sponsored links
DLD 2007

Norman Foster: My green agenda for architecture

ノーマン・フォスター: 私のグリーン・アジェンダ

January 1, 2007

建築家ノーマン・フォスターが自身の仕事を振り返りながら、建物をグリーンに、美しくそして本来的に無公害なものとしてデザインする上でコンピューターがどの様な助けとなるか論じます。この講演は2007年ミュンヘンのDLDカンファレンズで行われたものです。www.dld-conference.com

Norman Foster - Architect
Sir Norman Foster, winner of the 1999 Pritzker Prize, is perhaps the leading urban stylist of our age. His elegant, efficient buildings grace cities around the globe. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
As an architect you design for the present,
建築家は 現在のために
過去を認識した上で
00:16
with an awareness of the past,
設計をします
00:23
for a future which is essentially unknown.
そして 本質的に未知である
未来のために設計します
00:26
The green agenda is probably the most important agenda
今日 グリーンアジェンダは恐らくもっとも
00:33
and issue of the day.
重要な議題であり 課題でしょう
00:37
And I'd like to share some experience
そこで私はここ40年間に渡る
私たちの経験--
00:40
over the last 40 years -- we celebrate our fortieth anniversary this year --
私たちは今年で40周年を迎えました--
を共有して
00:44
and to explore and to touch on some observations
持続可能性の本質に関して
探究し いくつかの知見に
00:49
about the nature of sustainability.
触れたいと思います
00:55
How far you can anticipate, what follows from it,
何が派生するか
どこまで予期できるのか?
00:59
what are the threats, what are the possibilities,
何が脅威で どんな--
01:02
the challenges, the opportunities?
可能性が 挑戦が そして機会があるか?
01:04
I think that -- I've said in the past, many, many years ago,
私はこれを 何年も昔から言っています
01:07
before anybody even invented the concept of a green agenda,
グリーン・アジェンダという概念が
考案される前から
01:11
that it wasn't about fashion -- it was about survival.
これは流行ではない サバイバルなのだと
01:17
But what I never said, and what I'm really going to make the point is,
しかし これまで一度も言わずにいて
これから ここで論じたいのは
01:23
that really, green is cool.
グリーンは本当に恰好いいということです
01:28
I mean, all the projects which have, in some way, been inspired
というのも多少なりとグリーン・アジェンダに影響された
01:31
by that agenda are about a celebratory lifestyle,
全てのプロジェクトは 祝福すべき
ライフスタイルに関するものであり
01:36
in a way celebrating the places and the spaces
すなわち 生活の質を定める場所と空間を
01:41
which determine the quality of life.
祝福するものだったからです
01:46
I rarely actually quote anything,
私はめったに何かを
引用することはないので
01:49
so I'm going to try and find a piece of paper if I can,
メモを探すのに
少し時間をください
01:53
[in] which somebody, at the end of last year, ventured the thought
これは去年の終わりにある人物--
有力な評論家であり
01:57
about what for that individual, as a kind of important observer,
アナリストであり記者でもある
トーマス・フリードマンが--
02:03
analyst, writer -- a guy called Thomas Friedman,
自らにとって2006年とはなんだったか
02:08
who wrote in the Herald Tribune, about 2006.
考えをめぐらせ ヘラルド・トリビューン紙に
書いたものです
02:12
He said,
彼は言います
02:18
"I think the most important thing to happen in 2006
「私が考えるに 2006年の最も重要な
02:21
was that living and thinking green hit Main Street.
出来事は 環境に配慮する生活や
考えが主流になったことだ
02:24
We reached a tipping point this year
我々は今年 ある転換点に達した
02:29
where living, acting, designing, investing and manufacturing green
生活、行動、設計、投資、生産において
環境に配慮することが
02:32
came to be understood by a critical mass
最も愛国的で 資本主義的で
02:37
of citizens, entrepreneurs and officials
地政学的で 競争力のあることだと理解した
02:39
as the most patriotic, capitalistic, geo-political
市民、企業家、官僚たちの量が
02:42
and competitive thing they could do.
決定的な多数となったのだ
02:45
Hence my motto: green is the new red, white and blue."
従って私の題辞はこうなる
緑が新たな赤 白 青であると」
02:48
And I asked myself, in a way, looking back,
そこで私は自問し 振り返ります
02:54
"When did that kind of awareness of the planet and its fragility first appear?"
「この惑星とそのもろさへの認識が
最初に萌芽したのはいつなのか?」
02:58
And I think it was July 20, 1969,
それは1969年の7月20日
人類が初めて
03:08
when, for the first time, man could look back at planet Earth.
惑星地球を振り返った日だったと
私は考えます
03:12
And, in a way, it was Buckminster Fuller who coined that phrase.
そしてある意味でこのようなフレーズを造り出したのは
バックミンスター・フラーでした
03:18
And before the kind of collapse of the communist system,
そして共産主義体制が崩壊する以前に
私はスペース・シティや
03:24
I was privileged to meet a lot of cosmonauts
ロシアの他の場所で多くの
ソ連の宇宙飛行士たちに
03:30
in Space City and other places in Russia.
出会う機会に恵まれました
03:33
And interestingly, as I think back,
そして思い返せば 面白いことに
03:35
they were the first true environmentalists.
彼らは最初の環境保護主義者でした
03:38
They were filled with a kind of pioneering passion,
彼らはアラル海の問題に触発されて
03:42
fired about the problems of the Aral Sea.
一種先駆的な情熱に満たされていました
03:47
And at that period it was --
その時代には ある意味--
03:50
in a way, a number of things were happening.
多くの事が起っていました
03:53
Buckminster Fuller was the kind of green guru --
バックミンスター・フラーは
一種の緑の導師でした--
03:55
again, a word that had not been coined.
これもまた 当時はなかった言葉です
04:00
He was a design scientist, if you like, a poet,
彼はデザインサイエンティスト
もしくは詩人でした
04:02
but he foresaw all the things that are happening now.
しかし彼は今起きていることを
全て予見していたのです
04:06
It's another subject. It's another conversation.
これは別のテーマで
改めて話す必要があります
04:10
You can go back to his writings: it's quite extraordinary.
彼の著作を読めばわかりますが
それは本当に並外れています
04:13
It was at that time, with an awareness
その当時 バックミンスターの
04:18
fired by Bucky's prophecies, his concerns
予言や 彼の市民としての
この惑星の市民としての
04:23
as a citizen, as a kind of citizen of the planet,
心配事が 問題意識を刺激し
私の考え方や
04:28
that influenced my thinking and what we were doing at that time.
当時の我々の仕事に影響を与えました
04:33
And it's a number of projects.
数多くのプロジェクトが影響を受けました
04:37
I select this one because it was 1973, and it was a master plan
その中でこれを選んだのは これが
1973年のものでカナリア諸島のある島の
04:40
for one of the Canary Islands.
マスタープランだからです
04:46
And this probably coincided with the time
そしてこれは恐らく 惑星地球の原典が--
04:48
when you had the planet Earth's sourcebook,
示され
ヒッピームーブメントが
04:52
and you had the hippie movement.
起こった時代と重なります
04:55
And there are some of those qualities in this drawing,
我々が勧めたい生活の特性は
04:57
which seeks to sum up the recommendations.
このスケッチに要約されています
05:01
And all the components are there which are now
スケッチに登場する要素は全て
05:04
in common parlance, in our vocabulary,
30年ほど経った今 一般的に使われ
05:07
you know, 30-odd years later:
なじみ深い単語になっています
05:10
wind energy, recycling, biomass, solar cells.
風力発電 リサイクル バイオマス
太陽電池
05:13
And in parallel at that time, there was
また 時を同じくして 専門的な
05:18
a very kind of exclusive design club.
設計事務所が存在しました
05:22
People who were really design conscious
所属する人たちは設計への意思が高く
05:27
were inspired by the work of Dieter Rams,
ディーター・ラムスの仕事と
05:30
and the objects that he would create
彼がブラウン社のために創作した
05:33
for the company called Braun.
作品に影響されていました
05:36
This is going back the mid-'50s, '60s.
今のは50 60年代の話になります
05:38
And despite Bucky's prophecies
そしてバックミンスターの予言
--全ては小型化され
05:41
that everything would be miniaturized
技術から驚くべきスタイルが生まれ
05:44
and technology would make an incredible style --
利便性や快適性が提供されるだろう--
05:47
access to comfort, to amenities --
この予言にも関わらず
05:50
it was very, very difficult to imagine
このスケッチに描かれたものが
こんなにも
05:54
that everything that we see in this image,
スタイリッシュに収まることを
05:57
would be very, very stylishly packaged.
想像するのは非常に困難でした
05:59
And that, and more besides, would be in the palm of your hand.
それも さらに掌に収まるんですから
06:02
And I think that that digital revolution
私は デジタル革命は現在
06:05
now is coming to the point
ある地点に到達したと思います
06:09
where, as the virtual world, which brings so many people together here,
それは沢山の人々をこの場所に集めた
仮想世界が
06:12
finally connects with the physical world,
物質世界とつながり
06:18
there is the reality that that has become humanized,
人間的な現実を作り出すことによって
06:20
so that digital world has all the friendliness,
デジタルな世界は
親しみ深く 直感的な
06:26
all the immediacy, the orientation of the analog world.
アナログ世界の持つ特性を持つのです
06:30
Probably summed up in a way
ある意味で 親切にも
06:34
by the stylish or alternative available here,
昼食時にいただいた このスタイリッシュな
06:36
as we generously had gifted at lunchtime,
代替品は その典型でしょう
06:40
the [unclear], which is a further kind of development --
これはさらなる発展であり--
06:44
and again, inspired by the incredible sort of sensual feel.
繰り返しになりますが
驚くほど官能的な印象をうけます
06:48
A very, very beautiful object.
非常に美しい物です
06:52
So, something which in [the] '50s, '60s was very exclusive
50年代半ばから60年代は
非常に専門的だったものが
06:54
has now become, interestingly, quite inclusive.
興味深いことに
今では一般的です
06:59
And the reference to the iPod as iconic,
その象徴としてiPodが挙げられます
07:02
and in a way evocative of performance, delivery --
機能と表現に関する
新しい考えを喚起しました--
07:06
quite interesting that [in] the beginning of the year 2007,
2007年の幕開けには
実に興味深いことに
07:11
the Financial Times commented that the Detroit companies
フィナンシャル・タイムズ紙がこんな論評を掲載しました
07:14
envy the halo effect that Toyota has gained
デトロイトの企業は
トヨタがプリウスで獲得した
07:18
from the Prius as the hybrid, energy-conscious vehicle,
ハイブリッドで省エネという名声をうらやんでいる
プリウスはiPod に匹敵するほどの
07:21
which rivals the iPod as an iconic product.
象徴的な製品となっている
07:26
And I think it's very tempting to, in a way, seduce ourselves --
そして建築家もしくは設計業務に携わる人間として
07:28
as architects, or anybody involved with the design process --
問題に対する答えは建築物にあるという思想は
07:33
that the answer to our problems lies with buildings.
とても魅力的でしょう
07:36
Buildings are important, but
建築物は重要です しかし
07:40
they're only a component of a much bigger picture.
大局に対しては構成要素の一つに過ぎません
07:42
In other words, as I might seek to demonstrate,
つまり 今から示そうとするように
07:45
if you could achieve the impossible,
もし永久機関に相当する
07:47
the equivalent of perpetual motion,
不可能が実現できるのであれば
07:49
you could design a carbon-free house, for example.
例えばCO2排出のない家を
設計でき それが―
07:52
That would be the answer.
答えになるでしょう
07:56
Unfortunately, it's not the answer.
残念ながら それは答えではなく
07:57
It's only the beginning of the problem.
問題の始まりに過ぎません
07:59
You cannot separate the buildings out
建築物を都市のインフラや
08:01
from the infrastructure of cites
交通輸送から
08:03
and the mobility of transit.
切り離すことは出来ません
08:05
For example, if, in that Bucky-inspired phrase, we draw back
例えば もし 先ほどのバッキー仕込みの
フレーズのように 一歩引いて
08:07
and we look at planet Earth,
惑星地球に目を向けましょう
08:13
and we take a kind of typical, industrialized society,
そして典型的な工業化された社会を--
08:15
then the energy consumed would be split
見てみると
エネルギー消費の内訳は
08:18
between the buildings, 44 percent, transport, 34 percent, and industry.
建築物が44% 運輸が34%
残りは産業用になります
08:21
But again, that only shows part of the picture.
無論 これも大局の一部です
08:27
If you looked at the buildings together with the associated transport,
仮に建築物を それに伴う運輸を
あわせて見てみると--
08:29
in other words, the transport of people, which is 26 percent,
すなわち 人の移動
これが26%になるのですが--
08:34
then 70 percent of the energy consumption
エネルギー消費量の内70%が
08:39
is influenced by the way that our cites and infrastructure work together.
都市とインフラの相互作用に
影響されています
08:41
So the problems of sustainability
故に持続可能性の問題は
08:48
cannot be separated from the nature of the cities,
建築物を内包する都市の性質から
08:51
of which the buildings are a part.
切り離すことは出来ないのです
08:54
For example, if you take, and you make a comparison
例えば 近代的な都市を取り上げ
08:57
between a recent kind of city,
比較するとしましょう
09:01
what I'll call, simplistically, a North American city --
私が北米型都市と呼ぶもの--
09:05
and Detroit is not a bad example, it is very car dependent.
デトロイトは悪くない例で
極めて車に依存してる都市です
09:08
The city goes out in annular rings,
その都市は環状に拡張していき
09:13
consuming more and more green space,
緑地を次々に消耗し
09:16
and more and more roads, and more and more energy
さらなる道路が
よりいっそうのエネルギーが
09:18
in the transport of people between the city center --
都市の中心部とを行き来する
人々の輸送に浪費され
09:22
which again, the city center, as it becomes deprived
都心部から生活が奪われ
09:26
of the living and just becomes commercial, again becomes dead.
単なる事業用地と化し 死に至ります
09:29
If you compared Detroit with a city of a Northern European example --
デトロイトと北欧の都市を比較しましょう--
09:34
and Munich is not a bad example of that,
ミュンヘンは悪くない例です
09:40
with the greater dependence on walking and cycling --
徒歩と自転車により大きく依存しており
09:44
then a city which is really only twice as dense,
密度が僅かに2倍にも関わらず
09:49
is only using one-tenth of the energy.
エネルギー消費はたったの十分の一です
09:55
In other words, you take these comparable examples
すなわち この比較例における
09:59
and the energy leap is enormous.
エネルギーの差は莫大なのです
10:01
So basically, if you wanted to generalize, you can demonstrate
つまり これを一般化すれば
人口密度の増加により
10:05
that as the density increases along the bottom there,
エネルギー消費の劇的な低減が
10:11
that the energy consumed reduces dramatically.
可能である事を立証できるのです
10:16
Of course you can't separate this out from issues like
勿論 これを都市の多様性や
10:20
social diversity, mass transit,
巨大な公共交通機関
快適に歩行可能な距離
10:23
the ability to be able to walk a convenient distance,
公共の場の質 等の問題から
10:26
the quality of civic spaces.
切り離すことは出来ません
10:30
But again, you can see Detroit, in yellow at the top,
もう一度 黄色で記されたデトロイトが
一番上にあります 並外れた消費量です
10:32
extraordinary consumption, down below Copenhagen.
ずっと下にはコペンハーゲンがあります
10:37
And Copenhagen, although it's a dense city,
コペンハーゲンは確かに高密度ですが
10:40
is not dense compared with the really dense cities.
真に高密度な都市と比べると
それ程ではありません
10:42
In the year 2000, a rather interesting thing happened.
さて2000年には かなり興味深い事が
起きました
10:47
You had for the first time mega-cities, [of] 5 million or more,
500万人を超える巨大都市が初めて
10:52
which were occurring in the developing world.
発展途上国に出現したのです
10:56
And now, out of typically 46 cities,
そして今では典型的な46の
11:00
33 of those mega-cities are in the developing world.
巨大都市中 33もの都市が
途上地域に存在しています
11:03
So you have to ask yourself -- the environmental impact of,
ですから 中国やインドなどが
環境に及ぼす影響について
11:08
for example, China or India.
考え直さねばなりません
11:12
If you take China, and you just take Beijing,
では中国
なかでも北京を考えましょう
11:14
you can see on that traffic system,
その交通システムにおいて
11:19
and the pollution associated with the consumption of energy
自転車の代わりに車が増えたことによって
11:22
as the cars expand at the price of the bicycles.
エネルギー消費に関連した
公害が発生しています
11:28
In other words, if you put onto the roads, as is currently happening,
言い換えるなら 毎日1,000台もの車を
新たに道路に置けば--
11:35
1,000 new cars every day --
これは実際に起きていることで
11:40
statistically, it's the biggest booming auto market in the world --
統計を見ても 世界で最も成長中の
自動車マーケットです--
11:44
and the half a billion bicycles serving one and a third billion people are reducing.
そして13億人を乗せてきた
5億台もの自転車が減少しているのです
11:50
And that urbanization is extraordinary, accelerated pace.
その都市化は異常な
ペースで進んでいます
11:58
So, if we think of the transition in our society
我々の社会では
農村から都市への変化には
12:05
of the movement from the land to the cities, which took 200 years,
200年をかけましたが
12:12
then that same process is happening in 20 years.
同じ変化が20年で起きています
12:17
In other words, it is accelerating by a factor of 10.
言い換えれば
10倍に加速しています
12:22
And quite interestingly, over something like a 60-year period,
そしてまた興味深いことに
ここ60年ほどの間に
12:27
we're seeing the doubling in life expectancy,
―都市化が3倍も進んだ期間に
12:35
over that period where the urbanization has trebled.
平均寿命が2倍に伸びてきました
12:38
If I pull back from that global picture,
さてグローバルな視点から切り替えて
12:44
and I look at the implication over a similar period of time
同じ期間を技術という視点で--
12:47
in terms of the technology -- which, as a tool,
設計者の道具としての技術という視点で--
12:51
is a tool for designers,
紐解いて見ましょう
12:55
and I cite our own experience as a company,
それには我々の企業としての経験を使い
12:57
and I just illustrate that by a small selection of projects --
いくつかのプロジェクトを取り上げて
説明します--
13:01
then how do you measure that change of technology?
まず 技術の変化をどう測るか?
13:06
How does it affect the design of buildings?
どう建物の設計に影響するのか?
13:11
And particularly, how can it lead
そして なにより より省エネルギーで
13:14
to the creation of buildings which consume less energy,
より公害が少なく そしてより
社会的責任を果たす
13:17
create less pollution and are more socially responsible?
建築物の創造とどう繋がるのでしょうか?
13:21
That story, in terms of buildings, started in the late '60s, early '70s.
その物語は 建築物に関してですが
60年代後半から70年代初頭に始まりました
13:26
The one example I take is a corporate headquarters
一例としてウィリス・アンド・フェーバー社の
13:32
for a company called Willis and Faber,
企業本社を取り上げたいと思います
13:35
in a small market town in the northeast of England,
本社はイングランド北東部の
小さな田舎町にあり
13:38
commuting distance with London.
ロンドンからの通勤圏内です
13:45
And here, the first thing you can see
まず あなたが見て取れるのは
13:48
is that this building, the roof is a very warm kind of
この建物の屋根がとても暖かい
毛布のようになっています
13:50
overcoat blanket, a kind of insulating garden,
一種の断熱する庭です
13:55
which is also about the celebration of public space.
また公共空間を称えるものでもあります
13:58
In other words, for this community, they have this garden in the sky.
言い換えれば このコミュニティは
空中の庭園を持っているのです
14:02
So the humanistic ideal is very, very strong in all this work,
この仕事は全ての面で
人間主義的な理想が強く出ていて
14:06
encapsulated perhaps by one of my early sketches here,
それは この初期のスケッチに
要約されていると思います
14:11
where you can see greenery, you can see sunlight,
青葉があり 日の光があり 自然との
14:16
you have a connection with nature.
つながりがあります
14:19
And nature is part of the generator, the driver for this building.
そして自然は動力の一部であり
ビルを回しているのは自然です
14:21
And symbolically, the colors of the interior are green and yellow.
そして象徴的に 内装の色は
緑と黄色になっています
14:26
It has facilities like swimming pools, it has flextime,
水泳プール等の設備を持ち
フレックスタイム制です
14:30
it has a social heart, a space, you have contact with nature.
社会の中心であり 社会的な空間であり
自然と触れ合いがあります
14:34
Now this was 1973.
これは1973年の事でした
14:39
In 2001, this building received an award.
2001年にこの建物は賞を受賞しました
14:42
And the award was about a celebration for a building
その賞は 非常に長い間
14:46
which had been in use over a long period of time.
使われ続けている建物を
賞賛するものでした
14:49
And the people who'd created it came back:
それを創り上げた人々つまり
プロジェクトマネージャーや
14:53
the project managers, the company chairmen then.
当時の社長が再び集まり
14:56
And they were saying, you know,
彼らは言いました
15:00
"The architects, Norman was always going on about
「建築家達 特にノーマンはいつも未来に--
15:01
designing for the future, and you know,
向けた設計を勧めていた
そして--
15:04
it didn't seem to cost us any more.
コストもかからないようだったから
15:06
So we humored him, we kept him happy."
我々は彼を満足させ
彼を幸福にすることにしたんだ」
15:08
The image at the top,
上の映像を少し詳しく
15:12
what it doesn't -- if you look at it in detail,
見て頂くと この建物が
15:14
really what it is saying is you can wire this building.
電気配線を可能な作りに
しているのがわかります
15:16
This building was wired for change.
この建物は変化に備えていたのです
15:20
So, in 1975, the image there is of typewriters.
1975年の映像では
タイプライターがあります
15:24
And when the photograph was taken, it's word processors.
そしてこの写真が撮られた時には
ワードプロセッサーになりました
15:28
And what they were saying on this occasion was that our competitors
さらに この授賞式で 社長たちは
他社は技術が新しくなるたびに
15:33
had to build new buildings for the new technology.
新しい建物を建てなければならなかった
と言っていました
15:37
We were fortunate,
我々は建物を未来に備えた--
15:41
because in a way our building was future-proofed.
作りにしていたため 幸運でした
15:43
It anticipated change, even though those changes were not known.
たとえ変化が未知でも
この建物は変化を想定していました
15:45
Round about that design period leading up to this building,
この建築物を設計していた時期に
15:51
I did a sketch, which we pulled out of the archive recently.
こんなスケッチを描いていました
最近アーカイブから取ってきたものです
15:55
And I was saying, and I wrote, "But we don't have the time,
私はこのように書いていました
「しかし我々には時間がなく
16:00
and we really don't have the immediate expertise
そして技術に関する
直接的な専門知識も
16:04
at a technical level."
全くない」
16:07
In other words, we didn't have the technology
つまり その建物を
16:08
to do what would be really interesting on that building.
本当に革新的にするための
技術を持ってなかったのです
16:10
And that would be to create a kind of three-dimensional bubble --
それは三次元の泡のようなものからなり
16:14
a really interesting overcoat that would naturally ventilate,
自然に換気の出来る
とても興味深い外装です
16:18
would breathe and would seriously reduce the energy loads.
呼吸し 
エネルギー負荷を著しく低減させます
16:23
Notwithstanding the fact that the building, as a green building,
それでも この建物はグリーン建築として
16:28
is very much a pioneering building.
とても先駆的な建物でした
16:31
And if I fast-forward in time, what is interesting
そして 時間を進めてみると面白いことに
16:33
is that the technology is now available and celebratory.
現在 その技術は利用可能で
広く普及しています
16:36
The library of the Free University, which opened last year,
昨年オープンした
ベルリン自由大学図書館は
16:41
is an example of that.
その一例です
16:47
And again, the transition from one of the many thousands
これもまた
何千枚ものスケッチやコンピューター画像から
16:49
of sketches and computer images to the reality.
現実世界に変換されたものです
16:53
And a combination of devices here,
そしてこの組み合わせ--
16:57
the kind of heavy mass concrete of these book stacks,
これら重量的なコンクリートの書架と
16:59
and the way in which that is enclosed by this skin,
それを包むこの膜が
17:03
which enables the building to be ventilated,
自然の力と協働した建物の
17:09
to consume dramatically less energy,
換気を可能にして 劇的に
17:13
and where it's really working with the forces of nature.
エネルギー消費を減らしました
17:16
And what is interesting is that this is hugely popular
そして興味深いことに
このシステムに対する利用者の評判は
17:19
by the people who use it.
非常に良いのです
17:25
Again, coming back to that thing about the lifestyle,
これは 先ほどのライフスタイルの話であり
17:27
and in a way, the ecological agenda is very much at one with the spirit.
環境保護が 我々の精神と
強く合致するということです
17:30
So it's not a kind of sacrifice, quite the reverse.
何かが犠牲になるのではなく
全く逆なのです
17:39
I think it's a great -- it's a celebration.
私はそれは偉大で 素晴らしいと考えます
17:42
And you can measure the performance,
エネルギー消費という観点から
17:45
in terms of energy consumption, of that building
典型的な図書館とこの建物の性能を比べて
17:49
against a typical library.
評価することができます
17:52
If I show another aspect of that technology
今度は全く異なった文脈で
17:55
then, in a completely different context --
この技術の 別の面をお見せします
17:58
this apartment building in the Alps in Switzerland.
このアパートメントは
スイスのアルプスにあり
18:02
Prefabricated from the most traditional of materials,
最も伝統的な建材を
用いたプレハブ式です
18:07
but that material -- because of the technology, the computing ability,
伝統的とはいっても
技術や計算手法の発展
18:10
the ability to prefabricate, make high-performance components
プレハブ工法や
丸太から製造される高機能な部材などの理由によって
18:15
out of timber -- very much at the cutting edge.
まさに最先端の建材です
18:19
And just to give a sort of glimpse of that technology,
ではその技術を大まかにご紹介します
18:23
the ability to plot points in the sky
空中に点をプロットしたら
18:26
and to transmit, to transfer that information
その情報を転送することができます
今では工場に直接
18:34
now, directly into the factory.
転送できます
18:41
So if you cross the border -- just across the border --
さて国境を越えて
少し先にある
18:46
a small factory in Germany, and here you can see the guy with his computer screen,
ドイツの小さな工場の様子です
男性とコンピューター画面が見えます
18:49
and those points in space are communicated.
先ほどの空間上のプロットが
伝達されています
18:55
And on the left are the cutting machines,
そして左側には工場の
切削装置があります
18:59
which then, in the factory,
これを使って
19:02
enable those individual pieces to be fabricated
個々の部品を製造する事ができます
19:04
and plus or minus very, very few millimeters,
そしてプラスマイナス僅か数ミリメートルで
19:08
to be slotted together on site.
現場で互いに組み合わされます
19:11
And then interestingly, that building to then be clad
そして面白いことに その建物の外部は
19:14
in the oldest technology, which is the kind of hand-cut shingles.
最も古い技術である 手作りの
杮葺(こけらぶき)で覆われています
19:20
One quarter of a million of them applied by hand as the final finish.
25万個のこけら板を
手作業で貼り付けて仕上げたのです
19:26
And again, the way in which that works as a building,
そして繰り返しますが
建物のこのような作りは
19:33
for those of us who can enjoy the spaces,
そこに暮らす人や訪問者にその空間を
19:37
to live and visit there.
楽しんでもらうためのものです
19:41
If I made the leap into these new technologies,
私がこれら新しい技術の使用に
踏み切ったとして
19:44
then how did we -- what happened before that?
どのように--
以前はどうしていたのでしょう?
19:48
I mean, you know, what was life like before the mobile phone,
つまり そう 携帯電話以前の生活--
今は当たり前になっていますが--
19:51
the things that you take for granted?
はどのような物だったのでしょうか?
19:57
Well, obviously the building still happened.
もちろん 建物はありました
20:00
I mean, this is a glimpse of the interior of our Hong Kong bank of 1979,
これは1979年の香港銀行の内部です
20:02
which opened in 1985, with the ability to be able to reflect sunlight
1985年にオープンし
太陽光を奥深くのスペースにまで--
20:10
deep into the heart of this space here.
空間の中心部へと反射していました
20:15
And in the absence of computers, you have to physically model.
コンピューターの無い時代には
物理的な模型が必要でした
20:18
So for example, we would put models under an artificial sky.
例えば 模型を人工の空の下に
置いていました
20:22
For wind tunnels, we would literally put them
風洞実験では 文字通り--
20:29
in a wind tunnel and blast air,
風洞に模型を置いて 空気を流します
20:31
and the many kilometers of cable and so on.
数キロのケーブルや
その他もろもろが必要になります
20:34
And the turning point was probably, in our terms,
我々にとって 転機となったのは恐らく
20:38
when we had the first computer.
最初のコンピューターを手にした時です
20:42
And that was at the time that we sought
ちょうど我々は空港の設計を見直し
20:46
to redesign, reinvent the airport.
発明し直そうと取り組んでいました
20:50
This is Terminal Four at Heathrow, typical of any terminal --
これはヒースロー空港の第4ターミナル
典型的な空港ターミナルです
20:54
big, heavy roof, blocking out the sunlight,
巨大で重く 日光を遮る屋根
20:59
lots of machinery, big pipes, whirring machinery.
大量の騒がしい機械 巨大なパイプ
21:01
And Stansted, the green alternative,
そしてスタンステッドは
グリーンな代替案です
21:06
which uses natural light, is a friendly place:
自然光を用いた優しい空間で
21:11
you know where you are, you can relate to the outside.
ここでは 外との
つながりが実感できます
21:13
And for a large part of its cycle, not needing electric light --
そして 日中の大部分は
電灯が不要です
21:17
electric light, which in turn creates more heat,
電灯は熱を生成し
21:21
which creates more cooling loads and so on.
空調の負荷を高めます
21:24
And at that particular point in time,
そして その当時の
21:26
this was one of the few solitary computers.
数少ないコンピューターは
こんなものでした
21:29
And that's a little image of the tree of Stansted.
小さな画像は
スタンステッドの樹状の構造です
21:33
Not going back very far in time, 1990,
大昔というわけではない 1990年の
21:39
that's our office.
我々のオフィスです
21:42
And if you looked very closely, you'd see
よくよく見ると
21:45
that people were drawing with pencils,
鉛筆を使ってスケッチしています
21:48
and they were pushing, you know, big rulers and triangles.
大きな定規や三角定規も使っています
21:50
It's not that long ago, 17 years, and here we are now.
さほど昔ではありません 17年です
今ではこうです
21:54
I mean, major transformation.
大きな変化でしょう
21:58
Going back in time, there was a lady called Valerie Larkin,
昔ヴァレリー・ラーキンという女性がいて
22:01
and in 1987, she had all our information on one disk.
1987年 彼女は1枚のディスクに
我々の情報全てを保有していました
22:05
Now, every week, we have the equivalent of 84 million disks,
今では毎週 我々の過去 現在
そして未来のプロジェクトの情報が
22:12
which record our archival information
ディスク8400万枚分も
22:21
on past, current and future projects.
記録されています
22:24
That reaches 21 kilometers into the sky.
積み上げれば21キロメートルもの
高さになります
22:27
This is the view you would get, if you looked down on that.
これはそこから見下ろした
場合の景色です
22:31
But meanwhile, as you know,
しかしその間 ご存知のように
22:34
wonderful protagonists like Al Gore
アル・ゴアのように素晴らしい指導者は
22:36
are noting the inexorable rise in temperature,
気温の上昇が止め難い状況に
入った事を指摘しました
22:40
set in the context of that,
この意味では 面白いことに
22:46
interestingly, those buildings which are celebratory
これら祝福すべき建物は
22:49
and very, very relevant to this place.
この状況と強く関わりがあります
22:51
Our Reichstag project,
このドイツ国会議事堂--
22:55
which has a very familiar agenda, I'm sure,
プロジェクトはよく知られた
使命を帯びています
22:58
as a public place where we sought to, in a way,
弁論の力によって 政治家と社会
23:02
through a process of advocacy,
公共の場の関係を
23:08
reinterpret the relationship between society and politicians,
解釈しなおそうと努める場所
23:11
public space. And maybe its hidden agenda, an energy manifesto --
そして 恐らく その隠れた使命は
エネルギー政策--
23:16
something that would be free, completely free
我々の知る燃料を使わない--
23:21
of fuel as we know it.
全く使わないものにすることです
23:24
So it would be totally renewable.
完全に再生可能にするために
23:27
And again, the humanistic sketch, the translation into the public space,
そして再び この人間的なスケッチが
公共の場に変わります
23:29
but this very, very much a part of the ecology.
しかし これは実に環境に良い設計なのです
23:34
But here, not having to model it for real.
今回は実際に模型を作る
必要はありませんでした
23:37
Obviously the wind tunnel had a place,
風洞試験は当然しましたが
23:41
but the ability now with the computer
今はコンピューター上で
23:44
to explore, to plan, to see how that would work
調査し 計画し
さらに自然の力がどのように
23:46
in terms of the forces of nature:
作用するかを見られます
23:50
natural ventilation, to be able to model the chamber below,
下の議場の自然換気もコンピュータでモデル化しました
23:52
and to look at biomass.
また生物資源も検討できます
23:56
A combination of biomass, aquifers, burning vegetable oil --
生物資源と帯水層 植物油の燃焼を組み合わせる
23:59
a process that, quite interestingly, was developed
このプロセスは興味深いことに
24:06
in Eastern Germany, at the time of its
まだソ連に依存していた頃の
24:10
dependence on the Soviet Bloc.
東ドイツで開発されました
24:14
So really, retranslating that technology and developing something
そして これらの技術を再び取り入れて
とてもクリーンな技術を
24:16
which was so clean, it was virtually pollution-free.
開発したことで
実質的に無公害の建物になりました
24:20
You can measure it again.
これは評価可能です
24:24
You can compare how that building, in terms of its emission
その建物からの排出量を
年間の二酸化炭素の量から
24:25
in tons of carbon dioxide per year --
評価できます
24:29
at the time that we took that project, over 7,000 tons --
プロジェクトに着手したときは
天然ガスを使用するなら排出量は
24:31
what it would have been with natural gas
7,000トン以上
24:35
and finally, with the vegetable oil, 450 tons.
それが最終的には植物油を使用し450トンとなりました
24:36
I mean, a 94 percent reduction -- virtually clean.
つまり 94%の削減-- 実質的にクリーンです
24:39
We can see the same processes at work
同じプロセスが動いているのを
24:42
in terms of the Commerce Bank --
コマース銀行で見れます
24:44
its dependence on natural ventilation,
自然換気への依存
24:46
the way that you can model those gardens,
庭をモデル化した手法
24:48
the way they spiral around.
螺旋状の配置方法
24:50
But again, very much about the lifestyle, the quality --
繰り返しますが それらはまさしく
ライフスタイル 生活の質--
24:52
something that would be more enjoyable as a place to work.
働く場所としてより楽しめるような
場になっています
24:56
And again, we can measure the reduction
そしてまたエネルギー消費の削減量を
25:00
in terms of energy consumption.
評価することができます
25:02
There is an evolution here between the projects,
プロジェクトの間に進歩が見られます
25:06
and Swiss Re again develops that a little bit further --
スイス・リではさらに少し
発展させました--
25:08
the project in the city in London.
ロンドンでのプロジェクトでした
25:13
And this sequence shows the buildup of that model.
この一連の映像が示すのは
モデルの発展過程ですが
25:15
But what it shows first, which I think is quite interesting,
最初の映像は実に興味深いと思いますが
25:19
is that here you see the circle, you see the public space around it.
そこには円があり その周りを
公共空間が取り巻いています
25:22
What are the other ways of putting
この場所に同量の容積を置くには
25:27
the same amount of space on the site?
他にどのような方法があるでしょうか?
25:29
If, for example, you seek to do a building
例えば 舗道の端から垂直に上る
25:32
which goes right to the edge of the pavement,
建物を試してみると
25:36
it's the same amount of space.
同じ容積になります
25:41
And finally, you profile this, you cut grooves into it.
そして最終的にこのような
輪郭を描き 溝を切りこみます
25:44
The grooves become the kind of green lungs
その溝はある種 自然の肺になります
25:49
which give views, which give light, ventilation,
それは景色を与え 光を与え 換気し
25:52
make the building fresher.
この建物を清らかにします
25:56
And you enclose that with something that also
そしてそれを 外観の中核を成す
25:58
is central to its appearance,
構造で包みます
26:01
which is a mesh of triangulated structures --
それは三角形の網目状の構造体で
26:04
again, in a long connection evocative of
ここにもそれらバックミンスター・フラーの
26:08
some of those works of Buckminster Fuller,
いくつかの作品と遠い結び付きがあります
26:11
and the way in which triangulation can increase performance
そして この三角形のグリッドは
性能を向上させ
26:14
and also give that building its sense of identity.
またこの建物にアイデンティティを
与えるものでもあります
26:18
And here, if we look at a detail of the way
そしてここでは
この建物が大気に解放され
26:23
that the building opens up and breathes into those atria,
アトリウムへと吸気する
詳細を示しています
26:26
the way in which now, with a computer, we can model the forces,
その詳細は コンピューターによって
モデル化でき
26:29
we can see the high pressure, the low pressure,
風圧の高い場所と
低い場所が見れます
26:34
the way in which the building behaves rather like an aircraft wing.
この手法では建物は
飛行機の翼のように振舞います
26:37
So it also has the ability, all the time,
従って 風の方向に関わらず
26:41
regardless of the direction of the wind,
常に建物に新鮮な
26:44
to be able to make the building fresh and efficient.
空気を効率よく取り込めます
26:46
And unlike conventional buildings,
そして従来の建築物と違って
ビルの最上部が
26:51
the top of the building is celebratory.
素晴らしいものになりました
26:54
It's a viewing place for people, not machinery.
そこは機械ではなく
人々の為の展望台です
26:56
And the base of the building is again about public space.
そしてこの建物の一階部分もまた
公共空間なのです
26:59
Comparing it with a typical building,
典型的な建物よりずっと広いのです
27:03
what happens if we seek to use such design strategies
我々が本当に広い視野を持って
これらのような
27:05
in terms of really large-scale thinking?
設計戦略を用いた場合
何が起こるのでしょうか?
27:10
And I'm just going to give two images
そこで会社の研究プロジェクトから
27:14
out of a kind of company research project.
二つのイメージを示したいと思います
27:16
It's been well known that the Dead Sea is dying.
死海が実際に死滅しようとしているのは
有名な話です
27:22
The level is dropping, rather like the Aral Sea.
その水面はアラル海のように
下がり続けています
27:28
And the Dead Sea is obviously much lower
そして言うまでもなく死海は
周囲の大海や
27:32
than the oceans and seas around it.
海よりも低い位置にあります
27:36
So there has been a project which rescues the Dead Sea
そこで パイプラインを作り
27:40
by creating a pipeline, a pipe,
死海を救う計画がありました
27:44
sometimes above the surface, sometimes buried,
一部は地上 一部は埋められた
27:48
that will redress that, and will feed from the Gulf of Aqaba
パイプを経由しアカバ湾から
死海へ水を供給して水面を
27:51
into the Dead Sea.
回復させるというものです
27:57
And our translation of that,
このプロジェクトを我々が40年間に渡って
確立した考えで解釈しましょう
27:59
using a lot of the thinking built up over the 40 years, is to say,
このプロジェクトを我々が40年間に渡って
確立した考えで解釈しましょう
28:00
what if that, instead of being just a pipe,
もしそれが唯のパイプではなくて
28:05
what if it is a lifeline?
ライフラインだったら?
28:08
What if it is the equivalent, depending on where you are,
それが 大運河のように
28:10
of the Grand Canal,
観光や居住 脱塩や農業など
28:14
in terms of tourists, habitation, desalination, agriculture?
どこに住む人にも価値を産むものだったらどうでしょう
28:16
In other words, water is the lifeblood.
言い換えれば 水は活力源です
28:21
And if you just go back to the previous image,
一つ前の画面に戻しましょう
28:23
and you look at this area of volatility and hostility,
この地域は不安定で
武力衝突が起こっています
28:26
that a unifying design idea as a humanitarian gesture
こんな設計アイデアで人道的姿勢を明確にすれば
28:30
could have the affect of bringing all those warring factions together
敵対する勢力も一緒になって
28:36
in a united cause, in terms of something that would be
間違いなくグリーンで広い意味で生産的な
28:40
genuinely green and productive in the widest sense.
ひとつの目的に向かって
共同できるかもしれません
28:44
Infrastructure at that large scale is also
巨大なインフラはまた
28:50
inseparable from communication.
コミュニケーションと不可分です
28:52
And whether that communication is the virtual world
そしてコミュニケーションは
仮想上であれ 現実のものであれ
28:57
or it is the physical world,
そしてコミュニケーションは
仮想上であれ 現実のものであれ
29:00
then it's absolutely central to society.
社会にとって真に重要なものです
29:01
And how do we make more legible in this growing world,
我々はこの成長する世界を
どうすれば明瞭にできるのでしょうか
29:04
especially in some of the places that I'm talking about --
特に私が話しているいくつかの場所--
29:09
China, for example, which in the next ten years
例えば中国では 次の十年で
29:13
will create 400 new airports.
400もの新たな空港を
建設しようとしています
29:15
Now what form do they take?
どのような空港でしょう?
29:19
How do you make them more friendly at that scale?
どうすればこの規模で
環境に優しくできるでしょう?
29:21
Hong Kong I refer to as a kind of analog experience in a digital age,
私は香港空港を デジタル時代における
一種のアナログ体験と呼んでいます
29:24
because you always have a point of reference.
ここを基準として考えましょう
29:31
So what happens when we take that and you expand that further
そしてそれを中国社会で発展させれば
29:33
into the Chinese society?
何が起こるでしょうか?
29:39
And what is interesting is that that produces in a way
それがある意味で 恐らく
究極的な巨大建築物を
29:43
perhaps the ultimate mega-building.
生み出せるかもしれません
29:47
It is physically the largest project on the planet at the moment.
それは当時 地上で最も物理的に
大きなプロジェクトでした
29:49
250 -- excuse me, 50,000 people working 24 hours, seven days.
250--失礼 5万人もの人々が
24時間 週7日働いていました
29:53
Larger by 17 percent than every terminal put together
それはヒースロー空港の
全てのターミナルと未完の--
29:59
at Heathrow -- built -- plus the new, un-built Terminal Five.
第5ターミナルを合わせたよりも
17%も大きいのです
30:03
And the challenge here is a building that will be green,
そしてここでの挑戦は建物を
グリーンにする事 つまり
30:08
that is compact despite its size
その規模に関わらずコンパクトで
30:12
and is about the human experience of travel,
そして人間的な旅行体験に
関わるものであり
30:15
is about friendly, is coming back to that starting point,
心地良くあることです
つまり 出発点に立ち戻り
30:20
is very, very much about the lifestyle.
ライフスタイルのことになります
30:25
And perhaps these, in the end, as celebratory spaces.
そして結局は 祝福すべき空間に
関することなのです
30:27
As Hubert was talking over lunch,
ヒューバートと昼食を共にし
30:33
as we sort of engaged in conversation,
この挑戦や都市について
30:35
talked about this, talked about cities.
話していた時
30:37
Hubert was saying, absolutely correctly, "These are the new cathedrals."
彼は「これらは新たな大聖堂だ」
と言いました--全くその通りです
30:39
And in a way, one aspect of this conversation
この会話の切り口の一つは
30:44
was triggered on New Year's Eve,
私が大晦日に行った
30:48
when I was talking about the Olympic agenda in China
中国のオリンピックにおける
環境保護政策の志と熱意に関する
30:52
in terms of its green ambitions and aspirations.
講演がきっかけになっています
31:00
And I was voicing the thought that --
そのとき 私はある意見を口にしたのでした
31:05
it just crossed my mind that New Year's Eve,
--それは2006年から
31:07
a sort of symbolic turning point as we move from 2006 to 2007 --
2007年へ向かう象徴的な転換点である
大晦日の夜に思いついたことでした--
31:09
that maybe, you know, the future was
恐らく未来の
31:15
the most powerful, innovative sort of nation.
最も力強く 革新的な国家ができたら
31:17
The way in which somebody like Kennedy inspirationally could say,
ケネディの感動的な言葉
「我々は人類を月面に立たせる」
31:21
"We put a man on the moon."
のように力強く
31:24
You know, who is going to say
のように力強く
31:25
that we cracked this thing of the dependence on fossil fuels,
化石燃料への依存と
これを盾にとるやっかいな体制からの
31:27
with all that being held to ransom by rogue regimes, and so on.
決別が宣言されることでしょう
31:32
And that's a concerted platform.
それは複合的な基盤であり
31:36
It's more than one device, you know, it's renewable.
再生可能な複数の手法を利用するでしょう
31:38
And I voiced the thought that maybe at the turn of the year,
この考えを口にした時が
年の変り目でした
31:41
I thought that the inspiration was more likely
その着想を実現するのは
31:45
to come from those other, larger countries out there --
おそらく我が国以外の大国
31:47
the Chinas, the Indias, the Asian-Pacific tigers.
中国やインドなどアジア太平洋の虎達
でしょう
31:49
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
31:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
31:55
Translator:Nao Yokoyama
Reviewer:Makoto Ikeo

sponsored links

Norman Foster - Architect
Sir Norman Foster, winner of the 1999 Pritzker Prize, is perhaps the leading urban stylist of our age. His elegant, efficient buildings grace cities around the globe.

Why you should listen

From museums and banks to airports and bridges, from apartment buildings to the Reichstag, in the past 35 years Norman Foster's beautiful and efficient designs have dramatically changed the character of cities (think of the London Gherkin) and landscapes (the Viaduc de Millau) around the world.

A common philosophy connects all of them, starting with social responsiveness and the use of natural resources (ventilation, light). Some of Foster's work has sparked controversy (such as his pyramid in Astana, Kazakhstan), but he has never ignored a chance to rewrite the rules of architecture, be it by tackling audaciously huge construction projects or by designing wind turbines and partly-solar-powered electric buses.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.