English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2004

Paul Moller: My dream of a flying car

ポール・モラーとスカイカー

Filmed
Views 419,996

ポール・モラーが将来の空の旅について話します。自動車が空を飛ぶことで道路という制約を離れた真の自由が実現します。ジェットを搭載した車であるモラー・スカイカーと乗員に優しいホバリング・ディスクの二つをご覧に入れます。

- Inventor
With a team of engineers, Paul Moller works on the Skycar, a combination car and jet, as well as the M200, a saucer-shaped hovering car. He also develops next-generation engines to power these and other amazing vehicles. Full bio

Many of you could ask the question, you know,
なぜ現状で空飛ぶ車、
00:13
why is a flying car, or maybe more accurately,
正確には車輪のついた飛行機が
00:15
a roadable aircraft, possible at this time?
実現可能かお知りになりたいでしょう?
00:18
A number of years ago,
過去に
00:22
Mr. Ford predicted that flying cars
フォード氏は将来何らかの形で
00:24
of some form would be available.
空飛ぶ車が実現すると予言しました。
00:26
Now, 60 years later,
60年後の今、
00:28
I'm here to tell you why it's possible.
それが可能であることを宣言します。
00:30
When I was about five years old,
私が5歳くらいだった頃
00:32
not very much -- about a year after
フォード氏がそんな予言をした
00:34
Mr. Ford made his predictions,
1年後くらいでしょうか、
00:36
I was living in a rural part of Canada,
私は人里離れた
00:38
on the side of a mountain in a very isolated area.
カナダの田舎に住んでいました。
00:41
Getting to school, for a kid that was actually pretty short for his age,
背の低かった当時、冬の間
00:46
through the Canadian winter, was not a pleasant experience.
学校に行くのは楽しいものではありませんでした。
00:50
It was a trying and scary thing
小さな子供にとってとても
00:53
for a young kid to be going through.
骨が折れて恐ろしいものでした。
00:57
At the end of my first year in school, in the summer of that year,
一年生の最後の夏休み
01:00
I discovered a couple hummingbirds
家の近くの納屋で
01:05
that were caught in a shed near my home.
ハチドリを見つけたんです。
01:08
They'd worn themselves out,
ガラス窓に何度もあたって
01:10
beating themselves against the window,
弱っていたので
01:12
and, well, they were easy to capture.
簡単に捕まえられました。
01:14
I took them outside and as I let them go, that split second, even though they were very tired,
外へ出して逃がしてやると、
01:16
that second I let them go they hovered for a second,
疲れていたにも関わらずちょっと手元で羽ばたいた後
01:20
then zipped off into the distance.
飛び去っていきました。
01:22
I thought, what a great way to get to school.
こんな感じで学校に行けたら!と思いました。
01:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:26
For a kid at that age, this was like infinite speed, disappearing,
子供心にとてつもないスピードに
01:29
and I was very inspired by that.
感動したのです。
01:33
And so the next -- over the next
信じられないかもしれませんが
01:35
six decades, believe it or not,
それから60年ほどの間
01:37
I've built a number of aircraft,
ハチドリができることを
01:39
with the goal of creating something that could do for you, or me,
皆さんや私自身ができるようにし、
01:42
what the hummingbird does,
いわば自由を与えてくれる
01:46
and give you that flexibility.
飛行機を制作し続けてきたのです。
01:48
I've called this vehicle, generically, a volantor,
私はこの乗り物を「軽やかに飛ぶ」というラテン語、
01:51
after the Latin word "volant," meaning,
「ボラント」という単語を借りて
01:55
to fly in a light, nimble manner.
「ボランター」と呼び続けてきました。
01:57
Volantor-like helicopter, perhaps.
ボランター・ヘリコプターとも言えるかもしれません。
02:00
The FAA, the controlling body above all,
連邦航空局は「パワーリフトエアークラフト」と
02:02
calls it a "powered lift aircraft."
呼ぶことで収まったようです。
02:05
And they've actually issued a pilot's license --
実際このタイプの飛行機のパイロットには
02:08
a powerlift pilot's license -- for this type of aircraft.
「パワーリフト操縦免許」が発行されます。
02:11
It's closer than you think. It's kind of remarkable when you consider that
現実的ですよね。まだ動く機体が無いことを
02:15
there are no operational powered lift aircraft.
考えれば異例とも言えるでしょう。
02:18
So for once, perhaps, the government is ahead of itself.
珍しいことに政府の方が先んじているのです。
02:21
The press calls my particular volantor a "Skycar."
報道の方はスカイカーと名付けました。
02:25
This is a little bit earlier version of it,
これは早期に開発したものなので
02:30
that's why it's given the X designation,
Xという記号を使っていますが
02:33
but it's a four-passenger aircraft
4人乗りであり、ヘリコプターのように
02:35
that could take off vertically, like a helicopter --
垂直に離陸できるので
02:37
therefore it doesn't need an airfield.
飛行場は必要ないんです。
02:39
On the ground, it's powered electrically.
地上では電気で動きます。
02:41
It's actually classified as a motorcycle
3つの車輪をもつオートバイに分類されるため
02:45
because of the three wheels, which is a great asset
殆どの州でハイウェイを利用することが
02:48
because it allows you, theoretically, to use this on the highways
理論的に可能であることは
02:50
in most states, and actually in all cities.
大きな特長と言えます。
02:52
So that's an asset because if you've got to deal with the crash protection issues
空を飛ばないと言い切ってしまえば
02:55
of the automobile, forget it -- you're never going to fly it.
墜落したときの乗員保護を考える必要ありませんから。
02:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:02
One could say that a helicopter
ヘリコプターはハチドリのように
03:07
does pretty much what the hummingbird does,
飛び回ることができると言いますが
03:09
and gets around in much the same way, and it's true,
正しい表現だと思います。
03:12
but a helicopter is a very complex device.
もちろんヘリコプターは非常に複雑なわけですが。
03:14
It's expensive --
とても高価なので
03:18
so expensive that very few people could own or use it.
一握りの人しか所有したり飛ばしたりできません。
03:20
It's often been described because of its fragile nature and its complexity,
複雑で壊れやすいので沢山の部品が
03:24
as a series of parts -- a large number of parts --
編隊飛行をしている
03:28
flying in formation.
なんて表現もされます。
03:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:32
Another difference, and I have to describe this,
ぜひ申し上げておきたいのですが
03:37
because it's very personal,
ヘリコプターと
03:39
another great difference between the helicopter
スカイカー・ボランターの違いは
03:41
and the volantor --
実際に
03:43
in my case the Skycar volantor --
私がしたように
03:45
is the experience that I've had
両者を飛ばしてみれば
03:47
in flying both of those.
おわかりになると思います。
03:49
In a helicopter you feel -- and it's still a remarkable sensation --
ヘリコプターは振動するクレーンで
03:51
you feel like you're being hauled up from above
上から引き上げられるような
03:54
by a vibrating crane.
驚きを感じると思います。
03:57
When you get in the Skycar -- and I can tell you,
スカイカーの場合、
03:59
there's only one other person that's flown it, but he had the same sensation --
二人しか乗車できませんが
04:01
you really feel like you're being lifted up
魔法の絨毯に乗っているような
04:04
by a magic carpet,
驚きがあるはずです。
04:06
without any vibration whatsoever. The sensation is unbelievable.
その振動のなさは信じられないほどです。
04:09
And it's been a great motivator.
そしてやる気を奮い立たせてくれます。
04:12
I only get to fly this vehicle occasionally,
株主を説得する時に
04:14
and only when I can persuade my stockholders
操縦する事もありますが
04:17
to let me do so,
私自身
04:19
but it's still one of those wonderful experiences
いまだに苦労が報われる気がする素晴らしい
04:21
that reward you for all that time.
経験だと思っています。
04:24
What we really need is something to replace the automobile
私たちが本当に必要としているのは50マイル強の
04:30
for those 50-plus mile trips.
ドライブをするために使われる車です。
04:33
Very few people realize that 50 mile-plus trips
アメリカでは85パーセントが
04:36
make up 85 percent of the miles traveled in America.
この50マイル強のドライブであることは殆ど認識されてません。
04:38
If we can get rid of that,
もしそれをなんとかすることができれば
04:41
then the highways will now be useful to you,
世界の大部分で起きている現象と比べ
04:43
as contrasted by what's happening
ハイウェイがとても
04:46
in many parts of the world today.
使い勝手の良いものになるでしょう。
04:48
On this next slide, is an interesting history
次のスライドでは
04:52
of what we really have seen in infrastructure,
インフラの歴史をご覧頂きます。
04:56
because whether I give you a perfect Skycar,
例え素晴らしいスカイカーを私が制作したとしても
05:00
the perfect vehicle for use, it's going to have very little value to you
それを使うインフラが無ければ
05:03
unless you've got a system to use it in.
意味が無いでしょうから。
05:06
I'm sure any of you have asked the question,
「そりゃ素晴らしい、でおれはどうすれば良いんだ?」
05:08
yeah, are there great things up there -- what am I going to do, get up there?
なんて声が聞こえてきますね。
05:10
It's bad enough on a highway, what's it going to be like to be in the air?
「ハイウェイだって酷いことになってるのに空中はどうなるんだよ」
05:12
This world that you're going to be talking about tomorrow
未来の世界は完全に統合され
05:15
is going to be completely integrated. You're not going to be a pilot,
あなたはパイロットではなく
05:18
you're going to be a passenger.
乗客になるのです。
05:20
And it's the infrastructure that really determines whether this process goes forward.
それこそがこの計画が進展する鍵を握っているインフラだと言えます。
05:22
I can tell you, technically we can build Skycars --
技術的には、いいですか?
05:25
my God, we went to the moon!
月に行くようなスカイカーですら作れるのです。
05:27
The technology there was much more difficult than what I'm dealing with here.
その技術は今開発しているものよりもより複雑でしょう
05:29
But we have to have these priority changes,
けれども私たちはスカイカーに適した
05:32
we have to have infrastructure to go with this.
インフラを整備する必要があるのです。
05:34
Historically you see that we got around
歴史的に見れば200年前は
05:36
200 years ago by canals,
運河を使っていました。
05:38
and as that system disappeared, were replaced by railroads.
そしてそれが鉄道によって代替された。
05:40
As that disappeared we came in with highways.
鉄道が消えた後はそれがハイウェイになった。
05:43
But if you look at that top corner -- the highway system --
ハイウェイシステムの曲線をみれば
05:45
you see where we are today. Highways are no longer being built,
今日の状態がわかります。ハイウェイはもう建設されていない。
05:48
and that's a fact. You won't see any additional highways
そうなんです。これから10年先
05:52
in the next 10 years.
もう新しいハイウェイは造られない。
05:55
However, the next 10 years, if like the last 10 years,
一方でこれからの10年間、交通量は
05:57
we're going to see 30 percent more traffic.
30%程増えるはずです。
05:59
And where is that going to lead you to?
それがどのような結果を生むか。
06:02
So the issue then, I've often asked, is
問題はそれが
06:04
when is it going to happen?
いつ起きるのかということを自問してきました。
06:06
When are we going to be able to have these vehicles?
新しい乗り物がいつ頃実用化されるか。
06:09
And of course, if you ask me, I'm going to give you a really optimistic view.
私が答えるならもちろんとても楽天的な見通しを答えます。
06:12
After all, I've been spending 60 years here believing it's going to happen tomorrow.
結局私は60年間明日にでも実現することを信じて過ごしてきたんです。
06:15
So, I'm not going to quote myself on this.
ですからここでは私ではなく
06:18
I'd prefer to quote someone else,
第三者の意見を確認してみようと思います。
06:21
who testified with me before Congress,
NASAの長官で
06:23
and in his position as head of NASA
私と共に連邦議会で
06:25
put forward this particular vision
このタイプの飛行機の将来性について
06:29
of the future of this type of aircraft.
証言した人の意見です。
06:31
Now I would argue, actually, if you look at the fact that on the highways today,
運輸省によると、現在ハイウェイでは
06:35
you're only averaging about 30 miles per hour --
平均30マイル時でしか
06:38
on average, according to the DOT --
流れていないそうです。
06:41
the Skycar travels at over 300 miles an hour,
スカイカーは300マイル時で
06:44
up to 25,000 feet.
25,000フィートまで飛ぶことができます。
06:46
And so, in effect, you could see perhaps a tenfold increase
事実上スピードに関して言えば
06:49
in the ability to get around
おそらく10倍のスピードで
06:51
as far as speed is concerned.
移動できるのです。
06:54
Unbeknownst to many of you,
ご存じないかもしれませんが
07:01
the highway in the sky that I'm talking about here
ここでお話ししている空のハイウェイは
07:04
has been under construction for 10 years.
もう10年前から建設されているのです。
07:06
It makes use of the GPS -- you're familiar with GPS in your automobile,
皆さんの車にも使われているGPSを用いているのです。
07:09
but you may not be familiar with the fact that there's a GPS U.S.,
アメリカのGPS、ロシアのGPSというものが
07:12
there's a Russian GPS,
あるのはご存じないかもしれませんね。
07:15
and there's a new GPS system
そしてヨーロッパにはガリレオという
07:17
going to Europe, called Galileo.
新しいGPSシステムがあるのです。
07:19
With those three systems,
これら3つのシステムがあれば
07:21
you have what is always necessary --
もし一つのシステムがダメになったときでも
07:23
a level of redundancy that says,
十分なバックアップが
07:25
if one system fails, you'll still have a way
確保され、コントロールを
07:27
to make sure that you're being controlled.
失わないようにできるのです。
07:29
Because if you're in this world, where computers are controlling what you're doing,
コンピュータがあなたの行為と密接に関係するこの世界に生きる以上
07:31
it's going to be very critical that something can't fail on you.
常に機能が保証されていることは非常に大切ですから。
07:34
How would a trip in a Skycar work?
スカイカーで出かけるってどんな経験でしょう?
07:39
Well, you can't right now
ちょっとうるさいので現状では
07:41
take off from your home because it's too noisy.
皆さんのお宅から離陸することはできません。
07:43
I mean to be able to take off from your home, you'd have to be extremely quiet.
家から離陸するためには非常に静かでなくてはいけませんからね。
07:46
But it's still fairly quiet.
けどまぁまぁ静かですよ。
07:49
You'd motor, electrically, to a vertiport,
数ブロックか、数マイル先の専用飛行場まで
07:51
which may be a few blocks, maybe even a few miles away.
電気モーターで移動します。
07:55
This is clearly, as I said earlier, a roadable aircraft,
前にも申しましたが、回転式航空機なので
07:57
and you're not going to spend that much time on the road.
路上を沢山走ることはありません。
08:00
After all, if you can fly like that,
つまり飛ぶことができれば
08:02
why are you going to drive around on a highway?
ハイウェイを走る必要ありませんものね。
08:04
Go to a local vertiport,
近所の専用飛行場に行って
08:06
plug in your destination,
目的地を入力すれば
08:08
delivered almost like a passenger.
あとは乗客のように運ばれるだけです。
08:11
You can play computer games, you can sleep, you can read on the way.
ゲームや読書もできますし、寝ていても良いです。
08:15
This is the world -- there won't be you as a pilot. And I know the pilots in the audience aren't going to like that --
あなたは操縦する必要ないのです。もちろん皆さんの中にはつまらないと思う人もいるでしょう。
08:19
and I've had a lot of bad feedback
実際に飛び回って経験してみたいと
08:22
from people who want to be up there, flying around
思う人からも
08:24
and experiencing that.
沢山の悪い評価を頂いています。
08:26
And of course, I suppose like recreational parks you can still do that.
もちろん楽しんだりする場も用意できると思います。
08:29
But the vehicle itself is going to be a very, very controlled environment.
ただし車自体は非常に管理された環境で使われるものです。
08:32
Or it's going to have no use to you as a person who might use such a system.
さもなければシステム自体、意味のないものになってしまいますから。
08:36
We flew the first vehicle for the international press
プロジェクトを始めた1965年に
08:40
in 1965, when I really got it started.
世界の報道関係者を集めて飛ばしたことがあります。
08:43
I was a professor at the U.C. Davis System,
カリフォルニア大学デービス校の教授だった頃ですが
08:45
and I got a lot of excitement around this,
夢中になって取り組み
08:47
and I was able to fund the initiation of the program back in that time.
プロジェクトの資金を用意することができました。
08:49
And then through the various years
それ以来長年にわたって
08:53
we invented various vehicles.
様々な乗り物を開発してきました。
08:55
Actually the critical point was in 1989,
ターニングポイントとなったのは1989年に
08:57
when we demonstrated the stability of this vehicle --
どのような状況でも安定していることを
09:00
how completely stable it was in all circumstances,
示したときです。
09:02
which is of course very critical.
安定性はとても大切な事ですから。
09:05
Still not a practical vehicle during all of this,
こういった経緯ですがまだ実用的ではありません。
09:07
but moving in the right direction, we believe.
ただ、正しい方向に進展していると思います。
09:10
Finally, in the early part of --
最終的に2002年の
09:14
or actually the middle of 2002,
中頃に
09:17
we flew the 400 -- M400, which was the four-passenger vehicle.
M400という4人乗りの乗り物を飛ばしたのです。
09:21
In this case here, we're flying it remotely, as we always did at the beginning.
これは遠隔操作で飛ばしました。初期段階はいつもそうするのです。
09:25
And we had very small power plants in it at this time.
とても小さな発動機を使いました。
09:29
We are now installing larger powerplants,
現在は私が実際に乗れるように
09:32
which will make it possible for me to get back on board.
より大きな発動機を搭載しています。
09:34
A vertical-takeoff aircraft
テスト段階においては垂直離陸式飛行機は
09:36
is not the safest vehicle during the test flight program.
必ずしも安全というわけではありません。
09:38
There's an old adage that applied for the years
1950年代から70年代にかけて
09:42
between 1950s and 1970s,
垂直離陸式飛行機に取り組む航空機メーカーには
09:45
when every aeronautical company
一つの格言が
09:48
was working on vertical-takeoff aircraft.
ありました。
09:50
A vertical-takeoff aircraft
垂直離陸機には
09:54
needs an artificial stabilization system --
追加的な安定装置が
09:56
that's essential.
不可欠であると。
09:58
At least for the hover,
少なくともホバリングしたり
10:00
and the low-speed flight.
低速で飛行するためには。
10:02
If that single-stability system,
もし機を飛ばす唯一の
10:06
that brain that flies that aircraft, fails, or if the engine fails,
安定装置かエンジンに支障があれば
10:08
that vehicle crashes. There is no option to that.
かならず墜落してしまう。
10:12
And the adage that I'm referring to,
そしてこうも言われていました。
10:15
that applied at that time,
垂直離陸機をひっくり返せば
10:17
was that nothing comes down faster
どんな飛行機よりも速く
10:19
than a VTOL aircraft upside down.
墜落する、なんて。
10:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:23
That's a macabre comment because we lost a lot of pilots.
沢山のパイロットが亡くなっているので実際ゾッとしますよね。
10:25
In fact, the aircraft companies gave up on
実際航空機メーカーは何年もの間
10:28
vertical-takeoff aircraft
垂直離陸機を
10:30
more or less for a number of years.
諦めてきました。
10:32
And there's really only one operational aircraft in the world today
現状では世界に一つだけヘリコプターではない
10:34
that's a vertical-takeoff aircraft -- as distinct from a helicopter --
実用段階の垂直離陸機があります。
10:37
and that's the Hawker Harrier jump jet.
それはホーカー・ハリヤー・ジャンプジェット。
10:39
A vertical-takeoff aircraft,
垂直離陸機は
10:47
like the hummingbird,
ハチドリと同じように
10:49
has a very high metabolism,
代謝が盛ん、
10:51
which means it requires a lot of energy.
つまり沢山のエネルギーを必要とするのです。
10:53
Getting that energy is very, very difficult. It all comes down
そのようなエネルギーを得るのは非常に困難であり
10:56
to that power plant -- how to get a large amount of power in a small package.
課題は大きなパワーを小さな機体でどのように得るのかにつきます。
10:59
Fortunately, Dr. Felix Wankel
幸運なことにフェリックス・ワンケル博士が
11:05
invented the rotary engine.
ロータリーエンジンを発明しました。
11:07
A very unique engine -- it's round,
小さくて丸く、振動がない
11:10
it's small, it's vibration-free.
とても特徴的なエンジンです。
11:12
It fits exactly where we need to fit it,
システムのダクトのハブ中央部に
11:15
right in the center of the hubs of the ducts in the system --
設置することができることはとても
11:17
very critical. In fact that engine --
大切なんです。実際、
11:20
for those who are into the automobile --
マツダRX-8に
11:22
know that it recently is applied to the RX8 --
搭載されている
11:24
the Mazda.
ものなのです。
11:26
And that sportscar won Sports Car of the Year.
そのスポーツカーはその年の賞を獲得しました。
11:28
Wonderful engine.
素晴らしいエンジンです。
11:32
In that application, it generates one horsepower per pound,
一般的な車のエンジンの2倍、つまり
11:34
which is twice as good as your car engine today,
1ポンドあたり1馬力を生み出すことができますが、
11:36
but only half of what we need.
それでも必要な馬力の半分です。
11:39
My company has spent 35 years
私が会社を設立してから35年、
11:41
and many millions of dollars taking that rotary engine,
50年代に発明されたロータリーエンジンに
11:44
which was invented in the late '50s, and getting it to the point that we get
沢山の資金を注ぎ込み
11:47
over two horsepower per pound, reliably, and critical.
1ポンドあたり2馬力以上を得るレベルに達しました。
11:50
We actually get 175 horsepower
1立方フィートあたり175馬力を
11:53
into one cubic foot.
得ることができたのです。
11:56
We have eight engines in this vehicle.
この乗り物には8基のエンジンを搭載しています。
11:59
We have four computers. We have two parachutes.
4台のコンピュータ、2本のパラシュートも積みます。
12:01
Redundancy is the critical issue here.
冗長性がとても大切なのです。
12:05
If you want to stay alive you've got to have backups.
生きていたければバックアップが必要ですから。
12:07
And we have actually flown this vehicle and lost an engine,
実際これを飛ばしたとき一基のエンジンが止まりましたが
12:09
and continued to hover.
空中に留まることができました。
12:11
The computers back up each other. There's a voting system --
コンピュータもお互いに補完しあいます。「投票システム」を採用し、
12:13
if one computer is not agreeing with the other three,
他の3台と異なる判断を下したコンピュータは
12:16
it's kicked out of the system.
システムから排除されるようになっています。
12:20
And then you have three -- you still have the triple redundancy.
そしてさらに3重の冗長性を確保しているのです。
12:21
If one of those fails, you still have a second chance.
もし一台の調子が悪くなってもまだ大丈夫です。
12:24
If you stick around, then good luck.
なんとか飛べる。運が良いこと祈ってます。
12:27
There won't be a third chance.
不運がまた重なったら次はありません。
12:29
The parachutes are there -- hopefully,
まぁ実用と言うより精神的な安心のためですが
12:33
more for psychological than real reasons, but
万が一と言うことになれば究極のバックアップが
12:35
they will be an ultimate backup if it comes to that.
パラシュートという形で用意されています。
12:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:41
I'd like to show you an animation in this next one,
ここでスカイカーがどのように
12:44
which is one element
活用され得るか
12:46
of the Skycar's use,
少々ご覧に入れましょう。
12:48
but it's one that demonstrates how it could be used.
まぁ一つの可能性ですから
12:50
You could think of it personally in your own terms,
どのように貴方が使うか
12:52
of how you might use it.
皆さんで考えて頂いてかまいません。
12:54
Video: Skycar dispatched, launch rescue vehicle for San Francisco.
スカイカーがレスキューカーとしてサンフランシスコに飛び立ちます。
12:56
Paul Moller: I believe that personal transportation
スカイカーや似たような移動手段は
13:28
in something like the Skycar,
私たちの生活において
13:30
probably in another volantor form as well,
かけがえのないものに
13:32
will be a significant part of our lives,
なると信じています。
13:35
as Dr. Goldin says, within the next 10 years.
ゴールドイン博士が言ったように、10年のうちには
13:38
And it's going to change the demographics in a very significant way.
生活様式を大きく変える事でしょう。
13:41
If you can live 75 miles from San Francisco and get there in 15 minutes,
15分でサンフランシスコから75マイル離れた所までいけるなら
13:45
you're going to sell your 700,000-dollar apartment,
70万ドルもするマンションを売り払って
13:49
buy an upscale home on the side of a mountain,
山麓の豪華な家を買い
13:53
buy a Skycar,
その頃には10万ドル程度になっている
13:55
which I think would be priced at that time perhaps
スカイカーを
13:57
in the area of 100,000 dollars, put money in the bank ...
買って、余ったお金は預金するでしょう。
13:59
that's a very significant incentive for getting out of San Francisco.
皆さんサンフランシスコから脱出したがるはずです。
14:02
But you better be the first one out of town as the real estate values go to hell.
不動産の価値が暴落しますから早めがいいですよ。
14:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:09
Developing the Skycar has been a real challenge.
スカイカーを制作するのは本当にやり甲斐のあることでした。
14:14
Obviously I'm dependent on a lot of other people
財政面や技術面で私のことを信じている
14:17
believing in what I'm doing -- both financially and in technical help.
沢山の人のお世話になっています。
14:19
And that has --
このように
14:23
you run into situations where you have this great acceptance of what you're doing,
なにかが受け入れられるときには
14:25
and a lot of rejection of the same kind of thing.
多くの拒否反応も経験するものです。
14:29
I characterized this emerging technology
新しく生まれる技術に対して
14:32
in an aphorism,
どのような反応があるか
14:36
as it's described,
私が経験したことをまとめてみました。
14:38
which really talks about what I've experienced,
他の方もきっと経験されることだと思います。
14:41
and I'm sure what other people may have experienced
(図表)
14:43
in emerging technologies.
初期に冷笑される  次に妨害される  最後に当然だと思われる
14:45
There's an interesting poll that came out recently
全米科学アカデミーの監修の下
14:53
under NAS --
テレビ局が
14:55
I think it's MSNBC --
興味深いアンケートをしたんです。
14:57
in which they asked the question,
「貴方はボランターを買いますか」という
14:59
"Are you in the market for a volantor?"
設問に対して
15:01
Twenty-three percent said, "Yes, as soon as possible."
23パーセントの人が「できるだけ早く」と答え
15:04
Forty-seven percent -- yes, as soon as they could -- price could come down.
47パーセントの人が「価格が下がるならなるべく早く」
15:07
Twenty-three percent said, "As soon as it's proven safe."
23パーセントの人が「安全が確保されれば」と答えたそうです。
15:10
Only seven percent said
わずか7パーセントが
15:13
that they wouldn't consider buying a Skycar.
スカイカーを検討しないそうです。
15:15
I'm encouraged by that. At least it makes me feel like,
非常に勇気づけられました。少なくとも
15:18
to some extent, it is becoming self-evident.
ある程度は市場が従来の自動車の代わりを、
15:22
That we need an alternative to the automobile,
少なくとも50マイル以上の移動に関して
15:25
at least for those 50-mile trips and more,
必要とし、現在ある
15:27
so that the highways become usable in today's world.
ハイウェイを有効に使えるようにしたいわけですから。
15:29
Thank you.
ご清聴有難うございました。
15:32
Translated by Ichiro Nishimura
Reviewed by Hidetoshi Yamauchi

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Paul Moller - Inventor
With a team of engineers, Paul Moller works on the Skycar, a combination car and jet, as well as the M200, a saucer-shaped hovering car. He also develops next-generation engines to power these and other amazing vehicles.

Why you should listen

Paul Moller is the president, CEO and chair of Moller International, a company devoted to engineering the combination of automobile and jet known as the Moller Skycar. His company also works on the M200, a low-flying disc, or volantor, that may go into production later in 2009. (As cool as it looks, the M200 has serious applications as a rescue vehicle.) A partner company, Freedom Motors, builds the Rotapower engine.

Moller developed the Aeronautical Engineering program at UC Davis while a professor there from 1963 to 1975. In 1972 he founded SuperTrapp Industries, and also led the group that developed the Davis Research Park Complex between 1975 and 1983. He's been working on VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) personal vehicles since the late 1960s.

More profile about the speaker
Paul Moller | Speaker | TED.com