sponsored links
TEDxMidwest

Majora Carter: 3 stories of local eco-entrepreneurship

マジョラ・カーター: 「地域の環境アクティビズムに関する3つの物語」

September 10, 2010

環境活動の将来は地域にかかっている-TEDxMidwestで、マジョラ・カーターが、地球を守り地元コミュニティを救う3人の物語を話します。彼らが行ってきたのは、「ふるさとの安全」を守ることです。

Majora Carter - Activist for environmental justice
Majora Carter redefined the field of environmental equality, starting in the South Bronx at the turn of the century. Now she is leading the local economic development movement across the USA. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So today, I'm going to tell you about some people
地域に根ざして活動してきた人たちのことを
00:16
who didn't move out of their neighborhoods.
お話しします
00:19
The first one is happening right here in Chicago.
まずはここ シカゴでの出来事です
00:22
Brenda Palms-Farber was hired
ブレンダ・パームス-ファーバーは
00:25
to help ex-convicts reenter society
前科を持つ人の社会復帰を支援し
00:27
and keep them from going back into prison.
再び刑務所に戻らないよう活動しています
00:30
Currently, taxpayers spend
現在
00:32
about 60,000 dollars per year
刑務所に1人収監すると
00:34
sending a person to jail.
年に600万円ほどの税金がかかります
00:37
We know that two-thirds of them are going to go back.
受刑者の2/3は刑務所に舞い戻ります
00:39
I find it interesting that, for every one dollar
しかし ヘッドスタートのような
00:41
we spend, however, on early childhood education,
子どもの早期教育に
00:43
like Head Start,
1ドル(100円)を費やすと
00:45
we save 17 dollars
収監など将来のコストが
00:47
on stuff like incarceration in the future.
17ドル(1700円)安くなるのです
00:49
Or -- think about it -- that 60,000 dollars
考えてみて下さい
00:52
is more than what it costs
年に600万円あれば
00:54
to send one person to Harvard as well.
ハーバード大に通わせることができます
00:56
But Brenda, not being phased by stuff like that,
でもブレンダは こういう段階的な
考え方ではなく
00:58
took a look at her challenge
自らの困難を直視して
01:01
and came up
ちょっと変わった解決法を
01:03
with a not-so-obvious solution:
思いつきました
01:05
create a business
蜂蜜からスキンケア製品を作る
01:07
that produces skin care products from honey.
ビジネスを生み出したのです
01:09
Okay, it might be obvious to some of you; it wasn't to me.
私にはあまりピンと来ませんでしたが
01:12
It's the basis of growing a form of social innovation
本当に可能性を持つ社会的イノベーションを
01:14
that has real potential.
育てるとはそういうことなのです
01:17
She hired seemingly unemployable men and women
彼女は 一見雇用に適さない人を雇って
01:19
to care for the bees, harvest the honey
養蜂と蜂蜜の収穫をさせて
01:22
and make value-added products
付加価値のある製品を作りました
01:24
that they marketed themselves,
社員たちが自ら販売先を探し
01:26
and that were later sold at Whole Foods.
やがてホールフーズで売られるようになりました
01:28
She combined employment experience and training
また 雇用経験と訓練を
01:30
with life skills they needed,
怒りの抑え方やチームワークといった
01:33
like anger-management and teamwork,
必須の技能と組み合わせ
01:35
and also how to talk to future employers
未来の雇用主に対して
01:37
about how their experiences
学んだことをどのように生かすことができるのか
01:40
actually demonstrated the lessons that they had learned
より多くを学びたいという熱意を
どうやって伝えるのか
01:42
and their eagerness to learn more.
ということを教えました
01:44
Less than four percent
ブレンダのプログラムを修了した
01:46
of the folks that went through her program
若者の中で 再び刑務所に入るのは
01:48
actually go back to jail.
4%もいません
01:50
So these young men and women learned job-readiness
彼らは養蜂をすることで
01:52
and life skills through bee keeping
働く姿勢と生活能力を身につけ
01:55
and became productive citizens in the process.
立派な市民となったのです
01:57
Talk about a sweet beginning.
新しい人生が始まります
02:00
Now, I'm going to take you to Los Angeles,
さて 次はロサンゼルスの話です
02:03
and lots of people know
ご存知の通り
02:05
that L.A. has its issues.
ロサンゼルスにはいろいろな問題がありますが
02:07
But I'm going to talk about L.A.'s water issues right now.
今は水問題についてお話しします
02:09
They have not enough water on most days
ロサンゼルスはほとんどいつも水不足なのに
02:12
and too much to handle when it rains.
一旦雨が降ると手に負えないほど降ります
02:14
Currently, 20 percent
現在 カリフォルニアで消費するエネルギーの
02:17
of California's energy consumption
20パーセントが
02:19
is used to pump water
主に南カリフォルニアに
02:21
into mostly Southern California.
水を送るために使われています
02:23
Their spending loads, loads,
雨が降って水があふれた時に
02:25
to channel that rainwater out into the ocean
雨水を海に流すためにも
02:27
when it rains and floods as well.
多額のお金が使われています
02:29
Now Andy Lipkis is working to help
アンディ・リプキスは ロサンゼルスが
02:31
L.A. cut infrastructure costs
水の管理とヒートアイランド化に関する
02:33
associated with water management and urban heat island --
インフラの整備費用を減らせるよう
02:35
linking trees, people and technology
樹木と人 そして技術をつなぎ
02:38
to create a more livable city.
より住みやすい街を作ろうとしています
02:41
All that green stuff actually naturally absorbs storm water,
木々は自然と雨を吸収しますし
02:43
also helps cool our cities.
都市を涼しくしてくれます
02:46
Because, come to think about it,
考えてみて下さい
02:48
do you really want air-conditioning,
欲しいのはエアコンですか
02:50
or is it a cooler room that you want?
それとも涼しい部屋ですか?
02:52
How you get it shouldn't make that much of a difference.
手段は違っても結果は同じことです
02:54
So a few years ago,
数年前
02:57
L.A. County
ロサンゼルス郡は
02:59
decided that they needed to spend 2.5 billion dollars
2,500億円を投じて
03:01
to repair the city schools.
公立学校を修繕することにしました
03:04
And Andy and his team discovered
アンディと彼のチームは
03:07
that they were going to spend 200 million of those dollars
そのうち200億円が 学校周辺の
03:09
on asphalt to surround the schools themselves.
アスファルト整備に使われることを知りました
03:12
And by presenting a really strong economic case,
アンディたちは経済面に強く訴えかけ
03:15
they convinced the L.A. government
ロサンゼルス政府を説得しました
03:18
that replacing that asphalt
アスファルトの代わりに
03:20
with trees and other greenery,
植樹や緑化をすれば
03:22
that the schools themselves would save the system more on energy
学校のエネルギー節約につながることを
03:24
than they spend on horticultural infrastructure.
示したのです
03:27
So ultimately, 20 million square feet of asphalt
最終的には1.8平方キロの
03:31
was replaced or avoided,
アスファルトが撤去・撤回され
03:33
and electrical consumption for air-conditioning went down,
エアコンの電気代は減り
03:35
while employment
地面の整備をする人の
03:38
for people to maintain those grounds went up,
雇用は増えました
03:40
resulting in a net-savings to the system,
エネルギー代が減っただけでなく
03:43
but also healthier students and schools system employees as well.
生徒も職員もより健康になりました
03:45
Now Judy Bonds
ジュディ・ボンドは
03:49
is a coal miner's daughter.
炭鉱で働く家に生まれました
03:51
Her family has eight generations
ウエスト・バージニア州の
03:53
in a town called Whitesville, West Virginia.
ホワイツビルという町に
03:55
And if anyone should be clinging
8世代続けて住んでいます
03:58
to the former glory of the coal mining history,
ジュディは
04:00
and of the town,
炭鉱と町の輝かしい歴史を
04:02
it should be Judy.
胸に強く抱いているはずです
04:04
But the way coal is mined right now is different
でも石炭の採掘法が今では変わりました
04:06
from the deep mines that her father
ジュディの父や祖父の時代は
04:08
and her father's father would go down into
何千人もの鉱員が雇われて
04:10
and that employed essentially thousands and thousands of people.
深い穴を掘り進みましたが
04:12
Now, two dozen men
今では20人ほどが数か月程度で
04:15
can tear down a mountain in several months,
山を切り崩すことができます
04:17
and only for about a few years' worth of coal.
石炭は数年分ぐらいしか採れません
04:19
That kind of technology is called "mountaintop removal."
この方法は山頂除去と言います
04:22
It can make a mountain go from this to this
たった数か月で
04:25
in a few short months.
山の姿をこのように変えます
04:28
Just imagine that the air surrounding these places --
こうした場所の周辺では
04:30
it's filled with the residue of explosives and coal.
空気が火薬や石炭の粉じんで一杯になります
04:32
When we visited, it gave some of the people we were with
私たちが訪れたときには
04:35
this strange little cough
たった数時間そこにいただけなのに
04:37
after being only there for just a few hours or so --
何人かは 変な咳をしていました
04:39
not just miners, but everybody.
鉱員だけでなく 普通の人でもそうです
04:41
And Judy saw her landscape being destroyed
ジュディは 景観が破壊され
04:43
and her water poisoned.
水が汚されるのを目の当たりにしました
04:45
And the coal companies just move on
山が空っぽになると
04:47
after the mountain was emptied,
石炭会社は去って行き
04:49
leaving even more unemployment in their wake.
失業者は以前よりも増えました
04:51
But she also saw the difference in potential wind energy
でもジュディは
04:53
on an intact mountain,
山頂が残された山と
04:56
and one that was reduced in elevation
600メートル以上低くされた山では
04:58
by over 2,000 feet.
風力発電のポテンシャルが違うことに気づきました
05:00
Three years of dirty energy with not many jobs,
仕事も生み出さない3年分の汚れたエネルギーか
05:02
or centuries of clean energy
何世紀も使えて
05:05
with the potential for developing expertise and improvements in efficiency
技術力に基づく専門性や効率性を高めたり
05:07
based on technical skills,
地域の風を最大限に活用するための
05:10
and developing local knowledge
知識を伸ばしたりする可能性を持つ
05:12
about how to get the most out of that region's wind.
クリーンなエネルギーか
05:14
She calculated the up-front cost
彼女は当初の経費と
05:16
and the payback over time,
通算の利益を計算し
05:18
and it's a net-plus on so many levels
地域にも国にも世界にも
05:20
for the local, national and global economy.
プラスになることがわかりました
05:22
It's a longer payback than mountaintop removal,
山頂除去よりも利益が出るのに
時間はかかりますが
05:25
but the wind energy actually pays back forever.
風力発電はずっと利益を生み出します
05:28
Now mountaintop removal pays very little money to the locals,
山頂除去では地元にはほとんどお金が来ませんし
05:31
and it gives them a lot of misery.
地域の人々をとても惨めにします
05:34
The water is turned into goo.
水はベトベトします
05:36
Most people are still unemployed,
多くの人は失業したままで
05:38
leading to most of the same kinds of social problems
スラムでの失業者と同じような
05:40
that unemployed people in inner cities also experience --
社会問題 - 薬物やアルコール
05:42
drug and alcohol abuse,
家庭内暴力 10代の妊娠や健康問題 -
05:45
domestic abuse, teen pregnancy and poor heath, as well.
などに直面しています
05:47
Now Judy and I -- I have to say --
ジュディと私は
05:50
totally related to each other.
深く関わり合っています
05:52
Not quite an obvious alliance.
心強い仲間です
05:54
I mean, literally, her hometown is called Whitesville, West Virginia.
彼女のふるさとはウエスト・バージニアの
05:56
I mean, they are not --
ホワイツビルです
05:58
they ain't competing for the birthplace of hip hop title
ヒップホップの曲のタイトルに
06:00
or anything like that.
なりたがっている訳ではありません
06:03
But the back of my T-shirt, the one that she gave me,
私はジュディがくれたTシャツを着ていますが
06:05
says, "Save the endangered hillbillies."
背中には「危機に瀕した南部者を救え」
06:08
So homegirls and hillbillies we got it together
地元民と南部者が一緒になり
06:13
and totally understand that this is what it's all about.
上手くやっているのです
06:16
But just a few months ago,
でもほんの数か月前
06:19
Judy was diagnosed
ジュディはステージ3の
06:21
with stage-three lung cancer.
肺がんだと診断されました
06:23
Yeah.
何ということでしょう
06:26
And it has since moved to her bones and her brain.
がんは骨と脳に転移しました
06:28
And I just find it so bizarre
彼女があれほど頑張って
06:33
that she's suffering from the same thing
人々を守ろうとしてきた病気に
06:36
that she tried so hard to protect people from.
自ら冒されるなんて
06:38
But her dream
ジュディの夢である
06:41
of Coal River Mountain Wind
コール・リバー・マウンテン風力発電は
06:43
is her legacy.
皆に受け継がれます
06:45
And she might not
彼女が山頂の風力発電を
06:47
get to see that mountaintop.
見ることはないかもしれません
06:50
But rather than writing
でもマニフェストのようなものを
06:53
yet some kind of manifesto or something,
書くのでなく
06:55
she's leaving behind
ジュディは 風力発電を実現するための
06:57
a business plan to make it happen.
ビジネスプランを後に残しています
06:59
That's what my homegirl is doing.
私の親友はそんなことをしています
07:01
So I'm so proud of that.
本当に誇りに思います
07:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:05
But these three people
お話ししてきた3人は
07:10
don't know each other,
互いに知り合いではありません
07:12
but they do have an awful lot in common.
しかし驚くほど多くの共通点があります
07:14
They're all problem solvers,
皆 問題の解決者です
07:16
and they're just some of the many examples
幸いにも私は今の仕事の中で
07:18
that I really am privileged to see, meet and learn from
彼らのような人に数多く出会い
07:20
in the examples of the work that I do now.
学んできました
07:22
I was really lucky to have them all featured
そうした人々を 公共ラジオで放送している
07:24
on my Corporation for Public Radio radio show
「約束の地」という私の番組で
07:26
called ThePromisedLand.org.
紹介してこられたのはとても幸運でした
07:28
Now they're all very practical visionaries.
皆とても実践的で先見の明を持っています
07:30
They take a look at the demands that are out there --
化粧品や健全な学校 電気など
07:32
beauty products, healthy schools, electricity --
社会にある需要を
07:35
and how the money's flowing to meet those demands.
満たしているかを見ています
07:37
And when the cheapest solutions
最も安い解決策が
07:39
involve reducing the number of jobs,
仕事を減らす場合は
07:41
you're left with unemployed people,
失業者が出ます
07:43
and those people aren't cheap.
それは安いことにはなりません
07:45
In fact, they make up some of what I call the most expensive citizens,
失業者は最もお金のかかる市民になりますし
07:47
and they include generationally impoverished,
世代を越えて貧困が続きます
07:50
traumatized vets returning from the Middle East,
傷を負った中東からの退役軍人や
07:52
people coming out of jail.
刑務所からの出所者などです
07:54
And for the veterans in particular,
退役軍人省によると 特に退役軍人は
07:56
the V.A. said there's a six-fold increase
向精神薬の服用が
07:58
in mental health pharmaceuticals by vets since 2003.
2003年から6倍に増えていると言われます
08:01
I think that number's probably going to go up.
これからさらに増えるでしょう
08:04
They're not the largest number of people,
人数が多い訳ではありませんが
08:06
but they are some of the most expensive --
最もお金がかかる人々ですし
08:08
and in terms of the likelihood for domestic abuse, drug and alcohol abuse,
家庭内暴力や薬物 アルコール中毒
08:10
poor performance by their kids in schools
子どもの学力不足やストレスから来る
08:13
and also poor health as a result of stress.
健康障害などにも陥りやすいのです
08:16
So these three guys all understand
お話ししてきた3人は
08:18
how to productively channel dollars
地域経済を通してお金を効果的に流し
08:20
through our local economies
既存の市場のニーズを満たしつつ
08:22
to meet existing market demands,
今ある社会問題を緩和し
08:24
reduce the social problems that we have now
新たな問題が生まれないようにする
08:26
and prevent new problems in the future.
方法を知っています
08:28
And there are plenty of other examples like that.
このような例は他にもたくさんあります
08:31
One problem: waste handling and unemployment.
問題の一つは廃棄物の扱いと失業です
08:33
Even when we think or talk about recycling,
リサイクルが注目を集めるこの時代でも
08:36
lots of recyclable stuff ends up getting incinerated or in landfills
再利用できるのに捨てられるものが沢山あります
08:38
and leaving many municipalities, diversion rates --
多くの自治体では
08:41
they leave much to be recycled.
リサイクルはまだまだ低調です
08:44
And where is this waste handled? Usually in poor communities.
そして廃棄物は貧困地域にやってきます
08:46
And we know that eco-industrial business, these kinds of business models --
エコ・インダストリアル・ビジネスというものがあります
08:49
there's a model in Europe called the eco-industrial park,
欧州ではエコ・インダストリアル・パークと呼ばれていますが
08:52
where either the waste of one company is the raw material for another,
ある会社の廃棄物が他社の原材料になったり
08:55
or you use recycled materials
再利用された材料から
08:58
to make goods that you can actually use and sell.
実用や販売が可能な製品を作ったりしています
09:00
We can create these local markets and incentives
再利用される材料が
09:02
for recycled materials
ものづくりの原料として使われるような
09:05
to be used as raw materials for manufacturing.
地域市場や誘因を作り出すことができます
09:07
And in my hometown, we actually tried to do one of these in the Bronx,
私の地元のブロンクスでもそんな取り組みを
09:09
but our mayor decided what he wanted to see
始めようとしましたが 市長はそこに
09:12
was a jail on that same spot.
刑務所を作りたがっていました
09:15
Fortunately -- because we wanted to create hundreds of jobs --
私たちは数多くの仕事を生み出したいと思っていたので
09:17
but after many years,
長い年月がかかりましたが 幸運なことに
09:20
the city wanted to build a jail.
刑務所を作ろうという市の計画は
09:22
They've since abandoned that project, thank goodness.
中止されました
09:24
Another problem: unhealthy food systems and unemployment.
もう一つの問題は 不健康な食事と失業です
09:27
Working-class and poor urban Americans
都市部に住む貧しいアメリカ人労働者は
09:30
are not benefiting economically
現在の食料システムから
09:32
from our current food system.
経済的な恩恵を受けていません
09:34
It relies too much on transportation,
今の食料システムは
09:36
chemical fertilization, big use of water
輸送と化学肥料に頼りすぎで
09:38
and also refrigeration.
多量の水を使い 冷蔵も欠かせません
09:40
Mega agricultural operations
巨大な農業事業者は
09:42
often are responsible for poisoning our waterways and our land,
水路や土地を汚染することもあり
09:44
and it produces this incredibly unhealthy product
極めて不健康な農産物を生産しています
09:47
that costs us billions in healthcare
そこから多額の医療費がかかり
09:50
and lost productivity.
生産性も低下しています
09:52
And so we know "urban ag"
都市部での農業が
09:54
is a big buzz topic this time of the year,
最近は大きな注目を集めていますが
09:56
but it's mostly gardening,
その大半は庭いじりです
09:58
which has some value in community building -- lots of it --
コミュニティのつながりを深めるには役立ちますが
10:00
but it's not in terms of creating jobs
雇用の創出や食料生産という点では
10:03
or for food production.
効果がありません
10:05
The numbers just aren't there.
十分な雇用や食料を生み出さないからです
10:07
Part of my work now is really laying the groundwork
私が今 手がけているのは
10:09
to integrate urban ag and rural food systems
都市部の農業と地方の食料システムを結びつけることです
10:11
to hasten the demise of the 3,000-mile salad
5,000キロもサラダを輸送するようなことを早くやめたいのです
10:14
by creating a national brand of urban-grown produce
今は都市部には消費者しかいませんが
10:17
in every city,
小規模な生産者たちが
10:20
that uses regional growing power
各地で 地元の生産力と
10:22
and augments it with indoor growing facilities,
屋内の栽培施設を使うことで
10:24
owned and operated by small growers,
都市部で栽培された農産物の
10:26
where now there are only consumers.
全国ブランドを作るのです
10:28
This can support seasonal farmers around metro areas
これにより 1年を通した生産には対応できない
10:30
who are losing out because they really can't meet
都市部の季節営農者を
10:33
the year-round demand for produce.
支援することができます
10:35
It's not a competition with rural farm;
田舎の農家と競争するのではなく
10:38
it's actually reinforcements.
相互に補うのです
10:40
It allies in a really positive
それは現実的で経済的にも成立する
10:42
and economically viable food system.
食料システムにつながります
10:44
The goal is to meet the cities' institutional demands
病院や老人クラブ 学校 デイケアなどの
10:46
for hospitals,
都市施設のニーズを満たしつつ
10:48
senior centers, schools, daycare centers,
地方での仕事のネットワークを作ることが
10:50
and produce a network of regional jobs, as well.
目標です
10:53
This is smart infrastructure.
これが私の考えるスマートインフラです
10:56
And how we manage our built environment
当たり前だと考えている環境を―
10:58
affects the health and well-being of people every single day.
いかに管理するかということが
日々の健康と福祉に影響を及ぼします
11:00
Our municipalities, rural and urban,
地方でも都市部でも 自治体は
11:03
play the operational course of infrastructure --
インフラの整備を主導します
11:05
things like waste disposal, energy demand,
廃棄物の処理 エネルギーの需要といったものだけでなく
11:08
as well as social costs of unemployment, drop-out rates, incarceration rates
失業や退学率 受刑率やさまざまな公衆衛生など
11:11
and the impacts of various public health costs.
社会的コストも含んでいます
11:14
Smart infrastructure can provide cost-saving ways
スマートインフラを使えば
11:17
for municipalities to handle
自治体は経費を抑えて
11:20
both infrastructure and social needs.
インフラと社会ニーズともに対処することができます
11:22
And we want to shift the systems
それによって
11:24
that open the doors for people who were formerly tax burdens
財政の負担となっていた人たちが
11:26
to become part of the tax base.
税の担い手になれるようにしたいのです
11:29
And imagine a national business model
地方の仕事を増やし
11:31
that creates local jobs and smart infrastructure
スマートインフラを作り出すことで
11:33
to improve local economic stability.
地域経済を安定させるビジネスモデルが生まれます
11:36
So I'm hoping you can see a little theme here.
私の話を聞いておわかりだと思いますが
11:39
These examples indicate a trend.
ある種の流れが生まれているようです
11:42
I haven't created it, and it's not happening by accident.
私が作ったのではありませんし
偶然できたものでもありません
11:44
I'm noticing that it's happening all over the country,
それはアメリカの至るところで起きていますし
11:47
and the good news is that it's growing.
育ちつつあります
11:49
And we all need to be invested in it.
私たちは皆それに関わるべきです
11:51
It is an essential pillar to this country's recovery.
アメリカの復活に欠かせないことです
11:53
And I call it "hometown security."
私はそれをふるさとの安全と呼んでいます
11:56
The recession has us reeling and fearful,
私たちは不況によろめき怯えています
11:59
and there's something in the air these days
でも 近頃は非常に心強い雰囲気も
12:02
that is also very empowering.
生まれて来ています
12:04
It's a realization
自らの復活の鍵になるのは
12:06
that we are the key
自分自身であるという
12:08
to our own recovery.
気づきです
12:10
Now is the time for us to act in our own communities
今こそ私たちは自らのコミュニティに立ち返り
12:12
where we think local and we act local.
地域のことを考え 地域で活動すべきです
12:15
And when we do that, our neighbors --
私たちがそうすれば
12:18
be they next-door, or in the next state,
隣人や隣りの州
12:20
or in the next country --
隣の国も
12:22
will be just fine.
そうするようになるでしょう
12:24
The sum of the local is the global.
グローバルとは地域の積み重ねなのです
12:27
Hometown security means rebuilding our natural defenses,
ふるさとの安全とは
我々本来の防御機能を再構築することで
12:30
putting people to work,
人々を職に就け
12:33
restoring our natural systems.
自然を再生することです
12:35
Hometown security means creating wealth here at home,
外国の富を破壊するのではなく
12:37
instead of destroying it overseas.
地元に富を生み出すことです
12:40
Tackling social and environmental problems
社会問題と環境問題を
12:42
at the same time with the same solution
同時に 同じ方法で解決すれば
12:44
yields great cost savings,
大きな節約になりますし
12:47
wealth generation and national security.
富が生まれ安全な社会になります
12:49
Many great and inspiring solutions
心動かされる優れた解決策が
12:52
have been generated across America.
アメリカ中で生み出されています
12:54
The challenge for us now
今 私たちが行うべきは
12:56
is to identify and support countless more.
こうした取り組みをより多く見つけ出し
支援することです
12:58
Now, hometown security is about taking care of your own,
ふるさとの安全とは 自助努力です
13:01
but it's not like the old saying,
でも昔のことわざのように
13:04
"charity begins at home."
慈善は家で始まるということではありません
13:06
I recently read a book called "Love Leadership" by John Hope Bryant.
最近「愛のリーダーシップ」という本を読みました
13:09
And it's about leading in a world
恐れで動いているかのようなこの世界を
13:12
that really does seem to be operating on the basis of fear.
導くことについての本です
13:14
And reading that book made me reexamine that theory
リーダーシップとは何なのか
13:17
because I need to explain what I mean by that.
考えさせられました
13:20
See, my dad
私の父は
13:23
was a great, great man in many ways.
多くの点で偉大な人でした
13:25
He grew up in the segregated South,
南部の人種隔離地域で育ち
13:27
escaped lynching and all that
本当に大変な時代の
13:29
during some really hard times,
リンチや様々な苦難を乗り越え
13:31
and he provided a really stable home for me and my siblings
家族や途中で倒れた仲間たちに捧げる
13:33
and a whole bunch of other people that fell on hard times.
頑丈な家を建てました
13:36
But, like all of us, he had some problems.
でも 他の皆と同じく 父にも問題がありました
13:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:43
And his was gambling,
熱狂的にギャンブル好きでした
13:45
compulsively.
父にとって
13:47
To him that phrase, "Charity begins at home,"
「慈善は家で始まる」という言葉は
13:49
meant that my payday -- or someone else's --
私や家族の給料日が
13:52
would just happen to coincide with his lucky day.
父のツイてる日とたまたま一致することでした
13:55
So you need to help him out.
父を助けるために
13:57
And sometimes I would loan him money
放課後や夏休みのバイトで貯めたお金を
13:59
from my after-school or summer jobs,
父に貸すこともありました
14:01
and he always had the great intention
父が大勝ちしたときに
14:04
of paying me back with interest,
いつも利子をつけて
14:06
of course, after he hit it big.
返すとは言ってくれました
14:08
And he did sometimes, believe it or not,
信じられないかもしれませんが
14:10
at a racetrack in Los Angeles --
父は実際 ロサンゼルスの競馬場で
14:12
one reason to love L.A. -- back in the 1940s.
大勝ちすることもありました 1940年代のことです
14:14
He made 15,000 dollars cash
現金で150万円稼いで
14:17
and bought the house that I grew up in.
家を買いました
14:19
So I'm not that unhappy about that.
それが嬉しくないわけではありません
14:21
But listen, I did feel obligated to him,
でも 父に対する義務を感じていました
14:23
and I grew up -- then I grew up.
そして私は大きくなり
14:26
And I'm a grown woman now,
今では大人の女性です
14:29
and I have learned a few things along the way.
いくつかのことを学んできました
14:31
To me, charity
私にとって 慈善とは
14:33
often is just about giving,
ただ与えるだけのものです
14:35
because you're supposed to,
人は施しをすべきですし
14:37
or because it's what you've always done,
いつもそうしてきました
14:39
or it's about giving until it hurts.
傷つくまで与えるのです
14:41
I'm about providing the means
施しとは そこから何かが育ち
14:44
to build something that will grow
与えられたものをより強固に
14:46
and intensify its original investment
するためのものです
14:48
and not just require greater giving next year --
翌年により多くの施しを求める
ものではありません
14:51
I'm not trying to feed the habit.
そうしたくはないんです
14:53
I spent some years
コミュニティを支え
14:55
watching how good intentions for community empowerment,
力づけるためにあるはずの善意が
14:57
that were supposed to be there
実際には人々を
15:00
to support the community and empower it,
より劣悪とまでは言わなくとも
15:02
actually left people
変わらぬ状況に留めおくという事例を
15:05
in the same, if not worse, position that they were in before.
何年も見てきました
15:07
And over the past 20 years,
この20年以上
15:10
we've spent record amounts of philanthropic dollars
記録的な額の慈善金が
15:12
on social problems,
社会問題に費やされましたが
15:14
yet educational outcomes,
教育の成果や栄養失調
15:16
malnutrition, incarceration,
収監 肥満 糖尿病
15:18
obesity, diabetes, income disparity,
収入の格差などは
15:20
they've all gone up with some exceptions --
多少の例外を除いて全て悪化しました
15:22
in particular, infant mortality
特に 貧困層における乳児死亡率は
15:25
among people in poverty --
大きく上がりました
15:28
but it's a great world that we're bringing them into as well.
でも今の社会は 偉大な場でもあります
15:30
And I know a little bit about these issues,
私はこれらの問題を多少は知っています
15:34
because, for many years, I spent a long time
ずっと非営利の産業複合体に
15:36
in the non-profit industrial complex,
身を置いてきたからです
15:39
and I'm a recovering executive director,
私は復帰途上の経営者でもあります
15:41
two years clean.
ちょうど2年になります
15:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:45
But during that time, I realized that it was about projects
その間 地元レベルでプロジェクトを起こし
15:47
and developing them on the local level
発展させることこそが
15:50
that really was going to do the right thing for our communities.
コミュニティに役立つのだと思うようになりました
15:52
But I really did struggle for financial support.
資金面では本当に苦労しました
15:55
The greater our success,
成功するほど
15:58
the less money came in from foundations.
財団からの援助が減りました
16:00
And I tell you, being on the TED stage
前回TEDのステージに立ち
16:02
and winning a MacArthur in the same exact year
マッカーサー財団のフェローになった年は
16:04
gave everyone the impression that I had arrived.
行き着くところまで来たと皆に思われていました
16:06
And by the time I'd moved on,
でも実際には
16:09
I was actually covering a third
私の事務所の赤字の三分の一は
16:11
of my agency's budget deficit with speaking fees.
自分の講演料で補っていました
16:13
And I think because early on, frankly,
私のプログラムは 当初
16:16
my programs were just a little bit ahead of their time.
少し時代の先を行っていたのだと思います
16:18
But since then,
でもその後 ただのゴミの山だった公園が
16:20
the park that was just a dump and was featured at a TED2006 Talk
TED2006の講演で注目され
16:22
became this little thing.
こんな場所になりました
16:25
But I did in fact get married in it.
実際 私はこの公園で結婚式を挙げました
16:28
Over here.
このあたりです
16:30
There goes my dog who led me to the park in my wedding.
式の時に先導してくれたうちの犬です
16:32
The South Bronx Greenway
サウス・ブロンクス グリーンウェイも
16:38
was also just a drawing on the stage back in 2006.
2006年にはただの構想でした
16:40
Since then, we got
それから 経済対策で準備された
16:43
about 50 million dollars in stimulus package money
50億円を受け取り
16:45
to come and get here.
このような姿になりました
16:47
And we love this, because I love construction now,
私は建設が大好きです
16:49
because we're watching these things actually happen.
こんなことが起きるのを目の当たりにできます
16:51
So I want everyone to understand
慈善を事業に変えることの
16:53
the critical importance
決定的な重要性を
16:55
of shifting charity into enterprise.
皆さんに理解してほしいのです
16:57
I started my firm to help communities across the country
私の会社では 国中のコミュニティが
17:00
realize their own potential
人々の暮らしを自ら改善する可能性を
17:03
to improve everything about the quality of life for their people.
持っていることに気づく手助けをしています
17:05
Hometown security
ふるさとの安全が
17:08
is next on my to-do list.
次に私が取り組む課題です
17:10
What we need are people who see the value
必要とされるのは
17:12
in investing in these types of local enterprises,
地域の事業に投資する人です
17:14
who will partner with folks like me
地域のプレイヤーと連携して
17:17
to identify the growth trends and climate adaptation
成長のトレンドや環境への適応を見極めると同時に
17:19
as well as understand the growing social costs
従来型ビジネスの社会的コストが
17:22
of business as usual.
増大しつつあることを理解してほしいのです
17:25
We need to work together
ともに力を合わせて
17:27
to embrace and repair our land,
土地を育み
17:29
repair our power systems
電力の仕組みを修復し
17:31
and repair ourselves.
私たち自身を癒さなければなりません
17:33
It's time to stop building
ショッピングモールや刑務所
17:35
the shopping malls, the prisons,
スタジアムや
17:37
the stadiums
これまでの過ちを象徴するようなものを
17:39
and other tributes to all of our collective failures.
建てるのはもうやめましょう
17:41
It is time that we start building
希望や可能性につながる
17:45
living monuments to hope and possibility.
生きた人々を生み出すべき時です
17:47
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
17:50
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:52
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:Ai Tokimatsu

sponsored links

Majora Carter - Activist for environmental justice
Majora Carter redefined the field of environmental equality, starting in the South Bronx at the turn of the century. Now she is leading the local economic development movement across the USA.

Why you should listen

Majora Carter is a visionary voice in city planning who views urban renewal through an environmental lens. The South Bronx native draws a direct connection between ecological, economic and social degradation. Hence her motto: "Green the ghetto!"

With her inspired ideas and fierce persistence, Carter managed to bring the South Bronx its first open-waterfront park in 60 years, Hunts Point Riverside Park. Then she scored $1.25 million in federal funds for a greenway along the South Bronx waterfront, bringing the neighborhood open space, pedestrian and bike paths, and space for mixed-use economic development.

Her success is no surprise to anyone who's seen her speak; Carter's confidence, energy and intensely emotional delivery make her talks themselves a force of nature. (The release of her TEDTalk in 2006 prompted Guy Kawasaki to wonder on his blog whether she wasn't "every bit as good as [Apple CEO] Steve Jobs," a legendary presenter.)

Carter, who was awarded a 2005 MacArthur "genius" grant, served as executive director of Sustainable South Bronx for 7 years, where she pushed both for eco-friendly practices (such as green and cool roofs) and, equally important, job training and green-related economic development for her vibrant neighborhood on the rise. Since leaving SSBx in 2008, Carter has formed the economic consulting and planning firm the Majora Carter Group, to bring her pioneering approach to communities far outside the South Bronx. Carter is working within the cities of New Orleans, Detroit and the small coastal towns of Northeastern North Carolina. The Majora Carter Group is putting the green economy and green economic tools to use, unlocking the potential of every place -- from urban cities and rural communities, to universities, government projects, businesses and corporations -- and everywhere else in between.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.