sponsored links
TED2007

Lawrence Lessig: Laws that choke creativity

ローレンス・レッシグ:法が創造性を圧迫する

March 3, 2007

ネット上で最も著名な法学者ローレンス・レッシグが、ジョン・フィリップ・スーザと蓄音器、土地法と上空権、ASCAP(米国作曲家作詞家出版家協会)の問題に言及しながら創造的な文化の再生について議論する。

Lawrence Lessig - Legal activist
Lawrence Lessig has already transformed intellectual-property law with his Creative Commons innovation. Now he's focused on an even bigger problem: The US' broken political system. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:24
I want to talk to you a little bit about user-generated content.
ユーザー作成コンテンツについての話をします
00:25
I'm going to tell you three stories on the way to one argument
3つのストーリーを通して、どのように
00:29
that's going to tell you a little bit
ユーザー作成コンテンツを
00:33
about how we open user-generated content up for business.
ビジネスに結びつけることができるのかを考えていきます
00:35
So, here's the first story.
まず、最初のストーリーです
00:39
1906. This man, John Philip Sousa, traveled to this place,
1906年、この男、ジョン・フィリップ・スーザは
00:40
the United States Capitol, to talk about this technology,
アメリカの国会議事堂を訪れました
00:46
what he called the, quote, "talking machines."
いわゆる「蓄音器」という技術について話をするためです
00:50
Sousa was not a fan of the talking machines.
スーザは、この機械が好きではありませんでした
00:54
This is what he had to say.
彼はこう言わずにはいられなかったのです
00:58
"These talking machines are going to ruin artistic development
「蓄音器は、この国の音楽の芸術的な発展を
00:59
of music in this country.
台無しにする
01:03
When I was a boy, in front of every house in the summer evenings,
私が子どもだった頃は、夏の夜になると家々の前で
01:04
you would find young people together
若者たちが集まり、
01:09
singing the songs of the day, or the old songs.
流行りの歌や昔の歌を歌っていたものだった
01:11
Today, you hear these infernal machines going night and day.
今では、このいまいましい機械が昼も夜も鳴り響いている
01:15
We will not have a vocal chord left," Sousa said.
私たちは声帯を失ってしまうだろう」と
01:21
"The vocal chords will be eliminated by a process of evolution
声帯が進化の過程で失われてしまうだろうと彼は言うのです
01:24
as was the tail of man when he came from the ape."
人類が猿から進化する過程で尻尾をなくしたように
01:28
Now, this is the picture I want you to focus on.
こちらをご覧ください
01:32
This is a picture of culture.
「文化」と書かれています
01:37
We could describe it using modern computer terminology
文化とは、現代のコンピュータ科学の用語を使えば、
01:39
as a kind of read-write culture.
一種の「読み書き文化」のことです
01:43
It's a culture where people participate in the creation
そこでは人々が自らの文化の創造と
01:46
and the re-creation of their culture. In that sense, it's read-write.
再創造に参加します その意味で「読み書き」なのです
01:49
Sousa's fear was that we would lose that capacity
スーザが恐れたのは、我々がその能力を失うことでした
01:54
because of these, quote, "infernal machines." They would take it away.
いわゆる「いまいましい機械」のせいです
01:59
And in its place, we'd have the opposite of read-write culture,
そしてその代わりに「読み書き文化」とは対極的な
02:04
what we could call read-only culture.
「読むだけ文化」とでもいうものが現われるのです
02:08
Culture where creativity was consumed
創造性は消費されるけれど
02:11
but the consumer is not a creator.
消費者が創造に参加することはないという文化です
02:14
A culture which is top-down, owned,
トップ・ダウンで、誰かに所有されていて
02:17
where the vocal chords of the millions have been lost.
人々の声帯が失われてしまった文化です
02:20
Now, as you look back at the twentieth century,
20世紀を振り返ってみると
02:24
at least in what we think of as the, quote, "developed world" --
少なくともいわゆる「先進世界」と呼ばれる地域では
02:28
hard not to conclude that Sousa was right.
スーザが正しかったことを認めざるを得ません
02:33
Never before in the history of human culture
人類の歴史の中でこれほど文化の創造が
02:36
had it been as professionalized, never before as concentrated.
職業化され、少数の手に握られたことはありませんでした
02:39
Never before has creativity of the millions
人々の創造性がこれほど
02:43
been as effectively displaced,
効率的に奪い去られたことはなかったのです
02:46
and displaced because of these, quote, "infernal machines."
それを引き起こしたのは、あの「いまいましい機械」です
02:48
The twentieth century was that century
20世紀という時代は、
02:52
where, at least for those places we know the best,
少なくとも我々が最もよく知る地域において、
02:54
culture moved from this read-write to read-only existence.
文化が「読み書きするもの」から「読むだけ」の存在に変わったのです
02:57
So, second. Land is a kind of property --
次に移ります 土地というのは、一種の資産です
03:05
it is property. It's protected by law.
法律で保護される所有物です
03:08
As Lord Blackstone described it, land is protected by trespass law,
かつてブラックストーン卿が述べたように、土地は不法侵入法で保護されています
03:12
for most of the history of trespass law,
不法侵入法ができてからずっと、
03:17
by presuming it protects the land all the way down below
その法律は土地の地下深くから
03:20
and to an indefinite extent upward.
遥か上空に至るまでを保護するものと考えられてきました
03:25
Now, that was a pretty good system
それは土地規制の歴史の大部分の期間、
03:29
for most of the history of the regulation of land,
とても上手く機能してきた仕組みでした
03:31
until this technology came along, and people began to wonder,
でも、飛行機という技術がやってくると、人々は思い始めました
03:33
were these instruments trespassers
飛行機は、不法侵入者なのだろうかと
03:39
as they flew over land without clearing the rights
飛行ルートの下にある農場の許可を得ないで
03:42
of the farms below as they traveled across the country?
飛び回ることは、不法侵入になるのだろうかと
03:45
Well, in 1945, Supreme Court got a chance to address that question.
1945年、最高裁はこの問題に取り組む機会を得ました
03:49
Two farmers, Thomas Lee and Tinie Causby, who raised chickens,
養鶏を営む2人の農家、トーマス・リーとティニー・コスビーが、
03:54
had a significant complaint because of these technologies.
飛行機に大きな不満を持っていました
04:00
The complaint was that their
というのも、彼らの鶏が
04:04
chickens followed the pattern of the airplanes
飛行機の後を追って飛び立ち
04:06
and flew themselves into the walls of the barn
納屋の壁に激突してしまうからでした
04:09
when the airplanes flew over the land.
飛行機はそのまま飛び去るというのに
04:13
And so they appealed to Lord Blackstone
それで、彼らはブラックストーン卿に訴え出ました
04:15
to say these airplanes were trespassing.
飛行機が、不法侵入していると
04:17
Since time immemorial, the law had said,
遥か昔から、法律は地主の許可なしに
04:21
you can't fly over the land without permission of the landowner,
土地の上を飛ぶことはできないと定めてきました
04:24
so this flight must stop.
だから、飛行は止めなければならないのです、と
04:28
Well, the Supreme Court considered this 100-years tradition
最高裁は、この100年に及ぶ伝統に検討を加え、
04:32
and said, in an opinion written by Justice Douglas,
ダグラス判事の意見にみられるように、
04:37
that the Causbys must lose.
コスビーたちの敗訴を言い渡しました
04:41
The Supreme Court said the doctrine protecting land
最高裁は、天に至るまでずっと土地を守るという原則は
04:43
all the way to the sky has no place in the modern world,
現代の世界では適用できないと述べました
04:47
otherwise every transcontinental flight would
さもなければ、すべての大陸横断飛行はそれに従わなくてはいけなくなり、
04:51
subject the operator to countless trespass suits.
航空会社は数え切れないほどの訴訟を抱え込むことになります
04:55
Common sense, a rare idea in the law, but here it was. Common sense --
常識という考えは法の世界では滅多に使われませんが、それは正に常識だったのです
04:58
(Laughter) --
(笑い)
05:03
Revolts at the idea. Common sense.
常識が、杓子定規な法の解釈に反旗をひるがえしたのです
05:04
Finally. Before the Internet, the last great terror
最後のストーリーです インターネットが現れる前、
05:08
to rain down on the content industry
コンテンツ業界に降りかかった最後の巨大な脅威は
05:16
was a terror created by this technology. Broadcasting:
この技術、放送による脅威でした
05:19
a new way to spread content,
放送はコンテンツを広める新たな方法でした
05:25
and therefore a new battle over the control
だから、コンテンツ・ビジネスのコントロール権を
05:28
of the businesses that would spread content.
めぐって新たな戦いが始まったのです
05:32
Now, at that time, the entity,
当時、
05:36
the legal cartel, that controlled the performance rights
ある合法的なカルテルが
05:38
for most of the music that would be broadcast
放送で使用される音楽の大部分について上演権を握っていました
05:42
using these technologies was ASCAP.
ASCAPという団体です
05:46
They had an exclusive license on the most popular content,
彼らはほとんどの人気楽曲の独占ライセンスを持っており、
05:48
and they exercised it in a way that tried to demonstrate
その権利を行使して放送局たちに
05:52
to the broadcasters who really was in charge.
力を見せつけようとしました
05:56
So, between 1931 and 1939, they raised rates by some 448 percent,
1931年から1939年の間に彼らは使用料を448%も上げたのです
05:59
until the broadcasters finally got together
ついに、放送局たちは連携して
06:06
and said, okay, enough of this.
もううんざりだと言いました
06:09
And in 1939, a lawyer, Sydney Kaye, started something
そして1939年、弁護士のシドニー・ケイが
06:11
called Broadcast Music Inc. We know it as BMI.
ブロードキャスト・ミュージック社と呼ばれる会社を始めました 今はBMIとして知られています
06:14
And BMI was much more democratic in the art
BMIは、ASCAPよりずっと民主的でした
06:18
that it would include within its repertoire,
BMIは、レパートリーの中に
06:21
including African American music for the first time in the repertoire.
初めて黒人音楽を加えたりしました
06:24
But most important was that BMI took public domain works
でも最も重要なのは、BMIがパブリック・ドメインの作品を利用して
06:28
and made arrangements of them, which they gave away for free
それらにアレンジを施し、会員たちに対して
06:33
to their subscribers. So that in 1940,
無料で使わせたことでした それで、1940年に
06:37
when ASCAP threatened to double their rates,
ASCAPが利用料を2倍に上げると脅しをかけた時、
06:41
the majority of broadcasters switched to BMI.
放送局の大半がBMIに乗り換えたのです
06:45
Now, ASCAP said they didn't care.
ASCAPは、それなら結構と言いました
06:48
The people will revolt, they predicted, because the very best music
人々が反発するだろうと考えたからです なぜなら、
06:50
was no longer available, because they had shifted
放送局がBMIの提供する次善のパブリック・ドメインの作品を
06:54
to the second best public domain provided by BMI.
使うようになったため、最良の音楽が利用できなくなったからです
06:57
Well, they didn't revolt, and in 1941, ASCAP cracked.
でも人々は反発しませんでした そして1941年、ASCAPは負けを認めました
07:03
And the important point to recognize
大事な点は、
07:09
is that even though these broadcasters
これらの放送局たちはセカンド・ベストのものを
07:12
were broadcasting something you would call second best,
放送していたにも関わらず、
07:17
that competition was enough to break, at that time,
競争によって当時の
07:19
this legal cartel over access to music.
音楽使用に対する法的なカルテルを打ち破ることができたということです
07:24
Okay. Three stories. Here's the argument.
3つのストーリーを話してきました ここから議論に入ります
07:28
In my view, the most significant thing to recognize
私の考えでは、インターネットがもたらした
07:32
about what this Internet is doing
もっとも重要なことは
07:34
is its opportunity to revive the read-write culture
「読み書き文化」を再生するきっかけを生み出したことです
07:36
that Sousa romanticized.
スーザが美化したあの文化です
07:40
Digital technology is the opportunity
デジタル技術は、
07:44
for the revival of these vocal chords
スーザが議会に対して熱烈に語りかけた
07:46
that he spoke so passionately to Congress about.
声帯を再生するきっかけになるのです
07:48
User-generated content, spreading in businesses
ユーザー作成コンテンツは、ビジネスの世界で
07:52
in extraordinarily valuable ways like these,
このように非常に貴重なものとして広がり、
07:56
celebrating amateur culture.
アマチュアの文化を後押ししています
07:59
By which I don't mean amateurish culture,
素人っぽい文化のことを言っているのではありません
08:02
I mean culture where people produce
私が言っているのは、人々がお金のためでなく
08:05
for the love of what they're doing and not for the money.
自分のしていることを楽しむために作り出す文化のことです
08:08
I mean the culture that your kids are producing all the time.
それは、あなた方の子どもたちがいつも作り出している文化でもあります
08:12
For when you think of what Sousa romanticized
スーザが美化したのは
08:17
in the young people together, singing the songs of the day,
若者たちがともに流行の歌や昔の歌を歌う姿でしたが、
08:20
of the old songs, you should recognize
そのことに思いを馳せるならば
08:23
what your kids are doing right now.
子どもたちが今していることも認めるべきです
08:25
Taking the songs of the day and the old songs
流行りの歌や昔の歌を持ってきて、
08:28
and remixing them to make them something different.
それらをリミックスして何か別のものを作り出すこと
08:30
It's how they understand access to this culture.
子どもたちは、そのようにして文化と接しているのです
08:34
So, let's have some very few examples
ほんの少しですが、例をご覧ください
08:37
to get a sense of what I'm talking about here.
私が話していることの意味がつかめるでしょう
08:40
Here's something called Anime Music Video, first example,
最初は、アニメ・ミュージック・ビデオと呼ばれるものです
08:42
taking anime captured from television
テレビからキャプチャーしたアニメを
08:44
re-edited to music tracks.
音楽トラックと再編集しています
08:48
(Music)
(音楽)
08:50
This one you should be -- confidence. Jesus survives. Don't worry.
自信を持ってください ジーザスは生き延びます 心配しないで
09:30
(Music)
(音楽:グロリア・ゲイナーの"I Will Survive")
09:35
(Laughter)
(笑い)
10:20
And this is the best.
そして、これが一番の出来です
10:28
(Music)
(音楽:ライオネル・リッチーとダイアナ・ロス"Endless Love")
10:30
My love ...
愛しい人よ
10:37
There's only you in my life ...
僕には君しかいないんだ
10:41
The only thing that's bright ...
僕に差し込む唯一の光なんだ
10:46
My first love ...
初恋のあなた
10:52
You're every breath that I take ...
あなたは、私の吐息なの
10:57
You're every step I make ...
私が踏み出す足取りの全てなの
11:01
And I ....
僕は
11:07
I want to share all my love with you ...
全ての愛を君と分かち合いたいんだ
11:11
No one else will do ...
他の誰とでもなく
11:22
And your eyes ...
あなたの瞳を見れば
11:27
They tell me how much you care ...
どれ程私のことを想ってくれているかがわかるわ
11:31
(Music)
(音楽)
11:37
So, this is remix, right?
これが、リミックスです
11:42
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:44
And it's important to emphasize that what this is not
強調しておかなければならないのは、
11:50
is not what we call, quote, "piracy."
これはいわゆる「海賊行為」ではないということです
11:52
I'm not talking about nor justifying
私は、著作権者の許可を得ずに
11:55
people taking other people's content in wholesale
他人のコンテンツを販売したり流通させたりする行為を
11:58
and distributing it without the permission of the copyright owner.
正当化するつもりはありません
12:01
I'm talking about people taking and recreating
私が言っているのは、デジタル技術を使って
12:04
using other people's content, using digital technologies
他の人のコンテンツを持ちより、再創造して
12:07
to say things differently.
別の意味づけをする人たちのことです
12:11
Now, the importance of this
大事なことは、
12:13
is not the technique that you've seen here.
ここで目にした技法ではありません
12:14
Because, of course, every technique that you've seen here
もちろん、今ご覧になった技法はどれも
12:18
is something that television and film producers
テレビや映画のプロデューサーたちが
12:20
have been able to do for the last 50 years.
この50年間使ってきたものです
12:22
The importance is that that technique has been democratized.
重要なのは、そうした技法が一般の人々のものになったということです
12:24
It is now anybody with access to a $1,500 computer
1500ドルのコンピュータを使うことさえできれば、
12:29
who can take sounds and images from the culture around us
今では誰でも身の回りのものから音や映像を取ってきて
12:34
and use it to say things differently.
別な意味づけをすることができます
12:36
These tools of creativity have become tools of speech.
創造のためのツールが、言葉を発するためのツールになったのです
12:38
It is a literacy for this generation. This is how our kids speak.
それが、今の若い世代のリテラシーです 今の子どもたちは、そのようにして話し、
12:43
It is how our kids think. It is what your kids are
考えるのです 子どもたちがデジタル技術への
12:50
as they increasingly understand digital technologies
理解を深め、そうした技術との関わり方を学ぶにつれて
12:55
and their relationship to themselves.
彼らはそうなっていくのです
12:59
Now, in response to this new use of culture using digital technologies,
このデジタル技術を用いた文化の新しい使い方に対して、
13:02
the law has not greeted this Sousa revival
法が「読み書き文化」の復権を歓迎し常識を持って接しているとは
13:09
with very much common sense.
言えません
13:13
Instead, the architecture of copyright law
代わりに、著作権法と
13:15
and the architecture of digital technologies,
デジタル技術のアーキテクチャが、
13:18
as they interact, have produced the presumption
相互に交わりあいながら、それらの行為は
13:20
that these activities are illegal.
全て違法だとする見方を作り出しています
13:23
Because if copyright law at its core regulates something called copies,
なぜならば、もし著作権法の根幹が複製を規制するのであれば、
13:26
then in the digital world the one fact we can't escape
デジタルの世界で文化を使う時には
13:29
is that every single use of culture produces a copy.
必ずコピーが生み出されるというのが逃れられない事実だからです
13:32
Every single use therefore requires permission;
そのため、すべての使用に際して許可が必要とされるのです
13:37
without permission, you are a trespasser.
許可を得なければ、侵害者になります
13:40
You're a trespasser with about as much sense
過去に飛行機が侵害者扱いされたのと同じような意味合いで
13:43
as these people were trespassers.
侵害者になってしまうのです
13:45
Common sense here, though, has not yet revolted
しかしながら、常識はまだ、こうした形の
13:50
in response to this response that the law has offered
創造性に対して法が取っている対応に
13:54
to these forms of creativity.
まだ反乱を起こしていません
13:57
Instead, what we've seen
代わりに見られるのは、
14:00
is something much worse than a revolt.
反発よりもずっと悪いものです
14:01
There's a growing extremism that comes from both sides
この議論に関わる両方のサイドが、
14:05
in this debate, in response to this conflict
法とテクノロジーの利用の間で起きている衝突に対して
14:09
between the law and the use of these technologies.
より極端な態度を取るようになってきているのです
14:12
One side builds new technologies, such as one recently announced
一方のサイドでは、新たな技術を利用して
14:15
that will enable them
ユーチューブのようなサイトから
14:19
to automatically take down from sites like YouTube
著作権で保護されたコンテンツを含むコンテンツを
14:22
any content that has any copyrighted content in it,
すべて自動的に取り去っています
14:25
whether or not there's a judgment of fair use
それがフェア・ユースに該当する使い方なのか
14:27
that might be applied to the use of that content.
どうかの判断せずに、取り去ってしまうのです
14:30
And on the other side, among our kids,
そして他方では、子どもたちの間で
14:32
there's a growing copyright abolitionism,
著作権の廃止論が広まっています
14:35
a generation that rejects the very notion
この世代は、著作権が果たすべき
14:39
of what copyright is supposed to do, rejects copyright
役割自体を否定し、著作権を拒絶し、
14:42
and believes that the law is nothing more than an ass
法律は機会さえあれば無視し、
14:45
to be ignored and to be fought at every opportunity possible.
対抗すべき下らないものに過ぎないと考えているのです
14:48
The extremism on one side begets extremism on the other,
一方の過激主義がもう片方を引き起こしているということを
14:55
a fact we should have learned many, many times over,
我々は繰り返し学ぶべきでした
14:59
and both extremes in this debate are just wrong.
そして、どちらの過激さも間違っているのです
15:03
Now, the balance that I try to fight for,
私は、バランスこそが大事だと訴えたいのです
15:07
I, as any good liberal, try to fight for first
善良なリベラル派として私がまず
15:11
by looking to the government. Total mistake, right?
政府を当てにしてそう訴えるのは、完全に間違っていますね
15:13
(Laughter)
(笑い)
15:17
Looked first to the courts and the legislatures to try to get them
まずは裁判所と立法府を見て、システムをより良識的なものと
15:18
to do something to make the system make more sense.
するために彼らに何をさせられるかを考えてみましょう
15:21
It failed partly because the courts are too passive,
失敗の原因の一端は、裁判所が受け身すぎ、
15:23
partly because the legislatures are corrupted,
立法府が堕落しているからです
15:27
by which I don't mean that there's bribery
堕落といっても、賄賂によって
15:29
operating to stop real change,
変化が妨げられているということではありません
15:32
but more the economy of influence that governs how Congress functions
むしろ、議会の機能を司る影響力の秩序が堕落しているのです
15:35
means that policymakers here will not understand this
だから、政治家たちは、直すには遅すぎるという時点まで
15:39
until it's too late to fix it.
問題を理解することができないのです
15:43
So, we need something different, we need a different kind of solution.
よって、なにか別のもの、別の解決策が必要です
15:45
And the solution here, in my view, is a private solution,
私の考えでは、それは民間の解決策です
15:49
a solution that looks to legalize what it is to be young again,
若者たちの行為を合法化することを目指す解決法、
15:53
and to realize the economic potential of that,
そうした行為が持つ経済的な可能性を実現するような解決法、
15:57
and that's where the story of BMI becomes relevant.
そしてBMIのストーリーに見られるような解決法です
15:59
Because, as BMI demonstrated, competition here
BIMが示したように、競争は
16:03
can achieve some form of balance. The same thing can happen now.
ある種のバランスをもたらします 今、同じことが起こっても不思議ではありません
16:06
We don't have a public domain to draw upon now,
今は頼りにできるパブリック・ドメインがありません
16:11
so instead what we need is two types of changes.
だから、代わりに2種類の変化が必要です
16:14
First, that artists and creators embrace the idea,
まず、アーティストやクリエイターたちが、
16:17
choose that their work be made available more freely.
彼らの作品がより自由に利用できるようになるよう支持してくれること
16:21
So, for example, they can say their work is available freely
例えば彼らは、自分の作品が非営利で
16:25
for non-commercial, this amateur-type of use,
アマチュア型の使用には自由に使えるけれど
16:28
but not freely for any commercial use.
営利目的の場合は自由な使用を禁じると言うことができます
16:30
And second, we need the businesses
そして次に、「読み書き文化」を作り上げているビジネスが、
16:32
that are building out this read-write culture
この「読み書き文化」をはっきりと
16:35
to embrace this opportunity expressly, to enable it,
支持する必要があります
16:38
so that this ecology of free content, or freer content,
そうすることにより、「自由なコンテンツ」、あるいは「より自由なコンテンツ」という
16:43
can grow on a neutral platform
生態系が中立的な場で育ち
16:48
where they both exist simultaneously,
相互に共存することができます
16:50
so that more-free can compete with less-free,
そこでは「より自由なコンテンツ」と「あまり自由でないコンテンツ」の競争が起き、
16:53
and the opportunity to develop the creativity in that competition
その競争の中で創造性を成長させる機会が
16:58
can teach one the lessons of the other.
双方の教訓を教えることができるのです
17:02
Now, I would talk about one particular such plan
私が知っているそんな計画のことを
17:05
that I know something about,
話したいところですが、
17:09
but I don't want to violate TED's first commandment of selling,
販売活動に関するTEDの決まりに背くわけにはいきません
17:10
so I'm not going to talk about this at all.
なので、それについての話はやめましょう
17:13
I'm instead just going to remind you of the point that BMI teaches us.
代わりに、BMIの事例が教えてくれるポイントについて考えてみましょう
17:15
That artist choice is the key for new technology
アーティストの選択が、ビジネスに結びつく機会を
17:22
having an opportunity to be open for business,
持った新しいテクノロジーにとっては決定的に重要です
17:27
and we need to build artist choice here
そうした新たなテクノロジーにその機会をつかませるためには、
17:30
if these new technologies are to have that opportunity.
アーティストに支持をしてもらわなくてはならないのです
17:33
But let me end with something I think much more important --
でも、最後にそれよりももっと重要だと私が考えていることを言わせてください
17:36
much more important than business.
ビジネスよりも、遥かに大切なことです
17:39
It's the point about how this connects to our kids.
それは、こうした議論が私たちの子どもとどのように関わっているのかということです
17:41
We have to recognize they're different from us. This is us, right?
我々は、子どもたちは自分たちとは違うということを理解しなくてはなりません これが私たちです
17:44
(Laughter)
(笑い)
17:49
We made mixed tapes; they remix music.
私たちは雑多なテープを作りましたが、彼らは音楽をリミックスします
17:50
We watched TV; they make TV.
私たちはテレビを見ましたが、彼らはテレビを作るのです
17:52
It is technology that has made them different,
技術こそが、子どもたちを我々の世代とは異なるものにしたのです
17:55
and as we see what this technology can do,
そして、こうした技術によって可能になることを見てきたように、
17:59
we need to recognize you can't kill
技術によって生み出される「創造に対する本能」を消し去るのは
18:01
the instinct the technology produces. We can only criminalize it.
不可能で、できるのはそれを犯罪扱いすることだけだということを知る必要があります
18:04
We can't stop our kids from using it.
我々は、子どもたちが技術を使うのを止めることはできません
18:08
We can only drive it underground.
できるのは、それをアンダーグラウンドの活動にすることだけです
18:10
We can't make our kids passive again.
我々は、子どもたちを再び受け身にすることはできません
18:12
We can only make them, quote, "pirates." And is that good?
できるのは、彼らを「海賊」にすることだけです それは正しいことなのでしょうか?
18:15
We live in this weird time. It's kind of age of prohibitions,
私たちは奇妙な時代に住んでいます 言ってみれば、禁止だらけの時代です
18:20
where in many areas of our life,
暮らしの中の多くの分野において、
18:24
we live life constantly against the law.
私たちは絶え間なく法に違反しています
18:26
Ordinary people live life against the law,
普通の人々が、法に違反した暮らしを送っているのです
18:29
and that's what I -- we are doing to our kids.
そして、我々は子どもたちに対しても同じことをしているのです
18:31
They live life knowing they live it against the law.
子どもたちは、法に違反しながら暮らしていることを知りながら生活を送っています
18:35
That realization is extraordinarily corrosive,
そう知ることは、極めて危険で
18:39
extraordinarily corrupting.
堕落に結び付きやすいことです
18:43
And in a democracy, we ought to be able to do better.
でも、民主主義の社会では、より良いことができるはずなのです
18:46
Do better, at least for them, if not for opening for business.
ビジネスのためでなくとも、少なくとも子どもたちに対して、より良いことをしてあげましょう
18:50
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
18:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:58
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:Masahiro Kyushima

sponsored links

Lawrence Lessig - Legal activist
Lawrence Lessig has already transformed intellectual-property law with his Creative Commons innovation. Now he's focused on an even bigger problem: The US' broken political system.

Why you should listen

Lawyer and activist Lawrence Lessig spent a decade arguing for sensible intellectual property law, updated for the digital age. He was a founding board member of Creative Commons, an organization that builds better copyright practices through principles established first by the open-source software community.

In 2007, just after his last TED Talk, Lessig announced he was leaving the field of IP and Internet policy, and moving on to a more fundamental problem that blocks all types of sensible policy -- the corrupting influence of money in American politics.

In 2011, Lessig founded Rootstrikers, an organization dedicated to changing the influence of money in Congress. In his latest book, Republic, Lost, he shows just how far the U.S. has spun off course -- and how citizens can regain control. As The New York Times wrote about him, “Mr. Lessig’s vision is at once profoundly pessimistic -- the integrity of the nation is collapsing under the best of intentions --and deeply optimistic. Simple legislative surgery, he says, can put the nation back on the path to greatness.”

Read an excerpt of Lessig's new book, Lesterland >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.