sponsored links
Serious Play 2008

Paula Scher: Great design is serious, not solemn

ポーラ・シェア 本気になる

May 5, 2008

ポーラ・シェアが自身のデザイン・キャリアを振返ります。彼女はアルバム・カバー、表紙、シティバンクのロゴ等を手掛けたことで有名です。本気になって遊び心を発揮した境地を語ります。伝説的な、彼女の素晴らしいデザインやイメージをお楽しみください。

Paula Scher - Designer at play
With a career that fuses rock and roll, corporate identity creation, and impressionistic geography, Paula Scher is a master conjurer of the instantly familiar. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
My work is play.
私の仕事は 遊ぶことです
00:16
And I play when I design.
私はデザインする時 遊びます
00:18
I even looked it up in the dictionary, to make sure
念のため 辞書で確認しました
00:20
that I actually do that,
本当の意味で 遊ぶためです
00:22
and the definition of play,
遊ぶ の定義は
00:24
number one, was engaging in a childlike
1. 子供じみた活動 または ―
00:26
activity or endeavor,
努力をすること
00:28
and number two was gambling.
2. ギャンブルすること
00:30
And I realize I do both
確かに デザイン中は
00:33
when I'm designing.
どちらもします
00:35
I'm both a kid and I'm gambling all the time.
いつも私は子供じみて ギャンブルしています
00:37
And I think that if you're not,
もし あなたがデザイナーで
00:40
there's probably something inherently wrong
楽しんでいなければ 今 置かれている ―
00:42
with the structure or the situation you're in,
組織 または状況に
本質的な 誤りがある
00:44
if you're a designer.
そう思うのです
00:46
But the serious part is what threw me,
でも本気をだすことは 苦手で
00:48
and I couldn't quite get a handle
理解できずにいました
00:50
on it until I remembered an essay.
そんな時 あるエッセーを思い出しました
00:54
And it's an essay I read 30 years ago.
それは 30年前に読んだエッセーです
00:57
It was written by Russell Baker,
作者は ラッセル・ベイカーでした
01:00
who used to write an "Observer" column in the New York Times.
ニューヨーク・タイムズのコラム
「オブザーバー」の執筆者です
01:02
He's a wonderful humorist. And I'm going to read you
氏は 素敵なユーモアの持ち主です
01:05
this essay,
エッセーの要約を
01:07
or an excerpt from it
読んでみます
01:09
because it really hit home for me.
私にとっては 核心を捉えているのです
01:11
Here is a letter of friendly advice.
友人として忠告しよう
01:14
Be serious, it says.
本気になれ
01:17
What it means, of course, is, be solemn.
もちろん まじめにやれ という意味です
01:19
Being solemn is easy.
まじめにやる ことは簡単で
01:22
Being serious is hard.
本気にやる ことは困難である
01:24
Children almost always begin by being serious,
子供たちは 常に本気から入る
01:27
which is what makes them so entertaining
だから 大人に比べれば
01:29
when compared with adults as a class.
子供は面白いのだ
01:31
Adults, on the whole, are solemn.
大人は概して まじめである
01:34
In politics, the rare candidate who is serious,
政界で本気な立候補者は まれで
01:36
like Adlai Stevenson,
例えば アドレー・スティーブンソン
01:39
is easily overwhelmed by one who is solemn, like Eisenhower.
いとも簡単にアイゼンハワー みたいな 
まじめな 候補に負けてしまう
01:41
That's because it is hard for most people
それは なぜかというと 大概の人には
01:44
to recognize seriousness, which is rare,
めったに見ない 本気さ よりも
01:46
but more comfortable to endorse solemnity,
よく見かける まじめさ の方が
01:49
which is commonplace.
心地よいからである
01:51
Jogging, which is commonplace,
手頃で 健康に良いとされる
01:54
and widely accepted as good for you, is solemn.
ジョギングは まじめ
01:56
Poker is serious.
ポーカーは 本気
01:59
Washington, D.C. is solemn.
ワシントン D.C. は まじめ
02:01
New York is serious.
ニューヨークは 本気
02:04
Going to educational conferences to tell you anything
教育関連のイベントで将来を
02:06
about the future is solemn.
語るのは まじめ
02:08
Taking a long walk by yourself,
一人ぼっちで 長い散歩に出て
02:11
during which you devise a foolproof scheme for robbing Tiffany's,
ティファニーを強盗する
完全犯罪を考えるのは
02:13
is serious.
本気
02:16
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:18
Now, when I apply Russell Baker's definition
ラッセル・ベイカーの まじめと 本気の
02:19
of solemnity or seriousness to design,
定義を デザインに当てはめると
02:21
it doesn't necessarily make any particular point about quality.
仕事の質とは関係ないことが わかります
02:23
Solemn design is often important and very effective design.
まじめなデザインは いつも重要だし とても効果的です
02:26
Solemn design is also socially correct,
まじめなデザインは 社会的に正しく
02:29
and is accepted by appropriate audiences.
適当な観衆の支持を受けやすいです
02:32
It's what right-thinking designers
仕事を正しく仕上げようと 多くのデザイナーや
02:34
and all the clients are striving for.
依頼主が目指している ことです
02:37
Serious design, serious play,
本気のデザイン 本気の遊び は
02:39
is something else.
異なります
02:41
For one thing, it often happens
ひとつには 本気は 自然に
02:43
spontaneously, intuitively,
直感的に 偶然に あるいは
02:45
accidentally or incidentally.
何かのついでに 生じます
02:48
It can be achieved out of innocence, or arrogance,
無邪気 あるいは 横柄さ 
の結果だったり
02:50
or out of selfishness, sometimes out of carelessness.
身勝手 時には 注意不足の
産物です
02:52
But mostly, it's achieved through all those kind of crazy
たいていは よく説明がつかない
02:55
parts of human behavior that
クレージーな人間性が
02:59
don't really make any sense.
引き出すもの なのです
03:01
Serious design is imperfect.
本気なデザインは 未完成です
03:03
It's filled with the kind of craft laws that come from something being
初めて作る物に よく見られる ―
03:05
the first of its kind.
不完全さ だらけです
03:07
Serious design is also -- often -- quite unsuccessful
まじめな見方をすると 本気のデザインは
03:09
from the solemn point of view.
往々にして 失敗作です
03:12
That's because the art of serious play
なぜかというと 本気の遊び の本質は
03:14
is about invention, change, rebellion -- not perfection.
発明 変革 反逆 であり
完璧は 二の次だからです
03:16
Perfection happens during solemn play.
完璧を望むのは まじめな遊びの時です
03:19
Now, I always saw design careers
私はデザインのキャリアは
03:23
like surreal staircases.
非現実的な階段だと 思いました
03:25
If you look at the staircase, you'll see
その階段を見ると
03:28
that in your 20s the risers are very high
20代は段差が とても高く
03:31
and the steps are very short,
幅が短いです
03:34
and you make huge discoveries.
大きな発見をたくさんして
03:37
You sort of leap up very quickly in your youth.
若い頃は どんどん成長します
03:39
That's because you don't know anything and you have a lot to learn,
何も知らないし 勉強することが
たくさんあるからです
03:42
and so that anything you do is a learning experience
だから 何をしても いい経験になります
03:44
and you're just jumping right up there.
短い期間で もうあんな上にいます
03:47
As you get older, the risers get shallower
歳を取ると段差は低くなり
03:49
and the steps get wider,
幅はとても広くなります
03:51
and you start moving along at a slower pace
動くペースは ゆっくりになります
03:53
because you're making fewer discoveries.
発見する度合が少なくなるからです
03:56
And as you get older and more decrepit,
また歳を取って 老いぼれます
03:58
you sort of inch along on this
いわば 這って
04:00
sort of depressing, long staircase,
憂鬱な 長い階段をすすみ
04:02
leading you into oblivion.
そして 忘却のかなたに消えるのです
04:04
(Laughter)
(笑い)
04:06
I find it's actually getting really hard to be serious.
本気になることは とても難しいことです
04:08
I'm hired to be solemn, but I find more and more
普段は まじめさを求められて 仕事をするのですが
04:13
that I'm solemn when I don't have to be.
必要以上に まじめすぎる気がします
04:16
And in my 35 years of working experience,
過去 35年の自分の経験上
04:18
I think I was really serious four times.
本当に本気だったのは 4回だけです
04:21
And I'm going to show them to you now,
それらを お見せしましょう
04:24
because they came out of very specific conditions.
本気が 特定の状況の下で 現れたのです
04:26
It's great to be a kid.
子供はいいものです
04:29
Now, when I was in my early 20s,
私が 20代の時
04:31
I worked in the record business, designing record covers for CBS Records,
CBSレコードでアルバム・カバーを
デザインしていました
04:34
and I had no idea what a great job I had.
いかに素敵な仕事だったのか 
私は気がつきませんでした
04:37
I thought everybody had a job like that.
みんなこんな物だろう と思っていました
04:39
And what --
そして
04:42
the way I looked at design and the way I looked at the world was,
私がデザインや 世界を見る尺度であり ―
04:44
what was going on around me
身の周りや ―
04:47
and the things that came at the time I walked into design
当時デザインの世界で遭遇したもの こそが
04:49
were the enemy.
敵だったのです
04:51
I really, really, really hated
私は とっても とっても とっても
04:53
the typeface Helvetica.
ヘルベチカ・フォントが嫌いでした
04:55
I thought the typeface Helvetica
ヘルベチカ・フォントは あまりにも
04:57
was the cleanest, most boring, most fascistic,
きれいすぎて 退屈で ファッショで
05:00
really repressive typeface,
抑圧的でした
05:03
and I hated everything that was designed in Helvetica.
ヘルベチカを使ったデザインは
全て嫌悪しました
05:06
And when I was in
私が
05:08
my college days,
学生の頃は
05:10
this was the sort of design
この種のデザインが
05:12
that was fashionable and popular.
流行して 人気がありました
05:14
This is actually quite a lovely book jacket by Rudy de Harak,
ルーディ・デハラックの素敵な表紙です
05:16
but I just hated it, because it was designed with Helvetica,
でもヘルベチカが許せなかったので
05:19
and I made parodies about it.
パロディ版を作ってみました
05:22
I just thought it was, you know, completely boring.
あまりにも つまらなかったのです
05:24
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:27
So -- so, my goal in life
私の人生の目標は
05:29
was to do stuff that wasn't made out of Helvetica.
ヘルベチカ以外を使うことでした
05:31
And to do stuff that wasn't made out of Helvetica
でもそれは とても困難でした
05:35
was actually kind of hard because you had to find it.
なぜって代わりを発見しないといけないからです
05:37
And there weren't a lot of books about the history of design
70年代初期 デザインの歴史を扱う書籍は
05:40
in the early 70s. There weren't --
ほとんどなく
05:43
there wasn't a plethora of design publishing.
デザイン出版なんて 高が知れていました
05:45
You actually had to go to antique stores. You had to go to Europe.
骨董品店を探し なければ
ヨーロッパに行って探すのでした
05:47
You had to go places and find the stuff.
いろんな所にいかないと 何も見つかりませんでした
05:49
And what I responded to was, you know,
そして ようやく見つけた私の答えは
05:52
Art Nouveau, or deco,
アールヌーボーや アールデコ
05:54
or Victorian typography,
ビクトリア朝の タイポグラフィ …
05:57
or things that were just completely not Helvetica.
とにかく ヘルベチカ以外でした
05:59
And I taught myself design this way,
独学で覚えて
06:03
and this was sort of my early years,
駆け出しの頃は
06:06
and I used these things
これらを使って
06:08
in really goofy ways
レコード・ジャケットや
06:10
on record covers and in my design.
自分のデザインに取り入れました
06:12
I wasn't educated. I just sort of
教えられたわけでもなく
06:14
put these things together.
一から造りあげたのです
06:16
I mixed up Victorian designs with pop,
ビクトリア風と ポップを掛合せたり
06:18
and I mixed up Art Nouveau with something else.
アールヌーボーと 何かを混ぜたりしました
06:20
And I made these very lush,
そして このように豪華で
06:23
very elaborate record covers,
凝ったジャケットを作りました
06:25
not because I was being a post-modernist or a historicist --
私は ポストモダニストでも 
歴史崇拝者でもありません
06:28
because I didn't know what those things were.
それらが どういうものかさえ 
知りませんでした
06:31
I just hated Helvetica.
単純に ヘルベチカが嫌いだっただけです
06:33
(Laughter)
(笑い)
06:35
And that kind of passion
そんな情熱のおかげで
06:36
drove me into very serious play,
本気で遊びが できたのです
06:39
a kind of play I could never do now
充分に経験を踏んだ今となっては
06:41
because I'm too well-educated.
もうできない遊びです
06:44
And there's something wonderful about
そんな若さは
06:46
that form of youth,
すばらしいものです
06:49
where you can let yourself
自分の好きなように
06:51
grow and play, and be
成長して 遊んで
06:54
really a brat, and then accomplish things.
チビのくせに大仕事を 
するわけですから
06:56
By the end of the '70s, actually,
70年代後半には
06:59
the stuff became known.
この種のものは 知れ渡り ―
07:01
I mean, these covers appeared all over the world,
だって世界中に広がりましたから
07:03
and they started winning awards,
表彰されるようになり
07:05
and people knew them.
みんな知ってしまいました
07:07
And I was suddenly a post-modernist,
それで私は突然 ポスト・モダニストとなり
07:09
and I began a career as -- in my own business.
自分でビジネスを始めるわけです
07:12
And first I was praised for it, then criticized for it,
はじめは称賛されましたが 
やがて批判も受けるようになりました
07:15
but the fact of the matter was, I had become solemn.
私は まじめになってしまったのです
07:18
I didn't do what I think
それ以降 14年位は
07:21
was a piece of serious work again for about 14 years.
本気な仕事は しなかったと思います
07:23
I spent most of the '80s being quite solemn,
80年代の大半は まじめで 通しました
07:27
turning out these sorts of designs
期待されているデザインを
07:29
that I was expected to do
作り続け
07:31
because that's who I was,
それが自分なのだ と
07:33
and I was living in this cycle of going from serious to solemn
こんなサイクルを回っていたのです
07:35
to hackneyed to dead, and getting rediscovered all over again.
本気 ⇒ まじめ ⇒ ありきたり ⇒ 死ぬほど退屈 ⇒ 再発見
07:38
So, here was the second condition
というわけで 第2の状況 ―
07:43
for which I think I accomplished some serious play.
ここで 本気な遊びを とり戻せました
07:45
There's a Paul Newman movie
私の大好きなポール・ニューマン主演の
07:50
that I love called "The Verdict."
「評決」という映画があります
07:52
I don't know how many of you have seen it, but it's a beaut.
みなさん ご覧になったか知りませんが
とても いい映画です
07:54
And in the movie, he plays
この映画で 彼は
07:57
a down-and-out lawyer
落ちぶれた
07:59
who's become an ambulance chaser.
悪徳弁護士を演じます
08:01
And he's taken on --
彼は 簡単に済みそうな
08:03
he's given, actually -- a malpractice suit to handle
不正医療行為の訴訟を
08:05
that's sort of an easy deal,
紹介されるのですが
08:08
and in the midst of trying to connect the deal,
公判の準備中に
08:10
he starts to empathize
被害者が 余りにも哀れなのを見て
08:12
and identify with his client,
共感するようになり
08:14
and he regains his morality and purpose,
倫理と自分の存在意義を取戻し
08:16
and he goes on to win the case.
勝訴を獲得するのです
08:19
And in the depth of despair,
映画の中の ある場面
08:21
in the midst of the movie, when it looks like he can't pull this thing off,
どう見ても勝ち目がない
絶望の淵に立って
08:24
and he needs this case,
この訴訟を取りたい
08:28
he needs to win this case so badly.
どうしても 勝訴したいと思う ―
08:30
There's a shot of Paul Newman alone,
ポール・ニューマンが オフィスでひとり
08:32
in his office, saying,
たたずむ シーンがあります
08:35
"This is the case. There are no other cases.
「この訴訟だ これしかないのだ」
08:38
This is the case. There are no other cases."
「この訴訟だ これしかないのだ」
「この訴訟だ これしかないのだ」
08:41
And in that moment of
この熱望と集中 の
08:44
desire and focus,
おかげで
08:46
he can win.
勝訴するのです
08:48
And that is a wonderful
これこそが
08:50
position to be in to create some serious play.
本気で遊ぶことの 本質なのです
08:52
And I had that moment in 1994
1994年に 同じことが私に起こりました
08:56
when I met a theater director
ジョージ・ウルフと言う名前の
08:59
named George Wolfe,
劇場監督が
09:01
who was going to have me design
私にデザインの依頼をして
09:03
an identity for the New York Shakespeare Festival,
当時のニューヨーク・シェイクスピア・フェスティバル
09:05
then known,
今の
09:08
and then became the Public Theater.
パブリック・シアターの
シンボルを作れ と言うのです
09:10
And I began getting immersed
そして 私はこのプロジェクトに
09:12
in this project
かつて無かった程
09:14
in a way I never was before.
没頭するのです
09:16
This is what theater advertising looked like at that time.
これが当時の劇場広告です
09:18
This is what was in the newspapers and in the New York Times.
ニューヨーク・タイムズなど 各紙に掲載されました
09:21
So, this is sort of a comment on the time.
当時の広告はこんな感じでした
09:24
And the Public Theater actually had much better advertising than this.
パブリック・シアターは これより ずっといい
宣伝をしていました
09:27
They had no logo and no identity,
ロゴ等は ありませんでしたが
09:30
but they had these very iconic posters
こんな図像的なポスターを使っていました
09:32
painted by Paul Davis.
ポール・デービスの作品です
09:35
And George Wolf had taken over from another director
ちょうどジョージ・ウルフが監督になり
09:37
and he wanted to change the theater,
劇場を変えようとしていました
09:40
and he wanted to make it urban and loud
都会的で 騒々しい
09:42
and a place that was inclusive.
包み込むような劇場にしたいと 考えました
09:44
So, drawing on my love of typography,
だから 私はフォントへの情熱をつぎ込んで
09:47
I immersed myself into this project.
このプロジェクトに没頭しました
09:50
And what was different about it was the totality of it,
ほかとの違いは 何でも扱ったことです
09:53
was that I really became the voice, the visual voice, of a place
私は その場所を代表する声 
視覚的な声になったのです
09:57
in a way I had never done before,
未だかつて したことがない位に
10:01
where every aspect --
ありとあらゆる局面 ―
10:03
the smallest ad, the ticket, whatever it was --
一番小さな広告 チケット あらゆる物の
10:05
was designed by me.
デザインを 私がしたのです
10:07
There was no format.
統一書式などありませんでした
10:09
There was no in-house department that these things were pushed to.
専任部門もありませんから
丸投げもできませんでした
10:11
I literally for three years made everything --
3年間 文字通り何でも作りました ―
10:14
every scrap of paper, everything online,
あらゆる紙媒体や ネット上のもの ―
10:16
that this theater did.
劇場が手掛けるもの全てです
10:19
And it was the only job,
他の仕事も持っていたのですが
10:21
even though I was doing other jobs.
これだけに集中しました
10:23
I lived and breathed it in a way I haven't
それ以来 依頼人と これほど一緒になって
10:25
with a client since.
熱中したことはありません
10:27
It enabled me to really express myself and grow.
本当に自分を表現し 成長することができました
10:29
And I think that you know
そのような機会が与えられると
10:33
when you're going to be given this position,
分かるものなのです
10:35
and it's rare, but when you get it and you have this opportunity,
めったにありませんが そんな機会を獲得したら
10:37
it's the moment of serious play.
それこそ 本気の遊び です
10:41
I did these things, and I still do them.
こんな事を 今でも続けています
10:43
I still work for the Public Theater.
パブリック・シアターの仕事は 今もしています
10:46
I'm on their board, and
私は取締役会メンバーで
10:48
I still am involved with it.
事業に参加しています
10:50
The high point of the Public Theater, I think, was in 1996,
パブリック・シアターの頂点は 1996年だったと思います
10:53
two years after I designed it,
私のデザインから 2年後です
10:56
which was the "Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk" campaign
「ノイズ&ファンク」キャンペーンでした
10:58
that was all over New York.
ニューヨーク中が 盛り上がりました
11:01
But something happened to it, and what happened to it was,
でも 何か変わってしまったのです 
何かと言うと
11:03
it became very popular.
あまりに有名になったのです
11:06
And that is a kiss of death for something serious
本気な人にとっては さようならです
11:08
because it makes it solemn.
まじめに なったのです
11:11
And what happened was
さらに 起きたことは
11:14
that New York City, to a degree,
ニューヨーク市が 私の存在を
11:16
ate my identity
食ってしまったのです
11:18
because people began to copy it.
みんながコピーしはじめました
11:21
Here's an ad in the New York Times
ニューヨーク・タイムズの広告です
11:24
somebody did for a play called "Mind Games."
「マインド・ゲーム」という劇の広告で コピーされ
11:26
Then "Chicago" came out, used similar graphics,
「シカゴ」でも同様な絵柄が使われました
11:30
and the Public Theater's identity was just totally eaten and taken away,
パブリック・シアターの独自性も
失われました
11:33
which meant I had to change it.
そこで 変更する必要に迫られました
11:36
So, I changed it so that every season was different,
シーズン毎に違うものを作りました
11:39
and I continued to do these posters,
これらのポスターも作りました
11:42
but they never had the seriousness
でも 最初の作品の独自性が持つ
11:44
of the first identity
本気さ はありませんでした
11:46
because they were too individual, and they didn't have that heft
なぜならば 全部バラバラで統一感がなく
11:48
of everything being the same thing.
重さが伝わらなかったのです
11:51
Now -- and I think since the Public Theater,
パブリック・シアター以降 ―
11:54
I must have done more than a dozen
10数件の大きな文化施設向けの
11:57
cultural identities for major institutions,
仕事をしましたが
11:59
and I don't think I ever -- I ever
あの時に味わった 本気さ を
12:02
grasped that seriousness again --
取り戻すことは ありませんでした
12:04
I do them for very big, important institutions
ニューヨーク市の とても大きく重要な
12:06
in New York City.
公共施設ばかりなのです
12:08
The institutions are solemn,
公共施設は まじめ です
12:10
and so is the design.
デザインも そうなります
12:13
They're better crafted than the Public Theater was,
パブリック・シアターの時より洗練され
12:15
and they spend more money on them, but I think
お金も余計に使いましたが
12:17
that that moment comes and goes.
あの時に戻ることは ありませんでした
12:19
The best way to accomplish serious design --
本気でデザインするための秘訣 ―
12:22
which I think we all have the opportunity to do --
― そんな機会は 誰にでも訪れます ―
12:24
is to be totally and completely unqualified for the job.
秘訣は その仕事に全然ふさわしくない という事です
12:27
That doesn't happen very often,
めったにある事ではありませんが
12:31
but it happened to me in the year 2000,
私は 2000年に経験しました
12:33
when for some reason or another,
なぜか よく知りませんが
12:35
a whole pile of different architects
多くの建築家が
12:37
started to ask me to design
一緒に劇場の内装デザインを
12:39
the insides of theaters with them,
しようと依頼してきたのです
12:41
where I would take environmental graphics and work them into buildings.
私は 環境グラフィックスを 
建物内部に 持ち込む役割でした
12:43
I'd never done this kind of work before.
この種の仕事は 初めてでした
12:46
I didn't know how to read an architectural plan,
建築図面なんて読めませんでした
12:48
I didn't know what they were talking about,
彼らが話していることすら
わかりませんでした
12:51
and I really couldn't handle the fact that a job --
そして たった一つの仕事が
12:53
a single job -- could go on for four years
4年間も続くなんて 
想像できませんでした
12:55
because I was used to immediacy in graphic design,
グラフィック・デザインの世界は
スピード勝負です
12:57
and that kind of attention to detail
しかも細部に 注意をはらうことは
13:00
was really bad for somebody like me, with ADD.
私みたいに多動症候群の人には やっかいでした
13:02
So, it was a rough -- it was a rough go,
ですから とてもつらい仕事でした
13:05
but I fell in love with this process
でも次第にグラフィックスと建築を
13:08
of actually integrating graphics into architecture
融合するプロセスに傾注しました
13:11
because I didn't know what I was doing.
自分が何をしているか わかってなかったからです
13:14
I said, "Why can't the signage be on the floor?"
“なんで表示が床にあったらだめなの” なんて言いました
13:17
New Yorkers look at their feet.
ニューヨーカーは足元を見ます
13:19
And then I found that actors and actresses
俳優は 床を見て次の合図を
13:21
actually take their cues from the floor,
受け取ることも知りました
13:23
so it turned out that these sorts of sign systems
なので このようなサインも
13:25
began to make sense.
理にかなっていたのです
13:28
They integrated with the building in really peculiar ways.
面白い形で建物に融合することができました
13:30
They ran around corners,
角にあったり
13:33
they went up sides of buildings,
側壁を上がったり
13:35
and they melded into the architecture.
建築物に溶け込みました
13:38
This is Symphony Space on 90th Street and Broadway,
90丁目とブロードウエイの角にある
シンフォニー・スペースです
13:40
and the type is interwoven into the stainless steel
活字が ステンレスと 組合わさっています
13:43
and backlit with fiber optics.
光ファイバーの バックライトがあります
13:46
And the architect, Jim Polshek,
建築家のジム・ポルシェクが
13:50
essentially gave me a canvas
活字で遊ぶ
13:52
to play typography out on.
キャンバスを 与えてくれたのです
13:54
And it was serious play.
それは 本気の遊び でした
13:56
This is the children's museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
ペンシルバニア州ピッツバーグにある
子供の博物館です
13:58
made out of completely inexpensive materials.
徹底して 安価な材質を使いました
14:01
Extruded typography that's backlit with neon.
ネオンがついた 飛び出す活字です
14:04
Things I never did before, built before.
それまで 作ったことのない作品です
14:07
I just thought they'd be kind of fun to do.
楽しいだろう と考えました
14:09
Donors' walls made out of Lucite.
ルーサイト製 寄贈者リストです
14:11
And then, inexpensive signage.
そして お金のかからない表示
14:14
(Laughter)
(笑い)
14:17
I think my favorite of these
お気に入りは
14:23
was this little job in Newark, New Jersey.
ニュージャージー州ニューアークの作品です
14:25
It's a performing arts school.
パフォーミング・アーツの学校です
14:27
This is the building that -- they had no money,
この建物には予算がありませんでした
14:30
and they had to recast it, and they said,
改修したかったのですが 
言われたのは
14:33
if we give you 100,000 dollars, what can you do with it?
10万ドルで何ができるかな と
14:35
And I did a little Photoshop job on it, and I said,
私は フォトショップを使って
14:38
Well, I think we can paint it.
塗装してみようと 言いました
14:40
And we did. And it was play.
そして塗りました
まさに 遊び です
14:42
And there's the building. Everything was painted --
これが建物です すべて塗装されました
14:46
typography over the whole damn thing,
この憎らしい建物の
全体に活字が躍っています
14:49
including the air conditioning ducts.
空調パイプも含めて
14:51
I hired guys who paint flats
ガレージの脇でアパートを塗装する
14:53
fixed on the sides of garages
人たちを雇って
14:55
to do the painting on the building, and they loved it.
塗装作業をしました みんな大喜びでした
14:58
They got into it -- they took the job incredibly seriously.
のめりこんだのです
信じられない位 本気になりました
15:00
They used to climb up on the building and call me
建物に登っては 私を呼び
15:02
and tell me that they had to correct my typography --
文字組を直そうと言ったり
15:04
that my spacing was wrong, and they moved it,
字間が違うと言って 正してくれたりと
15:07
and they did wonderful things with it.
素晴らしい仕事をしてくれました
15:09
They were pretty serious, too. It was quite wonderful.
彼らも とても本気だったのです
素晴らしい経験でした
15:11
By the time I did Bloomberg's headquarters
ブルームバーグ本社を手掛けた頃には
15:14
my work had begun to become accepted.
仕事が 認められるように なっていました
15:17
People wanted it in big, expensive places.
大がかりで 高価な場所での
仕事を依頼され始めました
15:21
And that began to make it solemn.
それで まじめに なり始めました
15:24
Bloomberg was all about numbers,
ブルームバーグは数字の世界です
15:26
and we did big numbers through the space
だから 空間に大きな数字を描き
15:28
and the numbers were projected on a spectacular LED
LEDで 目を見張るような投影をしました
15:31
that my partner, Lisa Strausfeld, programmed.
プログラムは パートナーの リサ・ストラスフェルドです
15:34
But it became the end
でも これが
15:37
of the seriousness of the play,
本気の遊びの 終わりになりました
15:39
and it started to, once again, become solemn.
再び まじめ になったのです
15:42
This is a current project
これが現在のプロジェクトです
15:45
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,
ペンシルバニア州 ピッツバーグです
15:47
where I got to be goofy.
ここでは 突拍子もないことをやりました
15:49
I was invited to design
ノースサイドと呼ばれる
15:51
a logo for this neighborhood, called the North Side,
住宅街のロゴをデザインする依頼でした
15:53
and I thought it was silly for a neighborhood to have a logo.
住宅街のロゴなんて 馬鹿げていると思いました
15:56
I think that's rather creepy, actually. Why would a neighborhood have a logo?
気味悪いとさえ思いました 
住宅街のロゴなんて ありうるでしょうか
15:59
A neighborhood has a thing -- it's got a landmark, it's got a place,
住宅街には ふつう目印とか 場所でしょう
16:02
it's got a restaurant. It doesn't have a logo. I mean, what would that be?
レストランはあっても ロゴはないでしょう
何それ と言ったところです
16:04
So I had to actually give a presentation
それで実際に市議会や
16:07
to a city council
町の住民に
16:10
and neighborhood constituents,
プレゼンすることに なりました
16:12
and I went to Pittsburgh and I said,
ピッツバークに行って こう話しました
16:14
"You know, really what you have here
「ねえ ここにあるのは
16:17
are all these underpasses
市の中心部とこの街を分断する
16:19
that separate the neighborhood from the center of town.
高架橋だけよ
16:21
Why don't you celebrate them, and make the underpasses landmarks?"
だったら これを飾って
ランドマークにしてしまったら」って
16:24
So I began doing this crazy presentation
こんな風に とんでもないプレゼンを はじめました
16:27
of these installations --
「こんな装飾を施した
16:30
potential installations -- on
高架橋は どうでしょう
16:32
these underpass bridges,
あくまで 提案ですが」
16:35
and stood up in front of the city council --
市議会の前で話すのは
16:37
and was a little bit scared,
正直 言って
16:39
I have to admit.
怖かったです
16:41
But I was so utterly unqualified for this project,
でも 私はプロジェクトに あまりにもふさわしくない ―
16:43
and so utterly ridiculous,
あまりに滑稽で
16:47
and ignored the brief so desperately
彼らの依頼も 完全に無視
だからこそ ―
16:49
that I think they just embraced it with wholeheartedness,
このアイデアが 気持ちよく受け入れられるだろう ―
16:53
just completely because it was so goofy to begin with.
そもそも突拍子もないのだから と思っていました
16:56
And this is the bridge they're actually
そして これが現在 まさに作業中の
17:00
painting up and preparing as we speak.
高架橋の様子です
17:02
It will change every six months, and it will become an art installation
6ヵ月ごとに変わる
インスタレーションになる予定です
17:05
in the North Side of Pittsburgh,
ピッツバーグ ノースサイドの
17:08
and it will probably become a landmark in the area.
おそらくランドマークに なるでしょう
17:10
John Hockenberry told you a bit about
ジョン・ヒッケンベリーが 
私のシティバンクとの
17:13
my travail with Citibank,
苦労話をお話ししました
17:16
that is now a 10-year relationship, and I still work with them.
もう10年の関係で まだ一緒に仕事をしています
17:18
And I actually am amused by them and like them,
愉快にさせてくれる お客様です
17:22
and think that as a very, very, very, very, very big corporation
そして とても とても とても とても とても 
大きな企業です
17:25
they actually keep their graphics very nice.
彼らのデザイン・センスは素敵です
17:28
I drew the logo for Citibank
私は最初の会議で ナプキンに
17:31
on a napkin in the first meeting.
シティバンクのロゴを 描きました
17:33
That was the play part of the job.
この仕事の 遊びの部分でした
17:36
And then I spent a year
それから1年間は
17:38
going to long, tedious,
長く つまらない
17:40
boring meetings,
退屈な会議に出ては
17:42
trying to sell this logo through
涙が出る思いをしながら
17:44
to a huge corporation
この巨大企業に
17:46
to the point of tears.
ロゴを売り込みました
17:48
I thought I was going to go crazy at the end of this year.
年の暮には発狂するかと思いました
17:50
We made idiotic presentations
我々は馬鹿なプレゼンをして
17:52
showing how the Citi logo made sense,
このロゴは 合理的だと言ったり
17:54
and how it was really derived from an umbrella,
傘がモデルだということを 見せたり
17:56
and we made animations of these things,
アニメーションを作ったりして
17:58
and we came back and forth and back and forth and back and forth.
行ったり来たり 行ったり来たり 行ったり来たり
していました
18:00
And it was worth it, because they bought this thing,
その価値はありました
だって買ってくれたのですから
18:03
and it played out on such a grand scale,
大々的に使われるようになり
18:06
and it's so internationally recognizable,
世界中で認められましたが
18:08
but for me it was actually a very, very depressing year.
私にとっては とても とても
憂うつな年だったのです
18:12
As a matter of fact, they actually never bought onto the logo
実は このロゴを本当に気に入ってくれたのは
18:16
until Fallon put it on
ファロンが
18:18
its very good "Live Richly" campaign,
"豊かな生活" キャンペーンを した時のことで
18:20
and then everybody accepted it all over the world.
それで やっと世界中で受入れてくれました
18:22
So during this time I needed
この期間中 私には
18:26
some kind of counterbalance
埋め合わせする 何かがないと
18:28
for this crazy, crazy existence
長時間の馬鹿らしい会議に
参加するという
18:30
of going to these long, idiotic meetings.
気違いじみた現実に
耐えられませんでした
18:32
And I was up in my country house,
そこで別荘に行っては
18:34
and for some reason, I began painting
絵を描くことにしました
18:36
these very big, very involved,
とても大きくて とても複雑で
18:38
laborious, complicated
骨がおれて 交錯した
18:41
maps of the entire world,
世界地図で
18:44
and listing every place on the planet, and putting them in,
地球上のすべての場所を書き込み
18:46
and misspelling them, and putting things in the wrong spot,
ミス・スペルしたり 場所を間違えたりしながら
18:49
and completely controlling the information,
全ての情報を掌握して
18:51
and going totally and completely nuts with it.
全て 完全に やりたい放題にしました
18:53
They would take me about six months initially,
はじめは 6ヵ月掛かりましたが
18:56
but then I started getting faster at it.
次第に速くなりました
18:59
Here's the United States.
アメリカ合衆国です
19:01
Every single city of the United States is on here.
ありとあらゆる市を描きました
19:03
And it hung for about eight months
クーパー・ヒューイット博物館に
19:05
at the Cooper-Hewitt, and people walked up to it,
8ヵ月展示され みんなは近寄っては
19:07
and they would point to a part of the map
地図のある場所を示して
19:10
and they'd say, "Oh, I've been here."
ここに行ったことがある とか言いました
19:12
And, of course, they couldn't have been because it's in the wrong spot.
もちろん それはあり得ません 
誤った場所ですから
19:14
(Laughter)
(笑い)
19:17
But what I liked about it was,
それでも 気に入ったのは
19:18
I was controlling my own idiotic information,
自分で 取るに足らない情報を制御して
19:20
and I was creating my own palette of information,
自分の情報パレットを作りながら
19:23
and I was totally and completely
すっかり 完全に
19:26
at play.
遊んでいたからです
19:28
One of my favorites was
お気に入りは
19:30
this painting I did of Florida after the 2000 election
2000年の大統領選挙後に描いた フロリダ州です
19:32
that has the election results rolling around in the water.
選挙結果が 波に揺れています
19:35
I keep that for evidence.
証拠として残しています
19:39
(Laughter)
(笑い)
19:41
Somebody
誰かが
19:42
was up at my house and saw the paintings
私の家を訪問して これらの絵を見て
19:44
and recommended them to a gallery,
あるギャラリーに 勧めてくれました
19:46
and I had a first show
最初の展示会です
19:48
about two-and-a-half years ago, and I showed these paintings
2年半程前のことで その時の絵を
19:50
that I'm showing you now.
今 お見せしています
19:53
And then a funny thing happened -- they sold.
面白いことに これらの絵は売れました
19:56
And they sold quickly,
あっという間です
19:59
and became rather popular.
そして 人気がでました
20:02
We started making prints from them.
私たちは 複製を作り始めました
20:05
This is Manhattan, one from the series.
マンハッタンです シリーズのひとつです
20:07
This is a print from the United States which we did in red, white and blue.
アメリカです 赤 白 青を使いました
20:11
We began doing these big silkscreen prints,
大きなシルク・スクリーン複製もしました
20:14
and they started selling, too.
これらも売れました
20:17
So, the gallery wanted me to have another show
それでギャラリーは 次の展示会を 2年以内に
20:19
in two years,
やろうと言ってきました
20:21
which meant that I really
というわけで 私は 本当に
20:23
had to paint these paintings
これまでにないほどに とても速く
20:26
much faster
これらの絵を
20:28
than I had ever done them. And I --
描かなければ いけませんでした
20:30
they started to become more political, and I picked areas
絵は政治的になり 私が選んだ地域は
20:32
that sort of were in the news
ニュースで話題に上ったり
20:35
or that I had some feeling about,
特別の思いがある場所になりました
20:37
and I began doing these things.
そんなことを していると
20:39
And then this funny thing happened.
変なことに 気が付きました
20:41
I found that I was no longer at play.
もはや 遊びでは なくなっていたのです
20:43
I was actually in this solemn landscape
展示会への期待を 果たすために
20:46
of fulfilling an expectation
まじめに 仕事を
20:49
for a show,
していたのです
20:51
which is not where I started with these things.
始めた時とは もはや大違いです
20:53
So, while they became successful,
この絵が成功するに連れ ―
20:55
I know how to make them,
だって初心者では ありませんから
20:58
so I'm not a neophyte,
作り方は知っていました
21:00
and they're no longer serious --
もはや 本気では なくなりました
21:02
they have become solemn.
まじめに なったのです
21:04
And that's a terrifying factor --
恐ろしいことです ―
21:07
when you start something and it turns that way --
何か始めたことが そこに行き着く ―
21:10
because it means that all that's left for you
結局 自分に残されたのは
21:12
is to go back and to find out
最初に戻って
21:15
what the next thing is that you can push,
次に がんばれるもの ―
21:17
that you can invent, that you can be ignorant about,
作り出せるもの まだ知らないもの ―
21:20
that you can be arrogant about,
自信満々になれるもの 失敗できるもの ―
21:23
that you can fail with,
バカになれるもの ―
21:25
and that you can be a fool with.
そういったものを 見つけることだけでした
21:27
Because in the end, that's how you grow,
とどのつまり こうして成長するのです
21:29
and that's all that matters.
結局それが大事なのです
21:32
So, I'm plugging along here --
だから コツコツやっているのです
21:34
(Laughter)
(笑い)
21:36
and I'm just going to have to blow up the staircase.
そして この階段を ぶち壊さねば
21:39
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
21:41
Translator:Akira Kan
Reviewer:Kazunori Akashi

sponsored links

Paula Scher - Designer at play
With a career that fuses rock and roll, corporate identity creation, and impressionistic geography, Paula Scher is a master conjurer of the instantly familiar.

Why you should listen

The tag "rock star" is recklessly applied to everyone from bloggers to biochemists, but in Paula Scher's case it couldn't be more appropriate. As a rock star designer, she's cooked up everything from Boston album covers to Elvis Costello posters, pausing somewhere in between to trash the ubiquitous visual authoritarianism of Helvetica. She's also created some of design's most iconic images, like the Citibank logo. She is a partner in the renowned design firm Pentagram, and in 2001 received the distinguished AIGA medal.

As a fine artist, Scher has also become increasingly well known for her microscopically detailed map paintings, densely latticed with hand-lettered text, that evoke not only place but the varied political, historical and cultural meanings (and preconceptions) brought to the world by the viewer.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.