million square miles --
1.5億平方キロメートル以上です
08:10
and to row in a straight line across it
これを直線で横断すると
08:12
would be about 8,000 miles.
1万2千キロ以上となります
08:14
Unfortunately, ocean rowboats
でも海上手漕ぎボートが
08:16
very rarely go in a straight line.
直線航路で行くことはまずなく
08:18
By the time I get to Australia,
オーストラリアに着く頃には
08:20
if I get to Australia,
もしたどり着ければですが
08:22
I will have rowed probably nine or 10,000 miles in all.
大体1.4~1.6万キロ漕ぐことになるはずです
08:24
So, because nobody in their straight mind would row
ということで 正気な人間がハワイで
08:29
straight past Hawaii without dropping in,
停泊せず素通りすることはないので
08:31
I decided to cut this very big undertaking
私はこの途方もない計画を
08:33
into three segments.
3区間に分けることにしました
08:35
The first attempt didn't go so well.
2007年の最初の試みは最悪でした
08:38
In 2007, I did a rather involuntary capsize drill
24時間で3回も転覆演習を
08:40
three times in 24 hours.
する羽目になり
08:43
A bit like being in a washing machine.
洗濯機の中にいるようでした
08:45
Boat got a bit dinged up,
ボートに少しキズがつき
08:47
so did I.
私もへこみました
08:49
I blogged about it. Unfortunately, somebody
このことをブログに書いたのですが
08:51
with a bit of a hero complex decided that
運悪く 少し英雄気取りの誰かが
08:53
this damsel was in distress and needed saving.
この窮地の乙女を救わなくてはと思ったようで
08:55
The first I knew about this was when the Coast Guard plane turned up overhead.
気付いたら沿岸警備隊のヘリが頭上にいました
08:58
I tried to tell them to go away.
大丈夫だと言ったのですが
09:01
We had a bit of a battle of wills.
向こうも譲らず
09:03
I lost and got airlifted.
負けて救出されてしまいました
09:05
Awful, really awful.
本当に惨めでした
09:07
It was one of the worst feelings of my life,
人生で最悪だったことの1つです
09:09
as I was lifted up on that winch line into the helicopter
ヘリにウィンチで引き上げられながら
09:11
and looked down at my trusty little boat
私の可愛い忠実なボートが
09:14
rolling around in the 20 foot waves
6メートルの波に揺られているのを見下ろし
09:16
and wondering if I would ever see her again.
見納めかと思いました
09:19
So I had to launch a very expensive
そこで 非常に費用のかかる
09:21
salvage operation
回収作業をして
09:23
and then wait another nine months
また漕ぎ出すことが出来るまで
09:25
before I could get back out onto the ocean again.
9ヶ月待つはめになりました
09:27
But what do you do?
でもどうしろと言うのでしょう?
09:29
Fall down nine times, get up 10.
七転び八起きです
09:31
So, the following year, I set out
それで翌年に再出発し
09:33
and, fortunately, this time made it safely across to Hawaii.
ラッキーなことに今回はハワイに無事に着きました
09:35
But it was not without misadventure.
でも何事もなかったわけではなく
09:38
My watermaker broke,
製水器が壊れました
09:40
only the most important piece of kit that I have on the boat.
ボートにあった一番大事な道具なのにです
09:42
Powered by my solar panels,
ソーラーパネルで作動し
09:45
it sucks in saltwater
海水を吸い上げて
09:47
and turns it into freshwater.
真水を作ります
09:49
But it doesn't react very well to being immersed in ocean,
海水に浸かるとうまく作動しないのですが
09:51
which is what happened to it.
そうなってしまいました
09:54
Fortunately, help was at hand.
でも運よく助けてもらえました
09:56
There was another unusual boat out there
同じ頃 私と同じことをしている
09:58
at the same time, doing as I was doing,
もう一艘の風変わりなボートがいて
10:00
bringing awareness to the North Pacific Garbage Patch,
太平洋ゴミベルトの認識を高めようとしていました
10:03
that area in the North Pacific about twice the size of Texas,
北太平洋のテキサスの倍ほどの海域に
10:06
with an estimated 3.5 million
推定350万トンとされる
10:09
tons of trash in it,
ゴミがあり
10:11
circulating at the center of
北太平洋旋回の中心を
10:13
that North Pacific Gyre.
循環しているのです
10:15
So, to make the point, these guys
そこで彼らは訴えかけるために
10:17
had actually built their boat out of plastic trash,
プラスチックのゴミでボートを作りました
10:19
15,000 empty water bottles
1万5千本の空のペットボトルが
10:22
latched together into two pontoons.
縛り付けられて船の両サイドの浮きになっています
10:24
They were going very slowly.
かなりゆっくり進んでいました
10:27
Partly, they'd had a bit of a delay.
ちょっと遅れる理由もありました
10:29
They'd had to pull in at Catalina Island shortly after they left Long Beach
ロングビーチを出てすぐのところで
10:31
because the lids of all the water bottles were coming undone,
ペットボトルのキャップが緩んで沈みそうになったので
10:34
and they were starting to sink.
カタリナ島で停泊して
10:37
So they'd had to pull in and do all the lids up.
キャップを全部締め直す必要があったからです
10:39
But, as I was approaching the end of my water reserves,
でも私の水の貯えが底をつきそうになった頃
10:44
luckily, our courses were converging.
ちょうど航路が交差していました
10:47
They were running out of food; I was running out of water.
向こうは食料 私は水が足りなくなってきていたので
10:49
So we liaised by satellite phone and arranged to meet up.
衛星電話でやり取りし 落ち合う調整をしました
10:52
And it took about a week
それから実際に徐々に近づくのに
10:55
for us to actually gradually converge.
約1週間かかりました
10:57
I was doing a pathetically slow speed
私は1.3ノットという
10:59
of about 1.3 knots,
情けない速度で進んでいて
11:01
and they were doing only marginally less pathetic speed of about 1.4:
向こうは少しだけましな1.4ノットでした
11:03
it was like two snails in a mating dance.
2匹のカタツムリが求愛ダンスしているようなものです
11:06
But, eventually, we did manage to meet up
でも最終的には落ち合うことができ
11:09
and Joel hopped overboard,
ジョエルが私のボートに来て
11:11
caught us a beautiful, big mahi-mahi,
見事なシイラを釣り上げてくれて
11:13
which was the best food I'd had
3ヶ月ぶりの
11:15
in, ooh, at least three months.
美味しい食事となりました
11:17
Fortunately, the one that he caught that day
幸運なことに その日釣ったのは
11:19
was better than this one they caught a few weeks earlier.
数週間前に彼らが釣ったこの魚より良い魚でした
11:21
When they opened this one up,
この魚はさばいてみると
11:24
they found its stomach was full of plastic.
お腹にプラスチックが一杯ありました
11:26
And this is really bad news because plastic
これは非常に良くないことです
11:28
is not an inert substance.
プラスチックは不活性物質でないからです
11:30
It leaches out chemicals
これを食べた可哀相な魚の体に
11:32
into the flesh of the poor critter that ate it,
化学物質が溶け出し
11:34
and then we come along and eat that poor critter,
その可哀相な魚を私たちが次に食べると
11:36
and we get some of the toxins accumulating
今度は私たちの体に有害物質が
11:39
in our bodies as well.
蓄積することになります
11:41
So there are very real implications for human health.
つまり人の健康に対して紛れもない影響があるのです
11:43
I eventually made it to Hawaii still alive.
最終的に私は生きてハワイにたどり着きました
11:47
And, the following year, set out
そして翌年には
11:50
on the second stage of the Pacific,
大西洋の第2区目の
11:52
from Hawaii down to Tarawa.
ハワイからタラワへと出発しました
11:55
And you'll notice something about Tarawa;
タラワに関してすぐに気付くのは
11:58
it is very low-lying.
土地がとても低いことです
12:01
It's that little green sliver on the horizon,
水平線に見える小さな緑の線がタワラです
12:03
which makes them very nervous
住人は水位が上がることを
12:06
about rising oceans.
とても心配しています
12:08
This is big trouble for these guys.
彼らにとっては大問題です
12:10
They've got no points of land more than about six feet above sea level.
海抜1.8メートル以上の土地はありません
12:12
And also, as an increase in extreme
また気候変動のせいで増加する
12:15
weather events due to climate change,
異常気象によって
12:17
they're expecting more waves
もっと多くの波が
12:19
to come in over the fringing reef,
島を囲むサンゴ礁を越えて入ってきて
12:21
which will contaminate their fresh water supply.
淡水に混じってしまうだろうとのことです
12:24
I had a meeting with the president there,
現地で会ったキリバスの大統領は
12:27
who told me about his
国家の撤退計画について
12:29
exit strategy for his country.
話してくれました
12:31
He expects that within the next 50 years,
今後50年以内に
12:33
the 100,000 people that live there
ここに住む10万人の国民が
12:35
will have to relocate to
ニュージーランドかオーストラリアに
12:37
New Zealand or Australia.
移住せざるを得ないそうです
12:39
And that made me think about how would I feel
それを聞いて もし英国が海面下に
12:41
if Britain was going to disappear under the waves;
消えてしまうとしたらどう思うかと考えました
12:43
if the places where I'd been born
私の生まれ故郷
12:46
and gone to school
学校に行った場所
12:48
and got married,
結婚した場所
12:50
if all those places were just going to disappear forever.
永遠に全部消えてしまうとしたら
12:52
How, literally, ungrounded
文字通りどんなに
12:54
that would make me feel.
根無し草のように感じるだろう?と
12:56
Very shortly, I'll be setting out to try and get to Australia,
まもなく私はオーストラリアに向かって出発します
13:00
and if I'm successful, I'll be the first woman ever to row solo
成功したら 単独で太平洋を漕いで横断した
13:03
all the way across the Pacific.
最初の女性となります
13:06
And I try to use this to bring awareness to these environmental issues,
これを利用して環境問題に対する認識を高め
13:08
to bring a human face to the ocean.
海を身近に感じてもらうようにしたいです
13:11
If the Atlantic was about my inner journey,
大西洋が自分の力を発見する
13:14
discovering my own capabilities,
内向的な旅だったとしたら
13:17
maybe the Pacific has been about my outer journey,
太平洋は外向的な旅なのかもしれません
13:19
figuring out how I can use
どうやって自分の面白い
13:22
my interesting career choice
キャリア選択を利用して
13:24
to be of service to the world,
世界に貢献するか そして
13:26
and to take some of those things that I've learned out there
海で学んだことのいくつかを
13:29
and apply them to the situation
人類が陥ってしまった状況に
13:32
that humankind now finds itself in.
どう応用するか考える旅です
13:34
I think there are probably three key points here.
これには3つの重要ポイントがあるのではと思います
13:37
The first one is about
1つ目は
13:40
the stories that we tell ourselves.
状況に対する自己見解です
13:42
For so long, I told myself
私はとても長い間自分に
13:44
that I couldn't have an adventure
背が高くないし
13:46
because I wasn't six foot tall
体育系でもなく髭もないので
13:48
and athletic and bearded.
冒険などできないと言い聞かせてきました
13:50
And then that story changed.
でもその見解が変わりました
13:53
I found out that people had rowed across oceans.
海を漕いで渡った人がいることを知ったのです
13:56
I even met one of them and she was just about my size.
実際に会った女性は私と同じような体格でした
13:59
So even though I didn't grow any taller,
そして大きくなったわけでも
14:02
I didn't sprout a beard,
髭が生えたわけでもないのに
14:04
something had changed: My interior dialogue had changed.
私の何かが変わり 自分との対話も変わったのです
14:06
At the moment, the story that we collectively tell ourselves
現在私たちの間で一般的に言われるのは
14:09
is that we need all this stuff,
あれが要る これが要る
14:12
that we need oil.
原油が要るという見解です
14:14
But what about if we just change that story?
でもそのような見解を変えたらどうでしょう?
14:16
We do have alternatives,
私たちには他の選択肢があり
14:19
and we have the power of free will
持続可能なそれらを選んで
14:21
to choose those alternatives, those sustainable ones,
環境に優しい未来を創造する
14:23
to create a greener future.
自由意志の力があります
14:26
The second point is about
2つ目のポイントは
14:30
the accumulation of tiny actions.
小さな行動の蓄積です
14:32
We might think that anything that we do as an individual
個人で何かしても追いつかない
14:35
is just a drop in the ocean, that it can't really make a difference.
変えられないと思うかもしれませんが
14:38
But it does. Generally, we haven't
そんなことはありません この問題は
14:41
got ourselves into this mess through big disasters.
大きな災害がもとに起こったのではないのです
14:43
Yes, there have been the Exxon Valdezes
エクソン・ヴァルディーズの原油流出や
14:46
and the Chernobyls,
チェルノブイリ原発事故はありましたが
14:48
but mostly it's been an accumulation
ほとんどは何十億人の個人が
14:50
of bad decisions
来る日も来る日も 毎年毎年
14:52
by billions of individuals,
間違った決断をしたことの
14:54
day after day and year after year.
蓄積によるものです
14:56
And, by the same token, we can turn that tide.
同様に形勢を変えることもできます
14:59
We can start making better,
私たちはこれからより良い
15:01
wiser, more sustainable decisions.
もっと賢明で持続可能な決断をすればいいのです
15:03
And when we do that, we're not just one person.
皆でそうすれば1人ではなくなります
15:06
Anything that we do spreads ripples.
波紋となって広がります
15:08
Other people will see if you're in the supermarket line
あなたがスーパーで並んでいて
15:11
and you pull out your
エコバックを取り出したら
15:13
reusable grocery bag.
他の人達の目につくでしょう
15:15
Maybe if we all start doing this,
皆が同じことをし始めたら
15:17
we can make it socially unacceptable
レジでビニール袋をもらうのが
15:19
to say yes to plastic in the checkout line.
社会的に容認されなくなるかもしれません
15:21
That's just one example.
これは単なる一例です
15:24
This is a world-wide community.
世界規模のコミュニティなのです
15:26
The other point:
最後は
15:29
It's about taking responsibility.
責任を持つということです
15:31
For so much of my life,
私は人生の長い間
15:33
I wanted something else to make me happy.
何かに幸せにしてもらおうとしていました
15:35
I thought if I had the right house or the right car
理想の家や文句なしの車があったら
15:38
or the right man in my life,
完璧な彼がいたら
15:40
then I could be happy.
幸せになれると思っていました
15:42
But when I wrote that obituary exercise,
でも死亡告知を書いてみた時
15:44
I actually grew up a little bit in that moment
実際ちょっとだけ成長して
15:47
and realized that I needed to create my own future.
自分の将来は自分で創らなくてはと悟りました
15:50
I couldn't just wait passively
幸福が自分を見つけて来てくれるのを
15:53
for happiness to come and find me.
何もしないで待っていても駄目だと
15:55
And I suppose I'm a selfish environmentalist.
利己的な環境保護主義者かもしれませんが
15:58
I plan on being around for a long time,
長生きするつもりでいます
16:00
and when I'm 90 years old,
90歳になった時
16:02
I want to be happy and healthy.
健康で幸せでいたいと思っています
16:04
And it's very difficult to be happy
でも食糧不足や干ばつで
16:06
on a planet that's racked
無茶苦茶になった地球上で
16:08
with famine and drought.
幸せでいるのはとても難しいです
16:10
It's very difficult to be healthy on a planet
土壌と海と大気が
16:13
where we've poisoned the earth
汚染された地球で
16:15
and the sea and the air.
健康を保つのはとても難しいです
16:18
So, shortly, I'm going to be
そこで近々新しい
16:21
launching a new initiative
「エコ・ヒーロー」という取り組みを
16:23
called Eco-Heroes.
始めるつもりです
16:25
And the idea here is that
エコ・ヒーローとして皆さんに毎日1つは
16:28
all our Eco-Heroes will log at least one green deed every day.
環境の為になることを記録してもらおうという発想です
16:30
It's meant to be a bit of a game.
ゲームのような感覚です
16:33
We're going to make an iPhone app out of it.
iPhoneのアプリも作る予定です
16:35
We just want to try and create that awareness
ただ関心を高めたいのです
16:37
because, sure, changing a light bulb isn't going to change the world,
電球を替えただけで世界は変わらないかもしれませんが
16:39
but that attitude,
その姿勢が
16:42
that awareness that leads you to change the light bulb
その電球を替えたり 再利用できるコーヒーマグを
16:44
or take your reusable coffee mug,
使うことに繋がるその意識が
16:47
that is what could change the world.
世界を変えるのです
16:49
I really believe that we stand
私たちは今 歴史上
16:52
at a very important point in history.
とても重要な所にいると心から思います
16:54
We have a choice. We've been blessed,
私たちには選択肢があり 幸か不幸か
16:57
or cursed, with free will.
自由意志もあります
16:59
We can choose a greener future,
環境に優しい未来を選択できるのです
17:01
and we can get there
そして皆で力を合わせて
17:04
if we all pull together to take it one stroke at a time.
少しずつ漕いで行けばたどり着けるのです
17:06
Thank you.
ありがとう
17:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:11
Translator:Sawa Horibe
Reviewer:Takafusa Kitazume

sponsored links

Roz Savage - Ocean rower
Roz Savage gave up her life as a management consultant to row across the Atlantic in 2005. Her mission now is to row across the Pacific, from the West Coast to Australia, raising awareness along the way of plastic pollution, climate change and eco-heroism.

Why you should listen

A latecomer to the life of adventure, Roz Savage worked as a management consultant for 11 years before setting out in a new life direction -- in a rowboat across the Atlantic Ocean. She completed her solo row across the Atlantic in 2005 and is now on a mission be the first woman to row solo across the Pacific, from the West Coast of the US to Australia. She began the pursuit in 2008, rowing from California to Hawaii, and rowed from Hawaii to Kiribati in 2009. In April 2010 she began the third and final stage of her Pacific row, from Kiribati to Australia.

When not on the open seas, Roz is a passionate environmental campaigner, focused on sustainability and ending plastic pollution. She's working on the new site EcoHeroes.me, where everyday acts of environmental heroism (as simple as refusing a plastic carrier bag) can be tracked and celebrated.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.