15:17
TED2004

Woody Norris: Hypersonic sound and other inventions

ウッディ・ノリスの驚嘆の発明の数々

Filmed:

ウッディ・ノリスが音作りの新しい形を可能にした2つの発明を紹介し、発明と教育に対する革新的なアプローチについて語る。「ほとんど何も発明されていない」と彼は言う。次は何を?

- Inventor
Woody Norris is a serial inventor of electronics, tools and cutting-edge sonic equipment -- such as the LRAD acoustic cannon. Full bio

I became an inventor by accident.
私は偶然発明家になっていました。
00:18
I was out of the air force in 1956. No, no, that's not true:
私は1956年に空軍を除隊しました。いや、そんな事はない
00:20
I went in in 1956, came out in 1959,
1956年に入隊し、1959年に除隊した後、
00:25
was working at the University of Washington,
ワシントン大学で働いていて
00:28
and I came up with an idea, from reading a magazine article,
雑誌の記事を読んでいた時に
00:30
for a new kind of a phonograph tone arm.
新しい蓄音機のトーンアームのアイデアが浮かんできました。
00:32
Now, that was before cassette tapes, C.D.s, DVDs --
今みんなが使っているカセットテープ、CDやDVDが
00:35
any of the cool stuff we've got now.
無かった頃の話しです。
00:38
And it was an arm that,
思いついたトーンアームは
00:40
instead of hinging and pivoting as it went across the record,
ピボット軸を支点としてアームが動くのではなく、
00:42
went straight: a radial, linear tracking tone arm.
まっすぐに動く、リニアトラッキングトーンアームです。
00:46
And it was the hardest invention I ever made, but it got me started,
これが今まで作った中で一番難しい発明でしたが、これがきっかけとなり、
00:50
and I got really lucky after that.
以降ずっとラッキーが続きました。
00:54
And without giving you too much of a tirade,
前置きはこれくらいとして、
00:56
I want to talk to you about an invention I brought with me today:
今日持ってきた発明について話しましょう:
00:58
my 44th invention. No, that's not true either.
私の44個目の発明です。いや、これもうそだ。
01:01
Golly, I'm just totally losing it.
今日はやけにボケているな。
01:05
My 44th patent; about the 15th invention.
44個目の特許、15個目の発明です。
01:07
I call this hypersonic sound.
私はこれを「ハイパーソニックサウンド」と呼んでいます。
01:10
I'm going to play it for you in a couple minutes,
少ししたら実際に聞いてもらおうと思いますが、
01:13
but I want to make an analogy before I do
その前に少しこの技術を別の物に例えてみたいと思います
01:15
to this.
これとです。
01:17
I usually show this hypersonic sound and people will say,
人に「ハイパーソニックサウンド」を見せると
01:20
That's really cool, but what's it good for?
すごいけど、これは何のために使うの?と良く聞かれます。
01:23
And I say, What is the light bulb good for?
逆に私はこう聞きます。電球は何のために使うの?
01:26
Sound, light: I'm going to draw the analogy.
音と光 この二つを比べてみたいと思います。
01:29
When Edison invented the light bulb, pretty much looked like this.
エジソンが電球を発明した時から形はこのままです。
01:32
Hasn't changed that much.
あまり変わっていません。
01:35
Light came out of it in every direction.
すべての方向に光が発されます。
01:37
Before the light bulb was invented,
電球が発明される前にも
01:40
people had figured out how to put a reflector behind it,
人は反射板を使い
01:42
focus it a little bit;
光を集中させる方法を見つけ、
01:45
put lenses in front of it,
レンズを前に置き
01:47
focus it a little bit better.
もう少し効率良く光を集中させました。
01:49
Ultimately we figured out how to make things like lasers
最終的にレーザーのような
01:51
that were totally focused.
志向性の高い光を作る事も可能になりました。
01:54
Now, think about where the world would be today
今の世界に置き換えて考えてみて下さい
01:57
if we had the light bulb,
光の方向を集中させる事の
01:59
but you couldn't focus light;
出来ない電球があったとしたら、
02:03
if when you turned one on it just went wherever it wanted to.
電気を点けると光が全方向に広がったとしたら。
02:05
That's the way loudspeakers pretty much are.
今のスピーカーはまさにその通りなのです。
02:10
You turn on the loudspeaker,
発明されてから80年ほど経つ
02:13
and after almost 80 years of having those gadgets,
スピーカーをつけると、
02:15
the sound just kind of goes where it wants.
音は好き勝手に広がって行きます。
02:18
Even when you're standing in front of a megaphone,
メガホンの前に立っていようが
02:21
it's pretty much every direction.
どこからでも音は聞こえます。
02:23
A little bit of differential, but not much.
多少の差はありますが、たいした差ではありません。
02:25
If the light bulb was the way the speaker is,
もし電球がスピーカーのように
02:28
and you couldn't focus or sharpen the edges or define it,
フォーカスさせたり、エッジを持たせたり出来なかったら、
02:31
we wouldn't have that, or movies in general,
あれが無かったり、映画も見れなかったり、
02:34
or computers, or T.V. sets,
パソコンやテレビも
02:39
or C.D.s, or DVDs -- and just go down the list
CDもDVDも・・・色々考えてみると
02:42
of what the importance is
光に指向性を持たせる事の
02:45
of being able to focus light.
大切さに気づくでしょう。
02:47
Now, after almost 80 years of having sound,
そして、音を作り始めて約80年、
02:50
I thought it was about time that we figure out
そろそろ音を自在に操る方法を
02:54
a way to put sound where you want to.
見つける時なのでは無いかと考えたのです。
02:56
I have a couple of units.
ここにいくつかの機材があります。
03:00
That guy there was made for a demo I did yesterday early in the day
そこのアイツは昨日デモしたものなんですが、
03:02
for a big car maker in Detroit who wants to put them in a car --
あれはデトロイトの自動車メーカーのために作った物
03:04
small version, over your head --
―頭上に取り付けるために小型化して
03:07
so that you can actually get binaural sound in a car.
バイノーラルサウンドが車内で楽しめます。
03:09
What if I could aim sound the way I aim light?
もし光のように音を狙った場所に出す事が出来たら?
03:13
I got this waterfall I recorded in my back yard.
これは家の庭で録音した滝の音です。
03:18
Now, you're not going to hear a thing unless it hits you.
実際にこれが向けられるまで何も聞こえません。
03:21
Maybe if I hit the side wall it will bounce around the room.
壁に当てると跳ね返って部屋中に広がるかもしれない。
03:25
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:28
The sound is being made right next to your ears. Is that cool?
耳のすぐ隣で音が作られる。すごくないですか?
03:31
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:35
Because I have some limited time, I'll cut it off for a second,
時間が限られてるので、一旦これは置いて、
03:43
and tell you about how it works and what it's good for.
これの仕組みと、何のために良いかについて話しましょう。
03:45
Course, like light, it's great to be able to put sound
当然、光のように、音で
03:48
to highlight a clothing rack, or the cornflakes, or the toothpaste,
洋服ラックや、コーンフレーク、歯磨き粉を引き立たせたり
03:51
or a talking plaque in a movie theater lobby.
映画館のロビーに喋るポップを立てたり。
03:54
Sony's got an idea -- Sony's our biggest customers right now.
ソニーは考えがあるようで 今はソニーが一番のお得意様です。
03:57
They tried this back in the '60s
実は60年代にも挑戦したが
04:01
and were too smart, and so they gave up.
頭が良すぎて、ギブアップしたらしい。
04:03
But they want to use it -- seriously.
でも使いたい・・・いや、本当だよ
04:05
There's a mix an inventor has to have.
・・・
04:08
You have to be kind of smart,
ちょっと頭が良く、
04:10
and though I did not graduate from college doesn't mean I'm stupid,
私は大学を卒業していないからと言ってバカではありません、
04:12
because you cannot be stupid and do very much in the world today.
今の世界ではバカでは大した事など出来ませんからね。
04:16
Too many other smart people out there. So.
そこら中に賢い人はいるので。それで
04:19
I just happened to get my education in a little different way.
私は普通とは違った方法で教育を受けたようです。
04:21
I'm not at all against education.
私は教育に関して反対などまったくしてません。
04:23
I think it's wonderful; I think sometimes people,
すばらしい物だと思います。時々人は
04:26
when they get educated, lose it:
勉強する事によって、何かを失う時はあります。
04:28
they get so smart they're unwilling to look at things that they know better than.
賢くなりすぎて、周りに目を向けようとしません。
04:31
And we're living in a great time right now,
今はとても恵まれた時代で、
04:35
because almost everything's being explored anew.
改めて色々な物が発掘されていってます。
04:38
I have this little slogan that I use a lot, which is:
私にはちょっとしたモットーがあります。それは
04:41
virtually nothing --
「実際、未だほとんど何も
04:44
and I mean this honestly --
大げさに言っているのではありません―
04:46
has been invented yet.
発明されていない。」
04:48
We're just starting.
まだ始まったばかりなのです。
04:50
We're just starting to really discover the laws of nature and science and physics.
最近になってやっと自然の法則や科学や物理について解明し始めている所です。
04:52
And this is, I hope, a little piece of it.
この発明もその手助けをしてると願っています。
04:56
Sony's got this vision back -- to get myself on track --
ちょっと話しがそれましたが、ソニーがまたこれに目をつけたのです
04:58
that when you stand in the checkout line in the supermarket,
スーパーのレジで並んでいる時に
05:02
you're going to watch a new T.V. channel.
テレビが見れるようになります。
05:05
They know that when you watch T.V. at home,
家でテレビを見る時は
05:07
because there are so many choices
色々とチャンネルがあり過ぎて
05:09
you can change channels, miss their commercials.
CM中はチャンネルを変えたりして、CMを見ない人が多い。
05:11
A hundred and fifty-one million people every day stand in the line at the supermarket.
1.51億人が毎日スーパーのレジで並んでいます。
05:15
Now, they've tried this a couple years ago and it failed,
数年前にこれを試したのですが、店員が20分毎繰り返される
05:20
because the checker gets tired of hearing the same message
テレビCMの音に耐えられなくなり、
05:22
every 20 minutes, and reaches out, turns off the sound.
最終的に、テレビの音は消されました。
05:24
And, you know, if the sound isn't there, the sale typically isn't made.
ただご存知の通り、その音が無ければその商品は売れずに終わります。
05:28
For instance, like, when you're on an airplane, they show the movie,
例えば、飛行機の中で
05:31
you get to watch it for free;
映画を無料で放映してますが、
05:34
when you want to hear the sound, you pay.
音を聞きたければ、払わなければならない。
05:36
And so ABC and Sony have devised this new thing
そこで、ABCとソニーが新しい試みとして
05:38
where when you step in the line in the supermarket --
スーパーのレジで並ぶ時―
05:42
initially it'll be Safeways. It is Safeways;
今はセーフウェイで
05:45
they're trying this in three parts of the country right now --
実験的に導入しています―
05:48
you'll be watching TV.
テレビが見れます。
05:50
And hopefully they'll be sensitive
余計な宣伝を増やして
05:52
that they don't want to offend you with just one more outlet.
気に障るような事をしなければいいんですが。
05:54
But what's great about it, from the tests that have been done, is,
今までの実験で分かっているこの発明のいい所は、
05:56
if you don't want to hear it,
音を聞きたくなかったら
05:59
you take about one step to the side and you don't hear it.
一歩横にずれれば聞こえなくなると言う事です。
06:01
So, we create silence as much as we create sound.
我々は音を作ると同時に静寂も作るのです。
06:04
ATMs that talk to you; nobody else hears it.
ATMの音声が貴方以外には聞こえない。
06:08
Sit in bed, two in the morning, watch TV;
夜中の2時、ベッドでテレビが見れる。
06:11
your spouse, or someone, is next to you, asleep;
たとえ隣で貴方の妻か誰かが寝ていても
06:13
doesn't hear it, doesn't wake up.
その人には何も聞こえませんし、起こす心配もありません。
06:17
We're also working on noise canceling things like snoring, noise from automobiles.
いびきや自動車からくる雑音のノイズキャンセリングにも取り組んでいます。
06:19
I have been really lucky with this technology:
私は運が良かったのです。
06:25
all of a sudden as it is ready, the world is ready to accept it.
今まさに世界はこの技術を必要としいるのです。
06:29
They have literally beat a path to our door.
需要が一気に高まっています。
06:34
We've been selling it since about last September, October,
去る9月、10月から発売を始めているのですが
06:36
and it's been immensely gratifying.
結果には驚かされています。
06:39
If you're interested in what it costs -- I'm not selling them today --
ちなみに、今日は売りませんが、コストが気になる方、
06:42
but this unit, with the electronics and everything,
このユニットすべてセットで
06:44
if you buy one, is around a thousand bucks.
一式だいたい9万円(千ドル)です。
06:46
We expect by this time next year,
来年の今頃は
06:48
it'll be hundreds, a few hundred bucks, to buy it.
数万円で買えるでしょう。
06:50
It's not any more pricey than regular electronics.
他の電気製品と比べても価格に大差はありません。
06:52
Now, when I played it for you, you didn't hear the thunderous bass.
先程これをお聞かせした時に重低音が聞こえなかったかと思います。
06:56
This unit that I played goes from about 200 hertz to above the range of hearing.
このユニットは200Hzから人間の可聴域超える帯域を持ったスピーカーです。
07:00
It's actually emitting ultrasound -- low-level ultrasound --
実は一秒間に100,000回ほど振動して、
07:05
that's about 100,000 vibrations per second.
超音波を発しているのです。
07:09
And the sound that you're hearing,
そして聞こえている音は
07:12
unlike a regular speaker on which all the sound is made on the face,
普通のスピーカーと違い、スピーカーの振動面で音を作るのでは無く、
07:14
is made out in front of it, in the air.
空気中で作られています。
07:18
The air is not linear, as we've always been taught.
ずっと教えられてきたように、空気はノンリニア特性を持っています。
07:21
You turn up the volume just a little bit --
音量を少し上げて、
07:25
I'm talking about a little over 80 decibels --
80デシベルを少し超えたあたりから
07:27
and all of a sudden the air begins to corrupt signals you propagate.
空気中を伝わる音の歪みが顕著なってきます。
07:30
Here's why: the speed of sound is not a constant. It's fairly slow.
なぜかと言うと、空気中の音速が一定ではないからです。そして結構遅い。
07:34
It changes with temperature and with barometric pressure.
気温や気圧で変わるのです。
07:39
Now, imagine, if you will, without getting too technical,
これをサイン波だと思って
07:43
I'm making a little sine wave here in the air.
想像して見てください。
07:46
Well, if I turn up the amplitude too much,
振幅が大きくなりすぎると、
07:49
I'm having an effect on the pressure,
圧力に作用してしまい、
07:52
which means during the making of that sine wave,
このサイン波が生成される間も
07:55
the speed at which it is propagating is shifting.
波の伝送速度が変わってしまうのです。
07:58
All of audio as we know it
オーディオの世界では
08:01
is an attempt to be more and more perfectly linear.
リニア特性が理想とされています。
08:04
Linearity means higher quality sound.
リニアであればあるほど高音質と言う事です。
08:08
Hypersonic sound is exactly the opposite:
「ハイパーソニックサウンド」はまったくの正反対です、
08:12
it's 100 percent based on non-linearity.
ノンリニアな特性が前提で作られています。
08:16
An effect happens in the air, it's a corrupting effect of the sound --
音は空気中で歪みます―
08:20
the ultrasound in this case -- that's emitted,
この技術の場合は発される超音波の部分に当たります―
08:25
but it's so predictable
ただその歪みは容易に予測でき
08:28
that you can produce very precise audio out of that effect.
それを利用して狙った音響効果を出せたりするのです。
08:30
Now, the question is, where's the sound made?
次に疑問に思うのは、音はどこで作られるか?です。
08:34
Instead of being made on the face of the cone,
コーンの面で作られるのではなく、
08:37
it's made at literally billions of little independent points
空気中に存在する何億と言うポイントが
08:39
along this narrow column in the air,
柱状に伸びて音は作られていて、
08:43
and so when I aim it towards you,
耳に向けると
08:47
what you hear is made right next to your ears.
音は耳のすぐ側で作られています。
08:49
I said we can shorten the column,
音の届く距離を縮めたり、
08:52
we can spread it out to cover the couch.
ソファに全体に広げたりも出来ます。
08:55
I can put it so that one ear hears one speaker,
片方の耳に片方のスピーカーが聞こえて
08:57
the other ear hears the other. That's true binaural sound.
反対の耳はもう片方が聞こえるようにしたり。これが本当のバイノーラルサウンド。
09:00
When you listen to stereo on your home system,
家でステレオを聞くとき
09:04
your both ears hear both speakers.
両方の耳で両方のスピーカーの音を聞いています。
09:07
Turn on the left speaker sometime
左スピーカーだけをつけても
09:10
and notice you're hearing it also in your right ear.
右耳でも聞こえてると言う事に気づくと思います。
09:12
So, the stage is more restricted --
そのためにあなたの前に広がる
09:14
the sound stage that's supposed to spread out in front of you.
音場が制限されます。
09:17
Because the sound is made in the air along this column,
音が柱状に伸びるため
09:20
it does not follow the inverse square law,
逆2乗の法則を従いません、
09:23
which says it drops off about two thirds
その法則は、距離が倍になるたびに
09:25
every time you double the distance:
3分の2ほど減退すると言う物で、
09:28
6dB every time you go from one meter, for instance, to two meters.
例えば1メートルから2メートルの間で6dB減退します。
09:30
That means you go to a rock concert or a symphony,
これがあれば、ロックコンサートやシンフォニーに行った時、
09:35
and the guy in the front row gets the same level
最前列にいる人と後ろで座っている人が
09:38
as the guy in the back row, now, all of a sudden.
同じ音圧で聞けるようになると言うことです。
09:40
Isn't that terrific?
素晴らしいと思いませんか?
09:42
So, we've been, as I say, very successful, very lucky,
このビジョンを理解してくれる企業がいる事が
09:45
in having companies catch the vision of this,
我々はとてもラッキーで、かなり上出来ではないかと思っています。
09:48
from cars -- car makers who want to put a stereo system in the front for the kids,
自動車メーカーは子供達のために前部座席のステレオシステムと
09:51
and a separate system in the back --
後ろに別のシステムを・・・
09:55
oh, no, the kids aren't driving today.
あ、いや、子供達は運転してませんよね。
09:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:59
I was seeing if you were listening.
聞いてるかテストしただけです。
10:00
Actually, I haven't had breakfast yet.
実は朝ご飯を食べてないんです。
10:02
A stereo system in the front for mom and dad,
前は両親のためのステレオシステムを
10:04
and maybe there's a little DVD player in the back for the kids,
後ろは子供達のために小さなDVDプレーヤーや
10:08
and the parents don't want to be bothered with that,
ラップ音楽を聴いていようと、
10:11
or their rap music or whatever.
両親はそれに気を取られる事もありません。
10:13
So, again, this idea of being able to put sound anywhere you want to
そのため、音を好きな所望の位置で鳴らすと言う事が
10:15
is really starting to catch on.
だんだん広まってきています。
10:18
It also works for transmitting and communicating data.
これはデータの転送や送受信にも応用が利きます。
10:20
It also works five times better underwater.
実は水中では性能が五倍向上します。
10:24
We've got the military -- have just deployed some of these into Iraq,
軍もこれをイラクに導入しています、
10:27
where you can put fake troop movements
偽の軍隊の動きを
10:31
quarter of a mile away on a hillside.
数百メートル先の丘の上に置いたり。
10:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:36
Or you can whisper in the ear of a supposed terrorist some Biblical verse.
あるいはテロリストに聖書の一節を囁いたり。
10:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:43
I'm serious. And they have these infrared devices
本当ですよ。人の表情を読み取る
10:45
that can look at their countenance,
赤外線機器で見て見ると
10:51
and see a fraction of a degree Kelvin in temperature shift
90メートル離れた場所からこれを再生した時
10:54
from 100 yards away when they play this thing.
わずかな温度変化がある事がわかります。
10:58
And so, another way of hopefully determining who's friendly and who isn't.
それを使って、敵か味方か判断する方法もあるのではないかと考えています。
11:01
We make a version with this which puts out 155 decibels.
これの155デシベル出力するバージョンを作りました。
11:05
Pain is 120.
痛みは120。
11:10
So it allows you to go nearly a mile away and communicate with people,
これを使えば1.6キロ(1マイル)離れた場所でも通信が可能で、
11:12
and there can be a public beach just off to the side,
すぐ隣にビーチがあったとしても
11:16
and they don't even know it's turned on.
そこにいる人はまったく気づかないでしょう。
11:18
We sell those to the military presently for about 70,000 dollars,
これを約600万円(7万ドル)で売っているのですが、
11:20
and they're buying them as fast as we can make them.
生産するペースで売れてしまいます。
11:24
We put it on a turret with a camera, so that when they shoot at you,
カメラと一緒にこれを砲塔に搭載し、相手に狙われても、
11:26
you're over there, and it's there.
狙われるのは砲塔であって、自分はあっちにいる。
11:31
I have a bunch of other inventions.
他にも色々発明はあります。
11:34
I invented a plasma antenna, to shift gears.
プラズマアンテナと言う物も発明しました。
11:36
Looked up at the ceiling of my office one day --
オフィスの天井を見上げた時、
11:38
I was working on a ground-penetrating radar project --
ちょうど地中探査レーダーのプロジェクトの真っ最中だったのですが、
11:41
and my physicist CEO came in and said, "We have a real problem.
物理学者のCEOが私のもとに来てこういいました、「ちょっと問題がある。
11:45
We're using very short wavelengths.
我々はかなり短い波長を使用している。
11:49
We've got a problem with the antenna ringing.
そのせいでアンテナのびびりがひどい。♪
11:52
When you run very short wavelengths,
高周波数を使うと、
11:54
like a tuning fork the antenna resonates,
アンテナが音叉のように共鳴してしまい、
11:56
and there's more energy coming out of the antenna
アンテナ自体が発するエネルギーが
11:58
than there is the backscatter from the ground
地中の後方散乱のを上回ってしまし
12:00
that we're trying to analyze, taking too much processing."
解析しようとしても処理が重くなりすぎてしまう。」
12:02
I says, "Why don't we make an antenna that only exists when you want it?
私の答えは「必要な時にだけ存在するアンテナを作ればいいのではないか?
12:05
Turn it on; turn it off.
電源を入れる、切る。
12:10
That's a fluorescent tube refined."
蛍光灯のような物です。」
12:13
I just sold that for a million and a half dollars, cash.
1.3億円(150万ドル)で売りました、現金で。
12:18
I took it back to the Pentagon after it got declassified,
特許申請を終わらせ、機密種別からはずされた後で
12:21
when the patent issued, and told the people back there about it,
ペンタゴンに持って行き、これを紹介した時、
12:24
and they laughed, and then I took them back a demo and they bought.
最初は笑われましたがデモを行ったらすぐ買ってくれました。
12:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:30
Any of you ever wore a Jabber headphone -- the little cell headphones?
Jabraのヘッドホンを使った方はいますか、あの小さい携帯用のヘッドホン?
12:32
That's my invention. I sold that for seven million dollars.
あれも私の発明です。6億円(7百万ドル)で売りました。
12:37
Big mistake: it just sold for 80 million dollars two years ago.
大きな間違いでした、つい二年前に70億円(8千万ドル)で売れてしまいました。
12:39
I actually drew that up on a little crummy Mac computer
あれは実は家の屋根裏部屋にあった
12:43
in my attic at my house,
古いマックで描きあげ、
12:46
and one of the many designs which they have now
今あるデザインのひとつは
12:49
is still the same design I drew way back when.
私が昔書いた物とまったく同じ物だったりします。
12:52
So, I've been really lucky as an inventor.
今まで言った通り、私は発明家としてはかなりラッキーです。
12:54
I'm the happiest guy you're ever going to meet.
私は貴方が出会う中で一番幸せな人間だと思います。
12:57
And my dad died before he realized anybody in the family
私の父は、家族の誰かが何かを成し遂げるのを
13:01
would maybe, hopefully, make something out of themselves.
知らないままに亡くなってしまいました。
13:06
You've been a great audience. I know I've jumped all over the place.
良い観客でいてくれてありがとう。色々話しが飛んでしまったのですが。
13:09
I usually figure out what my talk is when I get up in front of a group.
話の内容はだいたいみんなの前に立ったときに考えるので。
13:11
Let me give you, in the last minute,
では最後に、残った一分で、
13:14
one more quick demo of this guy,
まだ聴けていない人のために、
13:16
for those of you that haven't heard it.
またこいつのデモをしたいと思います。
13:19
Can never tell if it's on.
いつやっても音が出てるかわかりません。
13:22
If you haven't heard it, raise your hand.
まだ聴いていない方は挙手お願いします。
13:24
Getting it over there?
そっちに行ってますか?
13:29
Get the cameraman.
後カメラマンも。
13:32
Yeah, there you go.
こんな感じです。
13:35
I've got a Coke can opening that's right in your head; that's really cool.
耳元でコーラの缶を開ける音なのですがいいと思いませんか?
13:37
Thank you once again.
最後にもう一度、ありがとうございます。
13:40
Appreciate it very much.
ご清聴ありがとうございます。
13:42
Translated by Tomohiro Sugimoto
Reviewed by Hidetoshi Yamauchi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Woody Norris - Inventor
Woody Norris is a serial inventor of electronics, tools and cutting-edge sonic equipment -- such as the LRAD acoustic cannon.

Why you should listen

When Woody Norris won the Lemelson-MIT Prize in 2005, his official prize bio called him "a classic independent inventor ... self-educated, self-funded and self-motivated." His mind seems to race toward things the world needs, though we don't know it yet: a nonlethal acoustic weapon that has been used to ward off pirates, a bone-induction headset, radar that can scan the human body, a tapeless tape recorder ...

Norris' educational background is a key to his restless mind. He is not quite "self-educated" -- he's taken many classes, but always at his own speed and in his own style, studying the things he knew he wanted to know and working closely with professors. Ironically, it's a model that cutting-edge colleges are now embracing.

His inventions have seeded several public companies. Recently he has been working on the AirScooter -- a sort of propeller-powered counterpart to the Moller SkyCar.

More profile about the speaker
Woody Norris | Speaker | TED.com