33:35
TED2014

Richard Ledgett: The NSA responds to Edward Snowden’s TED Talk

リチャード・レジェット: エドワード・スノーデン氏のTEDにおけるトークに対するNSA(米国国家安全保障局) の反論

Filmed:

TED2014でのエドワード・スノーデン氏の驚きの登場の後、クリス・アンダーソンは言いました。「もし、NSAが返答したいのであれば、そうして下さい。」 そう、彼らはこれに応じました。 ビデオ通話により、NSAの副長官のリチャード・レジェットはアンダーソンの質問であるセキュリティとプライバシー保護のバランスについて答えます。

- Deputy director, NSA
Richard Ledgett is deputy director and senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency. He acts as the agency’s chief operating officer, responsible for guiding and directing studies, operations and policy. Full bio

Chris Anderson: We had Edward Snowden here
クリス・アンダーソン:
エドワード・スノーデン氏が
00:12
a couple days ago,
数日前に こちらに来ました
00:14
and this is response time.
今日はそれに対する返答の機会です
00:16
And several of you have written to me
NSAからのゲストに聞きたい質問を
00:18
with questions to ask our guest here from the NSA.
何人かの方が送ってくださいました
00:20
So Richard Ledgett is the 15th deputy director
さて リチャード・レジェットは
NSA(米国国家安全保障局)の
00:25
of the National Security Agency,
15代 副長官であり
00:27
and he's a senior civilian officer there,
彼は上級の民間士官でもあり
00:30
acts as its chief operating officer,
また最高執行責任者として
00:33
guiding strategies, setting internal policies,
戦略の指導
内部ポリシーの制定を行い
00:35
and serving as the principal advisor to the director.
また長官の主任顧問としても
働いていらっしゃいます
00:39
And all being well,
では 準備ができましたので
00:43
welcome, Rick Ledgett, to TED.
リック・レジェットさん ようこそTED へ
00:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:48
Richard Ledgett: I'm really thankful for the opportunity to talk to folks here.
リチャード ・ レジェット: 皆さんとお話しする機会頂きとても感謝しています
00:55
I look forward to the conversation,
会話を楽しみにしております
00:59
so thanks for arranging for that.
お手配ありがとうございました
01:01
CA: Thank you, Rick.
クリス: リック どうも有難うございます
01:04
We appreciate you joining us.
ご参加頂き 感謝しております
01:05
It's certainly quite a strong statement
NSAが表に出て
01:08
that the NSA is willing to reach out
オープンなところを見せていただくことは
01:10
and show a more open face here.
とても力強い表明です
01:12
You saw, I think,
ご覧になったと思いますが
01:16
the talk and interview that Edward Snowden
エドワード ・ スノーデン氏の
トークとインタビューが
01:18
gave here a couple days ago.
数日前にここで行われました
01:22
What did you make of it?
あなたはどう思われましたか?
01:23
RL: So I think it was interesting.
リック:興味深いものでしたね
01:25
We didn't realize that he
was going to show up there,
彼が登場するとは思ってもみませんでしたし
01:28
so kudos to you guys for arranging
そのような素晴らしくかつ驚きの
手配をして下さった皆さんに
01:31
a nice surprise like that.
賛辞をお送りしたいと思います
01:34
I think that, like a lot of the things
スノーデン氏が機密情報を
漏えいし始めてから
01:37
that have come out since Mr. Snowden
スノーデン氏が機密情報を
漏えいし始めてから
01:42
started disclosing classified information,
色々なことが起こりました
01:47
there were some kernels of truth in there,
中には核心をついた話もあったものの
01:50
but a lot of extrapolations and half-truths in there,
誇張やら事実半分だったりするものも
多くあったと思いますので
01:53
and I'm interested in helping to address those.
こういったことを明らかに
していきたいと思っています
01:56
I think this is a really important conversation
アメリカ合衆国において
01:59
that we're having in the United States
また国際的に行う
02:01
and internationally,
この会話は
02:03
and I think it is important and of import,
とても重要だと思います
02:04
and so given that, we need to have that be
とすれば 我々はそれを
02:09
a fact-based conversation,
事実に基づいた会話にすべきで
02:12
and we want to help make that happen.
そのように手助けしたいと
思っています
02:14
CA: So the question that a lot
of people have here is,
クリス: ここにいる多くの皆さんが抱いている疑問は
02:16
what do you make of Snowden's motivations
スノーデン氏が行なったことの動機と
02:21
for doing what he did,
それから 彼は逃亡する以外に
02:24
and did he have an alternative
way that he could have gone?
何か別の方法があったかどうかについて
どうお考えですか?
02:26
RL: He absolutely did
リック:行方を晦ます以外にも
02:30
have alternative ways that he could have gone,
彼には別の方法が確かにありました
02:33
and I actually think that characterizing him
私は彼のことを
正当な告発活動を踏みにじる
02:37
as a whistleblower
そんな告発者であると
02:43
actually hurts legitimate whistleblowing activities.
位置づけています
02:44
So what if somebody who works in the NSA --
NSA で働いている
誰かがこんなことをしたら―
02:48
and there are over 35,000 people who do.
ここでは35,000 人以上もの人が働いていますが
02:52
They're all great citizens.
彼らはすべて素晴らしい市民です
02:55
They're just like your husbands, fathers, sisters,
彼らは あなたの夫、父親、姉妹
02:57
brothers, neighbors, nephews, friends and relatives,
兄弟、隣人、甥、友人そして親戚と同じく
02:59
all of whom are interested in doing the right thing
皆 祖国のために
また我々の同盟国のために
03:03
for their country
やるべきことを行うことに
03:06
and for our allies internationally,
関心がある人達です
03:07
and so there are a variety of venues to address
もし何か懸念があるのならば
03:10
if folks have a concern.
様々な相談相手がいます
03:14
First off, there's their supervisor,
まずは 直接の上司
03:15
and up through the supervisory chain
そして 組織内の
03:17
within their organization.
上位機構
03:20
If folks aren't comfortable with that,
もし それで満足できないのなら
03:21
there are a number of inspectors general.
多くの監察官がいます
03:23
In the case of Mr. Snowden, he had the option
スノーデン氏の場合
彼には選択の余地があったのです
03:25
of the NSA inspector general,
NSA 監察長官
03:29
the Navy inspector general,
海軍監察長官
03:31
the Pacific Command inspector general,
太平洋司令監察長官
03:32
the Department of Defense inspector general,
国防総省監察長官
03:34
and the intelligence community inspector general,
そして諜報機関コミュニティ監察長官などです
03:36
any of whom would have both kept
his concerns in classified channels
彼らは誰もが 彼の関心事を
機密ルートで扱い
03:38
and been happy to address them.
喜んで問題提起を行ったでしょう
03:42
(CA and RL speaking at once)
(クリスとリックが同時に話す)
03:45
He had the option to go to
congressional committees,
彼には議会の委員会に行くという
選択肢があり
03:47
and there are mechanisms
to do that that are in place,
そうするための制度手続きがありましたが
03:50
and so he didn't do any of those things.
でも 彼はそういう事は
一切しなかったのです
03:53
CA: Now, you had said that
クリス:スノーデン氏には
03:55
Ed Snowden had other avenues
彼の懸念を提起する
03:58
for raising his concerns.
他の手段があったと
おっしゃいましたね
04:01
The comeback on that is a couple of things:
それに対する反論がいくつかあります
04:03
one, that he certainly believes that as a contractor,
1つは 契約社員の身分では
04:07
the avenues that would have been available
to him as an employee weren't available,
正社員向けの相談窓口のようなものはないと
彼は思い込んでいました
04:10
two, there's a track record of other whistleblowers,
2つ目は ある他の内部告発者の追跡記録では
04:14
like [Thomas Andrews Drake] being treated
[トーマス ・ アンドリュース・ドレイク]のように
04:18
pretty harshly, by some views,
ある見方によると
かなり厳しく扱われたようです
04:20
and thirdly, what he was taking on
そして3つ目は
彼が騒ぎ立てていたことは
04:23
was not one specific flaw that he'd discovered,
彼が見つけたある特定の1つの欠陥ではなく
04:25
but programs that had been approved
国の三権の各機構により
04:28
by all three branches of government.
承認されたプログラムであったということです
04:30
I mean, in that circumstance,
つまり そのような状況では
04:33
couldn't you argue that what he did
彼がやったことは 妥当であったと
04:36
was reasonable?
お考えになることは
できないでしょうか?
04:38
RL: No, I don't agree with that.
リック : いいえ 私はそれに同意しません
04:41
I think that the —
私は —
04:43
sorry, I'm getting feedback
すいません 音がマイクを通して
04:47
through the microphone there —
反響していまして —
04:49
the actions that he took were inappropriate
彼の取った行動は不適切です
04:52
because of the fact that
he put people's lives at risk,
というのも基本的に長い目で見ると
彼が人々の命を危険に晒したという
04:57
basically, in the long run,
事実があるからです
05:02
and I know there's been a lot of talk
私はスノーデン氏とジャーナリストの間には
05:04
in public by Mr. Snowden
and some of the journalists
公になった多くの談話があったことを
知っていますが
05:05
that say that the things that have been disclosed
そこで暴露されたことは
05:10
have not put national security and people at risk,
国家安全保障や人々を危機に
晒していないということですが
05:13
and that is categorically not true.
それは全くもって真実ではありません
05:17
They actually do.
実際に危機に晒しています
05:22
I think there's also an amazing arrogance
またそこには驚くべき傲慢さもあると思います
05:24
to the idea that he knows better than
彼は憲法の立案者よりも
05:26
the framers of the Constitution
良く知っていると考えていることです
05:31
in how the government should
be designed and work
政府というものが権力分立のために
05:34
for separation of powers
どのように設計され
機能しているかということ
05:36
and the fact that the executive
and the legislative branch
そして 行政部門と立法部門が
05:38
have to work together and they have
checks and balances on each other,
互いに絡み合って 監視し均衡を保ち
05:45
and then the judicial branch,
そして 司法部門が
全体のプロセスを監督するという
05:47
which oversees the entire process.
概念について
05:49
I think that's extremely arrogant on his part.
より良く知っていると考える
彼のそういうところが非常に傲慢です
05:50
CA: Can you give a specific example
クリス:彼がどんなふうに人々の命を
危険に晒したかについて
05:55
of how he put people's lives at risk?
具体的な例を挙げて頂けますでしょうか?
05:57
RL: Yeah, sure.
リック: ええ もちろん
06:00
So the things that he's disclosed,
彼が暴露したのは
06:02
the capabilities,
(諜報)能力に関する情報ですが
06:06
and the NSA is a capabilities-based organization,
NSA は能力に依存する組織なのです
06:07
so when we have foreign intelligence targets,
さて外国に我々にとっての
諜報対象がいるとき
06:10
legitimate things of interest --
適切な関心事 例えば
06:14
like, terrorists is the iconic example,
テロリストなどは象徴的な例ですが―
06:15
but it includes things like human traffickers,
それ以外にも人身売買
06:17
drug traffickers,
麻薬密売
06:20
people who are trying to build
advanced weaponry, nuclear weapons,
高度な兵器や核兵器を製造しようとする者
06:22
and build delivery systems for those,
そして これらを流通させたり
06:26
and nation-states who might be executing aggression against their immediate neighbors,
近隣諸国への攻撃を実行するであろう
国家を含みますが
06:28
which you may have some visibility
この様なことは皆さんにも
お心当たりのあると思いますが
06:32
into some of that that's going on right now,
まさに進行中の事例がいくつもあり
06:34
the capabilities are applied
我々の能力が非常に慎重 整然かつ
06:37
in very discrete and measured and controlled ways.
管理された方法で発揮されています
06:41
So the unconstrained disclosure
of those capabilities
ですから我々の能力が無制限に
公開されてしまうと
06:46
means that as adversaries see them
敵がそれらを見て
06:49
and recognize, "Hey, I might be vulnerable to this,"
「うーん これには勝てないね」と認識し
06:51
they move away from that,
そこから逃げることを意味します
06:54
and we have seen targets in terrorism,
実際 民族国家におけるテロリスト
06:55
in the nation-state area,
雑多な密輸入者 その他の者など
06:58
in smugglers of various types, and other folks
我々の攻撃の対象が情報の暴露により
07:00
who have, because of the disclosures,
彼らの行動を把握可能な私たちの
範疇から
07:03
moved away from our ability
彼らの行動を把握可能な私たちの
範疇から
07:05
to have insight into what they're doing.
逃げていることが分かっています
07:08
The net effect of that is that our people
その結果 海外の危険な地域に居る
07:10
who are overseas in dangerous places,
外交官か軍人かに関わらず
我々の仲間と
07:13
whether they're diplomats or military,
外交官か軍人かに関わらず
我々の仲間と
07:15
and our allies who are in similar situations,
同様な状況におかれている
我々の同盟国の人々が
07:17
are at greater risk because we don't see
より高い危険に晒されています
なぜなら
07:20
the threats that are coming their way.
迫りくる脅威が分からないからです
07:23
CA: So that's a general response saying that
クリス:一般的な反応は
07:26
because of his revelations,
彼の暴露のせいで
07:28
access that you had to certain types of information
あなた方が有していた
ある種の情報へのアクセスが
07:30
has been shut down, has been closed down.
断ち切られ 閉鎖されたということでした
07:33
But the concern is that the nature of that access
問題視されているのは
そのアクセスそのものの本質が
07:36
was not necessarily legitimate in the first place.
そもそも合法的なものでは
なかったということ
07:40
I mean, describe to us this Bullrun program
つまり Bullrun プログラムは
あなたがお話しされたような
07:43
where it's alleged that the NSA
NSAによる情報へのアクセスのために
07:46
specifically weakened security
(システムの)セキュリティを
07:48
in order to get the type of
access that you've spoken of.
弱めていると言われているようです
07:51
RL: So there are, when our
リック:ええ 我々の合法的な海外諜報員が
07:55
legitimate foreign intelligence targets
of the type that I described before,
先ほど述べたような類の相手を
標的にするとき
08:00
use the global telecommunications system
彼らのコミュニケーションの手段として
08:03
as their communications methodology,
グローバル通信システムを使用します
08:06
and they do, because it's a great system,
何故ならそれは素晴らしいシステムで
08:08
it's the most complex system ever devised by man,
それは今まで人間によって考案された
最も複雑なシステムですが
08:10
and it is a wonder,
驚嘆すべきもので
08:12
and lots of folks in the room there
そちらにいらっしゃる多くの方々も
08:14
are responsible for the creation
その製作や改良に
08:16
and enhancement of that,
関わっていらっしゃいます
08:18
and it's just a wonderful thing.
そう実に素晴らしいシステムなのです
08:19
But it's also used by people who are
しかし 通信システムは
我々と同盟国に対して反する活動を―
08:22
working against us and our allies.
行っている人々にも使われています
08:25
And so if I'm going to pursue them,
そして 彼らを追跡するつもりなら
08:27
I need to have the capability
彼らを探し当てる能力を
08:29
to go after them,
有している必要があります
08:31
and again, the controls are in
そして 繰り返しますが 監視の成否は
08:33
how I apply that capability,
能力の運用方法にあるのであって
08:36
not that I have the capability itself.
能力を持っていること自体に
あるのではありません
08:39
Otherwise, if we could make it so that
さもなくば 我々は全ての悪者を
08:41
all the bad guys used one corner of the Internet,
インターネットの隅に押しやり
badguy.comのような
08:43
we could have a domain, badguy.com.
ドメインだけを使わせることが出来たら
08:45
That would be awesome,
素晴らしいことでしょう
08:47
and we could just concentrate all our efforts there.
我々は監視をそこに集中すれば
良いのですから
08:48
That's not how it works.
でも 現実には有り得ません
08:50
They're trying to hide
政府が彼らを隔離し
08:52
from the government's ability
行動を断とうとする能力から
08:54
to isolate and interdict their actions,
彼らは逃れようとするからです
08:56
and so we have to swim in that same space.
ですから同じサイバー空間で
戦わなければならないのです
08:59
But I will tell you this.
この事をお伝えしておきましょう
09:02
So NSA has two missions.
NSAには2つの使命があります
09:03
One is the Signals Intelligence mission
1つは電波諜報任務であり
09:05
that we've unfortunately read so
much about in the press.
残念なことですが 多くのことが
報道されたことを承知しています
09:06
The other one is the Information Assurance mission,
残りの1つは情報保証任務であり
09:10
which is to protect the national security
systems of the United States,
アメリカ合衆国の国家安全保障システムを
保護するものです
09:12
and by that, that's things like
このシステムを用いて
09:15
the communications that the president uses,
大統領が使用する通信
09:17
the communications that
control our nuclear weapons,
核兵器制御のための通信
09:19
the communications that our
military uses around the world,
我々の軍隊が世界で使用する通信
09:21
and the communications that we use with our allies,
同盟国と共に使用する通信
09:23
and that some of our allies themselves use.
同盟国自身が使う通信が保護されます
09:26
And so we make recommendations
on standards to use,
ですから我々は推奨規格を作り
09:28
and we use those same standards,
共通の規格を使用します
09:33
and so we are invested
このような備えによって
09:35
in making sure that those communications
目的とする通信を安全なものにしています
09:37
are secure for their intended purposes.
目的とする通信を安全なものにしています
09:39
CA: But it sounds like what you're saying is that
クリス: あなたが仰ることは
09:43
when it comes to the Internet at large,
インターネット全般について
09:45
any strategy is fair game
いかなる手段も合衆国の安全を
改善するものであれば
09:49
if it improves America's safety.
公正なやりとりであると聞こえます
09:51
And I think this is partly where there is such
しかし ここが意見の
分かれるところであると思います
09:54
a divide of opinion,
しかし ここが意見の
分かれるところであると思います
09:56
that there's a lot of people in this room
この会場 そして世界中にいる
09:58
and around the world
多くの人々はインターネットについて
異なる考え方をもっています
09:59
who think very differently about the Internet.
多くの人々はインターネットについて
異なる考え方をもっています
10:00
They think of it as a momentous
彼らはそれを重要な人類の発明のように
10:02
invention of humanity,
例えば グーテンベルグの
10:05
kind of on a par with the
Gutenberg press, for example.
活版の発明に並ぶようなことと考えます
10:07
It's the bringer of knowledge to all.
それはすべてに知識をもたらすものです
10:10
It's the connector of all.
それはすべてを繋ぐものです
10:12
And it's viewed in those sort of idealistic terms.
インターネットはそういう理想的な見方で捉えられています
10:14
And from that lens,
そして その見方からすると
10:17
what the NSA has done is equivalent to
NSAが行ったことというのは
10:19
the authorities back in Germany
昔 ドイツの当局が
10:21
inserting some device into every printing press
幾つかのからくりをすべての
印刷機に取り入れることで
10:24
that would reveal which books people bought
人々がどの本を買い
何を読むかということを
10:26
and what they read.
明らかにしようとしたことと
同じ行為なのです
10:30
Can you understand that from that viewpoint,
そのような観点から
人々が怒っているのだと
10:32
it feels outrageous?
お分かりになりますか?
10:34
RL: I do understand that, and I actually share
the view of the utility of the Internet,
リック: 勿論理解していますし ネットの
有益性について同感です
10:38
and I would argue it's bigger than the Internet.
そして インターネットより大きいものは
10:42
It is a global telecommunications system.
世界的な通信システムだと
申し上げたいのです
10:43
The Internet is a big chunk of
that, but there is a lot more.
インターネットが大半を占めていますが
他にも色々あります
10:46
And I think that people have legitimate concerns
透明性と機密とのバランスについて
10:48
about the balance between
transparency and secrecy.
人々が懸念するのは尤もなことです
10:52
That's sort of been couched as a balance
それはプライバシーと国家安全保障の間の
10:58
between privacy and national security.
一種のバランスとして横たわっています
11:00
I don't think that's the right framing.
それを正しい枠組みとは思いませんが
11:04
I think it really is transparency and secrecy.
実際のところ透明性と機密の問題だと
思います
11:05
And so that's the national and international conversation that we're having,
このことは国内および国際的に
議論を行っており
11:07
and we want to participate in that, and want
我々の組織だけでなく
11:11
people to participate in it in an informed way.
国民の皆さんにも
オープンな形で参加してほしいのです
11:12
So there are things,
さて他にも もう少し―
11:15
let me talk there a little bit more,
お話しすべきことがあります
11:17
there are things that we need
to be transparent about:
もう少し透明性を必要とする事柄があります
11:18
our authorities, our processes,
我々の権限、プロセス
11:22
our oversight, who we are.
監視 それから我々が誰であるかについて
11:24
We, NSA, have not done a good job of that,
我々NSAは上手く対応出来ておらず
11:26
and I think that's part of the reason
その事が 報道機関が
11:28
that this has been so revelational
大々的に暴露し
センセーションを引き起こした
11:29
and so sensational in the media.
理由の一部であると思います
11:32
Nobody knew who we were. We were the No Such Agency, the Never Say Anything.
誰も我々の実体を知りませんでした
「存在のない機関」「何も語らない機関」でした
11:34
There's takeoffs of our logo
我々のロゴを模したものがありますが
11:38
of an eagle with headphones on around it.
鷹がヘッドフォンをしているというものです
11:41
And so that's the public characterization.
これが大衆による我々のイメージなのです
11:44
And so we need to be more
transparent about those things.
ですから我々の役目を
もっと透明なものにする必要があります
11:47
What we don't need to be transparent about,
一方 つまびらかにすべきでない事もあります
11:52
because it's bad for the U.S.,
合衆国にとって不利なこと
11:53
it's bad for all those other
countries that we work with
同盟国にとって不利なこと
11:56
and that we help provide information
このような国と人々の安全保障のために
11:58
that helps them secure themselves
このような国と人々の安全保障のために
12:00
and their people,
提供するような情報です
12:02
it's bad to expose operations and capabilities
作戦や能力を公開するというのは
12:03
in a way that allows the people
that we're all working against,
我々が対峙する人達 つまり
12:07
the generally recognized bad guys,
一般に悪者だと認識されるような人々に
12:13
to counter those.
反撃の機会を与えてしまいます
12:18
CA: But isn't it also bad to deal
クリス: しかし 世界中に 実質のところ
12:20
a kind of body blow to the American companies
インターネット・サービスの
殆どを提供している
12:23
that have essentially given the world
米企業にとって大きな痛手を負わせることも
12:26
most of the Internet services that matter?
マイナスだったのではありませんか?
12:28
RL: It is. It's really the companies are
リック: そうです そのような企業は
12:33
in a tough position, as are we,
我々と同じく 苦しい立場に立たされています
12:37
because the companies,
というのも これらの企業に対して
12:40
we compel them to provide information,
我々が情報提供を強要しているからです
12:42
just like every other nation in the world does.
世界中の全ての国も
行っていることではありますが
12:44
Every industrialized nation in the world
全ての先進国には
12:46
has a lawful intercept program
合法的な傍受プログラムがあり
12:50
where they are requiring companies
国の防衛のために必要な
12:52
to provide them with information
情報提供をすることを
12:54
that they need for their security,
国は企業に要求しています
12:56
and the companies that are involved
そして 関与する企業は
12:57
have complied with those programs
それぞれの国で同様に
このようなプログラムに従っています
13:00
in the same way that they have to do
それぞれの国で同様に
このようなプログラムに従っています
13:01
when they're operating in Russia or the U.K.
ロシアや英国
13:03
or China or India or France,
中国 インドまたはフランス
皆さんが思いつく限りのどんな国でも
13:06
any country that you choose to name.
そこで経営する限り
13:10
And so the fact that these revelations
そして このような暴露によって
13:12
have been broadly characterized as
「A社は信頼できない
プライバシーが疑わしいからね」
13:17
"you can't trust company A because
「A社は信頼できない
プライバシーが疑わしいからね」
13:20
your privacy is suspect with them"
といった風に広く捉えられる事実は
13:21
is actually only accurate in the sense that
実際にその通りです
13:25
it's accurate with every other company in the world
どんな企業も それぞれの国で事業をすれば
13:29
that deals with any of those countries in the world.
同じことをするという意味で その通りです
13:32
And so it's being picked up by people
この暴露事件を逆手にとって
13:34
as a marketing advantage,
商売上の優位を得るために
13:36
and it's being marketed that
way by several countries,
我々の同盟国を含めた
13:38
including some of our allied countries,
いくつかの国で
13:39
where they are saying,
こんな風に言われているのです
13:41
"Hey, you can't trust the U.S.,
「ヘイ アメリカなんて信用するな
13:42
but you can trust our telecom company,
でも我が国の通信会社は
信用できるよ
13:44
because we're safe."
安全だからね」
13:47
And they're actually using that to counter
実際に彼らは米国企業が有する
13:48
the very large technological edge
大規模な最先端技術
たとえばクラウドや
13:50
that U.S. companies have
インターネット ベースの技術に対抗するために
13:52
in areas like the cloud and
Internet-based technologies.
このような宣伝文句を利用しています
13:54
CA: You're sitting there with the American flag,
クリス: あなたはそこで
アメリカの国旗を横にして座っていますが
13:58
and the American Constitution guarantees
さて合衆国憲法は不条理な
調査と押収から
14:01
freedom from unreasonable search and seizure.
免れる自由を保障しています
14:04
How do you characterize
あなたはアメリカ国民の
14:07
the American citizen's right to privacy?
プライバシーの権利を
どのように考えますか?
14:09
Is there such a right?
そのような権利というものは
あるのでしょうか?
14:13
RL: Yeah, of course there is.
リック: はい もちろんあります
14:16
And we devote an inordinate
amount of time and pressure,
我々は大変な時間を使い
自らにプレッシャーをかけて
14:18
inordinate and appropriate, actually I should say,
法外で相応しい
14:22
amount of time and effort in order to ensure
いや 相当な時間と労力というべきですが
14:24
that we protect that privacy.
プライバシー保護のために捧げています
14:26
and beyond that, the privacy of citizens
それはアメリカ市民だけではなく
14:28
around the world, it's not just Americans.
世界中の人々の
プライバシーのためでもあります
14:31
Several things come into play here.
ここでは様々な要素が関連してきます
14:35
First, we're all in the same network.
まず 我々は皆 同じネットワーク上にいます
14:37
My communications,
私自身の通信手段として
14:39
I'm a user of a particular Internet email service
私はあるインターネット
電子メールサービスのユーザーですが
14:40
that is the number one email service of choice
世界中のテロリストによって
もっとも多く使われている
14:44
by terrorists around the world, number one.
メールサービスと同じものです
14:48
So I'm there right beside them in email space
ですからインターネットの世界では
14:50
in the Internet.
私はテロリストのすぐ隣に居るわけです
14:53
And so we need to be able to pick that apart
だから私たちは
彼らの情報だけを選び出し
14:55
and find the information that's relevant.
関連のある情報を見つけだす
必要があるのです
14:58
In doing so, we're going to necessarily encounter
そうすると我々は 必然的に
単に自分のことをしている
15:05
Americans and innocent foreign citizens
アメリカ国民や
無実の外国人市民に遭遇します
15:08
who are just going about their business,
アメリカ国民や
無実の外国人市民に遭遇します
15:10
and so we have procedures in
place that shreds that out,
そこで 我々にはそのような情報を
破棄する手続きがあります
15:12
that says, when you find that,
関係しない情報を見つけたときには―
15:14
not if you find it, when you find it,
because you're certain to find it,
「もし」ではないのは
必ず見つけてしまうからです
15:17
here's how you protect that.
そういうふうにして守るのです
15:19
These are called minimization procedures.
これらは最小化の手順と呼ばれます
15:21
They're approved by the attorney general
憲法に基づいており
検事総長によって承認されています
15:23
and constitutionally based.
憲法に基づいており
検事総長によって承認されています
15:25
And so we protect those.
日々 合法的なビジネスに
勤しんでいる
15:26
And then, for people, citizens of the world
国民と世界の市民のために
15:29
who are going about their lawful business
こうやって我々は日々
情報を保護しています
15:33
on a day-to-day basis,
こうやって我々は日々
情報を保護しています
15:35
the president on his January 17 speech,
1月17日の大統領演説では
15:37
laid out some additional protections
我々が提供することになる
15:39
that we are providing to them.
付加的な保護手続きについて
述べられました
15:41
So I think absolutely,
だから私は絶対に人々はプライバシーの
権利を持っていると思いますし
15:43
folks do have a right to privacy,
だから私は絶対に人々はプライバシーの
権利を持っていると思いますし
15:45
and that we work very hard to make sure
その権利が確実に保護されるよう
15:46
that that right to privacy is protected.
最大限の努力を払っています
15:49
CA: What about foreigners using
クリス: 外国人がアメリカ企業の
15:52
American companies' Internet services?
インター ネット・サービスを
利用していることについては?
15:53
Do they have any privacy rights?
彼らにもプライバシーの権利はありますか?
15:55
RL: They do. They do, in the sense of,
リック: もちろん彼らも持っています
15:59
the only way that we are able to compel
我々がこれらの企業の1つに
16:02
one of those companies to provide us information
情報提供を強いることができるのは
16:08
is when it falls into one of three categories:
3つのカテゴリのいずれか1つに
該当する時に限ります
16:10
We can identify that this particular person,
ある種の選択基準によって
識別することにより
16:13
identified by a selector of some kind,
テロ抑止 もしくは(武器の)拡散や
16:17
is associated with counterterrorist
外国における諜報の標的に関連した
16:19
or proliferation or other foreign intelligence target.
人物を特定できるのです
16:23
CA: Much has been made of the fact that
クリス: これらのプログラムを通じて
16:28
a lot of the information that you've obtained
入手した情報の多くは
本質的にはメタデータだという
16:30
through these programs is essentially metadata.
事実について多く語られています
16:32
It's not necessarily the actual words
それは必ずしも
誰かがメールに書いたり
16:35
that someone has written in an email
または電話で伝えた
メッセージそのものでなくても良いのです
16:37
or given on a phone call.
または電話で伝えた
メッセージそのものでなくても良いのです
16:38
It's who they wrote to and when, and so forth.
それは手紙を書いた
「相手」や「時間」といったことなのです
16:40
But it's been argued,
しかし それが議論の的になっており
16:44
and someone here in the audience has talked
ここの観客のある人が
16:45
to a former NSA analyst who said
元NSAアナリストに話をしましたが 彼は―
16:48
metadata is actually much more invasive
メタデータは 実際 コアデータよりはるかに
侵害的であると言っていました
16:50
than the core data,
メタデータは 実際 コアデータよりはるかに
侵害的であると言っていました
16:52
because in the core data
何故なら コアデータでは
16:54
you present yourself as you want to be presented.
その人自身の言葉そのものとして
表現されていますが
16:55
With metadata, who knows what the conclusions are
メタデータでは 一体誰が
16:58
that are drawn?
導かれた結論を知っているのでしょう?
17:01
Is there anything to that?
それについては どうですか?
17:02
RL: I don't really understand that argument.
リック: その議論については
知りません
17:04
I think that metadata's important
for a couple of reasons.
いくつかの理由でメタデータは
重要だと思います
17:06
Metadata is the information that lets you
メタデータは隠れようとしている人々の
17:09
find connections that people are trying to hide.
つながりに関する情報を提供します
17:13
So when a terrorist is corresponding
テロリストが我々の認知していない人々―
17:17
with somebody else who's not known to us
テロ活動やその支援に関わっていたり
17:19
but is engaged in doing or
supporting terrorist activity,
もしくは国際的な制裁に違反して
17:21
or someone who's violating international sanctions
イランまたは北朝鮮のような国に
17:23
by providing nuclear weapons-related material
核兵器関連の資料を提供しようと
17:26
to a country like Iran or North Korea,
する人々とコンタクトを取ろうとする時
17:29
is trying to hide that activity
because it's illicit activity.
彼らは非合法と分かっているから
秘密裏にしようとするのです
17:31
What metadata lets you do is connect that.
メタデータはこのようなつながりを
明らかにします
17:35
The alternative to that
その代替手段は
17:37
is one that's much less efficient
ずっと非効率的で
はるかにプライバシーを侵害します
17:39
and much more invasive of privacy,
ずっと非効率的で
はるかにプライバシーを侵害します
17:41
which is gigantic amounts of content collection.
巨大なコンテンツの回収です
17:42
So metadata, in that sense,
メタデータはその意味では
17:46
actually is privacy-enhancing.
事実 プライバシーを強化するものです
17:47
And we don't, contrary to some of the stuff
印刷されたメッセージに対する
扱いと異なり
17:50
that's been printed,
印刷されたメッセージに対する
扱いと異なり
17:52
we don't sit there and grind out
普通の人々のメタデータのプロファイルは
17:53
metadata profiles of average people.
保持することなく破棄します
17:56
If you're not connected
もし あなたが正当な諜報員の標的と
17:59
to one of those valid intelligence targets,
繋がりがない場合
18:01
you are not of interest to us.
あなたは我々の関心事ではありません
18:04
CA: So in terms of the threats
クリス: アメリカ全体が直面している
18:08
that face America overall,
様々な脅威の中で
18:11
where would you place terrorism?
テロリズムの位置づけはどうでしょう?
18:13
RL: I think terrorism is still number one.
リック: テロは今もナンバーワンだと思います
18:16
I think that we have never been in a time
私は 我々は未だかつてない時を経験しており
18:19
where there are more places
より多くの場所で
18:23
where things are going badly
物事は悪い方向へと向かい
18:25
and forming the petri dish in which terrorists
そしてテロリストが統治の欠如を利用して
18:28
take advantage of the lack of governance.
はびこるような そんな時代に
18:32
An old boss of mine, Tom Fargo, Admiral Fargo,
昔の上司 トム・ファーゴ海軍総督は
18:37
used to describe it as arcs of instability.
それを不安定の弧と述べていました
18:41
And so you have a lot of those arcs of instability
現時点の世界において
18:43
in the world right now,
不安の弧は様々な場所に存在し
18:45
in places like Syria, where there's a civil war
例えばシリアのような
18:47
going on and you have massive numbers,
内戦が起こっているような場所では
何千ものとてつもない数の
18:49
thousands and thousands of foreign fighters
外人の戦士が
18:52
who are coming into Syria
テロリストになる方法を学び
18:53
to learn how to be terrorists
実践練習をするために
18:55
and practice that activity,
シリアに入り込んでいるのです
18:57
and lots of those people are Westerners
その中には欧米諸国や
18:59
who hold passports to European countries
いくつかのケースでは
アメリカに入国できる
19:01
or in some cases the United States,
パスポートを保持する西洋人であり
19:05
and so they are basically learning how
基本的に聖戦の仕方を学んでおり
19:07
to do jihad and have expressed intent
そのために出国し
19:09
to go out and do that later on
その後(聖戦のために)
19:13
in their home countries.
祖国に戻ってくるのです
19:15
You've got places like Iraq,
イラクのような場所では
19:17
which is suffering from a high
level of sectarian violence,
宗派間の激しい抗争に
悩まされていて
19:18
again a breeding ground for terrorism.
テロリズムの温床となっています
19:21
And you have the activity in the Horn of Africa
「アフリカの角」(北東地域)や
19:24
and the Sahel area of Africa.
アフリカのサヘル地域における
テロ活動もあります
19:26
Again, lots of weak governance
繰り返しますが 多くの脆弱な統治体制は
19:29
which forms a breeding ground for terrorist activity.
テロ活動の温床を形成します
19:32
So I think it's very serious. I think it's number one.
非常に深刻な問題です
テロが1番だと思います
19:36
I think number two is cyber threat.
2番目はサイバー脅威です
19:38
I think cyber is a threat in three ways:
サイバーは3つの意味で脅威だと考えます
19:40
One way, and probably the most common way
1つ目は 多くの方が耳にしたことがある
19:46
that people have heard about it,
おそらく最も一般的な方法であり
19:49
is due to the theft of intellectual property,
知的財産の盗難です
19:52
so basically, foreign countries going in,
基本的に 諸外国が関与し
19:54
stealing companies' secrets,
企業秘密を盗み
19:58
and then providing that information
その情報を
20:00
to state-owned enterprises
国営企業や
20:02
or companies connected to the government
政府関連企業に提供し
20:04
to help them leapfrog technology
技術の飛躍的進歩や
20:06
or to gain business intelligence
ビジネス・インテリジェンスを得て
20:09
that's then used to win contracts overseas.
海外で契約を獲得するために使用されます
20:11
That is a hugely costly set of
activities that's going on right now.
それは今まさに起きていることで
非常に金銭的な痛手を被る恐れがあります
20:14
Several nation-states are doing it.
いくつかの国家がやっていることです
20:17
Second is the denial-of-service attacks.
第2に サービスを不能にする攻撃(DoS攻撃)です
20:19
You're probably aware that there have been
おそらくお気付きでしょうが
20:22
a spate of those directed against
米国の金融セクターに対する
20:24
the U.S. financial sector since 2012.
この様な攻撃が
2012年以来 続発しています
20:26
Again, that's a nation-state who
is executing those attacks,
これも攻撃をしかける主体は国家であり
20:29
and they're doing that
半匿名にして報復しているのです
20:32
as a semi-anonymous way of reprisal.
半匿名にして報復しているのです
20:33
And the last one is destructive attacks,
最後の1つは破壊的な攻撃で
20:38
and those are the ones that concern me the most.
私をもっとも心配させるものなのです
20:39
Those are on the rise.
それらは増加しています
20:40
You have the attack against Saudi Aramco in 2012,
2012年に
2012年8月に
20:42
August of 2012.
サウジ ・ アラムコに対する攻撃があり
20:45
It took down about 35,000 of their computers
約35,000台のコンピューターを
ワイパー・スタイル・ウイルスで破壊しました
20:47
with a Wiper-style virus.
約35,000台のコンピューターを
ワイパー・スタイル・ウイルスで破壊しました
20:49
You had a follow-on a week later
1週間後に続きがあって
20:51
to a Qatari company.
カタールの会社が攻撃されました
20:53
You had March of 2013,
2013年3月には
20:55
you had a South Korean attack
韓国への攻撃がありました
20:57
that was attributed in the press to North Korea
報道によると北朝鮮の陰謀とされますが
21:00
that took out thousands of computers.
数千のコンピューターが破壊されました
21:02
Those are on the rise,
この様な攻撃は増加しています
21:04
and we see people expressing interest
実際このようなサイバー攻撃能力のある人物の
21:05
in those capabilities
雇用を意思表示する者たちを
21:08
and a desire to employ them.
確認しています
21:09
CA: Okay, so a couple of things here,
クリス: わかりました
ここでのいくつかの事柄
21:11
because this is really the core of this, almost.
ほぼ問題の核心といえるものがあります
21:13
I mean, first of all,
第1に
21:15
a lot of people who look at risk
リスクを見ている多くの人も
21:16
and look at the numbers
その件数を見ている人も
21:18
don't understand this belief that terrorism
この信念―テロリズムが なおも
21:19
is still the number one threat.
最大の脅威である ということを
理解していません
21:21
Apart from September 11,
9月11日以外に
21:23
I think the numbers are that
in the last 30 or 40 years
ここ30-40年において 数字としては
21:25
about 500 Americans have died from terrorism,
約500人のアメリカ人が
テロにより死亡しています
21:27
mostly from homegrown terrorists.
主に 自国のテロリストたちによるものです
21:30
The chance in the last few years
ここ数年間のこととなると
21:34
of being killed by terrorism
テロリズムによって殺される確率は
21:36
is far less than the chance
of being killed by lightning.
落雷によって死ぬよりも
はるかに少ないのです
21:37
I guess you would say that a single nuclear incident
1回の原発事故や
21:41
or bioterrorism act or something like that
生物兵器によるテロ活動のようなものがあれば
統計はがらりと変わると
21:45
would change those numbers.
おっしゃるかも知れませんね
21:48
Would that be the point of view?
そういう見解をお持ちでしょうか?
21:50
RL: Well, I'd say two things.
リック: 2点 申し上げます
21:52
One is, the reason that there hasn't been
1つは9/11以降 米国において
21:53
a major attack in the United States since 9/11,
大きな攻撃がない理由です
21:55
that is not an accident.
それは偶然ではないのです
21:57
That's a lot of hard work that we have done,
それは我々や
21:59
that other folks
他の諜報機関の方々や
22:01
in the intelligence community have done,
軍隊や
22:02
that the military has done,
世界中の同盟国の方々の
22:04
and that our allies around the globe have done.
尽力の賜物なのです
22:05
You've heard the numbers about
ご存知かもしれませんが
22:07
the tip of the iceberg in terms
ほんの氷山の一角に過ぎませんが
22:09
of numbers of terrorist attacks that NSA programs
NSAの作戦がテロ攻撃の阻止に
貢献したものは
22:12
contributed to stopping was 54,
54件を数えます
22:14
25 of those in Europe,
そのうちの25件がヨーロッパにおいて
22:17
and of those 25,
その25件のうち
22:19
18 of them occurred in three countries,
18件は3つの国で発生しています
22:21
some of which are our allies,
その内のいくつかは我々の同盟国です
22:24
and some of which are beating the heck out of us
それでも NSAプログラムの監視をすり抜けて
22:26
over the NSA programs, by the way.
攻撃を仕掛けてくるものもいます
22:28
So that's not an accident that those things happen.
ですからテロの犠牲が少ないのは
偶然ではないのです
22:32
That's hard work. That's us finding intelligence
それは尽力によるもので
テロ活動を見つけ出す
22:35
on terrorist activities
諜報活動の成果なのです
22:37
and interdicting them through one way or another,
法に基づく執行権限により
22:39
through law enforcement,
諸国と協力し
22:41
through cooperative activities with other countries
時には軍隊を投入して
22:42
and sometimes through military action.
テロリストと対峙しています
22:45
The other thing I would say is that
もう一点申し上げておきたいことは
22:48
your idea of nuclear or chem-bio-threat
あなたが言及された核または
化学・生物兵器に対する脅威について
22:51
is not at all far-fetched
根拠のないものではなく
22:56
and in fact there are a number of groups
事実 何年もの間
22:58
who have for several years expressed interest
このような兵器を入手しようとし
22:59
and desire in obtaining those capabilities
そのような行動に出ている集団が
23:01
and work towards that.
いくつもあります
23:04
CA: It's also been said that,
クリス: 実際のところ
23:06
of those 54 alleged incidents,
これら54の嫌疑の掛かっている事件の内
23:07
that as few as zero of them
スノーデン氏が暴露した
物議を醸すプログラムと
23:10
were actually anything to do
スノーデン氏が暴露した
物議を醸すプログラムと
23:12
with these controversial programs
何らかの関係があったものは
23:13
that Mr. Snowden revealed,
ほとんどゼロであり
23:15
that it was basically through
other forms of intelligence,
干し草の中の針を探すような事件の解決は
23:18
that you're looking for a needle in a haystack,
他のタイプの諜報を通して
なされたものと言われています
23:22
and the effects of these programs,
そしてこれらのプログラムの効果は
23:25
these controversial programs,
物議を醸すプログラムは
23:27
is just to add hay to the stack,
干し草の山をただ高くしているだけであり
23:28
not to really find the needle.
本当に針を見つけるものではないと
言われています
23:30
The needle was found by other methods.
針は 他の方法によって
発見されたと言われています
23:31
Isn't there something to that?
それについては何かありませんか?
23:33
RL: No, there's actually two programs
リック: はい 実際には
その議論に関係している
23:38
that are typically implicated in that discussion.
2つのプログラムがあります
23:40
One is the section 215 program,
1つはセクション215 プログラムです
23:42
the U.S. telephony metadata program,
米国の電話メタデータ プログラムと
23:45
and the other one is
もう一つは
23:48
popularly called the PRISM program,
PRISMプログラムと一般に呼ばれるもので
23:50
and it's actually section 702
of the FISA Amendment Act.
FISA改正法の第702条によるものです
23:52
But the 215 program
しかし215 プログラムだけが
23:55
is only relevant to threats
アメリカ合衆国に対する脅威に
23:59
that are directed against the United States,
関連したものです
24:01
and there have been a dozen threats
アメリカが巻き込まれた
24:03
where that was implicated.
脅威は数多く起きています
24:06
Now what you'll see people say publicly
きっと人々のこのような言葉を耳にするでしょう
24:07
is there is no "but for" case,
「もしなかったら」という場合は実例がないので
24:10
and so there is no case where, but for that,
諜報プログラムがなかったから
脅威は起こっていただろうと
24:12
the threat would have happened.
言えないだろうと
24:16
But that actually indicates a lack of understanding
しかし それは実のところ
テロリストの調査が
24:18
of how terrorist investigations actually work.
どのように機能しているかについての
理解の欠如を示しています
24:22
You think about on television,
あなたはテレビで殺人事件の謎を
24:27
you watch a murder mystery.
見ていると考えてみて下さい
24:29
What do you start with? You start with a body,
何から始めますか?死体の調査から始め
24:30
and then they work their way
from there to solve the crime.
犯罪の捜査をすすめ
問題の解決を図ります
24:32
We're actually starting well before that,
我々はもっと早い段階
24:34
hopefully before there are any bodies,
できれば死体が発生する前に
24:35
and we're trying to build the case for
攻撃者は誰か
何をしようとしているのか―
24:37
who the people are, what they're trying to do,
ということを場合を想定します
24:39
and that involves massive amounts of information.
これには大量の情報が必要です
24:42
Think of it is as mosaic,
それはモザイクのようなもので
24:45
and it's hard to say that any one piece of a mosaic
モザイクの どの1ピースが
24:46
was necessary to building the mosaic,
モザイクの重要な要素か
言い当てることはできませんが
24:48
but to build the complete picture,
しかし 完全な絵を構築するには
24:51
you need to have all the pieces of information.
すべての情報が必要です
24:53
On the other, the non-U.S.-related
threats out of those 54,
その一方 例の54の脅威の内
24:54
the other 42 of them,
非米国関連は42で
24:58
the PRISM program was hugely relevant to that,
プリズム・プログラム(監視プログラム)は
大いに関与しており
25:01
and in fact was material in contributing
事実 攻撃の阻止に
25:05
to stopping those attacks.
寄与しました
25:08
CA: Snowden said two days ago
クリス: スノーデン氏は2日前に言いました
テロリズムは常に
25:10
that terrorism has always been
クリス: スノーデン氏は2日前に言いました
テロリズムは常に
25:12
what is called in the intelligence world
「(諜報)行為の口実」
25:15
"a cover for action,"
と諜報の世界では呼ばれていると
25:17
that it's something that,
それはこんな理由からです
25:19
because it invokes such a powerful
テロは人々の強く感情的な
25:21
emotional response in people,
反応を呼び起こすので
25:22
it allows the initiation of these programs
さもなくば不可能であったであろう
25:24
to achieve powers that an organization like yours
これらのプログラムの導入が
25:27
couldn't otherwise have.
人々に受け入れられることです
25:30
Is there any internal debate about that?
それについて 内部で
何か論議はあるのでしょうか?
25:32
RL: Yeah.
リック: はい
25:35
I mean, we debate these things all the time,
我々はいつも このことを議論しています
25:37
and there is discussion that goes on
議論は今でも続けられ
25:39
in the executive branch
行政府や
25:42
and within NSA itself
NSA 内部
25:43
and the intelligence community about
諜報コミュニ ティーでは
25:46
what's right, what's proportionate,
何が正しく バランスの取れたもので
25:47
what's the correct thing to do.
何が正しい行為か議論しています
25:49
And it's important to note that the programs
大事なことを申し上げておきますが
25:50
that we're talking about
我々が話しているプログラムは
25:51
were all authorized by two different presidents,
2人の別々の大統領
25:53
two different political parties,
2つの異なる政党により
25:56
by Congress twice,
議会によって2回
25:58
and by federal judges 16 different times,
連邦裁判官によって16回
認可されたものであり
26:00
and so this is not NSA running off
NSA が勝手に作り出し
独自に実行しているのではないということです
26:04
and doing its own thing.
NSA が勝手に作り出し
独自に実行しているのではないということです
26:09
This is a legitimate activity
これは アメリカ合衆国政府の
26:10
of the United States foreign government
合法的な活動であり
26:12
that was agreed to by all the branches
アメリカ合衆国政府の
26:15
of the United States government,
全ての各3権機関によって
合意されており
26:17
and President Madison would have been proud.
マディソン大統領は誇りに思っていたでしょう
26:19
CA: And yet, when congressmen discovered
クリス: とは言っても その承認のもとで
実際に何が行われていたのかを
26:22
what was actually being done
with that authorization,
下院議員たちが知った時
26:26
many of them were completely shocked.
彼らの多くはひどくショックを受けました
26:29
Or do you think that is not a legitimate reaction,
あなた方に与えた権限で
26:31
that it's only because it's now come out publicly,
何が行われているか正確に知りながらも
26:35
that they really knew exactly what you were doing
公の明るみに出されたことに対する
26:37
with the powers they had granted you?
不条理な反応だと思いますか?
26:40
RL: Congress is a big body.
リック: 議会は大きな組織です
26:42
There's 535 of them,
535人いますし
26:44
and they change out frequently,
メンバーも頻繁に変わりますし
26:46
in the case of the House, every two years,
下院の場合2年毎に替ります
26:48
and I think that the NSA provided
それに私は NSAは監督委員会に
26:50
all the relevant information
to our oversight committees,
すべての関連情報を
提出していると思います
26:54
and then the dissemination of that information
また監視委員会が国会開催中に
26:57
by the oversight committees throughout Congress
報告した情報は
26:59
is something that they manage.
彼らが管理するものです
27:01
I think I would say that Congress members
議会のメンバーは
27:04
had the opportunity to make themselves aware,
知り得る機会があり
27:09
and in fact a significant number of them,
実際 相当な数の議員が
27:12
the ones who are assigned oversight responsibility,
我々の監視責任の任務を負い
27:14
did have the ability to do that.
知る権限を持っていたのです
27:18
And you've actually had the chairs of
those committees say that in public.
そして 事実 委員会の議長が
公の場で報告しました
27:19
CA: Now, you mentioned the
threat of cyberattacks,
クリス: あなたが語られたサイバー攻撃が
大いなる懸念であることは
27:23
and I don't think anyone in this room would disagree
クリス: あなたが語られたサイバー攻撃が
大いなる懸念であることは
27:24
that that is a huge concern,
誰も異を唱えることは
無いと思うのですが
27:26
but do you accept that there's a tradeoff
しかし 攻撃と防衛戦略には
27:28
between offensive and defensive strategies,
妥協点があって
27:30
and that it's possible that the very measures taken
「暗号化を弱める」ことを可能にする
措置によって
27:33
to, "weaken encryption,"
悪い連中を特定することが
27:35
and allow yourself to find the bad guys,
サイバー攻撃への扉を開くことに
27:38
might also open the door to forms of cyberattack?
なりかねないということについて
お認めになりますか?
27:40
RL: So I think two things.
リック: 2点あります
27:45
One is, you said weaken encryption. I didn't.
1つ目は 暗号化を弱めると
あなたは言われましたが 私は言っていません
27:47
And the other one is that
もう1つは
27:51
the NSA has both of those missions,
NSA にはそれら両方のミッションがありますが
27:56
and we are heavily biased towards defense,
我々は著しく防衛に偏っており
27:59
and, actually, the vulnerabilities that we find
実際に我々が脆弱性を見つけると
28:01
in the overwhelming majority of cases,
圧倒的にほとんどの場合
28:05
we disclose to the people who are responsible
それらの製品の製造 もしくは開発に関し
28:07
for manufacturing or developing those products.
責任ある人々に開示します
28:10
We have a great track record of that,
これにはかなりの実績があり
28:13
and we're actually working on a proposal right now
実際に 私たちは透明性を保ち
28:15
to be transparent and to
publish transparency reports
透明性のあるレポートを発行し
28:17
in the same way that the Internet companies
インターネット企業も同様に
28:20
are being allowed to publish
transparency reports for them.
透明性のあるレポートを発行できるような
28:23
We want to be more transparent about that.
そんな提案を作ろうとしています
28:26
So again, we eat our own dog food.
繰り返しになりますが 我々は自分たちが
作ったものを使います
28:28
We use the standards, we use the products
我々は自ら推奨する基準を用い
製品を使用します
28:32
that we recommend,
我々は自ら推奨する基準を用い
製品を使用します
28:34
and so it's in our interest
他の人達も必要とするように
28:37
to keep our communications protected
我々の通信を保護することが
28:39
in the same way that other people's need to be.
我々の関心事なのです
28:41
CA: Edward Snowden,
クリス: エドワード ・スノーデン氏の
28:45
when, after his talk, was wandering the halls here
トークの後
代理ロボットがこのホール内を
28:48
in the bot,
動き回っていた時に
28:53
and I heard him say to a couple of people,
彼が何人かの人に
話しているのを聞きました
28:54
they asked him about what he thought
彼のNSA全体に対する印象を
28:56
of the NSA overall,
尋ねていたのです
28:58
and he was very complimentary about the people
彼はそこであなたと働く人たちについて
29:00
who work with you,
とても敬意を表しており
29:02
said that it's a really
従業員たちは正しいことを行おうという
29:04
impassioned group of employees
実に熱い想いを持った人達であり
29:08
who are seeking to do the right thing,
実に熱い想いを持った人達であり
29:10
and that the problems have come from
問題は良くない方法で作られた
29:13
just some badly conceived policies.
ポリシーに起因するのだと
話していました
29:16
He came over certainly very reasonably and calmly.
彼は確かに非常に分別をわきまえ
落ち着いて登場し
29:19
He didn't come over like a crazy man.
狂っているようには見えませんでした
29:23
Would you accept that at least,
あなたは彼のやり方には
29:25
even if you disagree with how he did it,
同意できないとしても
29:27
that he has opened a debate that matters?
少なくとも問題点について議論の道を
彼が開いたことに同意頂けますか?
29:30
RL: So I think that the discussion
リック: 議論することは
29:34
is an important one to have.
重要だと思いますが
29:37
I do not like the way that he did it.
彼のやり方は好きになれません
29:39
I think there were a number of other ways
他にも手段がいろいろ
29:42
that he could have done that
有ったはずで そうすれば
29:44
that would have not endangered our people
我々の敵が何をしているかについての
29:45
and the people of other nations
可視性を失うことによって
29:49
through losing visibility
我が国民や他の国の人々を
29:51
into what our adversaries are doing.
危険にさらすことがなかったでしょう
29:53
But I do think it's an important conversation.
しかし 本当に重要な対話だと思います
29:56
CA: It's been reported that there's
クリス: あなたと同僚との間でも
29:59
almost a difference of opinion
彼と司法取引を行って
30:00
with you and your colleagues
恩赦すべきかという
30:03
over any scenario in which
いくつかのシナリオにおいて
30:04
he might be offered an amnesty deal.
意見の違いがあると報告されています
30:06
I think your boss, General Keith Alexander,
あなたの上司である
キース・アレキサンダー長官は
30:09
has said that that would be a terrible example
法をそんな風に破った人と
30:11
for others;
あなたが交渉しようものなら
30:13
you can't negotiate with someone
ひどい前例になると
30:15
who's broken the law in that way.
発言しています
30:17
But you've been quoted as saying that,
しかし あなたがこう言ったと
記録されています
30:19
if Snowden could prove that he was surrendering
もしスノーデンがまだ公開されていない
全ての文書を
30:21
all undisclosed documents,
返還することが確かに示し得るのならば
30:24
that a deal maybe should be considered.
特赦は考慮されるべき取引だと
30:26
Do you still think that?
まだ そうお考えですか?
30:28
RL: Yeah, so actually,
リック: ええ 実際のところは
30:31
this is my favorite thing about
that "60 Minutes" interview
あの「60 分」インタビューで
私が面白いと思うことは
30:32
was all the misquotes that came from that.
誤って引用されている部分なんですね
30:35
What I actually said, in
response to a question about,
スノーデン氏に対する刑の軽減措置について
30:37
would you entertain any discussions
議論して頂けませんか
という質問に対し
30:39
of mitigating action against Snowden,
私の実際の返答は こうでした
30:41
I said, yeah, it's worth a conversation.
そうですね対話の価値がありますね と
30:48
This is something that the attorney general
これはアメリカ合衆国の検事総長と
30:49
of the United States and the president also
大統領も
30:51
actually have both talked about this,
実際に話していたことです
30:53
and I defer to the attorney general,
この件は検事総長に委ねます
30:55
because this is his lane.
これは彼の扱うことだからです
30:56
But there is a strong tradition
しかしアメリカの法学には
30:58
in American jurisprudence
強い伝統があって
31:00
of having discussions with people
政府にとって利益があるのならば
31:03
who have been charged with crimes in order to,
犯罪で起訴されている人々 と
31:08
if it benefits the government,
交渉を行い
31:10
to get something out of that,
何か利点を得ようとします
31:11
that there's always room for that kind of discussion.
常にそのような議論の余地があります
31:14
So I'm not presupposing any outcome,
結論有りきではありませんから
31:16
but there is always room for discussion.
常に議論の余地があるということです
31:18
CA: To a lay person it seems like
クリス: 一般の人にとっては それはあたかも
31:22
he has certain things to offer the U.S.,
彼はアメリカ合衆国
31:23
the government, you, others,
政府、あなた、他の人々に
31:27
in terms of putting things right
物事を正しい方向に導き
31:28
and helping figure out a smarter policy,
そして 将来に向けたより賢明なポリシーと
31:30
a smarter way forward for the future.
やり方を見つけ出すための方法を
提示しているように思えます
31:32
Do you see, has that kind of possibility
そんな考えも
31:38
been entertained at all?
あっても良いとは思いませんか?
31:41
RL: So that's out of my lane.
リック: 私が関与することでも
31:43
That's not an NSA thing.
NSAが決める事ではないのです
31:45
That would be a Department of Justice
それは司法省の範疇に入る
31:46
sort of discussion.
議論といえるでしょう
31:48
I'll defer to them.
私は彼らにお任せします
31:51
CA: Rick, when Ed Snowden ended his talk,
クリス: リック
エド・スノーデン氏が彼の話を終えたとき
31:54
I offered him the chance to
share an idea worth spreading.
彼に「広める価値のある考えを共有する」
チャンスを与えました
31:57
What would be your idea worth spreading
あなたにとって TEDのグループに対して
32:01
for this group?
「広める価値のある考え」は何ですか?
32:02
RL: So I think, learn the facts.
リック: 事実を知るということだと思います
32:05
This is a really important conversation,
これは 本当に重要な対話です
32:07
and it impacts, it's not just NSA,
その影響は NSAだけではなく
32:09
it's not just the government,
政府だけではなく
32:11
it's you, it's the Internet companies.
皆さん そしてインターネット企業に及びます
32:13
The issue of privacy and personal data
プライバシーおよび個人データの問題は
32:16
is much bigger than just the government,
政府よりもはるかに大きいので
32:19
and so learn the facts.
事実を知ってください
32:20
Don't rely on headlines,
ニュースの見出しに惑わされず
32:22
don't rely on sound bites,
雑多な話にだまされず
32:24
don't rely on one-sided conversations.
一方的な話を単に鵜呑みにしてはいけません
32:25
So that's the idea, I think, worth spreading.
これが私の考える
「広める価値のあるアイデア」です
32:28
We have a sign, a badge tab,
我々には印 記章があり
32:31
we wear badges at work with lanyards,
我々は職場では記章を首紐に下げています
32:34
and if I could make a plug,
もし耳栓をしたら
32:36
my badge lanyard at work says, "Dallas Cowboys."
私の首紐はこう言うのです
32:38
Go Dallas.
「ダラスだ カウボーイズ達よ」
「ダラスに行け」と
32:41
I've just alienated half the audience, I know.
私はたった今 半分の観客の方を
嫌な感じにさせましたね
32:44
So the lanyard that our people
暗号分析作業をする
32:47
who work in the organization
我々の組織で働く人たちの
32:51
that does our crypto-analytic work
首紐に取り付けられたタブには
32:52
have a tab that says, "Look at the data."
「データを見よ」と書かれています
32:55
So that's the idea worth spreading.
これは「広める価値のあるアイデア」です
32:57
Look at the data.
データを見てください
32:58
CA: Rick, it took a certain amount of courage,
クリス: リック ここに来て
33:01
I think, actually, to come and speak openly
ここにいる人たちに
素直に話すことは
33:03
to this group.
勇気のいることだったと思います
33:06
It's not something the NSA
has done a lot of in the past,
過去にはNSAがほとんど
行なわなかったことです
33:07
and plus the technology has been challenging.
その上 技術は一層複雑になってきています
33:10
We truly appreciate you doing that
あなたが登場され
重要な話をしてくださったことを
33:13
and sharing in this very important conversation.
とても感謝しています
33:15
Thank you so much.
どうもありがとうございました
33:17
RL: Thanks, Chris.
リック: ありがとう クリス
33:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
33:21
Translated by Masami Hisai
Reviewed by Tomoyuki Suzuki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Richard Ledgett - Deputy director, NSA
Richard Ledgett is deputy director and senior civilian leader of the National Security Agency. He acts as the agency’s chief operating officer, responsible for guiding and directing studies, operations and policy.

Why you should listen

Richard Ledgett began his NSA career in 1988 and has served in operational, management, and technical leadership positions at the branch, division, office, and group levels. Now, think of him as the COO of the NSA, guiding and directing studies, operations and policy. From 2012 to 2013 he was the Director of the NSA/CSS Threat Operations Center, responsible for round-the-clock cryptologic activities to discover and counter adversary cyber efforts. Prior to NTOC he served in several positions from 2010 to 2012 in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence in both the collection and cyber mission areas. He was the first National Intelligence Manager for Cyber, serving as principal advisor to the Director of National Intelligence on all cyber matters, leading development of the Unified Intelligence Strategy for Cyber, and coordinating cyber activities across the Intelligence Community (IC). Previous positions at NSA include Deputy Director for Analysis and Production (2009-2010), Deputy Director for Data Acquisition (2006-2009), Assistant Deputy Director for Data Acquisition (2005-2006), and Chief, NSA/CSS Pacific (2002-2005). He also served in a joint IC operational activity, and as an instructor and course developer at the National Cryptologic School.

He led the NSA Media Leaks Task Force from June 2013 to January 2014, and was responsible for integrating and overseeing the totality of NSA’s efforts surrounding the unauthorized disclosures of classified information by a former NSA affiliate.

More profile about the speaker
Richard Ledgett | Speaker | TED.com