06:31
TEDGlobal 2012

Tim Leberecht: 3 ways to (usefully) lose control of your brand

ティム・リーバーレヒト 「自分のブランドの制御をうまく手放す3つの方法」

Filmed:

人や企業やブランドがその評判をしっかり制御できた時代は(そのようなものがあったとして)終わりました。ネット上でのおしゃべりの拡散が意味するのは、それが価値あるものである限り、統制することのできない自由な対話が絶えず生じるということです。ティム・リーバーレヒトは、この制御の喪失を受け入れ、さらにはそれに向けてデザインをし、自らの価値に再び身を投じる力とするための、3つの大きなアイデアを提示しています。

- Business romantic
Tim Leberecht argues that in a time of big data and quantification of everything, we are losing sight of the importance of the emotional and social aspects of business and work. Full bio

Companies are losing control.
企業は制御を失っています
00:16
What happens on Wall Street
ウォールストリートで起きたことは
00:19
no longer stays on Wall Street.
ウォールストリートに留まりません
00:21
What happens in Vegas ends up on YouTube. (Laughter)
ラスベガスで起きたことは YouTubeに
アップされることになります (笑)
00:23
Reputations are volatile. Loyalties are fickle.
評判は移ろいやすく
忠誠心は移り気です
00:27
Management teams seem increasingly
経営側と社員は ますます
00:31
disconnected from their staff. (Laughter)
乖離しているように見えます
00:34
A recent survey said that 27 percent of bosses believe
最近の調査で 会社が
社員のやる気を
00:37
their employees are inspired by their firm.
引き出していると思っている
管理職は27%ですが
00:40
However, in the same survey, only four percent
同じ調査で そう
思っている社員は
00:43
of employees agreed.
4%しかいませんでした
00:45
Companies are losing control
企業は顧客や社員に対する
00:48
of their customers and their employees.
制御を失いつつあります
00:50
But are they really?
でも 本当にそうなのでしょうか?
00:53
I'm a marketer, and as a marketer, I know
私はマーケターとして
00:56
that I've never really been in control.
それが決して制御できるもの
ではないと知っています
00:59
Your brand is what other people say about you
「ブランドとは自分が
部屋にいないとき
01:02
when you're not in the room, the saying goes.
他の人たちが自分のことを
どう言うかだ」と良く言いますが
01:05
Hyperconnectivity and transparency allow companies
現在における超接続性と
透明性のおかげで
01:08
to be in that room now, 24/7.
企業はその部屋に 週7日24時間
いられるようになりました
01:12
They can listen and join the conversation.
みんなの会話に耳を傾け
参加できるのです
01:15
In fact, they have more control over the loss of control
実際この制御の喪失状況を
01:17
than ever before.
かつてなく制御できる
ようになっています
01:20
They can design for it. But how?
それに合わせてデザインできるのです
どのようにしてか?
01:23
First of all, they can give employees and customers more control.
1つは 社員や顧客に もっと力を
与えてしまうことによってです
01:26
They can collaborate with them on the creation of ideas,
アイデアや 知識や コンテンツや
デザインや 製品を生み出す際に
01:29
knowledge, content, designs and product.
彼らに協力してもらう
ことができます
01:33
They can give them more control over pricing,
例えば値段について もっと
力を与えることもでき
01:36
which is what the band Radiohead did
それはバンドの
レディオヘッドが
01:39
with its pay-as-you-like online release of its album
アルバム「イン・レインボウズ」で
やったことです
01:41
"In Rainbows." Buyers could determine the price,
買い手が好きに 値段を
決められました
01:44
but the offer was exclusive, and only stood for a limited period of time.
ただしサイト限定で
一定の期間だけです
01:47
The album sold more copies than previous releases of the band.
このアルバムは 彼らの他の
どのアルバムよりも よく売れました
01:51
The Danish chocolate company Anthon Berg
デンマークのチョコレート会社
アンソンバーグは
01:55
opened a so-called "generous store" in Copenhagen.
コペンハーゲンに「思いやりストア」
というのをオープンしました
01:59
It asked customers to purchase chocolate
チョコレートを買うとき
お金を払う代わりに
02:02
with the promise of good deeds towards loved ones.
好きな人のために何か良いことをする
約束をしてもらうのです
02:04
It turned transactions into interactions,
これは取引を交流に
02:08
and generosity into a currency.
思いやりを貨幣に変えました
02:11
Companies can even give control to hackers.
ハッカーに力を与える
ことだってできます
02:13
When Microsoft Kinect came out,
マイクロソフトがXbox用の
02:16
the motion-controlled add-on to its Xbox gaming console,
モーションコントロール装置
Kinectを売り出したとき
02:19
it immediately drew the attention of hackers.
それはすぐにハッカーたちの
興味を引くことになりました
02:23
Microsoft first fought off the hacks, but then shifted course
最初マイクロソフトは ハックを
防ごうとしていましたが
02:26
when it realized that actively supporting the community
コミュニティを積極的にサポート
する方が得策だと気付いて
02:30
came with benefits.
方針を変えました
02:32
The sense of co-ownership, the free publicity,
コミュニティが生み出す 共同所有感
無料の宣伝 付加価値によって
02:34
the added value, all helped drive sales.
売上が大きく押し上げられる
ことになりました
02:37
The ultimate empowerment of customers
顧客に対する究極の
権限移譲は
02:40
is to ask them not to buy.
「買うな」と言うことでしょう
02:43
Outdoor clothier Patagonia encouraged prospective buyers
アウトドア・ウェアの
パタゴニアは
02:46
to check out eBay for its used products
新品を買う前に
eBayでの中古品の物色や
02:50
and to resole their shoes before purchasing new ones.
靴底の張り替えをするように
客に勧めています
02:53
In an even more radical stance against consumerism,
大量消費に反対する さらに
過激な行動として
02:56
the company placed a "Don't Buy This Jacket"
クリスマスシーズンに
03:00
advertisement during the peak of shopping season.
「このジャケットを買わないで」
という広告を打ちました
03:02
It may have jeopardized short-term sales,
短期的な売上を犠牲にしても
03:05
but it builds lasting, long-term loyalty
価値観を共有し長く持続する
忠実な顧客との関係を
03:08
based on shared values.
築こうとしているのです
03:11
Research has shown that giving employees more control
仕事に対する権限を
与えられることによって
03:13
over their work makes them happier and more productive.
社員はより楽しく 生産的になることが
調査結果で示されています
03:16
The Brazilian company Semco Group famously
ブラジルのセムコグループは
03:20
lets employees set their own work schedules
社員に仕事のスケジュールや
給料まで
03:23
and even their salaries.
決めさせることで
知られています
03:25
Hulu and Netflix, among other companies,
Huluや Netflixの
オープン休暇制度では
03:27
have open vacation policies.
自分で好きなだけ
休暇を設定できます
03:30
Companies can give people more control,
社員や顧客に もっと権限を
与えることもできれば
03:32
but they can also give them less control.
権限を減らしてしまうこともできます
03:35
Traditional business wisdom holds that trust
古くからあるビジネスの知恵は
03:39
is earned by predictable behavior,
「予期できる振る舞いによって
信頼は築かれる」
03:42
but when everything is consistent and standardized,
と教えていますが すべてが一定で
標準化されているとしたら
03:45
how do you create meaningful experiences?
どうやって意味深い体験を
作り出せるのでしょう?
03:47
Giving people less control might be a wonderful way
できることを制限して
しまうというのは
03:50
to counter the abundance of choice
多すぎる選択肢の問題への
処方箋として
03:54
and make them happier.
人々にもっと満足を
与えられるかもしれません
03:56
Take the travel service Nextpedition.
旅行サービスのNextpeditionは
03:58
Nextpedition turns the trip into a game,
旅行をゲームに変え
04:01
with surprising twists and turns along the way.
驚くような紆余曲折を
体験させてくれます
04:04
It does not tell the traveler where she's going
旅行者は 直前まで
行き先を知らされません
04:07
until the very last minute, and information is provided
情報は その場になって
提供されます
04:09
just in time. Similarly, Dutch airline KLM
同様に オランダの航空会社KLMは
04:12
launched a surprise campaign, seemingly randomly
びっくりギフトキャンペーンを
始めました
04:16
handing out small gifts to travelers
旅行中に一見ランダムな
04:19
en route to their destination.
小さな贈り物が 旅行者に
手渡されます
04:22
U.K.-based Interflora monitored Twitter
イギリスを本拠とする
インターフローラは
04:24
for users who were having a bad day,
顧客のツイートを見ていて
04:27
and then sent them a free bouquet of flowers.
運の悪かった日にブーケを
プレゼントしています
04:30
Is there anything companies can do to make
時間に追われていると
04:34
their employees feel less pressed for time? Yes.
社員に感じさせないようにできる
方法はあるでしょうか?
04:36
Force them to help others.
あります 他の人を
助けさせることです
04:39
A recent study suggests that having employees complete
最近の研究によると
1日のうちで時々
04:42
occasional altruistic tasks throughout the day
人助けの仕事をやり遂げると
04:45
increases their sense of overall productivity.
総体として より生産的な感覚が
得られることが分かりました
04:48
At Frog, the company I work for, we hold internal
私が働いている
フロッグ・デザインでは
04:52
speed meet sessions that connect old and new employees,
社内で出会いセッションをして
古顔と新顔を引き合わせ
04:56
helping them get to know each other fast.
素早く知り合えるようにしています
05:00
By applying a strict process, we give them less control,
決まった手順を設けることで
彼らの力や選択肢は減りますが
05:03
less choice, but we enable more and richer social interactions.
より豊かな社会的インタラクションが
可能になるのです
05:07
Companies are the makers of their fortunes,
会社というのは 自らの
運命の作り手であり
05:11
and like all of us, they are utterly exposed to serendipity.
私たち同様 予期せぬものに
晒されています
05:14
That should make them more humble, more vulnerable
それによってより
謙虚で 無防備で
05:18
and more human.
人間的になるのです
05:22
At the end of the day, as hyperconnectivity
結局のところ 超接続性と
透明性によって
05:25
and transparency expose companies' behavior
会社のしていることは
白日の下に晒されるので
05:28
in broad daylight, staying true to their true selves
本当の自分に忠実であるというのが
05:30
is the only sustainable value proposition.
持続しうる唯一の提供価値です
05:34
Or as the ballet dancer Alonzo King said,
バレエダンサーの
アロンゾ・キングが言うように
05:37
"What's interesting about you is you."
「自分の興味深い点が何かというと
それは自分だということ」なのです
05:40
For the true selves of companies to come through,
会社にとっての 本当の
自分が現れ出るためには
05:43
openness is paramount,
オープンであることが
何より重要ですが
05:46
but radical openness is not a solution,
極度のオープンさが
答えというわけではありません
05:49
because when everything is open, nothing is open.
すべてがオープンというのは
何もオープンでないのと同じです
05:52
"A smile is a door that is half open and half closed,"
「微笑みというのは 半分開き
半分閉じた扉である」と
05:55
the author Jennifer Egan wrote.
作家のジェニファー・イーガンは
書いています
06:00
Companies can give their employees and customers
会社は 社員や顧客に
与える力を増減でき
06:02
more control or less. They can worry about how much
どれほどのオープンさが
その人にとって良く
06:05
openness is good for them, and what needs to stay closed.
何をしまっておく必要があるか
考えることもできますが
06:08
Or they can simply smile, and remain open
単に微笑んで
あらゆる可能性に
06:12
to all possibilities.
オープンでいることもできます
06:16
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
06:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:22
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Takahiro Shimpo

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Tim Leberecht - Business romantic
Tim Leberecht argues that in a time of big data and quantification of everything, we are losing sight of the importance of the emotional and social aspects of business and work.

Why you should listen

In his book The Business Romantic: Give Everything, Quantify Nothing, and Create Something Greater Than Yourself, Leberecht invites us to rediscover romance, beauty and serendipity, by designing products, services and experiences that “make us fall back in love with our work and our life.” The book inspired the creation of the Business Romantic Society, a global collective of artists, developers, designers, researchers and scientists who share the mission of bringing beauty to business. Now running consulting firm Leberecht & Partners, he was previously the chief marketing officer at NBBJ, a global design and architecture firm, and at Frog Design. He also co-founded the “15 Toasts” dinner series that creates safe spaces for people to have conversations on difficult topics.

More profile about the speaker
Tim Leberecht | Speaker | TED.com