sponsored links
TED2013

Kees Moeliker: How a dead duck changed my life

キース・ムーリカー: 死んだカモが私の人生を どう変えたか

February 28, 2013

ある日の午後、キース・ムーリカーが見つけた研究対象は、ほとんどの鳥類学者が見向きもしないようなものでした。1羽のカモが彼のオフィスがあるガラス張りの建物に衝突して死に、そして... その後に見たものが彼の人生を変えることになります。 [注意: 刺激の強い映像や動物の性行動の描写が含まれます。]

Kees Moeliker - Ornithologist
Kees Moeliker writes and speaks about natural history, especially birds and remarkable animal behavior, as well as improbable research and science-communication-with-a-laugh. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
This is the Natural History Museum in Rotterdam,
私は ロッテルダム自然史博物館で
00:12
where I work as a curator.
学芸員をしています
00:15
It's my job to make sure the collection stays okay,
私の仕事は
コレクションの管理と
00:18
and that it grows,
標本を収集すること ―
00:21
and basically it means I collect dead animals.
つまり動物の死骸を収集することです
00:23
Back in 1995,
1995年に
00:28
we got a new wing next to the museum.
博物館の隣に新しい棟ができました
00:30
It was made of glass,
ガラス張りだったので
00:35
and this building really helped me to do my job good.
本当に仕事が はかどりました
00:37
The building was a true bird-killer.
鳥がよくビルに
ぶつかって死んだからです
00:42
You may know that birds don't understand
ご存知かもしれませんが
00:47
the concept of glass. They don't see it,
鳥はガラスが何か
わかっていません
00:49
so they fly into the windows and get killed.
ガラスが見えないので
衝突して死んでしまいます
00:52
The only thing I had to do was go out,
私は死骸を拾いに行って
00:56
pick them up, and have them stuffed for the collection.
標本にしてコレクションに
加えるだけでいいんです
00:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:02
And in those days,
その頃 私は
01:05
I developed an ear to identify birds
ガラスにぶつかる音だけで
01:07
just by the sound of the bangs they made against the glass.
鳥の種類がわかるようになっていました
01:11
And it was on June 5, 1995,
1995年6月5日のことです
01:16
that I heard a loud bang against the glass
窓に衝突する
大きな音が聞こえました
01:20
that changed my life and ended that of a duck.
それが私の人生を変え
一羽のカモの人生に終止符を打ちました
01:24
And this is what I saw when I looked out of the window.
外をのぞくと
こんな光景が見えました
01:28
This is the dead duck. It flew against the window.
窓に激突したカモの死骸です
01:34
It's laying dead on its belly.
うつぶせで死んでいます
01:37
But next to the dead duck is a live duck,
近くにいるカモは生きています
01:39
and please pay attention.
よく見てください
01:42
Both are of the male sex.
どちらもオスです
01:45
And then this happened.
そして次の瞬間 ―
01:50
The live duck mounted the dead duck,
生きたカモが死骸の上に乗り
01:52
and started to copulate.
交尾を始めたのです
01:55
Well, I'm a biologist. I'm an ornithologist.
私は生物学者で鳥類学者ですから
01:58
I said, "Something's wrong here."
「何かおかしいぞ」と思いました
02:00
One is dead, one is alive. That must be necrophilia.
一羽は死に もう一羽は
生きているから屍姦です
02:03
I look. Both are of the male sex.
よく見ましたが どちらもオスです
02:09
Homosexual necrophilia.
だからホモセクシャルの屍姦です
02:12
So I -- (Laughter)
そこで ―
(笑)
02:17
I took my camera, I took my notebook,
カメラとノートと
椅子を用意して
02:22
took a chair, and started to observe this behavior.
行動を観察しはじめました
02:25
After 75 minutes — (Laughter) —
75分も経つと ― (笑)
02:30
I had seen enough, and I got hungry,
私は満足しましたし
お腹も空いて
02:36
and I wanted to go home.
家に帰りたくなりました
02:41
So I went out, collected the duck,
そこで外に出てカモを回収し
02:43
and before I put it in the freezer,
冷凍庫に入れる前に
02:47
I checked if the victim was indeed of the male sex.
その死骸が本当に
オスなのか確かめました
02:49
And here's a rare picture of a duck's penis,
これは とても珍しい
カモの男性器の写真です
02:54
so it was indeed of the male sex.
確かにオスでした
02:57
It's a rare picture because there are 10,000 species of birds
珍しいというのは
1万種いる鳥類の中で
03:00
and only 300 possess a penis.
男性器があるのは
300種に過ぎないからです
03:04
[The first case of homosexual necrophilia in the mallard Anas platyrhynchos (Aves:Anatidae)]
『マガモにおける
同性愛屍姦の初めての事例』
03:08
I knew I'd seen something special,
珍しいものを観察したという
認識はありましたが
03:11
but it took me six years to decide to publish it.
論文の発表を決意するまでに
6年もかかりました
03:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:20
I mean, it's a nice topic for a birthday party
誕生パーティーや
コーヒー・ブレイクには
03:23
or at the coffee machine,
うってつけの話題でも ―
03:26
but to share this among your peers is something different.
学会での発表となると
話は別です
03:28
I didn't have the framework.
理論的な枠組みも ありませんでした
03:31
So after six years, my friends and colleagues urged me to publish,
6年経って友人や同僚に
急かされる形で
03:33
so I published "The first case of homosexual necrophilia
『マガモにおける同性愛屍姦の
初めての事例』を
03:36
in the mallard."
公表することになりました
03:39
And here's the situation again.
状況を整理しましょう
03:41
A is my office,
"a" は私のオフィス ―
03:44
B is the place where the duck hit the glass,
"b" はカモがガラスに
当たった場所 ―
03:46
and C is from where I watched it.
"c" は私が観察していた場所です
03:49
And here are the ducks again.
これは先ほどの写真です
03:52
As you probably know, in science,
皆さん ご存知かもしれませんが
03:54
when you write a kind of special paper,
科学論文を書いても
内容が特殊だと ―
03:56
only six or seven people read it.
読者は せいぜい6〜7人です
03:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:02
But then something good happened.
でも いい知らせがありました
04:08
I got a phone call from a person called Marc Abrahams,
マーク・エイブラハムズという
人が電話をしてきたのです
04:11
and he told me, "You've won a prize with your duck paper:
「あなたのカモの論文が ―
04:15
the Ig Nobel Prize."
イグノーベル賞を受賞しました」
04:20
And the Ig Nobel Prize —
イグノーベル賞とは ―
04:24
(Laughter) (Applause) —
(笑)
(拍手)
04:26
the Ig Nobel Prize honors research
イグノーベル賞とは
04:30
that first makes people laugh, and then makes them think,
まず人を笑わせ
そして考えさせる研究に ―
04:32
with the ultimate goal to make more people
贈られる賞で
より多くの人が
04:35
interested in science.
科学に関心をもつことを
目指しています
04:38
That's a good thing, so I accepted the prize.
それはいいことだと思って
賞をもらうことにしたのです
04:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:45
I went -- let me remind you that Marc Abrahams
ところで マークの電話は
ストックホルムからではなく
04:48
didn't call me from Stockholm.
ところで マークの電話は
ストックホルムからではなく
04:52
He called me from Cambridge, Massachusetts.
マサチューセッツ州の
ケンブリッジからでした
04:53
So I traveled to Boston, to Cambridge,
私はボストンを経て
ケンブリッジへ向かい
04:55
and I went to this wonderful Ig Nobel Prize ceremony
ハーバード大学で開かれた ―
04:58
held at Harvard University, and this ceremony
素晴らしい授賞式に出席しました
05:02
is a very nice experience.
とても楽しい体験でした
05:04
Real Nobel laureates hand you the prize.
本物のノーベル賞受賞者が
表彰してくれるのです
05:09
That's the first thing.
それでも ほんの序の口です
05:13
And there are nine other winners who get prizes.
他に9人の受賞者がいました
05:14
Here's one of my fellow winners. That's Charles Paxton
彼は一緒に受賞した
チャールズ・パクストンです
05:17
who won the 2000 biology prize for his paper,
彼の[2002年]の
生物学賞 受賞論文は
05:20
"Courtship behavior of ostriches towards humans
『イギリスでの飼育条件下における ―
05:26
under farming conditions in Britain."
人間に対する
ダチョウの求愛行動』 でした
05:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:32
And I think there are one or two more
今 ここにもイグノーベル賞の
05:36
Ig Nobel Prize winners in this room.
受賞者がいるはずです
05:39
Dan, where are you? Dan Ariely?
ダン・アリエリーは
どこですか?
05:42
Applause for Dan.
彼に拍手を
05:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:48
Dan won his prize in medicine
ダンは 安価な偽薬よりも
05:51
for demonstrating that high-priced fake medicine
高価な偽薬の方が
効果が高いことを立証して
05:55
works better than low-priced fake medicine.
医学賞を受賞しました
05:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:02
So here's my one minute of fame,
これが私の
いわば「1分間の栄光」 ―
06:06
my acceptance speech,
受賞スピーチの様子です
06:09
and here's the duck.
これが そのカモです
06:14
This is its first time on the U.S. West Coast.
アメリカ西海岸では
初公開になります
06:16
I'm going to pass it around.
今 まわします
06:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:23
Yeah?
どうぞ
06:29
You can pass it around.
皆にまわしてください
06:30
Please note it's a museum specimen,
これは標本資料です
06:31
but there's no chance you'll get the avian flu.
鳥インフルエンザに
かかる心配はありませんよ
06:34
After winning this prize, my life changed.
受賞後 私の人生は一変しました
06:39
In the first place, people started to send me
まず カモにまつわる ―
06:43
all kinds of duck-related things,
いろいろな物が
送られてきて
06:45
and I got a real nice collection.
充実したコレクションが
できたことです
06:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:52
More importantly,
もっと良いことに
驚くべき動物の行動に関する ―
06:54
people started to send me their observations
記録が集まってきたのです
07:01
of remarkable animal behavior,
記録が集まってきたのです
07:05
and believe me, if there's an animal misbehaving on this planet,
だから動物の倒錯した行動なら
何でも知っています
07:08
I know about it.
本当です
07:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:13
This is a moose.
これはムースです
07:17
It's a moose trying to copulate
交尾しようとしているのは
バイソンの銅像です
07:22
with a bronze statue of a bison.
交尾しようとしているのは
バイソンの銅像です
07:23
This is in Montana, 2008.
2008年 モンタナ州での記録です
07:27
This is a frog that tries to copulate with a goldfish.
これは金魚と
交尾しようとするカエル
07:30
This is the Netherlands, 2011.
2011年 オランダです
07:35
These are cane toads in Australia.
オーストラリアの
オオヒキガエルです
07:38
This is roadkill.
車に轢かれていて
07:42
Please note that this is necrophilia.
屍姦の事例です
07:43
It's remarkable: the position.
体位も目を引きます
07:47
The missionary position is very rare in the animal kingdom.
正常位は動物界では
非常に珍しいのです
07:48
These are pigeons in Rotterdam.
ロッテルダムで
観察されたハトです
07:53
Barn swallows in Hong Kong, 2004.
2004年 香港のツバメです
07:59
This is a turkey in Wisconsin
ウィスコンシン州の
シチメンチョウです
08:03
on the premises of the Ethan Allen juvenile correctional institution.
イーサン・アレン少年院の
構内で観察されました
08:06
It took all day,
交尾は一日がかりだったので
08:13
and the prisoners had a great time.
受刑者も楽しむことができました
08:15
So what does this mean?
さて この行動は
何を意味するのでしょう?
08:20
I mean, the question I ask myself,
なぜ自然界で
こんなことが起こるのか?
08:22
why does this happen in nature?
これが私の疑問です
08:25
Well, what I concluded
そこで事例を検討して
08:27
from reviewing all these cases
ある結論に至りました
08:29
is that it is important that this happens
屍姦が起こる重要な要素とは
08:31
only when death is instant
突然かつ劇的な死と
08:35
and in a dramatic way
交尾に適した姿勢である と
08:39
and in the right position for copulation.
交尾に適した姿勢である と
08:41
At least, I thought it was till I got these slides.
少なくとも このスライドを
見るまでは そう考えていました
08:44
And here you see a dead duck.
カモの死骸が写っています
08:50
It's been there for three days,
死後3日が経過している上に
08:53
and it's laying on its back.
仰向けになっています
08:55
So there goes my theory of necrophilia.
私の屍姦の理論も水の泡です
08:57
Another example of the impact
もう一つ建物のガラスが
鳥の命を左右する例を紹介します
09:03
of glass buildings on the life of birds.
もう一つ建物のガラスが
鳥の命を左右する例を紹介します
09:04
This is Mad Max, a blackbird who lives in Rotterdam.
ロッテルダムにいるクロウタドリの
マッド・マックスです
09:06
The only thing this bird did was fly against this window
この鳥は2004〜08年に渡り
来る日も来る日も ―
09:10
from 2004 to 2008, day in and day out.
窓にぶつかり続けました
09:16
Here he goes, and here's a short video.
ビデオをご覧ください
09:21
(Music) (Clunk)
(音楽)
(コン)
09:24
(Clunk)
(コン)
09:31
(Clunk)
(コン)
09:46
(Clunk)
(コン)
09:56
So what this bird does
実は この鳥は
09:58
is fight his own image.
窓に映った自分と
けんかしているのです
10:00
He sees an intruder in his territory,
縄張りが侵されたと思っています
10:05
and it's coming all the time and he's there,
ここに来る度に
侵入者が見えるので
10:07
so there is no end to it.
終わりはありません
10:10
And I thought, in the beginning -- I studied this bird for a couple of years --
私は この鳥を
2年間観察しましたが
10:12
that, well, shouldn't the brain of this bird be damaged?
はじめは脳の障害を
疑っていました
10:15
It's not. I show you here some slides,
でもそうではありません
10:18
some frames from the video,
ビデオから取った
画像を見てください
10:21
and at the last moment before he hits the glass,
ガラスにぶつかる瞬間に
10:23
he puts his feet in front,
足を前に出し
10:27
and then he bangs against the glass.
それから当たっています
10:29
So I'll conclude to invite you all to Dead Duck Day.
最後に 皆さんを
「死んだカモの日」にご招待します
10:33
That's on June 5 every year.
毎年6月5日 ―
10:38
At five minutes to six in the afternoon,
午後6時 5分前に
10:41
we come together at the Natural History Museum in Rotterdam,
私達はロッテルダム
自然史博物館に集い ―
10:44
the duck comes out of the museum,
例のカモを博物館から持ち出して
10:48
and we try to discuss new ways
鳥が窓と衝突するの防ぐための
10:51
to prevent birds from colliding with windows.
新しい方法について
検討するのです
10:53
And as you know, or as you may not know,
皆さん ご存じかわかりませんが
10:57
this is one of the major causes of death
世界的に 鳥の主な死因の
一つが衝突死なのです
10:59
for birds in the world.
世界的に 鳥の主な死因の
一つが衝突死なのです
11:02
In the U.S. alone, a billion birds die
米国だけでも
11:03
in collision with glass buildings.
10億羽がガラスの建物に
衝突して死んでいます
11:06
And when it's over, we go to a Chinese restaurant
式典が終わると
皆で中華料理店に行き
11:10
and we have a six-course duck dinner.
アヒルのフルコースを食べます
11:15
So I hope to see you
来年は皆さんと
11:20
next year in Rotterdam, the Netherlands,
オランダ ロッテルダムで
お会いできることを
11:23
for Dead Duck Day.
楽しみにしています
11:26
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
11:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:29
Oh, sorry.
あぁ すみません
11:31
May I have my duck back, please?
私のカモを
返していただけますか?
11:36
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑)
(拍手)
11:39
Thank you.
ありがとう
11:42
Translator:Kazunori Akashi
Reviewer:Shohei Tanaka

sponsored links

Kees Moeliker - Ornithologist
Kees Moeliker writes and speaks about natural history, especially birds and remarkable animal behavior, as well as improbable research and science-communication-with-a-laugh.

Why you should listen

In Kees Moeliker's career (he's now curator of the Natural History Museum Rotterdam) he's rediscovered long-lost birds, such as the black-chinned monarch (Monarcha boanensis) on the remote Moluccan island of Boano in 1991. On the tiny West Papuan island of Boo he collected and named a new subspecies of fruit bat (Macroglossus minimus booensis).

Aaaaand he's the guy who observed and published the first scientifically documented case of homosexual necrophilia in ducks. For this, he was awarded the 2003 Ig Nobel biology prize, and that much-coveted award led him to appreciate that curiosity and humour can be powerful tools for scientists and science communicators.

Moeliker later used these tools to tell the world about two other notorious, complicated subjects: the brutally murdered ‘Domino’ sparrow and the feared disappearance of the once-ubiquitous pubic louse. He has pioneered unusual ways to engage international audience — to make people think about remarkable animal behaviour, biodiversity and habitat destruction.

His writings include two books, in Dutch: 'De eendenman' (The Duck Guy, 2009) and 'De bilnaad van de teek' (The Butt Crack of the Tick, 2012).

Each year, on June 5, he organizes Dead Duck Day, an event that commemorates the first known case of homosexual necrophilia in the mallard duck. The event also raises awareness for the tremendous number of bird deaths caused, worldwide, by glass buildings.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.