sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2011

Paul Snelgrove: A census of the ocean

ポール・スネルグローブ: 海洋生物調査

July 14, 2011

海洋学者ポール・スネルグローブが10年間にわたるプロジェクトの結果を私たちに話してくれます。このプロジェクトの目的は海に生息する生物をすべて調査するというものです。センサス・オブ・マリン・ライフの調査による驚愕の発見を映し出した見事な写真を披露してくれます。

Paul Snelgrove - Marine biologist
Paul Snelgrove led the group that pulled together the findings of the Census of Marine Life -- synthesizing 10 years and 540 expeditions into a book of wonders. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
The oceans cover some 70 percent of our planet.
私たちが住んでいる惑星の70%が海で覆われています
00:15
And I think Arthur C. Clarke probably had it right
アーサー・C・クラークが私たちの惑星を
00:18
when he said that perhaps we ought to call our planet
呼ぶのにふさわしい名前は海の惑星だと言った時
00:20
Planet Ocean.
彼は的を得ていると思いました
00:23
And the oceans are hugely productive,
さて 海にはとてつもない生産力があります
00:25
as you can see by the satellite image
それは光合成の衛星画像によって
00:27
of photosynthesis, the production of new life.
新しい生命の生産量を見ればわかるでしょう
00:29
In fact, the oceans produce half of the new life every day on Earth
事実 地球上で日々生まれる生命の半分を
海が生みだしているのです
00:31
as well as about half the oxygen that we breathe.
そればかりでなく私たちが呼吸する酸素の約半分も
海が生み出しているんですよ
00:34
In addition to that, it harbors a lot of the biodiversity on Earth,
さて 地球上の多様な生物が海を住処にしていますが
00:37
and much of it we don't know about.
その海に生息している生物について
あまり分かっていません
00:40
But I'll tell you some of that today.
そこで本日 そのいくつかについて話してみたいと思います
00:42
That also doesn't even get into the whole protein extraction
私たちが海からタンパク質を収穫する
00:44
that we do from the ocean.
お話は含まれていません
00:46
That's about 10 percent of our global needs
地球上で必要とされるタンパク質の10%くらいしか
海からとっていません
00:48
and 100 percent of some island nations.
島国の中には100%海からとっている国もありますけれども
00:50
If you were to descend
もしあなたが95%の生物圏(生物が生存可能な場所)まで
00:53
into the 95 percent of the biosphere that's livable,
潜って行ったら
00:55
it would quickly become pitch black,
そこは直ちに暗闇の世界になっていることでしょう
00:57
interrupted only by pinpoints of light
そしてそこには小さな光があるだけで
00:59
from bioluminescent organisms.
その光は生物発光体から出ているのです
01:01
And if you turn the lights on,
ライトを照らして見ると
01:03
you might periodically see spectacular organisms swim by,
時に目を見張るような生物が泳ぎ過ぎていくことでしょう
01:05
because those are the denizens of the deep,
これらは深海の住民
01:07
the things that live in the deep ocean.
つまり 海深くに生息する生物なんです
01:09
And eventually, the deep sea floor would come into view.
潜り続けていくと 最後には 海底が見えてきます
01:11
This type of habitat covers more of the Earth's surface
海の生息地が地球上のほとんどの表面を覆っていて
01:14
than all other habitats combined.
その他の生息地すべてをあわせたよりも ずっと広いのです
01:17
And yet, we know more about the surface of the Moon and about Mars
海については未知でも月や火星の表面について
01:19
than we do about this habitat,
私たちはもっとたくさんのことを知っています でも
01:21
despite the fact that we have yet to extract
この月や火星から
01:23
a gram of food, a breath of oxygen or a drop of water
1グラムの食料 一呼吸分の酸素 そして水一滴さえも
01:25
from those bodies.
採取したことさえないにもかかわらずにですよ
01:28
And so 10 years ago,
さて10年前のことですが
01:30
an international program began called the Census of Marine Life,
マリン・ライフ・センサス(海洋生物調査)
と呼ばれる国際プログラムが開始されました
01:32
which set out to try and improve our understanding
そのプログラムにより
世界中の海洋に生息する
01:35
of life in the global oceans.
生物の理解を促進しようとしました
01:37
It involved 17 different projects around the world.
世界中から17のプロジェクトが加わりました
01:39
As you can see, these are the footprints of the different projects.
これはさまざまな違ったプロジェクトの足跡です
01:42
And I hope you'll appreciate the level of global coverage
このプログラムにより全地球規模の調査が達成できたことを
01:44
that it managed to achieve.
評価してもらいたいと思います
01:47
It all began when two scientists, Fred Grassle and Jesse Ausubel,
フレデリック・グラッスルとジェシー・オースベルという
二人の科学者が
01:49
met in Woods Hole, Massachusetts
マサチューセッツ州ウッズホールで出会ったことから
全てが始まりました
01:51
where both were guests at the famed oceanographic institute.
ウッズホールには有名は海洋研究所があり
二人はそこのゲストとして招待されていました
01:54
And Fred was lamenting the state of marine biodiversity
フレッドは海洋生物の多様性について嘆いていました
01:56
and the fact that it was in trouble and nothing was being done about it.
何しろそれがどんどん減少するのに
放置されたままでしたから
01:59
Well, from that discussion grew this program
まあ それが議論の発端となりプログラムが誕生した訳です
02:02
that involved 2,700 scientists
そしてこのプログラムには2700人の科学者が
02:04
from more than 80 countries around the world
世界80カ国以上から参加しました
02:06
who engaged in 540 ocean expeditions
科学者たちは総額6億5千万ドルの研究費で
02:08
at a combined cost of 650 million dollars
540の海洋研究に従事し
02:11
to study the distribution, diversity and abundance
地球上の海洋生物の分布 多様性と個体数を
02:14
of life in the global ocean.
調査したのです
02:16
And so what did we find?
さて そこでの発見は何だったか
02:19
We found spectacular new species,
私たちは目を見張るような新種を発見しました
02:21
the most beautiful and visually stunning things everywhere we looked --
その新種は驚愕するような美しさで
02:23
from the shoreline to the abyss,
しかも海岸線から深海までのいたるところで発見され
02:26
form microbes all the way up to fish and everything in between.
微生物から魚に至るまでです
02:28
And the limiting step here wasn't the unknown diversity of life,
未知の生物の多様性に関しての調査に比べ
02:31
but rather the taxonomic specialists
分類学の専門家が手間取りました
02:34
who can identify and catalog these species
分類学者は新種を同定し
02:36
that became the limiting step.
目録化する知識を持った専門家です
02:38
They, in fact, are an endangered species themselves.
分類学者自体が絶滅危惧種でした
02:40
There are actually four to five new species
事実 海に関しては4つから5つの新種が
02:43
described everyday for the oceans.
日々登録されています
02:45
And as I say, it could be a much larger number.
ですから とにかく膨大な数となるわけです
02:47
Now, I come from Newfoundland in Canada --
さて私はカナダのニューファンドランド
02:50
It's an island off the east coast of that continent --
北米大陸の東海岸沖合の島の出身です。
02:53
where we experienced one of the worst fishing disasters
ニューファンドランドは人類史上最悪の漁場の
02:55
in human history.
乱獲に見舞われました
02:58
And so this photograph shows a small boy next to a codfish.
この写真を見て下さい 
男の子がタラの横に立っていますね
03:00
It's around 1900.
1900年頃のことです
03:02
Now, when I was a boy of about his age,
私がこの写真に写っている子ぐらいの時
03:04
I would go out fishing with my grandfather
よく祖父と魚釣りに行ったものです
03:06
and we would catch fish about half that size.
でも私が釣った魚はこの魚の半分しかありませんでした
03:08
And I thought that was the norm,
まあ それが当時は普通の大きさだと思っていました
03:10
because I had never seen fish like this.
こんな大きな魚なんて見たことがありませんでしたから
03:12
If you were to go out there today, 20 years after this fishery collapsed,
今日 そこに行っても
漁業がすっかり駄目になり20年も経っていますから
03:14
if you could catch a fish, which would be a bit of a challenge,
魚を釣ることができたとしても
釣ること自体も難儀ですが
03:17
it would be half that size still.
釣った魚は 当時 私が釣った魚の半分くらいのものでしょう
03:20
So what we're experiencing is something called shifting baselines.
今 シフティングベースライン
(価値基準の変化)を経験しているわけです
03:22
Our expectations of what the oceans can produce
海の生産能力の大きさを
03:25
is something that we don't really appreciate
私たちは理解していないのです
03:27
because we haven't seen it in our lifetimes.
自分の生涯で見たことがないからです
03:29
Now most of us, and I would say me included,
今 殆どの人々が 私も含めて
03:32
think that human exploitation of the oceans
人間による海洋搾取がこの50年 いや恐らく この100年で
03:35
really only became very serious
ひどい状態に
03:37
in the last 50 to, perhaps, 100 years or so.
なってしまったと思っています
03:39
The census actually tried to look back in time,
そこで海洋生物調査は実際に入手可能な
03:41
using every source of information they could get their hands on.
あらゆる情報を駆使し過去を検証しました
03:43
And so anything from restaurant menus
レストランのメニューから
03:46
to monastery records to ships' logs
修道院の記録や航海日誌まで
03:48
to see what the oceans looked like.
海がどんなものであったかを調べるためには
何でも収集したのです
03:50
Because science data really goes back
科学データは第2次世界大戦ころまで
03:52
to, at best, World War II, for the most part.
遡れます
03:54
And so what they found, in fact,
事実 分かったことは
03:56
is that exploitation really began heavily with the Romans.
海洋搾取が
なんとローマ時代に始まっていたのです
03:58
And so at that time, of course, there was no refrigeration.
勿論当時冷凍設備などはありませんでした
04:00
So fishermen could only catch
だから漁師はその日に
04:03
what they could either eat or sell that day.
食べたり売りさばける量だけを獲っていました
04:05
But the Romans developed salting.
しかしローマ人は塩漬けにすることを思いつきました
04:07
And with salting,
そして塩漬けすることで
04:09
it became possible to store fish and to transport it long distances.
魚を蓄えたり 遠く離れたところに輸送できるようになりました
04:11
And so began industrial fishing.
その結果漁業の産業化が始まったのです
04:14
And so these are the sorts of extrapolations that we have
このグラフは私たちが推測して 作成したものですが
04:17
of what sort of loss we've had
人類出現以前と比較して
04:20
relative to pre-human impacts on the ocean.
どれだけ魚を失ったかを示しています
04:22
They range from 65 to 98 percent
生物の大多数のグループでは 失われたものが
04:25
for these major groups of organisms,
65%から98%に及んでいることを
04:27
as shown in the dark blue bars.
濃紺のバーが示しています
04:29
Now for those species the we managed to leave alone, that we protect --
さて危害を加えず保護した動物
04:31
for example, marine mammals in recent years and sea birds --
近年の海洋哺乳動物や海鳥などですが
04:34
there is some recovery.
ある程度回復が伺えます
04:36
So it's not all hopeless.
だから まったく絶望的だということではないのです
04:38
But for the most part, we've gone from salting to exhausting.
しかし 大抵の場合 私たちは塩漬けにし
取り尽してしまう行為に及んでいます
04:40
Now this other line of evidence is a really interesting one.
さてこの線は大変興味深いものを示しています
04:43
It's from trophy fish caught off the coast of Florida.
この写真はフロリダ沖合釣り大会の優勝魚です
04:45
And so this is a photograph from the 1950s.
1950年代に撮影されたものです
04:48
I want you to notice the scale on the slide,
このスライドでは魚の大きさに着目してください
04:51
because when you see the same picture from the 1980s,
1980年代に写された優勝魚を見ると
04:53
we see the fish are much smaller
こちらの魚の方がずっと小さい
04:55
and we're also seeing a change
それにその他の変化にも気が付きますよね
04:57
in terms of the composition of those fish.
優勝魚として釣られた魚の種類も変わっています
04:59
By 2007, the catch was actually laughable
2007年までには優勝魚というには
05:01
in terms of the size for a trophy fish.
実に笑ってしまうようなサイズです
05:03
But this is no laughing matter.
でも笑っている場合じゃないんです
05:05
The oceans have lost a lot of their productivity
海が多くの生産力をなくしてしまったのですから
05:07
and we're responsible for it.
そして私たちにその責任があるのです
05:09
So what's left? Actually quite a lot.
じゃあ 何が残されているのか
実はかなり多くのものがあります
05:12
There's a lot of exciting things, and I'm going to tell you a little bit about them.
わくわくするものがたくさんあるんです
これからそれについてちょっと話しましょう
05:14
And I want to start with a bit on technology,
まず技術について少々触れておきたいと思います
05:17
because, of course, this is a TED Conference
これはTED Conferenceですし
05:19
and you want to hear something on technology.
聴衆の皆さんも技術について何か知りたいはずですよね
05:21
So one of the tools that we use to sample the deep ocean
深海から試料を採取するために
05:23
are remotely operated vehicles.
遠隔操作の探査機を使います
05:25
So these are tethered vehicles we lower down to the sea floor
これがケーブル式探査機で
海床まで降ろし
05:27
where they're our eyes and our hands for working on the sea bottom.
海床で私たちの目となり手となって
働いてくれます
05:30
So a couple of years ago, I was supposed to go on an oceanographic cruise
2、3年前 私は海洋調査の旅に参加しようとしましたが
05:33
and I couldn't go because of a scheduling conflict.
日程が合わず 行けませんでした
05:36
But through a satellite link I was able to sit at my study at home
しかし衛星回線を通して家から参加できました それも
05:39
with my dog curled up at my feet, a cup of tea in my hand,
犬が私の足下でうずくまり
私は紅茶を飲みながら
05:42
and I could tell the pilot, "I want a sample right there."
「そこでサンプルを採って」
と指示できるのです
05:45
And that's exactly what the pilot did for me.
するとパイロットはきちんと採取してくれます
05:47
That's the sort of technology that's available today
そんなことが今日では技術によって可能なんですね
05:49
that really wasn't available even a decade ago.
10年前でさえ
こんなことはできませんでした
05:52
So it allows us to sample these amazing habitats
技術によりこんな深海にある
05:54
that are very far from the surface
驚くような生息地から
05:56
and very far from light.
しかも光から遥か遠くの場所からも採取が可能になりました
05:58
And so one of the tools that we can use to sample the oceans
海洋から採取をするために使用する道具に
06:00
is acoustics, or sound waves.
音波があります
06:03
And the advantage of sound waves
音波は光よりずっと
06:05
is that they actually pass well through water, unlike light.
水中をよく伝播できるのが利点です
06:07
And so we can send out sound waves,
つまり 音波を送ると
06:09
they bounce off objects like fish and are reflected back.
魚のような物体に当たると反射するんです
06:11
And so in this example, a census scientist took out two ships.
この画面では海洋生物調査の科学者が
2隻の船を使っています
06:14
One would send out sound waves that would bounce back.
一隻の船が音波を出し それが反射する
06:17
They would be received by a second ship,
その音波を2隻目の船が受信するという仕掛けです
06:19
and that would give us very precise estimates, in this case,
この方法だと大変詳細な推測ができるんです
06:21
of 250 billion herring
この場合ですと2500億匹のニシンの群れがあることが
06:24
in a period of about a minute.
約1分で分かるのです
06:26
And that's an area about the size of Manhattan Island.
しかもそのニシンの群れは
マンハッタン島くらい広がっているんです
06:28
And to be able to do that is a tremendous fisheries tool,
このような推測ができるなんて
実に素晴らしい漁具です
06:31
because knowing how many fish are there is really critical.
何匹魚がいるかを把握できるのは重要です
06:33
We can also use satellite tags
音波以外にも通信衛星タグというものも使っています
06:36
to track animals as they move through the oceans.
この通信衛星タグは
海洋を移動する物を追跡できるんです
06:38
And so for animals that come to the surface to breathe,
動物が呼吸するために海面にあがります
06:40
such as this elephant seal,
例えばこのゾウアザラシみたいにね
06:42
it's an opportunity to send data back to shore
ゾウアザラシが海面に出てくるとデータが送られ
06:44
and tell us where exactly it is in the ocean.
海のどこにいるのか 正確に把握できます
06:46
And so from that we can produce these tracks.
このデータからゾウアザラシの足跡を作成できますよ
06:49
For example, the dark blue
例えば 濃紺の色をたどれば
06:51
shows you where the elephant seal moved in the north Pacific.
ゾウアザラシが北太平洋のどこにいるかが分かるでしょう
06:53
Now I realize for those of you who are colorblind, this slide is not very helpful,
あっ 今 気がついたのですが
この中に色盲の方がいらしたらこのスライドじゃ 駄目ですね
06:55
but stick with me nonetheless.
すみませんが それでも 私の説明におつきあいください
06:58
For animals that don't surface,
さて 海面に浮上しない動物については
07:00
we have something called pop-up tags,
ポップアップタグと呼ばれる器具があります
07:02
which collect data about light and what time the sun rises and sets.
これは光に関してや日出日没の時間に関しての
データを収集します
07:04
And then at some period of time
つまり ポップアップタグはある時間になると海面に
07:07
it pops up to the surface and, again, relays that data back to shore.
浮上し 私たちのところにデーターを送ってくれるのです
07:09
Because GPS doesn't work under water. That's why we need these tools.
とにかく海の下ではGPSは機能しませんから
この道具が必要なんです
07:12
And so from this we're able to identify these blue highways,
これから この青い帯状の部分が分かりますね
07:15
these hot spots in the ocean,
この帯が海の中のホットスポットです
07:18
that should be real priority areas
このホットスポットの部分は最大優先して
07:20
for ocean conservation.
海洋保護をすべき場所です
07:22
Now one of the other things that you may think about
さて 皆さんもすでにお気付きかもしれませんが
07:24
is that, when you go to the supermarket and you buy things, they're scanned.
スーパーに行き買い物をするときに品物をスキャンしますね
07:26
And so there's a barcode on that product
品物にはバーコードがついていて
07:29
that tells the computer exactly what the product is.
バーコードによってコンピューターが
どんな品物であるかを認識しますよね
07:31
Geneticists have developed a similar tool called genetic barcoding.
遺伝学者も遺伝子バーコードと言う
類似した方法を開発しました
07:34
And what barcoding does
そのバーコードで何をするかというと
07:37
is use a specific gene called CO1
ある生物が同じ種であればが必ず持つCO1と言う
07:39
that's consistent within a species, but varies among species.
特別な遺伝子を使うのです 
この特別な遺伝子は種によって異なります
07:41
And so what that means is we can unambiguously identify
つまり 明らかにどの種であるか
07:44
which species are which
識別できるのです
07:46
even if they look similar to each other,
どんなにお互いが似て見えたとしても
07:48
but may be biologically quite different.
生物学的には全く異種であることが分かるのです
07:50
Now one of the nicest examples I like to cite on this
これに関して良い例を挙げてみたいと思います
07:52
is the story of two young women, high school students in New York City,
二人の若い女の子 ニューヨークの高校生の話ですが
07:54
who worked with the census.
海洋生物調査の仕事をしていました
07:57
They went out and collected fish from markets and from restaurants in New York City
ニューヨークのレストランや市場から魚を集め
07:59
and they barcoded it.
その魚のバーコードを調べました
08:02
Well what they found was mislabeled fish.
すると 魚の名前が違っていることが分かりました
08:04
So for example,
例えば
08:06
they found something which was sold as tuna, which is very valuable,
マグロ とても高価な魚ですよね マグロという名前で
08:08
was in fact tilapia, which is a much less valuable fish.
売られていた魚は実はティラピアでした
ティラピアはマグロよりずっと安い魚ですね
08:10
They also found an endangered species
また絶滅危惧種の魚が
08:13
sold as a common one.
ごくありふれた魚として売られていたことも分かりました
08:15
So barcoding allows us to know what we're working with
バーコード法によって
魚の種類を調査でき
08:17
and also what we're eating.
また食糧の素性が分かるのです
08:19
The Ocean Biogeographic Information System
オーシャン・バイオジオグラフィック・インフォメーション・
システムは
海洋生物調査の全データベースです
08:22
is the database for all the census data.
オーシャン・バイオジオグラフィック・インフォメーション・
システムは
海洋生物調査の全データベースです
08:24
It's open access; you can all go in and download data as you wish.
誰でもアクセス可能で
自由にそのデータをダウンロードできます
08:26
And it contains all the data from the census
そこには海洋生物調査からの資料もありますが
08:29
plus other data sets that people were willing to contribute.
それに加え皆さんもデータを提供することができます
08:32
And so what you can do with that
それを使ってできることは
08:34
is to plot the distribution of species and where they occur in the oceans.
種の分布や海のどこに生物がいるかを示すことができます
08:36
What I've plotted up here is the data that we have on hand.
ここにある図は手持ちのデータで作成しました
08:39
This is where our sampling effort has concentrated.
これは最も採集努力をしているところです
08:41
Now what you can see
今ご覧になっているデータは
08:44
is we've sampled the area in the North Atlantic,
特に上手く採集できた北大西洋地域
08:46
in the North Sea in particular,
北海
08:48
and also the east coast of North America fairly well.
そして北米東海岸のものです
08:50
That's the warm colors which show a well-sampled region.
この赤い色の地域がかなりデータ採取ができた地域で
08:52
The cold colors, the blue and the black,
青い色や黒色の部分が
08:55
show areas where we have almost no data.
殆どデータ採取ができていない地域です
08:57
So even after a 10-year census,
ですから 今まで10年間調査しても
08:59
there are large areas that still remain unexplored.
依然として調査し尽くせない地域がたくさんあります
09:01
Now there are a group of scientists living in Texas, working in the Gulf of Mexico
さて テキサス州の科学者グループが
メキシコ湾で研究していますが
09:04
who decided really as a labor of love
彼らは報酬なしで
09:07
to pull together all the knowledge they could
メキシコ湾の生物の多様性について
09:09
about biodiversity in the Gulf of Mexico.
英知を結集しようと決心しました
09:11
And so they put this together, a list of all the species,
研究者はすべての種のリスト
09:13
where they're known to occur,
どこにどのような生物がいるかの
リスト作成に一丸となっていましたし
09:16
and it really seemed like a very esoteric, scientific type of exercise.
これはとても難解かつ
科学的な任務であるように見受けられました
09:18
But then, of course, there was the Deep Horizon oil spill.
しかし その時 石油掘削施設「ディープ・ホライズン」の
事故により原油が流出し
09:21
So all of a sudden, this labor of love
報酬を期待せずにしていた研究が
09:24
for no obvious economic reason
つまり経済的な理由を何も持っていなかった研究が
09:26
has become a critical piece of information
突如 大変重要な情報になりました
09:29
in terms of how that system is going to recover, how long it will take
つまり生態系がどのように回復するのか
回復にはどのくらいの期間が必要か
09:31
and how the lawsuits
またこれから起きる訴訟や
09:34
and the multi-billion-dollar discussions that are going to happen in the coming years
数十億ドルの物議をかもす話し合いが
09:36
are likely to be resolved.
どのように決着していくのかという点で
非常に重大な情報となるのです
09:39
So what did we find?
さて 私たちが発見したものは何か?
09:42
Well, I could stand here for hours, but, of course, I'm not allowed to do that.
それを話すために何時間もかかるのでもちろん
今ここでは話せません
09:44
But I will tell you some of my favorite discoveries
海洋生物調査の発見から
09:46
from the census.
印象的ないくつかを話しましょう
09:48
So one of the things we discovered is where are the hot spots of diversity?
発見とは 多様性のホットスポットはどこか?
09:50
Where do we find the most species of ocean life?
海洋生物の大半の種はどこで見つかるか?
09:53
And what we find if we plot up the well-known species
良く知られている種の位置を描いてみると
09:56
is this sort of a distribution.
このような分布が得られます
09:58
And what we see is that for coastal tags,
沿岸生物群については―
10:00
for those organisms that live near the shoreline,
つまり海岸近くに生息する生物は
10:02
they're most diverse in the tropics.
熱帯地域が一番多様性に富んでいます
10:04
This is something we've actually known for a while,
このことは 実は以前から分かっていたことですから
10:06
so it's not a real breakthrough.
新発見とは言えません
10:08
What is really exciting though
でも 本当にわくわくすることは
10:10
is that the oceanic tags, or the ones that live far from the coast,
海洋生物群―岸から遠くの生物たちは
10:12
are actually more diverse at intermediate latitudes.
実は中間緯度で多様であると言うことです
10:14
This is the sort of data, again, that managers could use
保護すべき海洋域の優先順位づけをしようというなら
10:16
if they want to prioritize areas of the ocean that we need to conserve.
管理者はこの種のデータを利用できます
10:19
You can do this on a global scale, but you can also do it on a regional scale.
皆さんだって地球規模でこれを利用できるし
地域ごとにも利用できるます
10:22
And that's why biodiversity data can be so valuable.
だからこそ 多様性に関するデータは
とても価値があるのです
10:25
Now while a lot of the species we discovered in the census
さて 海洋生物調査が発見した多くの生物の種が
10:28
are things that are small and hard to see,
小さく見つけにくいんですが
10:31
that certainly wasn't always the case.
しかし小さいものばかりだとは限りません
10:33
For example, while it's hard to believe
例えば信じがたいことですが
10:35
that a three kilogram lobster could elude scientists,
3キロもあるロブスターが科学者の目を逃れていました
10:37
it did until a few years ago
実は数年前
10:39
when South African fishermen requested an export permit
南アフリカの漁師が輸出許可を申請した時に初めて
10:41
and scientists realized that this was something new to science.
これが新種だと言うことに気がついたんです
10:44
Similarly this Golden V kelp
同様にこの黄金V昆布もそうです これは
10:47
collected in Alaska just below the low water mark
アラスカの低水位線の下で採取されたのですが
10:49
is probably a new species.
恐らく新種です
10:51
Even though it's three meters long,
長さが3メートルもあるにもかかわらず
10:53
it actually, again, eluded science.
これもまた科学者の目から逃れていました
10:55
Now this guy, this bigfin squid, is seven meters in length.
どうですか こいつ
このアオリイカは長さが7メートルあります
10:57
But to be fair, it lives in the deep waters of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge,
公正を期すために言いますが
これは大西洋中央海嶺の深海に棲息しているから
11:00
so it was a lot harder to find.
とても見つけにくかったのです
11:03
But there's still potential for discovery of big and exciting things.
大きい わくわくするような生き物が
これからまだまだ発見される可能性があるんですよ
11:05
This particular shrimp, we've dubbed it the Jurassic shrimp,
この写真のエビを私たちは
ジュラシック・シュリンプというあだ名で呼んでいるんですが
11:08
it's thought to have gone extinct 50 years ago --
これは50年前にとっくに絶滅したと思われています
11:11
at least it was, until the census discovered
少なくとも海洋生物調査が発見するまでのことですけれども
11:13
it was living and doing just fine off the coast of Australia.
でもこのエビはオーストラリアの沖合で棲息し
なかなか元気にやっていますよ
11:15
And it shows that the ocean, because of its vastness,
海はあまりに広大ですから
11:18
can hide secrets for a very long time.
長い間 秘密をかくすことができるんですね
11:21
So, Steven Spielberg, eat your heart out.
そう だからスティーブン・スピルバーグも悩んでいますよね
11:23
If we look at distributions, in fact distributions change dramatically.
生物分布についてですが
実際には 分布は劇的に変化するんです
11:26
And so one of the records that we had
私たちの記録の一つによると
11:29
was this sooty shearwater, which undergoes these spectacular migrations
ハイイロミズナギドリは
11:32
all the way from New Zealand
はるかニュージーランドから
11:35
all the way up to Alaska and back again
アラスカまで 壮大な渡りをしますが
11:37
in search of endless summer
常夏を求めて帰っていきます
11:39
as they complete their life cycles.
そのような渡りを一生繰り返していくのです
11:41
We also talked about the White Shark Cafe.
ホホジロザメ・カフェについても話したことがありますが
11:43
This is a location in the Pacific where white shark converge.
ホホジロザメ・カフェとはホホジロザメが群がっている
太平洋上のある場所のことを言います
11:45
We don't know why they converge there, we simply don't know.
なぜそこで群がっているのか私たちにはわかりません
本当に全然わからないのです
11:48
That's a question for the future.
これを解くのは未来の課題です
11:50
One of the things that we're taught in high school
高校時代に教えられてきたことに
11:52
is that all animals require oxygen in order to survive.
動物は生きるために酸素が必要だということがありますね
11:54
Now this little critter, it's only about half a millimeter in size,
さてこの小さいな奇妙な動物 1ミリの半分しかないサイズで
11:57
not terribly charismatic.
カリスマ性なんて微塵もありません
12:00
But it was only discovered in the early 1980s.
1980年代初頭に発見されたばかりです
12:02
But the really interesting thing about it
これについてとても興味深いことは
12:04
is that, a few years ago, census scientists discovered
数年前 海洋生物調査の科学者が発見したことです
12:06
that this guy can thrive in oxygen-poor sediments
どんなことかというと こいつは地中海の深海で
12:09
in the deep Mediterranean Sea.
酸素がごく少ない沈殿物の中でもすくすくと育つんです
12:11
So now they know that, in fact,
要するに 分かったことは
12:13
animals can live without oxygen, at least some of them,
動物は酸素なしでも生きることができる
少なくともそういった動物がいる
12:15
and that they can adapt to even the harshest of conditions.
そしてそういう動物は
とても厳しい環境にも適応できるということです
12:17
If you were to suck all the water out of the ocean,
もし海から水を吸い出してしまったら
12:20
this is what you'd be left behind with,
残るものは
12:23
and that's the biomass of life on the sea floor.
海床にある生物のバイオマスです
12:25
Now what we see is huge biomass towards the poles
この巨大なバイオマスは
南極と北極の近くに多く見られますが
12:27
and not much biomass in between.
その中間にはあまり見られません
12:30
We found life in the extremes.
私たちは極端な条件下でも生物を発見しました
12:33
And so there were new species that were found
私たちが発見した新生物は
12:35
that live inside ice
氷の中で生きていました
12:37
and help to support an ice-based food web.
その生物は氷中の食物連鎖を支えています
12:39
And we also found this spectacular yeti crab
この目を見張るようなイエティークラブも
私たちが発見しました
12:41
that lives near boiling hot hydrothermal vents at Easter Island.
これはイースター島の沸騰する
熱水孔の近くで生きています
12:43
And this particular species
このカニは
12:46
really captured the public's attention.
本当に世間から注目を浴びました
12:48
We also found the deepest vents known yet -- 5,000 meters --
もっとも深い熱水孔は5千メートル
12:51
the hottest vents at 407 degrees Celsius --
一番高温なものが407度であるということは既知のことです
12:54
vents in the South Pacific and also in the Arctic
そしてその熱水孔が南太平洋と南極にもありますが
12:57
where none had been found before.
そこでは何の生物も発見されませんでした
12:59
So even new environments are still within the domain of the discoverable.
新しい環境には依然として今後発見を待つ領域があり
13:01
Now in terms of the unknowns, there are many.
未知ということに関していうなら
本当にたくさんのことがまだわかっていません
13:04
And I'm just going to summarize just a few of them
ではこれから簡単に未知のものについて
13:06
very quickly for you.
まとめていきましょう
13:08
First of all, we might ask, how many fishes in the sea?
第一に海にはどのくらいの種類の魚がいるのか
13:10
We actually know the fishes better than we do any other group in the ocean
現実的にはどの海洋生物より
私たちは魚に関して知っています
13:13
other than marine mammals.
海の哺乳類は別としてね
13:15
And so we can actually extrapolate based on rates of discovery
これまでの発見率から予測して
13:17
how many more species we're likely to discover.
この先どのくらいの種を発見できるんでしょうか
13:20
And from that, we actually calculate
これについては実際 計算してみたのですが
13:23
that we know about 16,500 marine species
1万6500種類の海の種が知られており
13:25
and there are probably another 1,000 to 4,000 left to go.
あと千から4千くらいを発見することになるでしょう
13:28
So we've done pretty well.
ということで
私たちはかなり上手くやりました
13:30
We've got about 75 percent of the fish,
つまり75%について もしくは90%くらいも
13:32
maybe as much as 90 percent.
魚については分かっているのです
13:34
But the fishes, as I say, are the best known.
しかし先ほど申し上げたように魚についてなら
一番分かっているということです
13:36
So our level of knowledge is much less for other groups of organisms.
私たちの知識レベルはほかの生物に関しては
依然として低いのです
13:39
Now this figure is actually based on a brand new paper
この数字は実は新しい論文に基づいたもので
13:42
that's going to come out in the journal PLoS Biology.
PLoSバイオロジーから発表されます
13:44
And what is does is predict how many more species there are
その内容は
あと何種の生物種が
13:47
on land and in the ocean.
陸上と海にいるかという推定です
13:49
And what they found
分かったことは
13:51
is that they think that we know of about nine percent of the species in the ocean.
海に関して9%くらいの生物の種が解明されており
13:53
That means 91 percent, even after the census,
つまり海洋生物調査以降でさえも91%が依然として
13:56
still remain to be discovered.
発見されていないのです
13:58
And so that turns out to be about two million species
つまり結局200万種類にも
14:00
once all is said and done.
なるということです
14:02
So we still have quite a lot of work to do
これからもたくさんやるべきことはあります
14:04
in terms of unknowns.
未知のことに関してはね
14:06
Now this bacterium
次にこのバクテリアは
14:08
is part of mats that are found off the coast of Chile.
これはチリの沿岸沖で見つけられた
バクテリアの群れの一部です
14:10
And these mats actually cover an area the size of Greece.
このような群れをあわせると
実にギリシア全土覆うくらいの大きさになります
14:13
And so this particular bacterium is actually visible to the naked eye.
今 話題にしているこのバクテリアは
実際に裸眼でも見られます
14:15
But you can imagine the biomass that represents.
これがどのくらいのバイオマスになるのか想像もできます
14:18
But the really intriguing thing about the microbes
でも微生物に関して実に驚くべきなのは
14:21
is just how diverse they are.
微生物には非常に多様性があるということです
14:23
A single drop of seawater
一滴の海水には
14:25
could contain 160 different types of microbes.
160もの違った微生物のタイプが含まれていると
言ってもいいでしょう
14:27
And the oceans themselves
海全体には
14:29
are thought potentially to contain as many as a billion different types.
10億以上もの違った微生物がいる
可能性があると考えられています
14:31
So that's really exciting. What are they all doing out there?
だから本当に興味がそそられるのです 
一体微生物はそこで何をしているのでしょうね
14:34
We actually don't know.
私たちには本当のことが分からないのです
14:37
The most exciting thing, I would say, about this census
さてこの調査で最も面白いことは
14:39
is the role of global science.
地球規模の科学の役割です
14:41
And so as we see in this image of light during the night,
夜 光のイメージの中で私たちは
14:43
there are lots of areas of the Earth
地上にはたくさんの地域があり
14:45
where human development is much greater
人間の発展が顕著な地域もあれば
14:47
and other areas where it's much less,
そうではない地域もある しかし
14:50
but between them we see large dark areas
その間には大きな暗い地域が存在し
14:52
of relatively unexplored ocean.
それがまだ未到の海です
14:54
The other point I'd like to make about this
もう一点指摘したいことは
14:56
is that this ocean's interconnected.
海は繋がっていると言うことです
14:58
Marine organisms do not care about international boundaries;
海洋生物は各国間の境界線など気にしていません
15:00
they move where they will.
彼らは自分の意思で動いています
15:02
And so the importance then of global collaboration
だからこそ地球規模での協力が
15:04
becomes all the more important.
さらに一層重要になるのです
15:07
We've lost a lot of paradise.
私たちは既にたくさんの楽園を失ってきました
15:09
For example, these tuna that were once so abundant in the North Sea
例えば こういうマグロは北海ではかつて豊富だったのに
15:11
are now effectively gone.
今ではほとんどいなくなっています
15:14
There were trawls taken in the deep sea in the Mediterranean,
地中海の海深くではトロール網漁業をしていますが
15:16
which collected more garbage than they did animals.
網に引っかかるものは魚よりもゴミの方が多いのです
15:19
And that's the deep sea, that's the environment that we consider to be
深海なんですよ 地球に残された まだ人類が汚していないと
15:21
among the most pristine left on Earth.
思われている深海の環境がこのざまなんです
15:24
And there are a lot of other pressures.
まだまだ他にも圧力はかかっています
15:26
Ocean acidification is a really big issue that people are concerned with,
海洋の温暖化同様 海洋の酸性化も大きな懸念事項です
15:28
as well as ocean warming, and the effects they're going to have on coral reefs.
これによる影響が珊瑚礁でも見られることでしょう
15:31
On the scale of decades, in our lifetimes,
数十年という単位で 私たちが生きている間にも
15:34
we're going to see a lot of damage to coral reefs.
珊瑚礁が損なわれていくのを目の当たりにするでしょう
15:37
And I could spend the rest of my time, which is getting very limited,
残りの生涯をかけ
と言っても限られた期間しかありませんが
15:39
going through this litany of concerns about the ocean,
海に関するこういった懸念を
何度も何度も繰り返し話していくつもりです
15:42
but I want to end on a more positive note.
しかし私としては
もう少し明るい感じで終わらせたいと思っています
15:44
And so the grand challenge then
そこで大きな課題は
15:46
is to try and make sure that we preserve what's left,
残されたものを守り通すということです
15:48
because there is still spectacular beauty.
残されたものにも
依然として目を見張るような美があるのですから
15:50
And the oceans are so productive,
そして海には生産力があり
15:52
there's so much going on in there that's of relevance to humans
海の中では起きている様々なこと
それがすべて人間に関係しています
15:54
that we really need to, even from a selfish perspective,
だから利己的な観点からでさえも
私たちは過去したことよりも
15:57
try to do better than we have in the past.
もっと良いことをする必要があるんです
16:00
So we need to recognize those hot spots
従って こういったホットスポットを認識し
16:02
and do our best to protect them.
そこを保護するために最大限努力しなくてはなりません
16:04
When we look at pictures like this, they take our breath away,
このような写真を見ると
その美しさにはっとさせられますが
16:06
in addition to helping to give us breath
そればかりか海が供給する酸素によって
16:08
by the oxygen that the oceans provide.
私たちの呼吸を助けているのです
16:10
Census scientists worked in the rain, they worked in the cold,
海洋生物調査の科学者たちは雨の中も 寒さの中も
16:12
they worked under water and they worked above water
水中でも水上でも調査研究を行い
16:15
trying to illuminate the wondrous discovery,
この驚くべき発見
16:17
the still vast unknown,
静かなこの広大な未知なるもの
16:19
the spectacular adaptations that we see in ocean life.
海洋生物に見たこの目を見張るような適応に
光を当てる努力をしてきました
16:21
So whether you're a yak herder living in the mountains of Chile,
チリの山岳に暮らすヤクの牧人であろうが
16:24
whether you're a stockbroker in New York City
ニューヨークの株式仲買人であろうが
16:27
or whether you're a TEDster living in Edinburgh,
エジンバラに住むTEDの関係者であろうが
16:30
the oceans matter.
海に関係しています
16:32
And as the oceans go so shall we.
つまり海が生き続ける限り私たちも生き続けるのです
16:34
Thanks for listening.
ご清聴ありがとうございました
16:36
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:38
Translator:Keiko Ishiwata
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Paul Snelgrove - Marine biologist
Paul Snelgrove led the group that pulled together the findings of the Census of Marine Life -- synthesizing 10 years and 540 expeditions into a book of wonders.

Why you should listen

From 2000 to 2010, the Census of Marine Life ran a focused international effort to catalogue as much knowledge as possible about the creatures living in our oceans. (It had never really been done before.) Some 2,700 scientists from 80 countries, on 540 expeditions, worked to assess the diversity, distribution, and abundance of marine life. More than 6,000 potential new species were discovered, amid scenes of ocean degradation, resilience, and wonder.

It was Paul Snelgrove's job to synthesize this mass of findings into a book. Snelgrove, a professor at Memorial University in Newfoundland who studies benthic sedimentary ecosystems, led the team that produced the book Discoveries of the Census of Marine Life, about the most important and dramatic findings of the CML: new species and habitats, unexpected and epic migration routes and changing distribution patterns. The census revealed how diverse, surprising, still vastly unknown, and tenacious life is in the oceans.

He says: "How to distill thousands of scientific papers and dozens of books into a coherent story? The answer was to lock myself in the basement, shut off email, and read, read, read."

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.