18:41
TEDxSanJoseCA

Seth Shostak: ET is (probably) out there -- get ready

セス・ショスタック: E.T.は(多分)いる -- 心して待て

Filmed:

SETIの研究者であるセス・ショスタックは24年以内に地球外生命体を発見できると賭けを申し出ます。そうでなければコーヒーを一杯おごると。何故、発見できるのか。そして、はるかに進んだ社会を発見することによって人類はどう影響を受けるのかについて語ります。 (TEDxSanJoseCAで撮影)

- Astronomer
Seth Shostak is an astronomer, alien hunter and bulwark of good, exciting science. Full bio

E.T. (地球外生命)は存在するのでしょうか?
00:15
Is E.T. out there?
私はSETI研究所で働いています
00:16
Well, I work at the SETI Institute.
SETI は私の名前(Seth)とよく似ていますが
00:19
That's almost my name. SETI:
地球外知的生命体探査のことです
00:21
Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.
つまり 私は宇宙人を探しています
00:23
In other words, I look for aliens,
この話をカクテルパーティーですると
00:25
and when I tell people that at a cocktail party, they usually
大抵 疑わしそうな目で見られますが
00:28
look at me with a mildly incredulous look on their face.
私は何気なく装うことにしています
00:31
I try to keep my own face somewhat dispassionate.
多くの人は 宇宙人探しなんて
00:33
Now, a lot of people think that this is kind of idealistic,
夢のようで 馬鹿げていて
不可能だと考えています
00:36
ridiculous, maybe even hopeless,
でも なぜ自分の仕事が
00:38
but I just want to talk to you a little bit about why I think
特別なものだと思っているのか そして
00:42
that the job I have is actually a privilege, okay,
私がこの仕事を始めたきっかけを
00:46
and give you a little bit of the motivation for my getting into
簡単にお話ししたいと思います
00:48
this line of work, if that's what you call it.
これは あれ 戻せますか?
00:50
This thing — whoops, can we go back?
地球の方 応答願います
00:53
Hello, come in, Earth.
戻りましたね
00:56
There we go. All right.
シエラネバダの奥にある
00:57
This is the Owens Valley Radio Observatory
オーウェンズバレー電波天文台です
00:59
behind the Sierra Nevadas, and in 1968,
1968年 私は博士論文のために
ここでデータを集めていました
01:03
I was working there collecting data for my thesis.
ただデータを集めるというのは
孤独で つまらない作業なので
01:06
Now, it's kinda lonely, it's kinda tedious, just collecting data,
夜に望遠鏡や
01:09
so I would amuse myself by taking photos at night
私自身の写真を撮って楽しんでいました
01:12
of the telescopes or even of myself,
夜になると 周囲50キロほどには
01:14
because, you know, at night, I would be the only hominid
ヒト科の動物はいなくなるからです
01:20
within about 30 miles.
これが当時の私の写真です
01:21
So here are pictures of myself.
観測所には ちょうどロシア人の宇宙学者が書いた
01:23
The observatory had just acquired a new book,
新しい本がありました
01:27
written by a Russian cosmologist
著者はヨシフ・シクロフスキーという人で
01:29
by the name of Joseph Shklovsky, and then expanded
コーネル大学にいた当時無名の
カール・セーガンという天文学者が
01:32
and translated and edited by a little-known
補稿を書き 翻訳と編集を
担当していました
01:35
Cornell astronomer by the name of Carl Sagan.
この本を読んだ時のことを覚えています
01:37
And I remember reading that book,
深夜3時にこの本を読んで
01:39
and at 3 in the morning I was reading this book
銀河の回転を計測するために
01:41
and it was explaining how the antennas I was using
自分が使っているアンテナは
ある恒星系から別の恒星系へ
01:44
to measure the spins of galaxies could also be used
交信したり情報を送ったりすることにも
01:49
to communicate, to send bits of information
使えることを知りました
01:51
from one star system to another.
一人ぼっちで ほとんど
寝てもいない深夜3時に
01:54
Now, at 3 o'clock in the morning when you're all alone,
これはとても素敵なアイデアに思えました
01:55
haven't had much sleep, that was a very romantic idea,
同じ技術を使うだけで
01:58
but it was that idea -- the fact that you could in fact
地球外に知的生命体がいることを
02:02
prove that there's somebody out there
証明できるという事実
02:04
just using this same technology --
このアイデアに魅せられ20年後に
02:06
that appealed to me so much that 20 years later I took a job
私はSETI研究所の職に
就くことになりました
02:09
at the SETI Institute. Now, I have to say
私の記憶は穴だらけなので
02:11
that my memory is notoriously porous, and I've often
この記憶が真実か それとも
02:15
wondered whether there was any truth in this story,
間違いなのか疑問でしたが
02:17
or I was just, you know, misremembering something,
最近 この写真のネガを引き伸ばしてみると
02:18
but I recently just blew up this old negative of mine,
ご覧のとおり
02:21
and sure enough, there you can see
シクロフスキーとセーガンの本が
02:23
the Shklovsky and Sagan book underneath that
アナログ計算機の下にあるのが見えます
02:25
analog calculating device.
私の記憶は正しかったのです
02:27
So it was true.
地球外知的生命体を探すアイデアはこの写真の当時
02:28
All right. Now, the idea for doing this, it wasn't very old
生まれて間もないものでした
02:31
at the time that I made that photo.
1960年にフランク・ドレイクという若い天文学者が
02:32
The idea dates from 1960, when a young astronomer
西ヴァージニアでこのアンテナを
02:36
by the name of Frank Drake used this antenna
近くのいくつかの星に向けて
02:38
in West Virginia, pointed it at a couple of nearby stars
E.T.からのメッセージを傍受しようとしたのです
02:42
in the hopes of eavesdropping on E.T.
何も聞くことはできませんでした
02:45
Now, Frank didn't hear anything.
実は聞こえた信号は
アメリカ空軍のもので
02:47
Actually he did, but it turned out to be the U.S. Air Force,
地球外知的生命体ではありませんでした
02:49
which doesn't count as extraterrestrial intelligence.
でもドレイクのアイデアは広く注目を集めました
02:52
But Drake's idea here became very popular
人の心を惹きつけるものだったからです
この点はまたお話しします
02:55
because it was very appealing — and I'll get back to that —
この実験は成功しませんでしたが
私たちはこれを元に
02:58
and on the basis of this experiment, which didn't succeed,
宇宙に耳を傾け続けているのです
03:01
we have been doing SETI ever since,
たまに途切れますが 活動は続いています
03:03
not continuously, but ever since.
まだ何も聞こえてきません
03:05
We still haven't heard anything.
まだ何も聞こえてきません
03:07
We still haven't heard anything.
実は地球外生命の存在すら
わかっていません
03:08
In fact, we don't know about any life beyond Earth,
でも この状態は近い将来
03:10
but I'm going to suggest to you that that's going to change
変わるだろうと思います
03:13
rather soon, and part of the reason, in fact,
私がそう考える大きな理由は
03:15
the majority of the reason why I think that's going to change
機器が進化しているからです
03:18
is that the equipment's getting better.
これは 皆さまの席から
560キロほどの場所にある
03:19
This is the Allen Telescope Array, about 350 miles
アレン・テレスコープ・アレイです
03:22
from whatever seat you're in right now.
これが今 私たちがE.T.を探すために
03:24
This is something that we're using today
使っているものです 
そして 電子機器も昔より
03:26
to search for E.T., and the electronics have gotten
とてもよくなりました
03:28
very much better too.
これは1960年にフランクドレイクが使っていたもの
03:30
This is Frank Drake's electronics in 1960.
これが
アレン・テレスコープ・アレイのものです
03:32
This is the Allen Telescope Array electronics today.
ある暇な学者が
03:34
Some pundit with too much time on his hands
今の新しい実験は
03:38
has reckoned that the new experiments are approximately
1960年のものよりも約100兆倍
03:41
100 trillion times better than they were in 1960,
良いものであると計算しました
03:45
100 trillion times better.
これは評価されるべき
03:47
That's a degree of an improvement that would look good
進歩ですよね
03:49
on your report card, okay?
しかし 一般の人に理解されていないのは
03:51
But something that's not appreciated by the public is,
実験は良くなり続けており
03:54
in fact, that the experiment continues to get better,
結果として より速くなる傾向にあることです
03:57
and, consequently, tends to get faster.
グラフでお見せします
グラフを出す度に
03:59
This is a little plot, and every time you show a plot,
聴衆の1割を失ってしまいます
04:01
you lose 10 percent of the audience.
こんなのが12枚あるのですが --(笑)
04:03
I have 12 of these. (Laughter)
でもこのグラフで探索スピードの変化を
04:05
But what I plotted here is just some metric
見ていただきたいのです
04:09
that shows how fast we're searching.
干し草の山の中から
一本の針を探すようなものです
04:12
In other words, we're looking for a needle in a haystack.
干し草の山の大きさは分かっています
銀河です
04:14
We know how big the haystack is. It's the galaxy.
でも今は干し草をかきわけるのに
ティースプーンではなく
04:16
But we're going through the haystack no longer
ブルドーザーを使っています
04:19
with a teaspoon but with a skip loader,
実験のスピードが上がっているからです
04:21
because of this increase in speed.
まだきちんと聞いていらして
04:23
In fact, those of you who are still conscious
数学が得意な方は気付くと思いますが
04:25
and mathematically competent,
このグラフは片対数グラフです
04:27
will note that this is a semi-log plot.
つまり 上昇率は指数関数のように増加します
04:29
In other words, the rate of increase is exponential.
指数関数的に進歩しているのがわかります
04:34
It's exponentially improving. Now, exponential is an
指数関数的という言葉は乱用され
メディアでもよく使われています
04:37
overworked word. You hear it on the media all the time.
本当の意味も知らずにです
04:39
They don't really know what exponential means,
でもこれは本当に
指数関数的です
04:40
but this is exponential.
18ヶ月毎に2倍になっており
04:42
In fact, it's doubling every 18 months, and, of course,
コンピューター通の方は周知の
04:45
every card-carrying member of the digerati knows
ムーアの法則です
04:47
that that's Moore's Law.
この調子でいけば 24年後には
04:49
So this means that over the course of the next
100万もの恒星系を見ることができ
04:51
two dozen years, we'll be able to look at a million star systems,
この宇宙に誰かいないか
04:55
a million star systems, looking for signals
探すことができるのです
04:57
that would prove somebody's out there.
100万もの恒星系ですよ 面白くないですか?
04:59
Well, a million star systems, is that interesting?
その中のいくつに 惑星があるでしょう?
05:01
I mean, how many of those star systems have planets?
事実 私たちはその答えを15年前ですら
05:04
And the facts are, we didn't know the answer to that
知りませんでした 実は 6ヶ月前ですら
05:07
even as recently as 15 years ago, and in fact, we really
本当にどれほどかわかりませんでした
05:09
didn't know it even as recently as six months ago.
しかし 今はわかります 最近の結果によれば
05:12
But now we do. Recent results suggest
恒星には必ずと言って良いほど
惑星があり それも複数存在します
05:15
that virtually every star has planets, and more than one.
まるでネコが妊娠したようなもので
05:18
They're like, you know, kittens. You get a litter.
生まれるのは1匹だけでなく 何匹もですよね
05:22
You don't get one kitten. You get a bunch.
これは私たちの銀河系にある惑星の数を
05:23
So in fact, this is a pretty accurate estimate
かなり正確に見積もったものです
05:26
of the number of planets in our galaxy,
この銀河系だけですよ
05:30
just in our galaxy, by the way,
天文学に詳しくない方のために
言いますと
05:32
and I remind the non-astronomy majors among you
地球のあるこの銀河系は望遠鏡でみることのできる
05:35
that our galaxy is only one of 100 billion
100万もの銀河の一つなのです
05:37
that we can see with our telescopes.
惑星ならたくさんありますが
05:39
That's a lot of real estate, but of course,
水星や海王星のような場所は
05:41
most of these planets are going to be kind of worthless,
あまり意味がありません
05:43
like, you know, Mercury, or Neptune.
海王星のことなんて考えた事もないでしょう
05:45
Neptune's probably not very big in your life.
では 惑星の何割が
05:47
So the question is, what fraction of these planets
住むのに適しているのでしょう?
05:51
are actually suitable for life?
まだわかりません
05:53
We don't know the answer to that either,
しかし NASAのケプラー望遠鏡のおかげで
05:54
but we will learn that answer this year, thanks to
今年にはわかります
05:57
NASA's Kepler Space Telescope,
そして 内部情報に詳しい人
つまりこの仕事をしているによると
05:58
and in fact, the smart money, which is to say the people who work on this project,
生命を有することのできる惑星は
06:03
the smart money is suggesting that the fraction of planets
1000個に1個か もしかすると
06:06
that might be suitable for life is maybe one in a thousand,
100個に1個くらいのものだそうです
06:10
one in a hundred, something like that.
悲観的に見積もったとしても
06:13
Well, even taking the pessimistic estimate, that it's
1000個に1個 ということは
06:15
one in a thousand, that means that there are
少なくとも10億もの地球の兄弟が
06:19
at least a billion cousins of the Earth
私たちのいる銀河系にあることになります
06:21
just in our own galaxy.
いろいろ数をあげましたが
06:23
Okay, now I've given you a lot of numbers here,
だいたいは大きな数です
06:25
but they're mostly big numbers, okay, so, you know,
ですから 住めそうな所は
十分あるということです
06:29
keep that in mind. There's plenty of real estate,
宇宙には それはもう沢山の惑星があり
06:31
plenty of real estate in the universe,
もしも地球だけが生命
面白い住人を持っているならば
06:33
and if we're the only bit of real estate in which there's
06:36
some interesting occupants, that makes you a miracle,
人類は奇跡の産物です
皆 自分を奇跡だと
思いたいのは分かりますが
06:39
and I know you like to think you're a miracle,
科学を学べば 自分が奇跡だと思ったとき
06:42
but if you do science, you learn rather quickly that
必ず その考えが間違いであると
気付きます
06:44
every time you think you're a miracle, you're wrong,
つまり
私たちは奇跡の産物ではないということです
06:46
so probably not the case.
するとこのような結論に達します
06:48
All right, so the bottom line is this:
調査の速度が上がり
06:50
Because of the increase in speed, and because of the
住めそうな惑星も沢山あるので
06:53
vast amount of habitable real estate in the cosmos, I figure
私たちは24年以内に何らかの信号を拾うと思います
06:58
we're going to pick up a signal within two dozen years.
結構 自信があるので
賭けてもいいですよ
07:00
And I feel strongly enough about that to make a bet with you:
24年以内に私たちがE.T.を見つける
そうでなければ
07:03
Either we're going to find E.T. in the next two dozen years,
07:06
or I'll buy you a cup of coffee.
コーヒーを一杯おごりましょう ー(笑)
24年でも悪くない賭けですよね
07:09
So that's not so bad. I mean, even with two dozen years,
ネットで信号傍受のニュースを見つけるか
07:12
you open up your browser and there's news of a signal,
コーヒーを一杯手に入れるのです
07:14
or you get a cup of coffee.
さぁ 人々が考えないような
07:16
Now, let me tell you about some aspect of this that
側面ついて話しましょう それは
07:20
people don't think about, and that is,
「何が起こるのか?」
私の言っていることが正しいとしましょう
07:22
what happens? Suppose that what I say is true.
実際わかりませんが
そうなるとします
07:25
I mean, who knows, but suppose it happens.
24年以内に 私たちは
07:28
Suppose some time in the next two dozen years
この宇宙に仲間がいると判断できる
07:29
we pick up a faint line that tells us
信号を受信するとします
07:31
we have some cosmic company.
すると その結果どうなるでしょう?
07:33
What is the effect? What's the consequence?
私なんて 発見の現場に
いるかもしれません
07:35
Now, I might be at ground zero for this.
実は自分に何が起こるかは想像できます
07:37
I happen to know what the consequence for me would be,
なぜなら1997年に
まさか ということがあったからです
07:39
because we've had false alarms. This is 1997,
これが午前3時ごろに
撮った写真です
07:42
and this is a photo I made at about 3 o'clock in the morning
ここ マウンテンビューで
コンピューターの画面を
07:44
in Mountain View here, when we were watching
見つめているところです
07:46
the computer monitors because we had picked up a signal
「ついに来たか」という信号を
受け取ったのです
07:49
that we thought, "This is the real deal." All right?
メン・イン・ブラックが来ると思いますよね
07:52
And I kept waiting for the Men in Black to show up. Right?
それに 誰かが電話をしてくると思ったんです
母とか政府機関とか
07:55
I kept waiting for -- I kept waiting for my mom to call,
07:59
somebody to call, the government to call. Nobody called.
電話はありませんでしたが 緊張で座れず
08:02
Nobody called. I was so nervous
室内をウロウロし
08:06
that I couldn't sit down. I just wandered around
08:07
taking photos like this one, just for something to do.
手持ちぶたさで
こんな写真を何枚も撮りました
08:10
Well, at 9:30 in the morning, with my head down
朝9時半頃
徹夜で疲れきり
08:12
on my desk because I obviously hadn't slept all night,
頭を机にのせて休んでいると
08:14
the phone rings and it's The New York Times.
電話が鳴りました
ニューヨークタイムズ紙でした
08:17
And I think there's a lesson in that, and that lesson is
そのことから学んだ教訓は
08:19
that if we pick up a signal, the media, the media will be on it
もし私たちが信号を受信すれば
メディアはイタチより早く
嗅ぎ付けてくるという事
08:22
faster than a weasel on ball bearings. It's going to be fast.
間違いなく 彼らに隠し事はできません
08:27
You can be sure of that. No secrecy.
08:28
That's what happens to me. It kind of ruins my whole week,
こうなると思います
一週間ムダになります
08:31
because whatever I've got planned that week is kind of out the window.
ほかに何もできない一週間になるでしょう
08:34
But what about you? What's it going to do to you?
でも皆さんにとっては
どうでしょうか?
08:36
And the answer is that we don't know the answer.
残念ながら まだわかりません
08:38
We don't know what that's going to do to you,
残念ながら まだわかりません
08:39
not in the long term, and not even very much in the short term.
長い期間においても
短い間ですらわかりません
08:42
I mean, that would be a bit like
この質問はまるで 1941年に戻って
08:45
asking Chris Columbus in 1491, "Hey Chris,
コロンブスにこう聞くようなものです
「もし ここと日本の間に大陸があると
わかったらどうする?
08:48
you know, what happens if it turns out that there's a
08:50
continent between here and Japan, where you're sailing to,
08:54
what will be the consequences for humanity
もし わかったら
人類にとって結果として何が起こる?」
もし わかったら
人類にとって結果として何が起こる?」
08:57
if that turns out to be the case?"
彼はもしかすると
08:58
And I think Chris would probably offer you some answer
あなたが理解できない答えを言うかもしれませんが
09:01
that you might not have understood, but it probably
多分正しくないでしょう それはE.T.を見つけたら
09:03
wouldn't have been right, and I think that to predict
どうなるかを予想するのと同じです
09:06
what finding E.T.'s going to mean,
09:08
we can't predict that either.
予想できません
09:09
But here are a couple things I can say.
でも いくつか言えることがあります
09:11
To begin with, it's going to be a society that's way in advance of our own.
まず E.T.の社会は私たちの社会より
ずっと進歩しているでしょう
09:15
You're not going to hear from alien Neanderthals.
ネアンデルタール人のようなE.T.から
信号を受けとることはないでしょう
09:16
They're not building transmitters.
電波送信機を作れませんから
09:18
They're going to be ahead of us, maybe by a few thousand
彼らは数千年年か もしくは数百万年
09:20
years, maybe by a few millions years, but substantially
私たちよりも進んでいます しかし 私たちよりも
進歩しているということは
09:23
ahead of us, and that means, if you can understand
09:25
anything that they're going to say, then you might be able
彼らから情報を手に入れることができれば
09:29
to short-circuit history by getting information from a society
未来へショートカットできるかもしれないのです
09:32
that's way beyond our own.
09:33
Now, you might find that a bit hyperbolic, and maybe it is,
大げさだと思うかもしれませんが
そうだとしても 起こり得ることですよね
09:36
but nonetheless, it's conceivable that this will happen,
09:39
and, you know, you could consider this like, I don't know,
これはユリウス・カエサルに英語を教えて
アメリカ議会図書館の鍵を渡すようなものです
09:41
giving Julius Caesar English lessons and the key
09:44
to the library of Congress.
これはユリウス・カエサルに英語を教えて
アメリカ議会図書館の鍵を渡すようなものです
09:45
It would change his day, all right?
彼の人生は逆転します
まずそれが一つ もう一つ絶対に起こるのは
09:47
That's one thing. Another thing that's for sure
09:49
going to happen is that it will calibrate us.
私たちに教訓を与えます
09:53
We will know that we're not that miracle, right,
私たちは 自分たちが奇跡の産物ではなく
09:57
that we're just another duck in a row,
ごく平凡な存在だとわかります
09:58
we're not the only kids on the block, and I think that that's
この近辺で唯一の生命ではなく
それは哲学的に重大なことだと思います
10:00
philosophically a very profound thing to learn.
10:03
We're not a miracle, okay?
私たちは奇跡ではないんです
三つ目はなんとなく漠然としていますが
10:07
The third thing that it might tell you is somewhat vague,
10:10
but I think interesting and important,
私は興味深く 重要だと思います それは
10:12
and that is, if you find a signal coming from a more
もし より進んだ社会から
信号を受信したとすると
10:14
advanced society, because they will be,
もし より進んだ社会から
信号を受信したとすると
10:16
that will tell you something about our own possibilities,
それは私たちのある可能性を示唆しています
10:19
that we're not inevitably doomed to self-destruction.
私たちは自己破壊によって
滅びる運命ではないということです
10:24
Because they survived their technology,
彼らが生き残れたのならば
10:25
we could do it too.
私たちにも可能です
10:27
Normally when you look out into the universe,
普通 宇宙の遠くを見れば見るほど
10:28
you're looking back in time. All right?
過去を見ていることになりますよね
10:31
That's interesting to cosmologists.
それは天文学者には面白い話でしょう
10:33
But in this sense, you actually can look into the future,
しかし この方法なら 未来を見ることができます
ボンヤリですが見えるのです
10:36
hazily, but you can look into the future.
これらが信号の発見によって
発生するであろうことです
10:38
So those are all the sorts of things that would come from a detection.
では その信号を見つけるまでに
10:44
Now, let me talk a little bit about something that happens
起こることについて話しましょう
10:46
even in the meantime, and that is,
SETIはとても重要だと思います
なぜなら その調査が
10:51
SETI, I think, is important, because it's exploration, and
ただの調査ではなく 理解しやすい調査だからです
10:55
it's not only exploration, it's comprehensible exploration.
10:58
Now, I gotta tell you, I'm always reading books about
実は 私はいつも探検家についての
本を読んでいます 探検はとても面白い
11:01
explorers. I find exploration very interesting,
マゼランやアムンゼン シャックルトン
フランクリン
11:03
Arctic exploration, you know, people like Magellan,
11:06
Amundsen, Shackleton, you see Franklin down there,
スコットなどによる北極探検は
とてもかっこいいですよね
11:09
Scott, all these guys. It's really nifty, exploration.
彼らは探検に惹かれていたのです
11:13
And they're just doing it because they want to explore,
「あぁ くだらない話だね」と
思うかもしれませんが
11:15
and you might say, "Oh, that's kind of a frivolous opportunity,"
11:17
but that's not frivolous. That's not a frivolous activity,
くだらなくなんかありません 全然
なぜなら 例えばアリは
11:20
because, I mean, think of ants.
ほとんどのアリは
前にいるアリに列をつくって
11:22
You know, most ants are programmed to follow one another
11:24
along in a long line, but there are a couple of ants,
ついていきますが 何匹かは
11:27
maybe one percent of those ants, that are what they call
1%ほどのアリは 言うところの
パイオニアで 列を抜けてウロウロします
11:29
pioneer ants, and they're the ones that wander off.
彼らがキッチンカウンターにいるアリです
11:32
They're the ones you find on the kitchen countertop.
彼らが砂糖かなにかを見つける前に
11:33
You gotta get them with your thumb before they
指でつぶさなくてはいけません
11:35
find the sugar or something.
このアリたちは
ほとんど死んでしまうとしても
11:37
But those ants, even though most of them get wiped out,
巣のアリたちの生存には不可欠です
11:39
those ants are the ones that are essential to the survival
11:43
of the hive. So exploration is important.
つまり 探検は大切なのです
また私は 私たちの社会で決定的に欠けているもの
11:46
I also think that exploration is important in terms of
11:50
being able to address what I think is a critical
つまり科学に対する教養 そして理解不足という
11:55
lack in our society, and that is the lack of science literacy,
問題について取り組むことができる
11:58
the lack of the ability to even understand science.
という点でも探検は重要だと思います
12:01
Now, look, a lot has been written about the
アメリカの科学教養の不足について
12:03
deplorable state of science literacy in this country.
批判した記事はたくさんあります
12:07
You've heard about it.
聞いたことがあるでしょう
一つ例を言いましょう
12:09
Well, here's one example, in fact.
12:11
Polls taken, this poll was taken 10 years ago.
ある世論調査があります
10年前にされたものです
12:14
It shows like roughly one third of the public thinks
これは 3分の1ほどの人々が
エイリアンが私たちの探す
宇宙どこかでなく
12:16
that aliens are not only out there, we're looking for them
ここにいると思っています
12:18
out there, but they're here, right?
空飛ぶ円盤で現れて
12:19
Sailing the skies in their saucers and occasionally
人々を ひどい実験のためにさらうと
12:22
abducting people for experiments their parents wouldn't approve of.
まぁ 本当だったら面白いですね しかも そうなら
12:25
Well, that would be interesting if it was true,
12:28
and job security for me, but I don't think the evidence is
私の職は安泰ですが
12:30
very good. That's more, you know, sad than significant.
証拠はとても信じられるものではありません
でも 人々が重要だと思っていることは
12:33
But there are other things that people believe
いろいろあります 同毒療法の有効性とか
12:35
that are significant, like the efficacy of homeopathy,
進化論はおかしな科学者による
12:39
or that evolution is just, you know, sort of a crazy idea
狂った考えだとか
12:42
by scientists without any legs, or, you know, evolution,
そういうもの 地球温暖化とかです
12:45
all that sort of thing, or global warming.
科学者を信じられないなんていう考えは
12:48
These sorts of ideas don't really have any validity,
根拠もないものです
12:51
that you can't trust the scientists.
このような問題を解決しなくてはいけません
12:53
Now, we've got to solve that problem, because that's
これらは非常に重要な問題だからです
でも皆さんは問題解決に
12:56
a critically important problem, and you might say,
SETI がどう役に立つのか
疑問に思われるでしょう
13:00
"Well, okay, how are we gonna solve that problem with SETI?"
もちろんSETIには このような問題を
13:02
Well, let me suggest to you that SETI obviously can't
解決することはできません
13:05
solve the problem, but it can address the problem.
でも 問題に関わることはできます
13:06
It can address the problem by getting young people
子どもたちが科学に目を向けるきっかけとなります
科学は難しい
13:09
interested in science. Look, science is hard, it
13:12
has a reputation of being hard, and the facts are, it is hard,
そう思われていますし
実際 そうなのです
でもこれは400年間積み上げてきた科学の結果なのです
13:15
and that's the result of 400 years of science, right?
18世紀だったら
13:20
I mean, in the 18th century, in the 18th century
図書館に行って数時間本を読めば
13:23
you could become an expert on any field of science
科学のいかなる分野でも専門家になれました
13:25
in an afternoon by going to a library,
もし図書館を見つけられればですが
13:28
if you could find the library, right?
19世紀なら 自宅の地下室に実験室でもあれば
13:30
In the 19th century, if you had a basement lab,
科学上の大発見ができました
13:34
you could make major scientific discoveries
自分の家でですよ? なぜなら 科学の研究対象に
13:37
in your own home. Right? Because there was all this
成り得るものがそこらじゅうにあったからです
13:39
science just lying around waiting for somebody to pick it up.
しかし 現在は違います
13:42
Now, that's not true anymore.
大学院や研究員として
13:43
Today, you've got to spend years in grad school
何年も費やし やっと
13:46
and post-doc positions just to figure out what
何が重要な問題かがわかるのです
13:49
the important questions are.
本当に大変なんです
13:51
It's hard. There's no doubt about it.
例をあげましょう ヒッグス粒子です
13:53
And in fact, here's an example: the Higgs boson,
ヒッグス粒子を見つけることです
13:56
finding the Higgs boson.
適当な10人にこう聞いてみて下さい
13:58
Ask the next 10 people you see on the streets,
「やぁ ヒッグス粒子を見つけるために
13:59
"Hey, do you think it's worthwhile to spend billions
何十億ものスイスフランを費やすのをどう思う?」と
14:02
of Swiss francs looking for the Higgs boson?"
こんな答えが返ってくるでしょう
14:04
And I bet the answer you're going to get, is,
「さぁ ヒッグス粒子が何か知らないし
14:07
"Well, I don't know what the Higgs boson is,
重要かもわからないよ」
14:08
and I don't know if it's important."
多くの人は スイスフランの価値さえ
14:10
And probably most of the people wouldn't even know
知らないでしょう
14:11
the value of a Swiss franc, okay?
でもこの問題に何十億ものスイスフランを
注ぎ込んでいます
14:14
And yet we're spending billions of Swiss francs on this problem.
でも 人々が科学に興味を持つ
助けにはなりません
14:16
Okay? So that doesn't get people interested in science
何の事か理解できないからです
14:19
because they can't comprehend what it's about.
一方 SETIはとても単純です
14:20
SETI, on the other hand, is really simple.
私たちは大きなアンテナを使い
14:22
We're going to use these big antennas and we're going to
信号を捉えるだけです
誰でもわかります
14:24
try to eavesdrop on signals. Everybody can understand that.
もちろん 技術的には高度ですが
14:26
Yes, technologically, it's very sophisticated,
誰でもアイデアはわかります
14:28
but everybody gets the idea.
これが一つ目 もう一つは
楽しい科学だということです
14:30
So that's one thing. The other thing is, it's exciting science.
なぜなら 私たちは昔から 他の知的生命体に
14:34
It's exciting because we're naturally interested
興味を持っていたからで これは私は
14:37
in other intelligent beings, and I think that's
不変的なものだと思います
14:39
part of our hardwiring.
つまり 敵かもしれない生物に
14:40
I mean, we're hardwired to be interested
興味を持つのは不変であり
14:42
in beings that might be, if you will, competitors,
ロマンチックな方は
恋人として興味を持つかもしれません
14:45
or if you're the romantic sort, possibly even mates. Okay?
人類が大きな歯を持つものに
14:48
I mean, this is analogous to our interest in things that
興味を持つのと似ていますね ー(笑)
14:50
have big teeth. Right?
私たちは大きな歯を持つ生物に興味を持ち
14:52
We're interested in things that have big teeth, and you
それが進化に役立つこと
またその嗜好は
14:54
can see the evolutionary value of that, and you can also see
『アニマルプラネット』を見れば分かります
14:56
the practical consequences by watching Animal Planet.
モコモコのネズミなんて
滅多に番組になりません
15:00
You notice they make very few programs about gerbils.
大きな歯を持つ生物に
関するものばかりです
15:02
It's mostly about things that have big teeth.
私たちはそのようなものに興味があります
15:05
Okay, so we're interested in these sorts of things.
私たち大人だけではありません 子どももです
15:07
And not just us. It's also kids.
ですからE.T.は
科学に興味を持たせる きっかけとして最適です
15:11
This allows you to pay it forward by using this subject as a
SETIは科学の全ての分野に関わっています
15:15
hook to science, because SETI involves all kinds of science,
生物学や天文学はもちろん
15:18
obviously biology, obviously astronomy,
地学 化学も そして多くの専門分野を
15:20
but also geology, also chemistry, various scientific
「私たちはE.T.を探している」と言って
紹介する事ができるのです
15:23
disciplines all can be presented in the guise of,
「私たちはE.T.を探している」と言って
紹介する事ができるのです
15:27
"We're looking for E.T."
私にとって これはとても重要です 実は
15:29
So to me this is interesting and important, and in fact,
これは私の信念ですが 大人に話をしたとしても
15:33
it's my policy, even though I give a lot of talks to adults,
彼らは2日すれば元の状態に戻ってしまいます
15:36
you give talks to adults, and two days later they're back where they were.
しかし 子どもたちに話をすれば
15:39
But if you give talks to kids, you know,
50人に1人ほど ハッとひらめいて 彼らは
15:42
one in 50 of them, some light bulb goes off, and they think,
「考えたこともなかった」と思い
15:46
"Gee, I'd never thought of that," and then they go,
本か雑誌を読んだりするのです
15:48
you know, read a book or a magazine or whatever.
彼らは何かに興味を持ったのです
15:50
They get interested in something.
これは単に自分の経験に基づく説ですが
15:51
Now it's my theory, supported only by anecdotal,
子供たちが何かに興味を持つのは
15:56
personal anecdotal evidence, but nonetheless,
8歳から11歳の間です
15:58
that kids get interested in something between the ages
この機会を大切にしなくてはいけません
16:01
of eight and 11. You've got to get them there.
大人向けの講演も大切ですが
16:03
So, all right, I give talks to adults, that's fine, but I try
私はその講演の10%を
16:06
and make 10 percent of the talks that I give,
子供たち向けにしています
16:08
I try and make those for kids.
ある男の人が私の高校 いや
16:10
I remember when a guy came to our high school, actually,
中学に来たことを覚えています 私は6年生で
16:13
it was actually my junior high school. I was in sixth grade.
何かについて話をしてくれました
その中で私が覚えているのは
16:16
And he gave some talk. All I remember from it
たった一言「エレクトロニクス」
16:19
was one word: electronics.
まるで 映画『卒業』の
ダスティン・ホフマンが
16:20
It was like Dustin Hoffman in "The Graduate," right,
「プラスチック」という言葉を聞いた時のようです
16:23
when he said "plastics," whatever that means, plastics.
とにかく「エレクトロニクス」と聞いた他は
16:25
All right, so the guy said electronics. I don't remember
何も覚えていません
実は 6年生で習ったことは
16:27
anything else. In fact, I don't remember anything
何も覚えていません
16:29
that my sixth grade teacher said all year,
でも その一言だけは覚えていました
16:31
but I remember electronics.
そして 私は電子工学に興味を持ちました
16:33
And so I got interested in electronics, and you know,
アマチュア無線の資格をとり
電子回路を作って遊んでいました
16:36
I studied to get my ham license. I was wiring up stuff.
その頃の15歳の私です
16:38
Here I am at about 15 or something, doing that sort of stuff.
あの一言にかなり影響されたのです
16:41
Okay? That had a big effect on me.
ですから 皆さんも子どもたちに
16:43
So that's my point, that you can have a big effect
大きな影響を与えられるということです
16:45
on these kids.
似たような事ですが 数年前に
16:47
In fact, this reminds me, I don't know, a couple years ago
パロアルトにある学校でお話をしました
16:51
I gave a talk at a school in Palo Alto
11歳くらいの子供が12人ほどいたでしょう
16:54
where there were about a dozen 11-year-olds
私の話を聞きに来ました
16:56
that had come to this talk.
私は子どもたちに1時間ほど話すつもりでした
16:57
I had been brought in to talk to these kids for an hour.
11歳の子どもたちが 半円状に座り
17:00
Eleven-year-olds, they're all sitting in a little semi-circle
大きな目で私を見つめていました
17:02
looking up at me with big eyes, and I started,
まず 後ろにあるホワイトボードに
17:04
there was a white board behind me, and I started off
22個のゼロを書き こう言いました
17:06
by writing a one with 22 zeroes after it, and I said,
「これは見ることのできる宇宙にある
17:09
"All right, now look, this is the number of stars
星の数なんだけれど
この数は大きすぎて
17:11
in the visible universe, and this number is so big
名前すらないんだ」と
17:14
there's not even a name for it."
子どもの一人がサッと手を挙げて
17:18
And one of these kids shot up his hand, and he said,
「いや 名前はあるよ
17:20
"Well, actually there is a name for it.
無量なんとかっていうやつでしょ?」と言いました
17:21
It's a sextra-quadra-hexa-something or other." Right?
残念ながら その子どもは間違っていましたが
17:24
Now, that kid was wrong by four orders of magnitude,
彼らが賢いことはわかりました
17:28
but there was no doubt about it, these kids were smart.
だから私は話すのを止めました
17:31
Okay? So I stopped giving the lecture.
彼らはただ 質問をしたかったからです
17:33
All they wanted to do was ask questions.
最後に私は子どもたちにこう言いました
17:35
In fact, my last comments to these kids, at the end I said,
「みんな頭がいいね
17:39
"You know, you kids are smarter
私が一緒に働いている人よりもね 」と ー(笑)
17:41
than the people I work with." Now — (Laughter)
彼らはそんなことも気にしませんでした
17:46
They didn't even care about that.
彼らが欲しかったのは 私のメールアドレスです
17:48
What they wanted was my email address
そうすれば もっと質問ができるのですから ー(笑)
17:50
so they could ask me more questions. (Laughter)
私はこの仕事ができてラッキーです
17:54
Let me just say, look, my job is a privilege
特別な時代に生きているからです
17:58
because we're in a special time.
一世代前では 今のような実験はできないでしょう
17:59
Previous generations couldn't do this experiment at all.
しかし一世代後では
18:02
In another generation down the line,
実験は成功してしまっていることでしょう
18:04
I think we will have succeeded.
だから本当によかったと思っています
鏡を見るとき
18:05
So to me, it is a privilege, and when I look in the mirror,
自分のことは見えません
18:09
the facts are that I really don't see myself.
見えるのは次の世代です
18:12
What I see is the generation behind me.
これはハフ・スクールの4年生のです
18:13
These are some kids from the Huff School, fourth graders.
私は2週間ほど前にここで話をしました
18:15
I talked there, what, two weeks ago, something like that.
もし 科学に対する興味を持たせ
18:18
I think that if you can instill some interest in science
その仕組みを教えることができるなら
18:23
and how it works, well, that's a payoff
それはすごいことだと思います
ありがとうございました
18:26
beyond easy measure. Thank you very much.
(拍手)
18:28
(Applause)
Translated by Shohei Tanaka
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Seth Shostak - Astronomer
Seth Shostak is an astronomer, alien hunter and bulwark of good, exciting science.

Why you should listen

Seth Shostak is the Senior Astronomer at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California. Inspired by a book about the solar system he read at the age of ten, he began his career with a degree in physics from Princeton University and a PhD in astronomy from the California Institute of Technology before working with radio telescopes in the US and the Netherlands to uncover how the universe will end. In 1999, he produced twelve 30-minute lectures on audio-tape and video titled "The Search for Intelligent Life in Space" for the Teaching Company and has hosted SETI’s Big Picture Science podcast since 2002. In 2010, he was elected as a Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry and is the Chair of the International Academy of Astronautics SETI Permanent Study Group. He has published four books, nearly 300 popular articles on astronomy, technology, film and television and gives frequent talks to both young and adult audiences.

More profile about the speaker
Seth Shostak | Speaker | TED.com