20:38
TED2007

Alan Kay: A powerful idea about ideas

アラン・ケイの考える、アイディアについてのすごいアイディア

Filmed:

私たちの良く知るその熱意と聡明さでもって、アラン・ケイが子どもたちに教えるためのより良い方法を描き出し、コンピューターならではの方法で数学や科学 を体験できる方法を見せてくれます。

- Educator and computing pioneer
One of the true luminaries of personal computing, Alan Kay conceived of laptops and graphical interfaces years before they were realized. At XeroxPARC, Apple, HP and Disney, he has developed tools for improving the mind. Full bio

A great way to start, I think, with my view of simplicity
手始めに 私の思うシンプルさについてですが
00:18
is to take a look at TED. Here you are, understanding why we're here,
TEDを見てみるのが早いでしょう 皆さんには
00:22
what's going on with no difficulty at all.
ここにいる理由も 起こっている事も 理解するのは簡単でしょう
00:29
The best A.I. in the planet would find it complex and confusing,
しかしそれは 最高の人工知能にも理解しがたい複雑なことなのです
00:34
and my little dog Watson would find it simple and understandable
私の飼い犬にとっては シンプルで理解できることだと思いますが
00:38
but would miss the point.
多分的外れでしょうね
00:43
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:45
He would have a great time.
楽しめるとは思いますが
00:48
And of course, if you're a speaker here, like Hans Rosling,
そして皆さんが ハンス ロスリングのように このTEDの講演者ならば
00:51
a speaker finds this complex, tricky. But in Hans Rosling's case,
複雑で難しいと思うでしょう しかし 彼の場合
00:56
he had a secret weapon yesterday,
昨日の彼には 秘密兵器がありました
01:01
literally, in his sword swallowing act.
見事に剣を飲み込んで見せました
01:03
And I must say, I thought of quite a few objects
白状すれば 私も今日
01:07
that I might try to swallow today and finally gave up on,
色んなものを飲み込んで見せようかと思っていたのですが 結局諦めました
01:09
but he just did it and that was a wonderful thing.
彼はやってのけました 素晴らしいことです
01:14
So Puck meant not only are we fools in the pejorative sense,
さて シェイクスピア劇に登場する妖精は 我々が愚かであるだけでなく
01:18
but that we're easily fooled. In fact, what Shakespeare
簡単に騙されてしまうから存在するのです 実際
01:23
was pointing out is we go to the theater in order to be fooled,
シェイクスピアは 我々は騙されるために劇場に行く
01:27
so we're actually looking forward to it.
つまり騙されることを期待しているのだと言っています
01:30
We go to magic shows in order to be fooled.
マジックショーへ行くのも騙されるためです
01:34
And this makes many things fun, but it makes it difficult to actually
これで色んな事が楽しくなりますが それによって
01:36
get any kind of picture on the world we live in or on ourselves.
我々の住む世界や 自分自身を理解するのが 難しくなります
01:44
And our friend, Betty Edwards,
友人であるベティ エドワーズは
01:48
the "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" lady, shows these two tables
「脳の右側で描け」の著者ですが この2つのテーブルの絵を
01:50
to her drawing class and says,
自分の教え子たちに見せて こう言っています
01:53
"The problem you have with learning to draw
絵を学ぶ上での問題点は
01:58
is not that you can't move your hand,
手を動かせない事ではなく
02:02
but that the way your brain perceives images is faulty.
脳のイメージの理解には誤りがある事なのです
02:04
It's trying to perceive images into objects
脳は ありのままに見るよりも
02:10
rather than seeing what's there."
画像を物体として理解しようとします
02:12
And to prove it, she says, "The exact size and shape of these tabletops
その証拠に この2つのテーブルの形と大きさは
02:14
is the same, and I'm going to prove it to you."
全く同じです これからご覧に入れましょう
02:19
She does this with cardboard, but since I have
彼女は 段ボールでやりましたが
02:22
an expensive computer here
私は せっかく良いコンピューターがあるので…
02:25
I'll just rotate this little guy around and ...
この小さいのを回してやって…
02:28
Now having seen that -- and I've seen it hundreds of times,
私はこれを何百回と見ています
02:34
because I use this in every talk I give -- I still can't see
講演のたびにやっているので
02:37
that they're the same size and shape, and I doubt that you can either.
未だにこの形と大きさが同じには見えません 皆さんもそうでしょう
02:41
So what do artists do? Well, what artists do is to measure.
画家たちはどうしているのでしょう? 測るのです
02:46
They measure very, very carefully.
非常に慎重に測ります
02:51
And if you measure very, very carefully with a stiff arm and a straight edge,
伸ばした腕と まっすぐの棒で 慎重に測ったら
02:53
you'll see that those two shapes are
この2つが 全く同じサイズであることが
02:57
exactly the same size.
分かると思います
02:59
And the Talmud saw this a long time ago, saying,
はるか昔に書かれたユダヤ教の聖典には このことが書かれています
03:02
"We see things not as they are, but as we are."
「我々は物を それが何かではなく 自分が何かとして見る」
03:07
I certainly would like to know what happened to the person
この事を そんなに昔に見抜いた人に
03:10
who had that insight back then,
何があったのか とても興味があります
03:12
if they actually followed it to its ultimate conclusion.
もしその人がその考え方で 究極の結論に辿り着いたなら
03:15
So if the world is not as it seems and we see things as we are,
もし世界が見たままでなく
03:21
then what we call reality is a kind of hallucination
自分をそこに見ているのだとすると 現実と呼ばれるものは
03:23
happening inside here. It's a waking dream,
頭の中で起こっている幻覚のようなもの 白昼夢です
03:29
and understanding that that is what we actually exist in
我々が実際 白昼夢の中に生きていると理解することは
03:32
is one of the biggest epistemological barriers in human history.
人類の歴史において 認識論上の最大の壁の一つでした
03:37
And what that means: "simple and understandable"
つまり シンプルで理解出来るものも
03:42
might not be actually simple or understandable,
実際は そうでもないかもしれないのです
03:44
and things we think are "complex" might be made simple and understandable.
そして複雑だと思っている事が シンプルで理解できるものかもしれません
03:47
Somehow we have to understand ourselves to get around our flaws.
我々は欠点を克服する為 どうにか自分を理解しなければなりません
03:53
We can think of ourselves as kind of a noisy channel.
ノイズの多い通信路のようなものです
03:57
The way I think of it is, we can't learn to see
目が不自由であることを自覚しなければ
03:59
until we admit we're blind.
見方を学ぶことはできないのです
04:04
Once you start down at this very humble level,
一度 非常に謙虚なレベルまで戻れば
04:06
then you can start finding ways to see things.
物の見方を見つけられるようになるでしょう
04:10
And what's happened, over the last 400 years in particular,
特に過去400年間に起こった出来事として
04:13
is that human beings have invented "brainlets" --
人類は「ミニブレイン」を発明しました
04:18
little additional parts for our brain --
脳を補助する小さな部品として
04:21
made out of powerful ideas that help us
世界を違った見方で見るのを助ける
04:25
see the world in different ways.
すごいアイディアで作られたものです
04:27
And these are in the form of sensory apparatus --
望遠鏡 顕微鏡などの感覚の道具や
04:29
telescopes, microscopes -- reasoning apparatus --
様々な考え方である理論の道具があります
04:32
various ways of thinking -- and, most importantly,
そして最も重要なのは
04:37
in the ability to change perspective on things.
物事に対する観点を変える力です これについて少し―
04:41
I'll talk about that a little bit.
お話しします
04:45
It's this change in perspective
ものの見方の変化 つまり
04:46
on what it is we think we're perceiving
我々が受け取っていると思っているものへの認識の変化は
04:48
that has helped us make more progress in the last 400 years
過去400年間に それ以前の全歴史を合わせたよりも
04:51
than we have in the rest of human history.
大きく進歩する力になりました
04:56
And yet, it is not taught in any K through 12 curriculum in America that I'm aware of.
しかし私の知る限りでは 米国の高校までの教育では それが教えられていません
04:58
So one of the things that goes from simple to complex
シンプルから複雑へと移行するのは
05:11
is when we do more. We like more.
「もっと」やるときです 我々は「もっと」―
05:13
If we do more in a kind of a stupid way,
やりたいと思いますが まずいやり方をすると
05:16
the simplicity gets complex
シンプルなものも 複雑になり
05:19
and, in fact, we can keep on doing it for a very long time.
それをずっと長い間やり続ける可能性があるのです
05:22
But Murray Gell-Mann yesterday talked about emergent properties;
昨日 マレー ゲルマンが「創発性」の話をしましたが
05:27
another name for them could be "architecture"
それは「建築」という名で呼んでも良いでしょう
05:30
as a metaphor for taking the same old material
同じ古い素材を使って 当たり前でも
05:34
and thinking about non-obvious, non-simple ways of combining it.
シンプルでもない組み合わせ方を考える メタファとしてです
05:38
And in fact, what Murray was talking about yesterday in the fractal beauty of nature --
実際彼が話していた自然のフラクタル的な美しさ
05:45
of having the descriptions
つまり多様なレベルで
05:53
at various levels be rather similar --
似た記述を持っているという事は
05:55
all goes down to the idea that the elementary particles
孤立しながらも くっつきやすく 激しく動き回っている
05:59
are both sticky and standoffish,
素粒子に至るまで
06:04
and they're in violent motion.
続いているのです
06:07
Those three things give rise to all the different levels
この3点は 我々の世界で
06:11
of what seem to be complexity in our world.
複雑に見える様々なレベルで現れます
06:14
But how simple?
しかし どれほどシンプルなのか?
06:20
So, when I saw Roslings' Gapminder stuff a few years ago,
数年前に ロスリングのGapminderを見た時
06:22
I just thought it was the greatest thing I'd seen
複雑な考え方を簡潔に伝える
06:27
in conveying complex ideas simply.
今まで見た中で最良の方法だと 思いました
06:29
But then I had a thought of, "Boy, maybe it's too simple."
しかし シンプルすぎじゃないかとも思いました
06:34
And I put some effort in to try and check
なので 少し頑張って確認してみました
06:37
to see how well these simple portrayals of trends over time
あのような時間の流れに沿ったトレンドのシンプルな記述が
06:42
actually matched up with some ideas and investigations from the side,
別の方面からの調査やアイディアに実際合うのかどうか
06:46
and I found that they matched up very well.
非常に良く符号するのが分かりました
06:51
So the Roslings have been able to do simplicity
ロスリングは データの重要な部分を落とすことなく
06:53
without removing what's important about the data.
シンプルにすることを可能にしたのです
06:58
Whereas the film yesterday that we saw
一方で昨日の細胞内部の
07:02
of the simulation of the inside of a cell,
シミュレーションの映像の方は
07:06
as a former molecular biologist, I didn't like that at all.
元分子生物学者として あの映像は全然気に入りません
07:08
Not because it wasn't beautiful or anything,
美しくないとかではなく
07:14
but because it misses the thing that most students fail to understand
分子生物学で ほとんどの学生が理解し損ねる事を
07:16
about molecular biology, and that is:
外しているからです つまり
07:21
why is there any probability at all of two complex shapes
2つの複雑な形がピッタリ合う相手を見つけ 組み合わさり
07:24
finding each other just the right way
触媒作用を受ける
07:29
so they combine together and be catalyzed?
そんな可能性が どうしてあるのでしょう?
07:31
And what we saw yesterday was
我々が昨日見たのは
07:34
every reaction was fortuitous;
全ての反応は偶然である というものでした
07:36
they just swooped in the air and bound, and something happened.
ただ空から降りてきて弾んで 何かが起こる
07:39
But in fact, those molecules are spinning at the rate of
しかし その分子は毎秒100万回も
07:43
about a million revolutions per second;
回転しているのです
07:47
they're agitating back and forth their size every two nanoseconds;
2ナノ秒ごとに ぐるぐるかき回され
07:50
they're completely crowded together, they're jammed,
いっしょくたに ぐちゃぐちゃになって
07:56
they're bashing up against each other.
お互いに激しくぶつかり合っています
07:59
And if you don't understand that in your mental model of this stuff,
それを 頭の中でモデルとして理解していないと
08:02
what happens inside of a cell seems completely mysterious and fortuitous,
細胞の中で起きている事は 非常に神秘的で偶発的に見えます
08:05
and I think that's exactly the wrong image
科学を教えようとする時には
08:10
for when you're trying to teach science.
甚だ間違ったイメージだと思います
08:12
So, another thing that we do is to confuse adult sophistication
我々のするもう1つの間違いは
08:18
with the actual understanding of some principle.
成熟した複雑化を 原理の実際の理解と混同することです
08:23
So a kid who's 14 in high school
中学校で14歳の生徒が
08:28
gets this version of the Pythagorean theorem,
このようなピタゴラスの定理に対する説明を受けます
08:30
which is a truly subtle and interesting proof,
これは非常に繊細で面白い証明ですが
08:36
but in fact it's not a good way to start learning about mathematics.
実際 数学について学び始めるのには 良いやり方ではありません
08:39
So a more direct one, one that gives you more of the feeling of math,
より分かりやすく 数学の感覚を与えてくれるのは
08:46
is something closer to Pythagoras' own proof, which goes like this:
ピタゴラス自身による証明に近いものです こんな風に
08:51
so here we have this triangle, and if we surround that C square with
同じ三角形を3つ追加して 四角形Cを囲み
08:55
three more triangles and we copy that,
コピーします
09:01
notice that we can move those triangles down like this.
上の2つの三角形を こう下に動かすことができます
09:04
And that leaves two open areas that are kind of suspicious ...
すると2つ空いた部分に何か入りそうです
09:09
and bingo. That is all you have to do.
ビンゴ! これで終わりです
09:12
And this kind of proof is the kind of proof
こういった証明こそ
09:19
that you need to learn when you're learning mathematics
数学を学ぶ際に どういう意味なのか
09:21
in order to get an idea of what it means
把握するために 学ぶべきものなのです
09:24
before you look into the, literally, 1,200 or 1,500 proofs
今まで発見された 1200とか1500通りもの
09:27
of Pythagoras' theorem that have been discovered.
ピタゴラスの定理の証明を 見ていく前に
09:31
Now let's go to young children.
では 子どもに話を進めましょう
09:37
This is a very unusual teacher
幼稚園と1年生を教えている
09:40
who was a kindergarten and first-grade teacher,
非常にユニークな先生がいます
09:42
but was a natural mathematician.
生来の数学者です
09:46
So she was like that jazz musician friend you have who never studied music
まるで 音楽を一度も勉強したことがないのに 素晴らしい演奏をする
09:48
but is a terrific musician;
ジャズ演奏家のような人です
09:53
she just had a feeling for math.
彼女は数学の感覚を持っているのです
09:55
And here are her six-year-olds,
これは 彼女の6歳の生徒達ですが
09:57
and she's got them making shapes out of a shape.
彼女は 生徒たちに 形から形を作らせています
10:00
So they pick a shape they like -- like a diamond, or a square,
みんな好きな図形を選びます
10:05
or a triangle, or a trapezoid -- and then they try and make
ひし形 四角 三角形や 台形
10:07
the next larger shape of that same shape, and the next larger shape.
そして同じ図形の一回り大きなもの 更に大きなものと 作っていきます
10:10
You can see the trapezoids are a little challenging there.
台形は少し難しいとお分かりになると思います
10:14
And what this teacher did on every project
この先生は どの授業でも
10:18
was to have the children act like first it was a creative arts project,
生徒達に最初は図工の授業のようにやらせ
10:21
and then something like science.
それから理科のようにやらせます
10:26
So they had created these artifacts.
こんな芸術作品ができました
10:28
Now she had them look at them and do this ... laborious,
そして それを見ながら ちょっと面倒な作業をさせます
10:30
which I thought for a long time, until she explained to me was
教えてもらう前に私も考えてみましたが
10:34
to slow them down so they'll think.
時間をかけて 子ども達自身に考えさせるのです
10:38
So they're cutting out the little pieces of cardboard here
生徒達は厚紙の小さい端を切り出し
10:41
and pasting them up.
貼り付けます
10:44
But the whole point of this thing is
最終的な目的は
10:46
for them to look at this chart and fill it out.
この表を 埋めていく事です
10:50
"What have you noticed about what you did?"
ここから何か気づくことがあるでしょうか?
10:53
And so six-year-old Lauren there noticed that the first one took one,
6歳の生徒のローレンは気づきました
10:57
and the second one took three more
最初は1個 2番目のは3個多くて
11:01
and the total was four on that one,
全部合わせると4個
11:06
the third one took five more and the total was nine on that one,
3番目のは5個多くて 全部で9個
11:08
and then the next one.
と続いていきます
11:12
She saw right away that the additional tiles that you had to add
彼女はすぐに 端に付け加える図形の数は
11:13
around the edges was always going to grow by two,
いつも2個ずつ増えるのに気付きました
11:18
so she was very confident about how she made those numbers there.
彼女はその数字の出し方に 自信満々でした
11:22
And she could see that these were the square numbers up until about six,
ローレンは6くらいまでは それが2乗の数である事が分かりました
11:25
where she wasn't sure what six times six was
分かっていなかったのは 6×6が何か
11:30
and what seven times seven was,
そして 7×7が何か という事でした
11:33
but then she was confident again.
でもきっとそうに違いないと思いました
11:35
So that's what Lauren did.
これが ローレンの方法でした
11:38
And then the teacher, Gillian Ishijima, had the kids
ジリアン イシジマ先生は 生徒達の作った作品を
11:40
bring all of their projects up to the front of the room and put them on the floor,
教室の前に集めて 床に並べました
11:44
and everybody went batshit: "Holy shit! They're the same!"
みんなびっくり うわぁ みんな一緒だ!
11:47
No matter what the shapes were, the growth law is the same.
形がどうあれ 大きくなる法則は一緒なのです
11:55
And the mathematicians and scientists in the crowd
この中にいる数学者や科学者の皆さんは
11:59
will recognize these two progressions
1階差分方程式と
12:02
as a first-order discrete differential equation
2階差分方程式の
12:04
and a second-order discrete differential equation,
2つの数列がお分かりになると思います
12:07
derived by six-year-olds.
6歳児が導き出したのです
12:12
Well, that's pretty amazing.
びっくりです
12:16
That isn't what we usually try to teach six-year-olds.
これは普通 6歳児に教えようとする事ではありません
12:17
So, let's take a look now at how we might use the computer for some of this.
ではこのようなやり方に コンピューターがどう使えるか 見てみましょう
12:20
And so the first idea here is
最初にまず
12:27
just to show you the kind of things that children do.
子ども達がどんな事をしているのか 少しお見せしましょう
12:31
I'm using the software that we're putting on the $100 laptop.
私たちが100ドルノートPCに入れているソフトを使います
12:35
So I'd like to draw a little car here --
ここに小さな車を描こうと思います
12:40
I'll just do this very quickly -- and put a big tire on him.
さっさとやりますね それから大きなタイヤをつけます
12:46
And I get a little object here and I can look inside this object,
小さなオブジェクトができます 中身を見ることもできます
12:59
I'll call it a car. And here's a little behavior: car forward.
これを「車」と名付けましょう ここをクリックすると車が進みます
13:03
Each time I click it, car turn.
こっちをクリックすると 車が曲がります
13:08
If I want to make a little script to do this over and over again,
ドラッグしてやるだけで
13:11
I just drag these guys out and set them going.
スクリプトが作れます 実行させてみます
13:13
And I can try steering the car here by ...
車をここで操作することもできます
13:20
See the car turn by five here?
「5ずつ曲がる」となっています
13:23
So what if I click this down to zero?
ではこれをゼロまで下げたら どうなるでしょう?
13:25
It goes straight. That's a big revelation for nine-year-olds.
まっすぐ進みます これは9歳児には驚きの発見です
13:28
Make it go in the other direction.
これを反対の方向に行かせてみます
13:33
But of course, that's a little bit like kissing your sister
しかしこんな風に運転するのでは
13:35
as far as driving a car,
満足できません
13:37
so the kids want to do a steering wheel;
子ども達は ハンドルがほしくなります
13:40
so they draw a steering wheel.
だからハンドルを描きます
13:43
And we'll call this a wheel.
これを 「ハンドル」と名付けます
13:46
See this wheel's heading here?
ここに「ハンドルの方向」というのがあります
13:51
If I turn this wheel, you can see that number over there going minus and positive.
ハンドルを回すと この数字がマイナスやプラスに変わります
13:55
That's kind of an invitation to pick up this name of
ここに出てくる数字の
14:00
those numbers coming out there
名前の部分をドラッグして
14:02
and to just drop it into the script here,
スクリプトにドロップします
14:05
and now I can steer the car with the steering wheel.
これで ハンドルを使って 運転できるようになりました
14:07
And it's interesting.
これは興味深いことです
14:12
You know how much trouble the children have with variables,
子ども達がどれだけ変数で手こずるかご存じでしょう
14:14
but by learning it this way, in a situated fashion,
しかしこのように実例に即して学ぶ事で
14:17
they never forget from this single trial
変数とは何か それをどうやって使うのか
14:19
what a variable is and how to use it.
この1回の実験で 2度と忘れないのです
14:22
And we can reflect here the way Gillian Ishijima did.
イシジマ先生のやり方に倣ってみましょう
14:25
So if you look at the little script here,
このスクリプトを見ると
14:27
the speed is always going to be 30.
速度は常に30です
14:29
We're going to move the car according to that over and over again.
このスクリプトを繰り返し実行することで 車は進みます
14:31
And I'm dropping a little dot for each one of these things;
そのたびに 小さな点を打つようにすると
14:36
they're evenly spaced because they're 30 apart.
点は30ずつ離れているので 均等に打たれます
14:40
And what if I do this progression that the six-year-olds did
あの6歳児の数列を適用したらどうなるでしょう?
14:43
of saying, "OK, I'm going to increase the speed by two each time,
毎回進む速度を2ずつ上げていけば
14:46
and then I'm going to increase the distance by the speed each time?
進む距離はそれに合わせて長くなっていきます
14:51
What do I get there?"
これで何が分かるでしょう?
14:54
We get a visual pattern of what these nine-year-olds called acceleration.
このあとに見る 9歳児が求めた加速度の図解が得られたのです
14:58
So how do the children do science?
では 彼らはどう科学したのか?
15:05
(Video) Teacher: [Choose] objects that you think will fall to the Earth at the same time.
(映像) 物は同時に地面に落ると思いますか?
15:08
Student 1: Ooh, this is nice.
すごく重い
15:11
Teacher: Do not pay any attention
他の人がしていることに
15:18
to what anybody else is doing.
気を取られないで!
15:20
Who's got the apple?
リンゴを取った人は?
15:35
Alan Kay: They've got little stopwatches.
(アラン: ストップウォッチを使っています)
15:37
Student 2: What did you get? What did you get?
どうなった? 結果は?
15:44
AK: Stopwatches aren't accurate enough.
(アラン: ストップウォッチでは精度が不十分です)
15:46
Student 3: 0.99 seconds.
0.99秒です
15:49
Teacher: So put "sponge ball" ...
ではスポンジボールと書いて…
15:52
Student 4l: [I decided to] do the shot put and the sponge ball
砲丸とスポンジボールがあって
15:56
because they're two totally different weights,
重さが全然違いますが
15:59
and if you drop them at the same time,
同時に落としたら
16:02
maybe they'll drop at the same speed.
同じスピードで落ちるのかもしれません
16:04
Teacher: Drop. Class: Whoa!
落して
16:06
AK: So obviously, Aristotle never asked a child
アリストテレスが 子どもに
16:10
about this particular point
この事を質問しなかったのは明らかです
16:13
because, of course, he didn't bother doing the experiment,
わざわざ実験しようとはしなかったんですから
16:16
and neither did St. Thomas Aquinas.
聖トマス アクィナスも然り
16:18
And it was not until Galileo actually did it
子どものように考えた大人である
16:20
that an adult thought like a child,
ガリレオが初めて実験したのです
16:22
only 400 years ago.
ほんの400年前のことです
16:25
We get one child like that about every classroom of 30 kids
このように本論にずばっと入ってくる子どもが
16:28
who will actually cut straight to the chase.
30人クラスに1人ぐらいいます
16:32
Now, what if we want to look at this more closely?
これをもっと詳しく見ていくと…
16:35
We can take a movie of what's going on,
ボールの落下を 映像に記録することもできますが
16:38
but even if we single stepped this movie,
しかしコマ送りにしても
16:41
it's tricky to see what's going on.
分かりづらいかもしれません
16:43
And so what we can do is we can lay out the frames side by side
だから フレームを横一列に並べるか
16:45
or stack them up.
積み重ねてみましょう
16:48
So when the children see this, they say, "Ah! Acceleration,"
すると生徒がこれを見て 「ああ 加速してる」と叫ぶでしょう
16:50
remembering back four months when they did their cars sideways,
4ヶ月前に車を横向きに動かした事を思い出すのです
16:55
and they start measuring to find out what kind of acceleration it is.
そして どんな加速度なのか 測り始めます
16:58
So what I'm doing is measuring from the bottom of one image
測っているのは 1つのボールの下端から
17:04
to the bottom of the next image, about a fifth of a second later,
次の5分の1秒後のボールの下端までの間隔です
17:10
like that. And they're getting faster and faster each time,
こんな風に どんどん速くなります
17:15
and if I stack these guys up, then we see the differences; the increase
これらをこうやって積み上げて 違いを見ると
17:17
in the speed is constant.
速度の上がり方が 一定です
17:27
And they say, "Oh, yeah. Constant acceleration.
生徒達は「加速度一定だ」と言うでしょう
17:30
We've done that already."
これは もう既にやりました
17:32
And how shall we look and verify that we actually have it?
実際それが合っているか どうやって確かめれば良いのでしょう?
17:34
So you can't tell much from just making the ball drop there,
この場で再現しただけでは よく分かりませんが
17:42
but if we drop the ball and run the movie at the same time,
再現しながら 実際の実験映像と比較することで
17:47
we can see that we have come up with an accurate physical model.
正確な物理的モデルが得られたと分かるのです
17:53
Galileo, by the way, did this very cleverly
ガリレオはこれを非常にうまい方法でやりました
18:00
by running a ball backwards down the strings of his lute.
リュート(琵琶に似た弦楽器)の弦の上で球を転がしたのです
18:04
I pulled out those apples to remind myself to tell you that
私は これはニュートンのリンゴのような話だと
18:07
this is actually probably a Newton and the apple type story,
お伝えするのを忘れないよう リンゴの絵を付けておきました
18:12
but it's a great story.
でも素晴らしい話です
18:17
And I thought I would do just one thing
100ドルノートPCを使って
18:19
on the $100 laptop here just to prove that this stuff works here.
1つだけお見せしましょう OLPC (One Laptop per Child) プロジェクトが 上手くいくだろう事を示せると思います
18:21
So once you have gravity, here's this --
重力があると…
18:31
increase the speed by something,
速度が一定の割合で増すので
18:34
increase the ship's speed.
宇宙船の速度が 増しますね
18:36
If I start the little game here that the kids have done,
子ども達が作ったゲームです ちゃんとやらないと―
18:39
it'll crash the space ship.
宇宙船は衝突します
18:42
But if I oppose gravity, here we go ... Oops!
しかしここで重力に逆らうと ほらどうだ…おっと!
18:44
(Laughter)
(笑い)
18:48
One more.
もう一度
18:50
Yeah, there we go. Yeah, OK?
ほら うまく行った
18:54
I guess the best way to end this is with two quotes:
この講演の最後に当たり 2つの引用をしようと思います
18:59
Marshall McLuhan said,
マーシャル マクルーハンは言いました
19:06
"Children are the messages that we send to the future,"
「子ども達は 我々が未来に送るメッセージである」
19:08
but in fact, if you think of it,
しかし 考えてみると 彼らは―
19:12
children are the future we send to the future.
我々が未来へ送る未来なのです
19:14
Forget about messages;
メッセージの事は 忘れてください
19:16
children are the future,
子どもは未来です
19:19
and children in the first and second world
先進国 新興国 そして特に
19:22
and, most especially, in the third world
発展途上国の子どもには
19:24
need mentors.
賢明な指導者が必要です
19:27
And this summer, we're going to build five million of these $100 laptops,
この夏 我々はこのような100ドルノートPCを 500万台作ります
19:29
and maybe 50 million next year.
来年は たぶん5000万台
19:34
But we couldn't create 1,000 new teachers this summer to save our life.
しかし 命を救う1000人の新しい教師を創り出すことはできませんでした
19:36
That means that we, once again, have a thing where we can put technology out,
私たちは テクノロジーで物を作り出すことは出来ましたが
19:43
but the mentoring that is required to go
シンプルなチャットソフトから
19:49
from a simple new iChat instant messaging system
もっと深い部分まで導いてくれるものが
19:52
to something with depth is missing.
欠けているのです
19:57
I believe this has to be done with a new kind of user interface,
これは 新しい種類のユーザインタフェースで
19:59
and this new kind of user interface could be done
解決する必要があると思います
20:02
with an expenditure of about 100 million dollars.
それは 1億ドルもあれば作れるでしょう
20:06
It sounds like a lot, but it is literally 18 minutes of what we're spending in Iraq --
大金に聞こえますが イラクでは18分間にいくら使っているのでしょう
20:11
we're spending 8 billion dollars a month; 18 minutes is 100 million dollars --
1ヶ月に80億ドル使っているので 9時間で1億ドルになります
20:18
so this is actually cheap.
だから実際安いものです
20:23
And Einstein said,
そして アインシュタインは言いました
20:25
"Things should be as simple as possible, but not simpler."
「物事は可能な限りシンプルであるべきだが それよりシンプルではいけない」
20:29
Thank you.
ご静聴ありがとうございました
20:32
Translated by Kaori Naiki
Reviewed by Yasushi Aoki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Alan Kay - Educator and computing pioneer
One of the true luminaries of personal computing, Alan Kay conceived of laptops and graphical interfaces years before they were realized. At XeroxPARC, Apple, HP and Disney, he has developed tools for improving the mind.

Why you should listen

"The best way to predict the future is to invent it." Alan Kay not only coined this favorite tech-world adage, but has proven its truth several times. A true polymath, as well as inventor, he has combined engineering brilliance with knowledge of child development, epistemology, molecular biology and more.

In the 1960s, Kay joined the computer team at XeroxPARC, where he worked on world-changing inventions like the graphical interface, object-oriented programming, and the personal computer itself. Later, at Apple, Atari, HP, Disney, and now at his own nonprofits, he has helped refine the tools he anticipated long before they were realized.

As the industry has blossomed, however, Kay continues to grapple with the deeper purpose of computing, struggling to create the machine that won't only recapitulate patterns in the world as we know it but will teach both children and adults to think, to see what otherwise is beyond them.

More profile about the speaker
Alan Kay | Speaker | TED.com