sponsored links
Serious Play 2008

Philip Rosedale: Life in Second Life

フィリップ・ローズデール: セカンドライフでの暮らし

May 8, 2008

なぜ仮想世界を作ったのでしょうか。フィリップ・ローズデールは彼が作った仮想世界である、セカンドライフについて、さらにそれを支える人間の創造性について語ります。セカンドライフは何が起こってもおかしくない、全く異なった空間なのです。

Philip Rosedale - Entrepreneur
Philip Rosedale (avatar "Philip Linden") is founder of Second Life, an online 3D virtual world inhabited by millions. He's chair of Linden Labs, the company behind the digital society. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
You know, we're going to do things a little differently.
それでは これから少し変わった事をします
00:16
I'm not going to show you a presentation. I'm going to talk to you.
プレゼンテーションをするのではなく
皆さんとお話をします
00:19
And at the same time, we're going to look at just images
同時に 画像も見ていきます
00:22
from a photo stream that is pretty close to live of things that --
セカンドライフ内の生活を垣間見る画像です
00:27
snapshots from Second Life. So hopefully this will be fascinating.
皆さんにとって面白いものであればいいなと
思います
00:32
You can -- I can compete for your attention with the strange pictures
スクリーン上の風変わりな画像が
00:36
that you see on screen that come from there.
皆さんを引きつけることでしょう
00:40
I thought I'd talk a little bit about some just big ideas about this,
セカンドライフの
大きなアイデアについて話をして
00:42
and then get John back out here so we can talk interactively
ジョンをここに呼び戻しましょう
そうすると対話しながら進められますから
00:47
a little bit more and think and ask questions.
それから質疑応答に移ります
00:51
You know, I guess the first question is,
それでは 最初の質問は
00:55
why build a virtual world at all?
一体全体なぜ仮想世界を作ったのか
00:58
And I think the answer to that is always going to be
それに対する答えはいつも
01:03
at least driven to a certain extent by the people
そもそもそのプロジェクトを始めようと考えた
01:07
initially crazy enough to start the project, you know.
クレイジーな人たちがある程度
関わっていると思います
01:09
So I can give you a little bit of first background just on me
最初に私の生い立ちについて少し話をして
01:14
and what moved me as a -- really going back as far as a teenager
10代の頃にまで遡ります
01:17
and then an adult, to actually try and build this kind of thing.
そして 大人になってこういうものを
実際に作り始めたところも話します
01:22
I was a very creative kid who read a lot, and got into electronics first,
私は読書好きな創造的な子供でした
まずは電子機器に興味をもち
01:25
and then later, programming computers, when I was really young.
その後コンピュータプログラミングに
興味を持ちました 当時はかなり若かったです
01:34
I was just always trying to make things.
いつも何かを作ろうとしていました
01:38
I was just obsessed with taking things apart and building things,
物を分解して また作るということに夢中で
01:42
and just anything I could do with my hands or with wood
自分の手で出来る木や電子機器
01:46
or electronics or metal or anything else.
金属やその他何にでも夢中でした
01:50
And so, for example -- and it's a great Second Life thing -- I had a bedroom.
そして私にとってはセカンドライフのようなもの
ですが 自分の寝室がありました
01:53
And every kid, you know, as a teenager, has got his bedroom he retreats to --
どんな10代の子供も
自分が逃げ込める寝室があると思いますが
01:57
but I wanted my door, I thought it would be cool if my door went up
私は 寝室のドアが上にあがると格好いいな
と思ったんです
02:00
rather than opened, like on Star Trek.
『スター・トレック』みたいに
普通に開け閉めするのではなく
02:05
I thought it would be neat to do that. And so I got up in the ceiling
そうすると格好いいと思ったので 天井に上がって
02:07
and I cut through the ceiling joists, much to my parents' delight,
天井の目地を切って
両親はさぞかし喜んだことと思いますが
02:10
and put the door, you know, being pulled up through the ceiling.
ドアを天井に上がるようにしたんです
02:15
I built -- I put a garage-door opener up in the attic
私はガレージのドアの開閉装置を
屋根裏に取り付けました
02:19
that would pull this door up.
そうすることで ドアが上がりますね
02:23
You can imagine the amount of time that it took me to do this to the house
それを施すのにどれほどの時間がかかったか
02:25
and the displeasure of my parents.
そして私の両親がどれほど怒ったか
想像がつくと思います
02:30
The thing that was always striking to me was that we as people
私がいつも思うことは 私たちは
02:32
could have so many really amazing ideas about things we'd like to do,
やりたいことについて
たくさんすばらしい考えを持っているのに
02:35
but are so often unable, in the real world, to actually do those things --
大抵 実世界では実際にはできません
02:40
to actually cobble together the materials
実際に材料を集めて
02:46
and go through the actual execution phase of building something
あなたが想像したものを
02:49
that you imagine from a design perspective.
実際に何かを作る段階まで到達することは
なかなかできません
02:52
And so for me, I know that when the Internet came around
私にとっても同じで インターネットが広まって
02:54
and I was doing computer programming and just, you know,
私はコンピュータプログラミングをやっていて
02:57
just generally trying to run my own little company
自分の小さい会社を運営しようとして
03:00
and figure out what to do with the Internet and with computers,
それでインターネットとコンピュータで
やるべきことがわかりました
03:03
I was just immediately struck by how the ultimate thing
私はインターネットとコンピュータで
本当にやりたいことが
03:06
that you would really want to do with the Internet and with computers
いかに究極なことなのか
03:12
would be to use the Internet and connected computers
インターネットとコンピュータを使って
03:15
to simulate a world to sort of recreate the laws of physics
世界を作ってみようと思いました
03:18
and the rules of how things went together --
原子や物を作る方法のような
03:25
the sort of -- the idea of atoms and how to make things,
物理的法則や物事が行われる法則を
再現しようと思いました
03:29
and do that inside a computer so that we could all get in there and make stuff.
そしてそれをコンピュータ上で行います
作るのに必要なものは全部そこにありますからね
03:32
And so for me that was the thing that was so enticing.
それが私にとっては魅力的なものでした
03:38
I just wanted this place where you could build things.
私はただ物を作る場所が欲しかっただけなんです
03:42
And so I think you see that in the genesis
それがセカンドライフの発端であり
03:45
of what has happened with Second Life, and I think it's important.
重要な部分だと思います
03:48
I also think that more generally, the use of the Internet and technology
また インターネットとテクノロジーを使うことは
03:52
as a kind of a space between us for creativity and design is a general trend.
私たちの間にある創造性とデザインの空間として一般的な傾向だと思います
03:58
It is a -- sort of a great human progress.
人間の大きな進歩です
04:04
Technology is just generally being used to allow us to create
テクノロジーは皆が共有できる 社会的な方法を
04:07
in as shared and social a way as possible.
作ることを可能にしています
04:13
And I think that Second Life and virtual worlds more generally
セカンドライフと仮想世界は一般的に
04:16
represent the best we can do to achieve that right now.
今現在到達しうる一番の状態であると思います
04:18
You know, another way to look at that,
他の方法で言うなれば
04:23
and related to the content and, you know, thinking about space,
宇宙について考える場合と似ていますね
04:25
is to connect sort of virtual worlds to space.
仮想世界と宇宙がある意味で似ています
04:28
I thought that might be a fun thing to talk about for a second.
ちょっとそれについて話してみるのも
楽しいかもしれません
04:31
If you think about going into space, it's a fascinating thing.
宇宙に行くということを考えるのは
とてもワクワクしますね
04:34
So many movies, so many kids, we all sort of
数多くの映画や 子供達や 私たちは多かれ少なかれ
04:39
dream about exploring space. Now, why is that?
宇宙探索について夢をみると思います
それはなぜでしょう
04:42
Stop for a moment and ask, why that conceit?
ちょっと立ち止まって考えてみましょう
どうしてそう思うのか
04:45
Why do we as people want to do that?
なぜ私たちはそうしたいのか
04:47
I think there's a couple of things. It's what we see in the movies --
いくつか思い浮かびます
私たちが映画で見るような
04:51
you know, it's this dream that we all share.
私たち全員が思い描く夢ですね
04:53
One is that if you went into space you'd be able to begin again.
1つは 宇宙に行ったら
全くのゼロから始められます
04:56
In some sense, you would become someone else in that journey,
その旅では
自分はある意味別の人間になることができます
05:01
because there wouldn't be -- you'd leave society and life as you know it, behind.
自分が知っている社会や生活を抜け出します
05:04
And so inevitably, you would transform yourself --
探索を始める際 おそらく元には戻れませんが
05:09
irreversibly, in all likelihood -- as you began this exploration.
自分自身を変化させなくてはいけません
05:12
And then the second thing is that there's this tangible sense
そして2つには おそらく
05:16
that if you travel far enough, you can find out there --
宇宙の遠く離れたところまで移動すると
05:20
oh, yeah -- you have no idea what you're going to find
そこで何を見つけるのか全くわからないでしょう
05:26
once you get there, into space.
一旦宇宙に行くと
05:29
It's going to be different than here.
こことは違うでしょう
05:31
And in fact, it's going to be so different than what we see here on earth
実際 地球上で見るものとは全く異なっていて
05:33
that anything is going to be possible.
何でも可能のような感じがする
05:38
So that's kind of the idea -- we as humans crave the idea of
そういう考えです 私たち人間が欲している
05:41
creating a new identity and going into a place where anything is possible.
新しいアイデンティティを構築し
何でも可能な場所へと行く
05:44
And I think that if you really sit and think about it,
もし本気でそう考えるなら
05:49
virtual worlds, and where we're going
仮想世界や
05:52
with more and more computing technology,
さらなるコンピュータテクノロジーがある場所は
05:56
represent essentially the likely, really tactically possible
実践的に可能な
06:00
version of space exploration.
宇宙探索みたいなものです
06:06
We are moved by the idea of virtual worlds because, like space,
私たちは宇宙のような 仮想世界のアイデアに
突き動かされています
06:08
they allow us to reinvent ourselves and they contain anything
そこでは私たち自身を新たに作ることができて
06:13
and everything, and probably anything could happen there.
そこには何でもそろっていて
そしておそらく何でもできる
06:17
You know, to give you a size idea about scale, you know,
スケールの大きさを皆さんに想像してもらうには
06:19
comparing space to Second Life, most people don't realize, kind of --
宇宙とセカンドライフとでは ほとんどの人には
分かりづらいかもしれませんから
06:22
and then this is just like the Internet in the early '90s.
たとえば90年代初期のインターネットです
06:26
In fact, Second Life virtual worlds are a lot like the Internet in the early '90s today:
セカンドライフ仮想世界は今日の90年代初期の
インターネットみたいなものです
06:29
everybody's very excited,
みんなが期待していて
06:32
there's a lot of hype and excitement about one idea or the next
1つ1つ考えが出てくる度に
06:34
from moment to moment, and then there's despair
多くの興奮があって そして絶望があって
06:37
and everybody thinks the whole thing's not going to work.
誰もがこれらが上手く行くわけないと考えて
06:40
Everything that's happening with Second Life
セカンドライフで起こっているすべてのことは
06:42
and more broadly with virtual worlds, all happened in the early '90s.
もっと広げると仮想世界で起こっていることは
すべて90年代初期に起こっていました
06:44
We always play a game at the office where you can take any article
いつも私たちはオフィスで記事を取ってきては
06:47
and find the same article where you just replace the words "Second Life"
セカンドライフという言葉に置き換えられる
記事を見つけてゲームをしています
06:50
with "Web," and "virtual reality" with "Internet."
ウェブはセカンドライフに
インターネットはバーチャルリアリティに
06:54
You can find exactly the same articles
皆さんもきっと人々が観察し
見つけたことについて書いてある記事と
06:59
written about everything that people are observing.
ほぼ同じ記事を見つけると思います
07:01
To give you an idea of scale, Second Life is about 20,000 CPUs at this point.
セカンドライフの規模をイメージするには 今現在約2万CPUが稼働しています
07:05
It's about 20,000 computers connected together
現在アメリカ合衆国にある3つの施設の
07:12
in three facilities in the United States right now,
約2万のコンピュータがつながっています
07:14
that are simulating this virtual space. And the virtual space itself --
それが仮想空間を作り出しています
07:18
there's about 250,000 people a day that are wandering around in there,
その仮想空間では1日に約25万人がその中を
歩き回っています
07:22
so the kind of, active population is something like a smallish city.
実際に活動している人口としては
小さな都市ほどでしょうか
07:26
The space itself is about 10 times the size of San Francisco,
空間はサンフランシスコの約10倍で
07:30
and it's about as densely built out.
同じ程 建物が密集しています
07:34
So it gives you an idea of scale. Now, it's expanding very rapidly --
これで規模のイメージがつかめたでしょうか
現在 すごい勢いで広がっています
07:37
about five percent a month or so right now, in terms of new servers being added.
新しいサーバーが加わるのは
現在1ヶ月につき5パーセントほどです
07:40
And so of course, radically unlike the real world,
もちろん実世界とは異なり 急激に
07:44
and like the Internet, the whole thing is expanding
インターネットのように すべてが拡大しています
07:47
very, very quickly, and historically exponentially.
非常に素早く 急激に
07:49
So that sort of space exploration thing is matched up here
そういうわけで宇宙探索がこれと
上手く重なるんですね
07:52
by the amount of content that's in there,
そこに存在する物の量や
07:55
and I think that amount is critical.
その大きさは決定的だと思います
07:57
It was critical with the virtual world
仮想世界が決定的なのは
07:59
that it be this space of truly infinite possibility.
この空間が真に無限の可能性を
秘めているからです
08:01
We're very sensitive to that as humans.
私たちは人間として
その事実にとても敏感になっています
08:04
You know, you know when you see it. You know when you can do anything in a space
きっとそれを見たら分かることでしょう
宇宙で何でもできると思っていたら
08:06
and you know when you can't.
そうではない時もある
08:09
Second Life today is this 20,000 machines,
セカンドライフは今日2万の機械で動いていて
08:11
and it's about 100 million or so user-created objects where, you know,
1億個程のユーザーが作り出した物体があり
08:13
an object would be something like this, possibly interactive.
その物体はおそらく相互作用し
08:17
Tens of millions of them are thinking all the time;
何千万もの物体が常に思考している
08:20
they have code attached to them.
それらには記号が付いているわけですね
08:22
So it's a really large world already, in terms of the amount of stuff that's there
物体の量で言えば
すでに巨大な世界になっていて
08:24
and that's very important.
そしてそれはとても重要です
08:27
If anybody plays, like, World of Warcraft,
例えばだれか『World of Warcraft』を
プレーするとしたら
08:29
World of Warcraft comes on, like, four DVDs.
World of WarcraftはDVD4枚くらいのサイズです
08:31
Second Life, by comparison, has about 100 terabytes
セカンドライフは 比較すると
約100テラバイトほどの
08:34
of user-created data, making it about 25,000 times larger.
ユーザーが作り出したデータがあり
それは大体2万5千倍の大きさですね
08:38
So again, like the Internet compared to AOL,
繰り返しますが
例えばインターネットと『AOL』や
08:43
and the sort of chat rooms and content on AOL at the time,
その当時のチャットルームの類や
AOLの内容と比べると
08:47
what's happening here is something very different,
ここで起こっていることは大きく異なっています
08:49
because the sheer scale of what people can do
人々ができる事の単純な規模の大きさは
08:51
when they're enabled to do anything they want is pretty amazing.
彼らがやりたい事ができるということは
かなりすばらしいことだと思います
08:54
The last big thought is that it is almost certainly true
最後の大きなアイディアは
正しいのはほぼ確実ですが
08:58
that whatever this is going to evolve into
これがどういうものに進化していこうとも
09:02
is going to be bigger in total usage than the Web itself.
ウェブそのものよりも使用量としては大きいものになるということです
09:05
And let me justify that with two statements.
2つ言いたいことがあります
09:09
Generically, what we use the Web for is to organize, exchange,
一般的に ウェブを使う目的は
09:12
create and consume information.
情報を系統立て 交換し 作り出し
消費するためです
09:16
It's kind of like Irene talking about Google being data-driven.
アイリーンが『グーグル』はデータ主導だと
言ったようなもので
09:18
I'd say I kind of think about the world as being information.
私は世界が情報そのものになった
という風に考えます
09:22
Everything that we interact with, all the experiences that we have,
私たちがやりとりすること
経験することすべては
09:25
is kind of us flowing through a sea of information
私たちが情報の海で
浮かんでいるようなものです
09:28
and interacting with it in different ways.
そして異なった方法でやりとりするのです
09:30
The Web puts information in the form of text and images.
ウェブはテキストと画像という形で
情報を作っています
09:33
The topology, the geography of the Web is text-to-text links for the most part.
ウェブのほとんどは
テキストがつながってできています
09:39
That's one way of organizing information,
これは情報をまとめる1つの方法ですね
09:44
but there are two things about the way you access information in a virtual world
しかし 仮想世界では他にも2種類
情報にアクセスする方法があるのです
09:47
that I think are the important ways that they're very different
それらは大きく異なっていて
重要な方法だと思います
09:52
and much better than what we've been able to do to date with the Web.
とても優れているので ウェブが時代遅れに
なったように思ってしまいます
09:55
The first is that, as I said, the --
1つ目は 私が言ったように
09:59
well, the first difference for virtual worlds is that
仮想世界で大きく異なっていることの1つは
10:03
information is presented to you in the virtual world
仮想世界では皆さんに対して
10:06
using the most powerful iconic symbols
もっとも強力な象徴的シンボルを使って
10:09
that you can possibly use with human beings.
つまり皆さんは人間を使って
情報を表現することが可能だということです
10:13
So for example, C-H-A-I-R is the English word for that,
例えば、C-H-A-I-Rという英単語は
これを指しますが
10:15
but a picture of this is a universal symbol.
この物体というのは世間一般のシンボルですね
10:20
Everybody knows what it means. There's no need to translate it.
皆さんはこれが何を意味するのか知っている
これを翻訳する必要はないですね
10:25
It's also more memorable if I show you that picture,
また C-H-A-I-Rを紙に書いて見せながら
10:28
and I show you C-H-A-I-R on a piece of paper.
皆さんにこの物体を皆さんに見せると
もっと記憶に残るものになるでしょう
10:31
You can do tests that show that you'll remember
きっと数日後覚えているかテストをすると
10:33
that I was talking about a chair a couple of days later a lot better.
皆さんは私が椅子の話をしていたと
よく覚えていることだと思います
10:36
So when you organize information using the symbols of our memory,
皆さんが実際にシンボルを使って
記憶の中の情報をまとめるとき
10:39
using the most common symbols that we've been immersed in all our lives,
私たちの生活に根ざした
もっとも一般的なシンボルを使うと
10:43
you maximally both excite, stimulate,
皆さんは最大限に脳を刺激し
10:47
are able to remember, transfer and manipulate data.
記憶することができ データを動かしたり
操作することができます
10:51
And so virtual worlds are the best way
そして仮想世界は私たちが
10:53
for us to essentially organize and experience information.
情報をまとめ 経験するのに最も良い方法です
10:57
And I think that's something that people have talked about for 20 years --
これは20年間人々が
話し合っていたことだと思います
11:01
you know, that 3D, that lifelike environments
3Dで 実際の生活をするような環境というのは
11:04
are really important in some magical way to us.
私たちには重要な 魔法のような方法ですね
11:08
But the second thing -- and I think this one is less obvious --
しかし2つ目に
これはあまり明らかなことではありませんが
11:10
is that the experience of creating, consuming, exploring that information
情報を作り 消費し 探るという経験は
11:14
is in the virtual world implicitly and inherently social.
仮想世界では絶対的に本質的に
社会性のあることです
11:22
You are always there with other people.
皆さんはいつも他の人たちといるわけですから
11:27
And we as humans are social creatures and must, or are aided by,
私たち人間は社会的な生き物で
情報の手を借りているし
11:30
or enjoy more, the consumption of information in the presence of others.
情報の消費を
他の人間と楽しまなくてはなりません
11:36
It's essential to us. You can't escape it.
私たちにとって欠かせないことなのです 
逃れることはできません
11:41
When you're on Amazon.com and you're looking for digital cameras or whatever,
もし『アマゾン』で
デジタルカメラだか何かを探していたとします
11:44
you're on there right now, when you're on the site, with like 5,000 other people,
そのページを見ている時 他に5千人ほどの人も
同じページを見ているのです
11:49
but you can't talk to them.
でも 彼らとは話せません
11:55
You can't just turn to the people that are browsing digital cameras
デジタルカメラの同じページを
11:57
on the same page as you, and ask them,
見ている人たちのほうに向いて 彼らに
12:01
"Hey, have you seen one of these before? Because I'm thinking about buying it."
「ちょっと、こういうの見たことある?
買おうと思うんだけどさ」とは聞けませんね
12:04
That experience of like, shopping together, just as a simple example,
例えば 一緒に買い物をするような単純な経験は
12:07
is an example of how as social creatures
社会性のある生き物として
12:11
we want to experience information in that way.
どのように私たちが情報を経験しているか
という例です
12:13
So that second point, that we inherently experience information together
つまり2つ目の点では
私たちは本来共に情報を経験し
12:15
or want to experience it together,
もしくは情報を共に経験したいと
思っているということは
12:21
is critical to essentially, kind of,
本質的であり
12:23
this trend of where we're going to use technology to connect us.
私たちがつながるために
テクノロジーを使うという傾向だと言えます
12:26
And so I think, again, that it's likely that in the next decade or so
10年後には 仮想世界は
12:31
these virtual worlds are going to be the most common way as human beings
インターネットを使う上で
12:36
that we kind of use the electronics of the Internet, if you will,
最も一般的な方法となっていて
12:41
to be together, to consume information.
共に情報を消費する方法となっているのです
12:46
You know, mapping in India -- that's such a great example.
例を挙げるとすると
インドの地図を作るようなことでしょうか
12:50
Maybe the solution there involves talking to other people in real time.
おそらくそこで何かを解決するには
実際に他の人々と話し合うことや
12:52
Asking for advice, rather than any possible way
助言を求めることが大きく関わってきます
12:57
that you could just statically organize a map.
単に統計的に地図を作る他の方法よりも
必要なことでしょう
13:02
So I think that's another big point.
というわけで これがもう1つの大きな点だと
思います
13:06
I think that wherever this is all going,
これがどういった方向に進もうとも
13:08
whether it's Second Life or its descendants, or something broader
それがセカンドライフであれ その子孫であれ
世界中のあらゆる場所で起こっている
13:10
that happens all around the world at a lot of different points --
もっと幅の広いものであれ
13:15
this is what we're going to see the Internet used for,
それがインターネットが使われた結果
発見するであろうものです
13:18
and total traffic and total unique users is going to invert,
すべての往来やすべてのユーザーが転化して
13:21
so that the Web and its bibliographic set of text and graphical information
そうすることでウェブや
その中のあらゆるテキストや画像の情報が
13:25
is going to become a tool or a part of that consumption pattern,
道具となり
消費のパターンの一部となるわけです
13:30
but the pattern itself is going to happen mostly in this type of an environment.
しかし 大抵パターン自体は
このような環境で起こります
13:33
Big idea, but I think highly defensible.
大きいアイデアですが
かなり擁護もできているとも思います
13:37
So let me stop there and bring John back,
それでは ここで一旦止めて
ジョンに戻ってきてもらいましょう
13:41
and maybe we can just have a longer conversation.
より長く会話ができるのではないかと思います
13:44
Thank you. John. That's great.
ジョン ありがとうございます
13:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:49
John Hockenberry: Why is the creation, the impulse to create Second Life,
セカンドライフを作る上で
創造する強い衝動があったと思いますが
13:54
not a utopian impulse?
なぜユートピアを作ろうとは
思わなかったのですか
13:58
Like for example, in the 19th century,
例えば19世紀では
14:01
any number of works of literature that imagined alternative worlds
多くの別世界を描いた文学作品は
14:03
were explicitly utopian.
明らかにユートピア的ですね
14:07
Philip Rosedale: I think that's great. That's such a deep question. Yeah.
すばらしいですね 深い質問です
14:09
Is a virtual world likely to be a utopia, would be one way I'd say it.
仮想世界はユートピアになりそうだと
ある意味ではそうかもしれません
14:13
The answer is no, and I think the reason why is because
しかし 答えはノーです 
その理由としては
14:18
the Web itself as a good example is profoundly bottoms-up.
ウェブ自体が底上げになっている
良い例だからです
14:22
That idea of infinite possibility, that magic of anything can happen,
つまり 無限の可能性
なんでも起こりうるという魔法が
14:25
only happens in an environment
個人レベルで 『レゴ』ブロックのレベルで
14:30
where you really know that there's a fundamental freedom
根本的な自由があると自分がよく分かっている
14:32
at the level of the individual actor, at the level of the Lego blocks,
環境でのみ起こる
14:35
if you will, that make up the virtual world.
もしあなたが望めば それが仮想世界を作る
14:39
You have to have that level of freedom, and so I'm often asked that,
人々には
そのレベルの自由がなくてはなりません
14:41
you know, is there a, kind of, utopian or,
そしてセカンドライフには
ユートピアとかそういった傾向が
14:44
is there a utopian tendency to Second Life and things like it,
あるのかどうかとよく問われます
14:46
that you would create a world that has a grand scheme to it?
また 壮大な計画をもって
世界を作ろうとしているのかとも聞かれます
14:49
Those top-down schemes are alienating to just about everybody,
そういったトップダウンの計画は
皆さんを遠ざけてしまいます
14:52
even if you mean well when you build them.
たとえ良かれと思って
それらを作っていてもです
14:56
And what's more, human society, when it's controlled,
さらに 人間社会は管理されているとき
14:59
when you set out a grand scheme of rules,
規則や人と関わる新しい方法
新しい街の配置の仕方などの
15:03
a new way of people interacting, or a new way of laying out a city, or whatever,
壮大な計画に着手すると
15:05
that stuff historically has never scaled much beyond,
そういったものは歴史的に見て
決してそれ以上にはならないのです
15:09
you know -- I always laughingly say -- the Mall of America, you know,
いつも言いながら笑ってしまいますが
『モール・オブ・アメリカ』のようなものです
15:12
which is like, the largest piece of centrally designed architecture
つまり
巨大な全体的にデザインされた建造物です
15:15
that, you know, has been built.
それが作られていると
15:18
JH: The Kremlin was pretty big.
『クレムリン』もかなり大きいですよ
15:20
PR: The Kremlin, yeah. That's true. The whole complex.
確かに クレムリンもです そうですね
大きな建物ですね
15:22
JH: Give me a story of a tool you created at the beginning
セカンドライフで初期に作り出した
人々が絶対に使いたいだろうという
15:25
in Second Life that you were pretty sure people would want to use
確信を持っていたが
15:29
in the creation of their avatars or in communicating
アバターを作る際に
または意思疎通を図る際のツールで
15:32
that people actually in practice said, no, I'm not interested in that at all,
実際に人々が使い始めたら
あまり興味を示さなかったものや
15:35
and name something that you didn't come up with
あなたが思いつかなかったが
15:39
that almost immediately people began to demand.
すぐに人々が欲しいと要求し始めたものの例を
挙げてください
15:44
PR: I'm sure I can think of multiple examples of both of those.
両方の例ともいくつかの例が思い浮かびますね
15:47
One of my favorites. I had this feature that I built into Second Life --
1つは私が気に入っているものです
セカンドライフに
15:50
I was really passionate about it.
私が情熱を持って組み込んだ
ある機能があります
15:53
It was an ability to kind of walk up close to somebody
それは人々に近寄って
15:55
and have a more private conversation,
もっとプライベートな会話ができる
という機能です
15:58
but it wasn't instant messaging because you had to sort of befriend somebody.
インスタントメッセージではありません
それをするには友達になる必要がありますから
16:00
It was just this idea that you could kind of have a private chat.
単にプライベートな会話ができるようになる
というアイデアです
16:03
I just remember it was one of those examples of data-driven design.
データ主導デザインの例のうちの1つだと
覚えていますが
16:06
I thought it was such a good idea from my perspective,
私から見ると
とても良いアイデアだと思ったのですが
16:09
and it was just absolutely never used, and we ultimately --
ほぼ使われることはなく 結局
16:11
I think we've now turned it off, if I remember.
その機能を止めたというのを覚えています
16:14
We finally gave up, took it out of the code.
結局あきらめて
コードから取ってしまいました
16:16
But more generally, you know, one other example I think about this,
しかし もっと一般的な例で
16:19
which is great relative to the utopian idea.
かつ ユートピアのアイデアと
大きく関わっているものを挙げましょう
16:23
Second Life originally had 16 simulators. It now has 20,000.
セカンドライフはもともと16のシミュレータを
使っていました 今は2万あります
16:26
So when it only had 16,
シミュレータがまだ16だった時に
16:31
it was only about as big as this college campus.
大体この大学のキャンパスと
ほぼ同じサイズしかありませんでした
16:33
And we had -- we zoned it, you know: we put a nightclub,
私たちはそれを区画で分けました
ナイトクラブや
16:36
we put a disco where you could dance,
実際に踊れるディスコを置いて
16:40
and then we had a place where you could fight with guns if you wanted to,
そして銃で戦える場所も作りました
16:42
and we had another place that was like a boardwalk, kind of a Coney Island.
他にもコニーアイランドにあるような
遊歩道も作りました
16:46
And we laid out the zoning, but of course,
区画整備をしましたが もちろん
16:50
people could build all around it however they wanted to.
人々は作りたいように
建物を作ることもできました
16:53
And what was so amazing right from the start was that the idea
開始当初から面白かったのは
16:56
that we had put out in the zoning concept, basically,
私たちは基本的に区画を決めていましたが
17:00
was instantly and thoroughly ignored,
それをすぐに全く無視して
17:04
and like, two months into the whole thing,
2ヶ月ほどで
17:06
-- which is really a small amount of time, even in Second Life time --
2ヶ月というのはセカンドライフ内の
時間で考えてみてもとても短い時間ですが
17:09
I remember the users, the people who were then using Second Life,
ユーザーが
その当時セカンドライフを使っていた人ですね
17:12
the residents came to me and said, we want to buy the disco --
その人たちがやってきて
ディスコを買いたいと言いました
17:16
because I had built it -- we want to buy that land and raze it
自分たちがその土地を買って
ディスコを破壊し
17:20
and put houses on it. And I sold it to them --
家を建てると言っていたので
彼らに売りました
17:24
I mean, we transferred ownership and they had a big party
所有権を移し 大きなパーティーを開いて
17:27
and blew up the entire building.
建物全体を爆破しました
17:29
And I remember that that was just so telling, you know,
つまり言いたいのは
17:31
that you didn't know exactly what was going to happen.
そこでは一体何が起こるか分からなかった
ということです
17:35
When you think about stuff that people have built that's popular --
人々が建てたものについて考えたとき
有名なことですが
17:37
JH: CBGB's has to close eventually, you know. That's the rule.
『CBGB』もいつかは店を畳まないと
いけませんから それが流れというものです
17:40
PR: Exactly. And it -- but it closed on day one, basically, in Internet time.
その通りです しかし インターネット時間で
初日に閉まったんです
17:43
You know, an example of something -- pregnancy.
もう1つのほうの例は 妊娠ですね
17:49
You can have a baby in Second Life.
セカンドライフでは
赤ちゃんを作ることができます
17:52
This is done entirely using, kind of, the tools that are built into Second Life,
これはセカンドライフ内の
ツールを使うことでできます
17:55
so the innate concept of becoming pregnant and having a baby, of course --
妊娠し 子供を持つというのは
生まれ持った概念ですが
18:01
Second Life is, at the platform level, at the level of the company -- at Linden Lab --
セカンドライフは リンデンラボ内の
プラットフォームの段階では
18:05
Second Life has no game properties to it whatsoever.
ゲームの特性は全く持ち合わせていません
18:10
There is no attempt to structure the experience,
そういった経験ができる構造を作ろうという
試みもありません
18:13
to make it utopian in that sense that we put into it.
ユートピア的意味を込めることになりますから
18:15
So of course, we never would have put a mechanism for having babies or, you know,
もちろん 赤ちゃんを作るというメカニズムも
作ろうとしていませんでした
18:18
taking two avatars and merging them, or something.
2つのアバターを使って
それらを合わせるといったような
18:21
But people built the ability to have babies and care for babies
しかし 人々は赤ちゃんを作る能力を構築し
そして可愛がっている
18:24
as a purchasable experience that you can have in Second Life and so --
セカンドライフで買って得られる経験ですね
18:29
I mean, that's a pretty fascinating example of, you know,
経済組織全体で起こっていることを
伝えるためには
18:33
what goes on in the overall economy.
とても魅力的な例だと思います
18:36
And of course, the existence of an economy is another idea.
もちろん 経済の存在は全く別の話です
18:38
I didn't talk about it, but it's a critical feature.
それについては話していませんでしたが
決定的な特徴です
18:40
When people are given the opportunity to create in the world,
人々が世界で創造する機会を与えられたら
18:43
there's really two things they want.
やりたいことが2つ出てくると思います
18:46
One is fair ownership of the things they create.
1つは 作り出したものを
正当に所有することです
18:48
And then the second one is -- if they feel like it,
2つ目は もし彼らが望めば
18:51
and they're not going to do it in every case, but in many they are --
全体に当てはまるわけではありませんが
18:53
they want to actually be able to sell that creation
自分たちの生計を立てるため
18:55
as a way of providing for their own livelihood.
作ったものを売りたいと考えます
18:59
True on the Web -- also true in Second Life.
ウェブ上でも
セカンドライフ上でも当てはまることです
19:01
And so the existence of an economy is critical.
それゆえ 経済の存在は決定的なのです
19:04
JH: Questions for Philip Rosedale? Right here.
フィリップ・ローズデールに対して
質問はありますか そちらの方
19:06
(Audience: Well, first an observation, which is that you look like a character.)
(初めてお目にかかって あなたは
あなたのキャラクターに似ていると思います)
19:10
JH: The observation is, Philip has been accused of looking like a character,
フィリップは自分のキャラクター
19:13
an avatar, in Second Life.
セカンドライフのアバターに似ていると
非難されています
19:18
Respond, and then we'll get the rest of your question.
返答してください
それから質問の残りに答えます
19:20
PR: But I don't look like my avatar.
でも 私のアバターには似ていませんよ
19:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:24
How many people here know what my avatar looks like?
この会場のどのくらいの人が私のアバターを
見たことがありますか
19:26
That's probably not very many.
おそらく多くはないでしょう
19:28
JH: Are you ripping off somebody else's avatar with that, sort of --
誰か他の人のアバターを
けなそうとしているんですか
19:30
PR: No, no. I didn't. One of the other guys at work had a fantastic avatar --
いえいえ でもある同僚は
すばらしいアバターを作りました
19:32
a female avatar -- that I used to be once in a while.
女性のアバターですが
時々私がなりすましていましたが
19:35
But my avatar is a guy wearing chaps.
でも 私のアバターは
男性で チャップスを着ています
19:38
Spiky hair -- spikier than this. Kind of orange hair.
トゲトゲの髪で これよりピンピンしています
それにオレンジ色の髪です
19:45
Handlebar mustache. Kind of a Village People sort of a character.
そして鎌ひげです 
村人といった感じのキャラクターですね
19:48
So, very cool.
とても格好いいです
19:53
JH: And your question?
では 質問は
19:55
(Audience: [Unclear].)
([不明瞭])
19:57
JH: The question is, there appears to be a lack of cultural fine-tuning in Second Life.
質問は セカンドライフでは
文化がうまく調整されて無かったと思います
20:00
It doesn't seem to have its own culture,
独自の文化もないようですし
20:06
and the sort of differences that exist in the real world
実世界に存在する差異は
セカンドライフ上の地図には
20:08
aren't translated into the Second Life map.
翻訳されていませんね
20:10
PR: Well, first of all, we're very early,
まず 私たちはまだ本当の初期段階である
ということです
20:13
so this has only been going on for a few years.
まだ数年しか経っていません
20:15
And so part of what we see is the same evolution of human behavior
今 私たちが目撃しているのは
社会に馴染んでいく際の
20:18
that you see in emerging societies.
人間の行動と同じ進化です
20:21
So a fair criticism -- is what it is -- of Second Life today is that
公平な批判としては 今日のセカンドライフは
20:23
it's more like the Wild West than it is like Rome, from a cultural standpoint.
文化的見地からすると
ローマというよりも開拓時代の西部地方です
20:27
That said, the evolution of, and the nuanced interaction that creates culture,
文化を作り出す交流の進化は
20:32
is happening at 10 times the speed of the real world,
実世界のスピードの10倍の速さで
起こっています
20:38
and in an environment where, if you walk into a bar in Second Life,
セカンドライフ内のバーに入ったとすると
20:41
65 percent of the people there are not in the United States,
そこにいる65パーセントが
アメリカ外の人間です
20:46
and in fact are speaking their, you know, various and different languages.
そして あらゆる言語でしゃべっています
20:49
In fact, one of the ways to make money in Second Life
事実 セカンドライフ内で
お金を稼ぐ方法の1つに
20:54
is to make really cool translators that you drag onto your body
自分の中にすばらしい翻訳家を引っ張ってきて
20:56
and they basically, kind of, pop up on your screen
基本的にはスクリーンに
21:01
and allow you to use Google or Babel Fish
『グーグル』や『バベルフィッシュ』や
21:03
or one of the other online text translators to on-the-fly
他の翻訳サイトを置いて
21:06
translate spoken -- I'm sorry -- typed text between individuals.
すぐに書き言葉を個人間で翻訳することです
21:09
And so, the multicultural nature and the sort of cultural melting pot
セカンドライフ内で多文化の性質や文化が
21:14
that's happening inside Second Life is quite --
溶け込んでいるというのは
21:18
I think, quite remarkable relative to what in real human terms
私たちが到達している実際の世界での
21:21
in the real world we've ever been able to achieve.
実際の人間関係とかなり関わっています
21:26
So, I think that culture will fine-tune, it will emerge,
文化は調整され 出現してくると思います
21:28
but we still have some years to wait while that happens,
しかし そうなるまでに
まだ数年必要になるでしょう
21:31
as you would naturally expect.
皆さんもそのように予想していると思います
21:35
JH: Other questions? Right here.
他に質問はありますか そちらの方
21:37
(Audience: What's your demographic?)
(人口統計はどうなっていますか)
21:40
JH: What's your demographic?
人口統計はどうなっているか
21:42
PR: So, the question is, what's the demographic.
はい 統計ですが
21:44
So, the average age of a person in Second Life is 32,
セカンドライフ内の平均年齢は32で
21:46
however, the use of Second Life increases dramatically
しかしながら セカンドライフの利用は
21:51
as your physical age increases. So as you go from age 30 to age 60 --
実際の年齢が上がるにつれ
劇的に増えています
21:56
and there are many people in their sixties using Second Life --
30歳から60歳まで上がると
60歳代の人も多くいますが
22:01
this is also not a sharp curve -- it's very, very distributed --
急上昇するのではなく
使用率はとても緩いカーブで
22:03
usage goes up in terms of, like, hours per week by 40 percent
例えば実年齢が
30歳から60歳に上がるにつれて
22:08
as you go from age 30 to age 60 in real life, so there's not --
一週間の利用時間は40%上がっています
22:12
many people make the mistake of believing that Second Life
多くの人がセカンドライフのことを
22:16
is some kind of an online game. Actually it's generally unappealing --
オンラインゲームの類だと勘違いしています
事実 一般的はあまり魅力がない
22:18
I'm just speaking broadly and critically --
今は一般的に批判的に話をしているだけですが
22:23
it's not very appealing to people that play online video games,
オンラインゲームをする人たちには
あまり魅力のないものかもしれません
22:26
because the graphics are not yet equivalent to --
なぜならグラフィックスはまだ
それとは同等にまで至っていないし
22:28
I mean, these are very nice pictures,
もちろんとても良い画像ですよ
22:32
but in general the graphics are not quite equivalent
しかし 一般的にグラフィックスは
『グランド・セフト・オート4』に見るような
22:33
to the fine-tuned graphics that you see in a Grand Theft Auto 4.
美しいグラフィックスと
同程度にはなっていません
22:35
So average age: 32. I mentioned
平均年齢は32 これはもう言いましたね
22:39
65 percent of the users are not in the United States.
65%はアメリカ合衆国外のユーザーです
22:42
The distribution amongst countries is extremely broad.
国ごとの分布はかなり幅が広いです
22:44
There's users from, you know, virtually every country in the world now in Second Life.
ほぼ世界各国のユーザーがいます
22:47
The dominant ones are -- if you take the UK and Europe,
主な国は イギリスやヨーロッパは
22:50
together they make up about 55 percent of the usage base in Second Life.
合わせればセカンドライフの約55%の
利用率になります
22:54
In terms of psychographic --
心理学的な点で言うと
22:58
oh, men and women: men and women are almost equally matched in Second Life,
ああ セカンドライフでは
男性と女性はほぼ同じ割合です
23:00
so about 45 percent of the people online right now on Second Life are women.
今現在セカンドライフで活動している
約45%の人々は女性です
23:05
Women use Second Life, though,
女性は活動時間を基に言うと
男性よりも約30〜40%多く
23:10
about 30 to 40 percent more, on an hours basis, than men do,
セカンドライフを利用しています
23:12
meaning that more men sign up than women,
つまり 男性の方が
登録数は多いということですが
23:15
and more women stay and use it than men.
女性のほうが長く利用するということです
23:17
So that's another demographic fact.
また別の統計情報ですね
23:20
In terms of psychographic, you know, the people in Second Life
心理的な面では セカンドライフ内の人々は
23:22
are remarkably dissimilar relative to what you might think,
皆さんが思うような人たちとは
かなりかけ離れていると思います
23:27
when you go in and talk to them and meet them, and I would, you know,
セカンドライフに入って 彼らと話したり
出会ったりすると
23:31
challenge you to just do this and find out.
皆さんには是非やってもらって
確かめてもらいたいと思いますが
23:33
But it's not a bunch of programmers.
彼らはプログラマーの団体ではありません
23:35
It's not easy to describe as a demographic.
統計で表現するのは簡単ではありません
23:38
If I had to just sort of paint a broad picture, I'd say, remember the people
もし 表現しなくてはならないとすると
皆さんは
23:42
who were really getting into eBay in the first few years of eBay?
『イーベイ』が登場した最初の数年に
イーベイに熱中した人たちを覚えていますか
23:46
Maybe a little bit like that: in other words, people who are early adopters.
そういう人たちかもしれません
言い換えると早期導入者です
23:50
They tend to be creative. They tend to be entrepreneurial.
彼らは創造性がありますし
企業家精神に溢れています
23:53
A lot of them -- about 55,000 people so far -- are cash-flow positive:
多くのユーザーは 大体5万5千人ほどですが
キャッシュフローに積極的です
23:56
they're making money from what -- I mean, real-world money --
彼らはセカンドライフで行っていることで
24:00
from what they're doing in Second Life, so it's a very build --
実際のお金を稼いでいます
24:03
still a creative, building things, build-your-own-business
クリエイティブで 物を作り
自分のビジネスを作るタイプの
24:07
type of an orientation. So, that's it.
方向性を持っていますね 以上です
24:10
JH: You describe yourself, Philip, as someone who was really creative
あなたは自分自身をとても創造性のある人間だと
言いましたが
24:12
when you were young and, you know, liked to make things.
若い時に ものづくりが好きだったと
24:14
I mean, it's not often that you hear somebody
あまり誰かが自分自身のことを
24:18
describe themselves as really creative.
創造性があるとは言わないと思いますが
24:21
I suspect that's possibly a euphemism for C student
長い時間自分の部屋で過ごす成績Cの学生の
24:23
who spent a lot of time in his room? Is it possible?
婉曲表現ではないかと疑っていますが
どうでしょうか
24:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
24:30
PR: I was a -- there were times I was a C student. You know, it's funny.
私は 確かに成績がCの時もありました
面白いですね
24:31
When I got to college -- I studied physics in college --
大学生の時 物理学を学んでいましたが
24:35
and I got really -- it was funny,
私は社交的な人間ではなかったので
24:37
because I was definitely a more antisocial kid. I read all the time.
いつも本を読んでいました
24:39
I was shy. I don't seem like it now, but I was very shy.
シャイでした 今はそのような感じは
しませんが とてもシャイでした
24:44
Moved around a bunch -- had that experience too.
たくさん引っ越したり そういう経験もしました
24:49
So I did, kind of, I think, live in my own world,
私は 自分の世界に閉じこもっていました
24:51
and obviously that helps, you know, engage your real interest in something.
そして明らかにそれが役にたって
本当に興味のあることに費やせました
24:54
JH: So you're on your fifth life at this point?
では あなたは現時点で
5番目の人生にいるということですか
24:57
PR: If you count, yeah, cities. So -- but I did --
都市を数えるなら そうですね
25:00
and I didn't do -- I think I didn't do as well in school as I could have. I think you're right.
学業はあまりうまくいきませんでしたね
あなたの言う通りです
25:06
I wasn't, like, an obsessed -- you know, get A's kind of guy.
私は絶対成績はAを取らなくてはと
考える学生ではありませんでした
25:10
I was going to say, I had a great social experience
私は大学生時代 それまではしてこなかった
25:14
when I went to college that I hadn't had before,
すばらしい社会経験をしました
25:16
a more fraternal experience, where I met six or seven other guys
というのも友人関係です 6、7人の
物理学を一緒に学んでいる友人に会って
25:18
who I studied physics with, and I was very competitive with them,
彼らには対抗意識がありました
25:21
so then I started to get A's. But you're right: I wasn't an A student.
以降Aを取り始めましたが その通りです
成績の良い学生ではありませんでした
25:24
JH: Last question. Right here.
最後の質問です そちらの方
25:28
(Audience: In the pamphlet, there's a statement -- )
(パンフレットで 〜という言葉がありますが〜)
25:30
JH: You want to paraphrase that?
言い直したいですか
25:33
PR: Yeah, so let me restate that.
はい 言い直します
25:35
So, you're saying that in the pamphlet there's a statement
パンフレットには このように書いている
25:37
that we may come to prefer our digital selves to our real ones --
私たちは実際の自分よりもデジタルな自分
25:40
our more malleable or manageable digital identities to our real identities --
実際の自己より順応性があり
扱いやすいデジタルの自己を好むようになり
25:44
and that in fact, much of human life and human experience
事実 人間の生活や経験の多くが
25:48
may move into the digital realm.
デジタル領域に移ることになるかもしれません
25:51
And then that's kind of a horrifying thought, of course.
それはもちろんぞっとするようなことで
25:54
That's a frightening change, frightening disruption.
恐ろしい変化であり 崩壊である と
25:57
I guess, and you're asking, what do I think about that? How do I --
きっとあなたが聞きたいのは 私がそれについて
どう考えているかということでしょうか
26:01
JH: What's your response to the people who would say, that's horrifying?
それが恐ろしいと言う人たちに対する
あなたの返答は何であるか
26:04
(Audience: If someone would say to you, I find that disturbing,
(もしそれは不気味だという人がいたら
26:06
what would be your response?)
あなたは何と答えますか)
26:08
PR: Well, I'd say a couple of things.
いくつか言うでしょうね
26:10
One is, it's disturbing like the Internet or electricity was.
1つ目はインターネットや電気が
かつてそうだったように不気味です
26:13
That is to say, it's a big change, but it isn't avoidable.
つまり 大きな変化が起こっていて
避けることができません
26:16
So, no amount of backpedaling or intentional behavior
後戻りすることや意図的な行動 政治的行動は
26:20
or political behavior is going to keep these technology changes
どんなことも テクノロジーの変化で
私たちがつながることを
26:25
from connecting us together,
止めておくことはできません
26:28
because the basic motive that people have --
なぜなら創造的で起業家的であるための
基本的な動機は
26:30
to be creative and entrepreneurial -- is going to drive energy
ウェブの時代に起こったように
エネルギーを仮想世界に
26:32
into these virtual worlds in the same way that it has with the Web.
注ぐということなのです
26:36
So this change, I believe, is a huge disruptive change.
この変化は
混乱を起こす大きな変化だと考えています
26:39
Obviously, I'm the optimist and a big believer in what's going on here,
明らかに 私は楽天家で今起こっていることに
大きな信頼を寄せています
26:44
but I think that as -- even a sober, you know, the most sober,
しかし 冷静な人も
26:48
disconnected thinker about this, looking at it from the side,
これに関して興味のない人も 端から見て
26:52
has to conclude, based on the data,
経済的な力が現れているという
データを基にすると
26:55
that with those kinds of economic forces at play,
以下のように
結論付けなくてはならないでしょう
26:57
there is definitely going to be a sea change,
確実に大転換が起こることになり
26:59
and that change is going to be intensely disruptive
そしてその変化は強烈に破壊的であり
27:02
relative to our concept of our very lives and being,
私たちの生活や生き方の根本
27:05
and our identities, as well.
私たちのアイデンティティにも関係している と
27:09
I don't think we can get away from those changes.
私はこの変化からは逃れられないと思っています
27:11
I think generally, we were talking about this --
私たちがこれまで話してきたことは
27:13
I think that generally being present in a virtual world and being challenged by it,
仮想世界に存在し それに刺激を受け
27:16
being -- surviving there, having a good life there, so to speak,
そこで生き抜き 良い人生を送ることは
27:22
is a challenge because of the multiculturality of it,
いわゆる挑戦です
そこには 多文化が混在し
27:26
because of the languages, because of the entrepreneurial richness of it,
多数の言語があり 起業家精神に溢れ
27:29
the sort of flea market nature, if you will, of the virtual world today.
今日の仮想世界には蚤の市的性質があります
27:34
It puts challenges on us to rise to. We must be better than ourselves, in many ways.
仮想世界は私たちが高みを目指すように挑み
私たちは多くの面で自分たち以上に
27:37
We must learn things and, you know, be more tolerant,
優れていなければなりません
おそらく実際の世界の私たちよりも
27:43
and be smarter and learn faster and be more creative, perhaps,
より学習し より寛容であり
より賢く より速く学び
27:46
than we are typically in our real lives.
そしてより創造的でなくてはなりません
27:52
And I think that if that is true of virtual worlds,
もし それが仮想世界に当てはまるのであれば
27:54
then these changes, though scary -- and, I say, inevitable --
恐ろしくて かつ避けることはできませんが
これらの変化は
27:56
are ultimately for the better,
究極的に好転していくもので
28:00
and therefore something that we should ride out.
それゆえ私たちが
乗り越えなくてはならないものなのです
28:02
But I would say that -- and many other authors and speakers about this,
他の多くのこのような内容を話した作家や
スピーカーも言ったかもしれませんが
28:05
other than me, have said, you know, fasten your seat belts
私も言いたいと思います 
シートベルトを締めてください
28:09
because the change is coming. There are going to be big changes.
変化がやってきますから
その変化はとても大きいものですから
28:12
JH: Philip Rosedale, thank you very much.
フィリップ・ローズデールでした
ありがとうございました
28:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
28:17
Translator:Yumiko Murakami
Reviewer:Takeshi Maeda

sponsored links

Philip Rosedale - Entrepreneur
Philip Rosedale (avatar "Philip Linden") is founder of Second Life, an online 3D virtual world inhabited by millions. He's chair of Linden Labs, the company behind the digital society.

Why you should listen

A tinkerer since childhood and an entrepreneur since he was a teenager, Philip Rosedale was always captivated with the idea of simulated reality and imaginary environments. He worked as CTO of RealNetworks until computing technology caught up with his fancies. Then he founded Linden Labs and built a virtual civilization called Second Life. That environment now boasts milions of citizens and a buzzing economy (currency: Linden dollars) that represents over $10 million in real value.

Second Life may be artificial but it's hardly trivial, Rosedale says. Its appeal to human creativity is obvious, but beyond the thriving in-world industries and bustling social spaces, real-life businesses (and even some religious organizations) are using Second Life as a platform for meetings, services and collaboration.

"You can imagine New York City being kind of like a museum," Rosedale says. "Still an incredibly cool place to go, but with no one working in those towers. You are going to [work] in a virtual world."

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.