18:40
TED2011

Ed Boyden: A light switch for neurons

エド・ボイデン: ニューロンの光スイッチ

Filmed:

感光性タンパク質の遺伝子を脳細胞に導入し、移植したファイバー光学系を用いて特定のニューロンを選択的にオンオフできることをエド・ボイデンが示します。この先例のない制御技術によって、PTSD やある種の失明のマウスモデルを治療することにも成功しました。神経補装具という新たな地平線が見えてきました。セッション司会のファン・エンリケズによる簡単な質疑応答も収録。

- Neuroengineer
Ed Boyden is a professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at the MIT Media Lab and the MIT McGovern Institute. Full bio

Think about your day for a second.
皆さんの日常について考えてみてください
00:15
You woke up, felt fresh air on your face as you walked out the door,
起床し 外に出て清々しい風を感じ
00:17
encountered new colleagues and had great discussions,
新しい同僚と良い議論をし
00:20
and felt in awe when you found something new.
新しい発見に感動するでしょう
00:22
But I bet there's something you didn't think about today --
でもたぶん気にも留めなかったことがあるはずです
00:24
something so close to home
実に当たり前すぎて
00:26
that you probably don't think about it very often at all.
普段はまったく意識されないことです
00:28
And that's that all the sensations, feelings,
それは感覚や感情
00:30
decisions and actions
決断や行動などは
00:32
are mediated by the computer in your head
頭の中にあって脳と呼ばれるコンピュータが
00:34
called the brain.
仕切っているということです
00:36
Now the brain may not look like much from the outside --
外見上 脳は大したものには見えません
00:38
a couple pounds of pinkish-gray flesh,
1kg 程度のピンクがかった灰色の
00:40
amorphous --
不定形の肉なのですが
00:42
but the last hundred years of neuroscience
過去百年の神経科学の発展により
00:44
have allowed us to zoom in on the brain,
脳を詳細に観察できるようになり
00:46
and to see the intricacy of what lies within.
その複雑さを研究できるようになりました
00:48
And they've told us that this brain
その結果 脳は
00:50
is an incredibly complicated circuit
数千億のニューロンと呼ばれる細胞が織りなす
00:52
made out of hundreds of billions of cells called neurons.
複雑な回路から成っていることが分かりました
00:54
Now unlike a human-designed computer,
人間が設計したコンピュータの
00:58
where there's a fairly small number of different parts --
部品の種類は少ないのですが
01:01
we know how they work, because we humans designed them --
これは我々が設計したので仕組みは分かっていますが --
01:03
the brain is made out of thousands of different kinds of cells,
脳は数千種類の多様な細胞から出来ています
01:06
maybe tens of thousands.
数万種類かもしれません
01:09
They come in different shapes; they're made out of different molecules.
形も違っていますし 構成する分子も違います
01:11
And they project and connect to different brain regions,
それぞれが様々な脳部位へと繋がっています
01:13
and they also change different ways in different disease states.
また様々な病気で 様々に変化します
01:16
Let's make it concrete.
具体的にお話ししましょう
01:19
There's a class of cells,
近隣細胞を不活性化する
01:21
a fairly small cell, an inhibitory cell, that quiets its neighbors.
抑制細胞という比較的小さな細胞があります
01:23
It's one of the cells that seems to be atrophied in disorders like schizophrenia.
これは統合失調症などで萎縮が見られる細胞です
01:26
It's called the basket cell.
籠細胞と呼ばれます
01:30
And this cell is one of the thousands of kinds of cell
我々が研究している数千種類の
01:32
that we are learning about.
細胞の内の一つです
01:34
New ones are being discovered everyday.
新種の細胞が日々発見されています
01:36
As just a second example:
もう一つ 例として
01:38
these pyramidal cells, large cells,
この大きな錐体細胞は
01:40
they can span a significant fraction of the brain.
多くの脳部位に存在しています
01:42
They're excitatory.
これは興奮性の細胞であり
01:44
And these are some of the cells
てんかんなどで
01:46
that might be overactive in disorders such as epilepsy.
過剰活性していると思われる細胞の一つです
01:48
Every one of these cells
これらの細胞一つ一つが
01:51
is an incredible electrical device.
驚くべき電気装置なのです
01:53
They receive input from thousands of upstream partners
数千個の上流の細胞から入力を受け取り
01:56
and compute their own electrical outputs,
自身の電気出力を計算し
01:58
which then, if they pass a certain threshold,
それが一定の閾値を超えている場合
02:01
will go to thousands of downstream partners.
数千個の下流の細胞へ出力します
02:03
And this process, which takes just a millisecond or so,
1ミリ秒ほどで起きるこのプロセスは
02:05
happens thousands of times a minute
1千億個の細胞全てで
02:08
in every one of your 100 billion cells,
毎分何千回も繰り返されます
02:10
as long as you live
皆さんが生きていて
02:12
and think and feel.
考え 感じている限りにおいて
02:14
So how are we going to figure out what this circuit does?
どうしたらこの回路の働きを解明できるでしょう?
02:17
Ideally, we could go through the circuit
理想は 回路を構成している
02:20
and turn these different kinds of cell on and off
全細胞をオンオフして どの種類の細胞が
02:22
and see whether we could figure out
どの機能に寄与しているかとか
02:25
which ones contribute to certain functions
どの病態でおかしくなるか
02:27
and which ones go wrong in certain pathologies.
調べていくことです
02:29
If we could activate cells, we could see what powers they can unleash,
細胞を活性化できれば それが何を引き起こし
02:31
what they can initiate and sustain.
何を維持するか 調べられます
02:34
If we could turn them off,
不活性化できれば
02:36
then we could try and figure out what they're necessary for.
それが何に必要な細胞か分かります
02:38
And that's a story I'm going to tell you about today.
これが本日 私がお話しする内容です
02:40
And honestly, where we've gone through over the last 11 years,
我々はこれまでの 11 年間
02:43
through an attempt to find ways
脳の回路 細胞 組織 経路を
02:46
of turning circuits and cells and parts and pathways of the brain
オンオフする方法を
02:48
on and off,
模索してきました
02:50
both to understand the science
科学を理解するため
02:52
and also to confront some of the issues
また人間として我々が直面する
02:54
that face us all as humans.
数々の問題に立ち向かうためにです
02:57
Now before I tell you about the technology,
技術的なお話をする前に
03:00
the bad news is that a significant fraction of us in this room,
残念なことに 長生きしていくと
03:03
if we live long enough,
我々はかなりの割合で
03:06
will encounter, perhaps, a brain disorder.
脳疾患に罹ります
03:08
Already, a billion people
既に十億人が
03:10
have had some kind of brain disorder
機能障害を及ぼす
03:12
that incapacitates them,
脳疾患に罹っています
03:14
and the numbers don't do it justice though.
この数字だけでは実態を伝えるには不十分です
03:16
These disorders -- schizophrenia, Alzheimer's,
統合失調症 アルツハイマー病
03:18
depression, addiction --
うつ病 依存症などの障害は
03:20
they not only steal our time to live, they change who we are.
我々の寿命を削るだけでなく 我々自身を変容させます
03:22
They take our identity and change our emotions
自己同一性を奪い 感情を変え
03:25
and change who we are as people.
人間としての我々を変えます
03:27
Now in the 20th century,
20 世紀には
03:30
there was some hope that was generated
脳障害を治療する
03:33
through the development of pharmaceuticals for treating brain disorders,
薬剤の開発がずいぶん期待されたものでした
03:36
and while many drugs have been developed
脳障害の症状を緩和する
03:39
that can alleviate symptoms of brain disorders,
たくさんの治療薬が開発される一方
03:42
practically none of them can be considered to be cured.
実際に完治できる薬はできませんでした
03:44
And part of that's because we're bathing the brain in the chemical.
その理由の一つは脳が化学物質に浸かっているためです
03:47
This elaborate circuit
数千種類の細胞からなる
03:50
made out of thousands of different kinds of cell
脳の精巧な回路は
03:52
is being bathed in a substance.
化学物質に浸っています
03:54
That's also why, perhaps, most of the drugs, and not all, on the market
全てではないけれど 市販のほとんどの薬が
03:56
can present some kind of serious side effect too.
深刻な副作用を引き起こす理由でしょう
03:58
Now some people have gotten some solace
脳に埋め込んだ電気刺激器で
04:01
from electrical stimulators that are implanted in the brain.
ある程度助かっている人もいます
04:04
And for Parkinson's disease,
パーキンソン病と
04:07
Cochlear implants,
人工内耳に関しては
04:09
these have indeed been able
この電気刺激機器が
04:11
to bring some kind of remedy
ある種の障害に対する
04:13
to people with certain kinds of disorder.
助けとなってきました
04:15
But electricity also will go in all directions --
しかし電流は全方向へ流れます
04:17
the path of least resistance,
抵抗の低い部位を
04:19
which is where that phrase, in part, comes from.
経路として流れていきます
04:21
And it also will affect normal circuits as well as the abnormal ones that you want to fix.
従って電気刺激は治したい異常回路と正常な回路 両方に影響します
04:23
So again, we're sent back to the idea
そうして再び我々は
04:26
of ultra-precise control.
超精密制御の考えに戻るのです
04:28
Could we dial-in information precisely where we want it to go?
信号を思い通りに制御できるのか?
04:30
So when I started in neuroscience 11 years ago,
11 年前に神経科学を始めたとき
04:34
I had trained as an electrical engineer and a physicist,
私は電気と物理が専門だったので
04:38
and the first thing I thought about was,
最初に考えたことは
04:41
if these neurons are electrical devices,
ニューロンが電気装置ならば
04:43
all we need to do is to find some way
その電気的変化を遠隔操作する方法を
04:45
of driving those electrical changes at a distance.
見つければよいということでした
04:47
If we could turn on the electricity in one cell,
もし隣接細胞は発火させずに
04:49
but not its neighbors,
一つの細胞だけを発火させられたら
04:51
that would give us the tool we need to activate and shut down these different cells,
様々な細胞を活性および抑制するツールが得られ
04:53
figure out what they do and how they contribute
そして個々が何をし そのネットワーク上で
04:56
to the networks in which they're embedded.
どのように役割を果たしているかが分かります
04:58
And also it would allow us to have the ultra-precise control we need
また同時に正常な計算ができなくなった回路を
05:00
in order to fix the circuit computations
元通りにするための
05:02
that have gone awry.
超精密制御が可能となります
05:05
Now how are we going to do that?
どうしたら実現できるでしょう?
05:07
Well there are many molecules that exist in nature,
自然界には光を電気へと変換できる分子が
05:09
which are able to convert light into electricity.
多数存在しています
05:11
You can think of them as little proteins
太陽電池のように働く
05:14
that are like solar cells.
小さなタンパク質だと考えてください
05:16
If we can install these molecules in neurons somehow,
この分子をどうにかしてニューロンに導入できれば
05:18
then these neurons would become electrically drivable with light.
そのニューロンは光刺激で活性化させられます
05:21
And their neighbors, which don't have the molecule, would not.
この分子を持たない隣接細胞は反応しません
05:24
There's one other magic trick you need to make this all happen,
これを実際のものにするには 更に
05:27
and that's the ability to get light into the brain.
脳内に光刺激を届けるための工夫が必要です
05:29
And to do that -- the brain doesn't feel pain -- you can put --
そのために 痛覚のない脳に
05:32
taking advantage of all the effort
インターネットや通信技術などの
05:35
that's gone into the Internet and communications and so on --
成果である光ファイバーを挿入します
05:37
optical fibers connected to lasers
光ファイバーにニューロンを
05:39
that you can use to activate, in animal models for example,
活性化させるためのレーザーを接続し
05:41
in pre-clinical studies,
動物を使った前臨床実験で
05:43
these neurons and to see what they do.
ニューロンの振る舞いを観察します
05:45
So how do we do this?
これはどうやるのでしょうか?
05:47
Around 2004,
2004 年頃に
05:49
in collaboration with Gerhard Nagel and Karl Deisseroth,
ゲルハルト・ナゲルとカール・ダイセロスと共同して
05:51
this vision came to fruition.
この構想は実現しました
05:53
There's a certain alga that swims in the wild,
野性の藻には
05:55
and it needs to navigate towards light
適切に光合成を行うために
05:58
in order to photosynthesize optimally.
光へ向かって移動するものが存在します
06:00
And it senses light with a little eye-spot,
我々の目とは異なる仕組みの
06:02
which works not unlike how our eye works.
小さな眼点で光を感知します
06:04
In its membrane, or its boundary,
その細胞膜には
06:07
it contains little proteins
光を電気へと変換できる
06:09
that indeed can convert light into electricity.
小さなタンパク質が含まれています
06:12
So these molecules are called channelrhodopsins.
これはチャネルロドプシンと呼ばれるものです
06:15
And each of these proteins acts just like that solar cell that I told you about.
このタンパク質は先ほど触れた太陽電池のように振る舞います
06:18
When blue light hits it, it opens up a little hole
青い光で刺激されると小さな穴を開き
06:21
and allows charged particles to enter the eye-spot,
荷電粒子を眼点内へ取り込みます
06:24
and that allows this eye-spot to have an electrical signal
それによって太陽電池が充電するのと同様に
06:26
just like a solar cell charging up a battery.
眼点は電気信号を溜めます
06:28
So what we need to do is to take these molecules
我々がしなければならなかったのは
06:31
and somehow install them in neurons.
この分子を抽出しニューロンへ導入することでした
06:33
And because it's a protein,
それはタンパク質なので
06:35
it's encoded for in the DNA of this organism.
その藻の DNA 内にコードされています
06:37
So all we've got to do is take that DNA,
あとはその DNA を抽出し
06:40
put it into a gene therapy vector, like a virus,
遺伝子治療用ベクターというウィルスみたいなものに取り込み
06:42
and put it into neurons.
それをニューロンに導入すれば良いだけでした
06:45
So it turned out that this was a very productive time in gene therapy,
これは遺伝子治療が大いに進んだ時期で
06:48
and lots of viruses were coming along.
たくさんのウィルスが登場しており
06:51
So this turned out to be very simple to do.
やってみると簡単なことでした
06:53
And early in the morning one day in the summer of 2004,
2004 年の夏のある朝に実験し
06:55
we gave it a try, and it worked on the first try.
最初の試行で成功しました
06:58
You take this DNA and you put it into a neuron.
この DNA を抽出しニューロンに導入するのです
07:00
The neuron uses its natural protein-making machinery
ニューロン自身のタンパク質生成機能が
07:03
to fabricate these little light-sensitive proteins
あの感光タンパク質を組み立て
07:06
and install them all over the cell,
ソーラーパネルを設置するが如く
07:08
like putting solar panels on a roof,
全ての細胞に導入します
07:10
and the next thing you know,
そうすると
07:12
you have a neuron which can be activated with light.
光刺激で活性化させられるニューロンの出来上がりです
07:14
So this is very powerful.
これは非常に強力です
07:16
One of the tricks you have to do
工夫が必要なのは
07:18
is to figure out how to deliver these genes to the cells that you want
隣接細胞ではなく目的の細胞だけに
07:20
and not all the other neighbors.
この遺伝子を導入する方法です
07:22
And you can do that; you can tweak the viruses
これは可能です まずウィルスを
07:24
so they hit just some cells and not others.
特定の細胞にだけ取り付くよう改造します
07:26
And there's other genetic tricks you can play
光で活性化する細胞を作るための
07:28
in order to get light-activated cells.
遺伝子の工夫はまだあります
07:30
This field has now come to be known as optogenetics.
この分野は光遺伝学として知られるようになりました
07:33
And just as one example of the kind of thing you can do,
その一例として複雑なネットワークを
07:37
you can take a complex network,
取り上げてみます
07:39
use one of these viruses to deliver the gene
高密度なネットワークに存在する
07:41
just to one kind of cell in this dense network.
一種類の細胞にだけ ウィルスを用いて遺伝子を導入できます
07:43
And then when you shine light on the entire network,
そしてネットワーク全体に対して光を照らすと
07:46
just that cell type will be activated.
その種類の細胞だけが活性化します
07:48
So for example, lets sort of consider that basket cell I told you about earlier --
例えば先ほどの籠細胞を取り上げてみましょう
07:50
the one that's atrophied in schizophrenia
統合失調症において萎縮してしまう
07:53
and the one that is inhibitory.
抑制系の細胞です
07:55
If we can deliver that gene to these cells --
この細胞の表現系を変化させずに
07:57
and they're not going to be altered by the expression of the gene, of course --
先の遺伝子を導入できれば
07:59
and then flash blue light over the entire brain network,
脳のネットワーク全体に青い光を照射して
08:02
just these cells are going to be driven.
この細胞だけを活性化できます
08:05
And when the light turns off, these cells go back to normal,
照射を止めれば細胞は正常状態に戻るので
08:07
so they don't seem to be averse against that.
特に悪影響もないでしょう
08:09
Not only can you use this to study what these cells do,
この技術を用いれば細胞の働きや
08:12
what their power is in computing in the brain,
脳全体における役割だけでなく
08:14
but you can also use this to try to figure out --
籠細胞が本当に萎縮しているとしたら
08:16
well maybe we could jazz up the activity of these cells,
そのことを明らかにし
08:18
if indeed they're atrophied.
籠細胞の活動を活性化できます
08:20
Now I want to tell you a couple of short stories
では我々がこの技術を
08:22
about how we're using this,
科学 臨床 前臨床 それぞれの段階で
08:24
both at the scientific, clinical and pre-clinical levels.
どう利用しているかお話ししたいと思います
08:26
One of the questions we've confronted
我々が取り組んだ問題の一つは
08:29
is, what are the signals in the brain that mediate the sensation of reward?
報酬という感覚を脳内で媒介する信号は何かというものです
08:31
Because if you could find those,
なぜならこれを発見できれば
08:34
those would be some of the signals that could drive learning.
学習を促進する信号に成り得るからです
08:36
The brain will do more of whatever got that reward.
脳は報酬を得たことを より実行します
08:38
And also these are signals that go awry in disorders such as addiction.
またその報酬信号は中毒などの障害では異常になります
08:40
So if we could figure out what cells they are,
従ってどの細胞かを解明できれば
08:43
we could maybe find new targets
薬の設計やスクリーニングに有効な
08:45
for which drugs could be designed or screened against,
新たな創薬ターゲットの発見や
08:47
or maybe places where electrodes could be put in
重症患者に対する適切な
08:49
for people who have very severe disability.
電極刺激部位の同定に繋がるかもしれません
08:51
So to do that, we came up with a very simple paradigm
そのために我々はフィオレッラグループと共同で
08:54
in collaboration with the Fiorella group,
ある単純なパラダイムを作りました
08:56
where one side of this little box,
この小さな箱の一方に
08:58
if the animal goes there, the animal gets a pulse of light
動物が移動すると 脳の感光性細胞を活性化する
09:00
in order to make different cells in the brain sensitive to light.
光のパルスが照射されるようにしました
09:02
So if these cells can mediate reward,
従って その細胞が報酬を媒介している場合
09:04
the animal should go there more and more.
動物は光が照射される方へ行くようになるはずです
09:06
And so that's what happens.
そしてその通りの結果が出ました
09:08
This animal's going to go to the right-hand side and poke his nose there,
この動物が右側の穴を鼻で突くと
09:10
and he gets a flash of blue light every time he does that.
その度に青い光が照射されるようにしました
09:12
And he'll do that hundreds and hundreds of times.
彼は何百回とこれを繰り返します
09:14
These are the dopamine neurons,
これらはドーパミンニューロンによるものです
09:16
which some of you may have heard about, in some of the pleasure centers in the brain.
快楽に関わる物質としてご存じの方もいるでしょう
09:18
Now we've shown that a brief activation of these
学習を促進するにはこれを少し
09:20
is enough, indeed, to drive learning.
活性化すればよいことが分かりました
09:22
Now we can generalize the idea.
次に このアイデアを拡張し
09:24
Instead of one point in the brain,
脳の一点だけでなく
09:26
we can devise devices that span the brain,
脳全体に対して立体的に光を照射できる
09:28
that can deliver light into three-dimensional patterns --
機器を用意します
09:30
arrays of optical fibers,
独立した小型の光源に接続した
09:32
each coupled to its own independent miniature light source.
光ファイバーの束を用います
09:34
And then we can try to do things in vivo
これによってシャーレでしか
09:36
that have only been done to-date in a dish --
出来なかったことを生体で実験できます
09:38
like high-throughput screening throughout the entire brain
例えば特定の現象を引き起こす信号の
09:41
for the signals that can cause certain things to happen.
スクリーニングを脳全体に対して実施できます
09:43
Or that could be good clinical targets
また 脳障害の治療ターゲットの
09:45
for treating brain disorders.
探索にも利用できます
09:47
And one story I want to tell you about
制御不能な不安や恐怖を示す
09:49
is how can we find targets for treating post-traumatic stress disorder --
PTSD の治療ターゲットをどう探すかについて
09:51
a form of uncontrolled anxiety and fear.
一つお話ししたいと思います
09:54
And one of the things that we did
我々が試したことの一つは
09:57
was to adopt a very classical model of fear.
恐怖の古典的モデルを取り入れることでした
09:59
This goes back to the Pavlovian days.
それはパブロフの時代まで遡ります
10:02
It's called Pavlovian fear conditioning --
これはパブロフの条件付けと呼ばれ
10:05
where a tone ends with a brief shock.
音の呈示後に電気ショックをあたえるものでした
10:07
The shock isn't painful, but it's a little annoying.
痛くはありませんが 少し不快なものでした
10:09
And over time -- in this case, a mouse,
こういった実験でよく用いられる
10:11
which is a good animal model, commonly used in such experiments --
マウスで繰り返し実験したところ
10:13
the animal learns to fear the tone.
音を怖がるよう条件付けられました
10:15
The animal will react by freezing,
動物は反射的にこわばります
10:17
sort of like a deer in the headlights.
ヘッドライトに照らされたときのシカと同じです
10:19
Now the question is, what targets in the brain can we find
ここでの問題は この恐怖を克服するための何かは
10:21
that allow us to overcome this fear?
脳のどこで見つけられるかということです
10:24
So what we do is we play that tone again
何をするかというと
10:26
after it's been associated with fear.
恐怖と条件付けた音を鳴らします
10:28
But we activate targets in the brain, different ones,
ただその時に 先ほどお見せした
10:30
using that optical fiber array I told you about in the previous slide,
光ファイバーを用いて別の脳部位を活性化させ
10:32
in order to try and figure out which targets
恐怖の記憶を克服するためには
10:35
can cause the brain to overcome that memory of fear.
どの脳部位が働くのかを調べます
10:37
And so this brief video
この簡単なビデオで
10:40
shows you one of these targets that we're working on now.
我々が取り組んでいるターゲットの一つをお見せします
10:42
This is an area in the prefrontal cortex,
こちらが前頭前野
10:44
a region where we can use cognition to try to overcome aversive emotional states.
嫌感情を認知で克服しようとする時に活動する脳部位です
10:46
And the animal's going to hear a tone -- and a flash of light occurred there.
動物は音を聴き そこで光の照射を受けます
10:49
There's no audio on this, but you can see the animal's freezing.
音声は入っていませんが動物が硬直しているのは確認できます
10:51
This tone used to mean bad news.
音は悪い知らせとして使われます
10:53
And there's a little clock in the lower left-hand corner,
左下の時計を見ると
10:55
so you can see the animal is about two minutes into this.
実験が始まって2分が過ぎたことが分かります
10:57
And now this next clip
次のシーンは
11:00
is just eight minutes later.
8 分後のものです
11:02
And the same tone is going to play, and the light is going to flash again.
同じ音刺激が呈示され 光が照射されます
11:04
Okay, there it goes. Right now.
光ります 今です
11:07
And now you can see, just 10 minutes into the experiment,
ご覧の通り 10 分の実験で
11:10
that we've equipped the brain by photoactivating this area
我々はこの部位を光で
11:13
to overcome the expression
活性化させ 恐怖の記憶を
11:16
of this fear memory.
克服させることが出来ました
11:18
Now over the last couple of years, we've gone back to the tree of life
我々はこの数年間 生命の樹を振り返っていました
11:20
because we wanted to find ways to turn circuits in the brain off.
脳内の回路をオフにする方法を探していたのです
11:23
If we could do that, this could be extremely powerful.
実現すれば 極めて有効な手段となります
11:26
If you can delete cells just for a few milliseconds or seconds,
数ミリ秒あるいは数秒でも細胞を
11:29
you can figure out what necessary role they play
除けておくことができれば
11:32
in the circuits in which they're embedded.
その回路における役割を解明できます
11:34
And we've now surveyed organisms from all over the tree of life --
我々は生命の樹全体の生物を調べ
11:36
every kingdom of life except for animals, we see slightly differently.
動物以外の界は若干異なることが分かりました
11:38
And we found all sorts of molecules, they're called halorhodopsins or archaerhodopsins,
また緑と黄色の光に反応するハロロドプシン
11:41
that respond to green and yellow light.
または古細菌ロドプシンと呼ばれる分子を見つけました
11:44
And they do the opposite thing of the molecule I told you about before
これらは先に述べた青い光に反応する
11:46
with the blue light activator channelrhodopsin.
チャネルロドプシンとは逆のことをします
11:48
Let's give an example of where we think this is going to go.
これらを上手く利用できる例を挙げます
11:52
Consider, for example, a condition like epilepsy,
脳が過剰に活動している
11:55
where the brain is overactive.
てんかんの症状を例に取ってみましょう
11:58
Now if drugs fail in epileptic treatment,
てんかん治療で薬が有効でなかった場合
12:00
one of the strategies is to remove part of the brain.
他には脳の一部を除去するという手段がありますが
12:02
But that's obviously irreversible, and there could be side effects.
それは明らかに不可逆で 副作用も見込まれます
12:04
What if we could just turn off that brain for a brief amount of time,
もし一時的に発作が止まるまで
12:06
until the seizure dies away,
脳を停止できたとしたらどうでしょう
12:09
and cause the brain to be restored to its initial state --
力学において動的な系を安定状態に移行させるように
12:12
sort of like a dynamical system that's being coaxed down into a stable state.
脳を初期状態に戻すのです
12:15
So this animation just tries to explain this concept
こちらのアニメーションは その概念の説明です
12:18
where we made these cells sensitive to being turned off with light,
光刺激によってオフに出来る細胞を作り
12:21
and we beam light in,
光を照射し
12:23
and just for the time it takes to shut down a seizure,
発作を鎮めるのにかかる時間だけ
12:25
we're hoping to be able to turn it off.
活動を停止させられたらと考えています
12:27
And so we don't have data to show you on this front,
この最新の研究についてお見せできるデータはありません
12:29
but we're very excited about this.
張り切って取り組んでいるところです
12:31
Now I want to close on one story,
もう一つの展望として
12:33
which we think is another possibility --
注目したいのが
12:35
which is that maybe these molecules, if you can do ultra-precise control,
超精密制御でこの分子を
12:37
can be used in the brain itself
脳自体に用いることが出来れば
12:39
to make a new kind of prosthetic, an optical prosthetic.
新たな光学式補装具が出来ると考えています
12:41
I already told you that electrical stimulators are not uncommon.
電気刺激機器が珍しくないことは既にお話ししました
12:44
Seventy-five thousand people have Parkinson's deep-brain stimulators implanted.
7万5千人のパーキンソン病患者が電気刺激機器を移植しており
12:47
Maybe 100,000 people have Cochlear implants,
補聴器としておそらく 10 万人以上が
12:50
which allow them to hear.
人工内耳を移植しています
12:52
There's another thing, which is you've got to get these genes into cells.
もう一つは遺伝子を細胞に導入する必要があるということです
12:54
And new hope in gene therapy has been developed
遺伝子治療における新たな期待として
12:57
because viruses like the adeno-associated virus,
この部屋にいる全員が保有しているであろう
13:00
which probably most of us around this room have,
何の症状ももたらさない
13:02
and it doesn't have any symptoms,
アデノウィルスが開発され
13:04
which have been used in hundreds of patients
脳や体に遺伝子を導入するために
13:06
to deliver genes into the brain or the body.
百人以上の患者で用いられています
13:08
And so far, there have not been serious adverse events
これまでこのウィルスによる悪影響は
13:10
associated with the virus.
報告されていません
13:12
There's one last elephant in the room, the proteins themselves,
まだ誰も触れていない大問題として
13:14
which come from algae and bacteria and fungi,
藻 バクテリア 菌類など
13:17
and all over the tree of life.
系統樹のあちこちからのタンパク質が問題です
13:19
Most of us don't have fungi or algae in our brains,
我々は通常脳に菌類や藻類を持っていませんが
13:21
so what is our brain going to do if we put that in?
それを導入したらどうなるでしょう?
13:23
Are the cells going to tolerate it? Will the immune system react?
許容するでしょうか?排除するでしょうか?
13:25
In its early days -- these have not been done on humans yet --
まだ人間では実験されていませんが
13:27
but we're working on a variety of studies
我々は数々の研究に着手しており
13:29
to try and examine this,
これを検証しようとしています
13:31
and so far we haven't seen overt reactions of any severity
まだこれらの分子や
13:33
to these molecules
光刺激による脳活性について
13:36
or to the illumination of the brain with light.
どのような悪影響も観察されていません
13:38
So it's early days, to be upfront, but we're excited about it.
正直 まだ初期段階ですが 我々は興奮しています
13:41
I wanted to close with one story,
最後に
13:44
which we think could potentially
臨床に活用できると思われる
13:46
be a clinical application.
お話をして締めたいと思います
13:48
Now there are many forms of blindness
我々の目の奥にある
13:50
where the photoreceptors,
光受容体が無くなってしまう
13:52
our light sensors that are in the back of our eye, are gone.
失明にはいくつもの形態があります
13:54
And the retina, of course, is a complex structure.
そして当然網膜は複雑な構造をしています
13:57
Now let's zoom in on it here, so we can see it in more detail.
拡大してもっと細かく見てみましょう
13:59
The photoreceptor cells are shown here at the top,
光受容体細胞は一番上にあり
14:01
and then the signals that are detected by the photoreceptors
受け取った信号は細胞の層の
14:04
are transformed by various computations
一番下にある神経節に至るまでに
14:06
until finally that layer of cells at the bottom, the ganglion cells,
様々な計算を経て変換され
14:08
relay the information to the brain,
そこから脳へ情報が伝達され
14:11
where we see that as perception.
我々は映像を知覚します
14:13
In many forms of blindness, like retinitis pigmentosa,
網膜色素変性や黄斑変性などの
14:15
or macular degeneration,
盲目において
14:18
the photoreceptor cells have atrophied or been destroyed.
光受容体細胞は萎縮または破壊されています
14:20
Now how could you repair this?
どうしたら治せるでしょう?
14:23
It's not even clear that a drug could cause this to be restored,
薬が結合する対象が存在しないため
14:25
because there's nothing for the drug to bind to.
薬による治療が可能かどうかすら不明です
14:28
On the other hand, light can still get into the eye.
その一方で 光信号は変わらず目に入ってきているのです
14:30
The eye is still transparent and you can get light in.
光は変わらず素通りしてきています
14:32
So what if we could just take these channelrhodopsins and other molecules
ではもしチャネルロドプシンなどの分子を
14:35
and install them on some of these other spare cells
代替の細胞などに導入し
14:38
and convert them into little cameras.
カメラ代わりに使えたとしたらどうでしょう?
14:40
And because there's so many of these cells in the eye,
目には多数の細胞が存在するので
14:42
potentially, they could be very high-resolution cameras.
解像度の非常に高いカメラとなるはずです
14:44
So this is some work that we're doing.
我々はこのようなことをしています
14:47
It's being led by one of our collaborators,
これは我々の共同研究者の一人
14:49
Alan Horsager at USC,
USC のアラン・ホーセイジャーが率い
14:51
and being sought to be commercialized by a start-up company Eos Neuroscience,
NIH の資金援助の下 Eos Neuroscience 社の立ち上げと共に
14:53
which is funded by the NIH.
商業化をしようとしています
14:56
And what you see here is a mouse trying to solve a maze.
これはマウスが迷路を解こうとしている場面です
14:58
It's a six-arm maze. And there's a bit of water in the maze
6 方向放射状迷路です マウスの活動を促すため
15:00
to motivate the mouse to move, or he'll just sit there.
水を少し入れています
15:02
And the goal, of course, of this maze
この迷路の目的は
15:04
is to get out of the water and go to a little platform
水から上がって
15:06
that's under the lit top port.
小さな台へ移動することです
15:08
Now mice are smart, so this mouse solves the maze eventually,
マウスは賢いので最終的には迷路を解きますが
15:10
but he does a brute-force search.
総当たりでやります
15:13
He's swimming down every avenue until he finally gets to the platform.
台にたどり着くまで全ての通路を泳ぎます
15:15
So he's not using vision to do it.
つまり見通しを立ててはいないのです
15:18
These different mice are different mutations
これらのマウスは遺伝子改変によって
15:20
that recapitulate different kinds of blindness that affect humans.
人間の盲目をモデルした変異マウスです
15:22
And so we're being careful in trying to look at these different models
それぞれのモデルを慎重に観察し
15:25
so we come up with a generalized approach.
一般化できる解決手法を模索します
15:28
So how are we going to solve this?
どのようにしたらよいでしょう?
15:30
We're going to do exactly what we outlined in the previous slide.
先のスライドで示した通り
15:32
We're going to take these blue light photosensors
我々は青い光センサーを
15:34
and install them on a layer of cells
目の裏の網膜の
15:36
in the middle of the retina in the back of the eye
細胞層の真ん中に導入し
15:38
and convert them into a camera --
カメラにします
15:41
just like installing solar cells all over those neurons
太陽電池を導入し ニューロンを
15:43
to make them light sensitive.
感光性にしたときと同様です
15:45
Light is converted to electricity on them.
そこで光は電気に変換されます
15:47
So this mouse was blind a couple weeks before this experiment
このマウスは実験の数週間前に失明させ
15:49
and received one dose of this photosensitive molecule in a virus.
感光性分子を含んだウィルスを投与しました
15:52
And now you can see, the animal can indeed avoid walls
そしてご覧の通り マウスは壁を避け
15:55
and go to this little platform
小さな台へとたどり着きます
15:57
and make cognitive use of its eyes again.
目の知覚機能が回復しています
15:59
And to point out the power of this:
またこのラットの凄いところは
16:02
these animals are able to get to that platform
失明を経験していないラットと
16:04
just as fast as animals that have seen their entire lives.
同等の成績で台にたどり着いているということです
16:06
So this pre-clinical study, I think,
この前臨床研究は
16:08
bodes hope for the kinds of things
今後我々が実現したいことの
16:10
we're hoping to do in the future.
希望を示していると考えます
16:12
To close, I want to point out that we're also exploring
最後に我々はニューロテクノロジーの分野における
16:14
new business models for this new field of neurotechnology.
新たなビジネスモデルも模索していることをお伝えしておきます
16:17
We're developing these tools,
我々はこういったものを開発し
16:19
but we share them freely with hundreds of groups all over the world,
皆が様々な障害の治療を研究できるよう
16:21
so people can study and try to treat different disorders.
世界中で数百のグループに自由に共有しています
16:23
And our hope is that, by figuring out brain circuits
我々の望みは
16:25
at a level of abstraction that lets us repair them and engineer them,
修復および設計が出来る程度まで
16:28
we can take some of these intractable disorders that I told you about earlier,
脳の回路を解明し
16:31
practically none of which are cured,
先にお話しした不治の難病を
16:34
and in the 21st century make them history.
21 世紀で過去のものとすることです
16:36
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:40
Juan Enriquez: So some of the stuff is a little dense.
ファン・エンリケズ: 少々 濃い内容でした
16:53
(Laughter)
(笑い)
16:56
But the implications
薬の代わりに光で
16:58
of being able to control seizures or epilepsy
発作やてんかんを抑え
17:00
with light instead of drugs,
また治療ターゲットを
17:03
and being able to target those specifically
同定するという狙いが
17:05
is a first step.
まず第一ですね
17:08
The second thing that I think I heard you say
第二に 脳を二つの色でコントロールできるように
17:10
is you can now control the brain in two colors,
なったとおっしゃっていたと思います
17:12
like an on/off switch.
スイッチのオンオフのように
17:15
Ed Boyden: That's right.
エド・ボイデン: その通りです
17:17
JE: Which makes every impulse going through the brain a binary code.
JE: 脳内の全ての信号を二進数に置き換えられると
17:19
EB: Right, yeah.
EB: そうですね
17:22
So with blue light, we can drive information, and it's in the form of a one.
青い光では 1 として情報を促進させられます
17:24
And by turning things off, it's more or less a zero.
光を弱めると大体 0 になります
17:27
So our hope is to eventually build brain coprocessors
障害者の機能を増強するために
17:29
that work with the brain
我々は最終的に脳と作動する
17:31
so we can augment functions in people with disabilities.
コプロセッサを作りたいと考えています
17:33
JE: And in theory, that means that,
JE: つまり理論的には
17:36
as a mouse feels, smells,
マウスが感じ 匂いをかぎ
17:38
hears, touches,
聞き 触れるのを
17:40
you can model it out as a string of ones and zeros.
1 と 0 の文字列でモデル化できるということですか?
17:42
EB: Sure, yeah. We're hoping to use this as a way of testing
EB: そうです 我々はこの技術を
17:45
what neural codes can drive certain behaviors
どの神経信号が特定の行動
17:47
and certain thoughts and certain feelings,
考え 感情へと導くかの評価に用い
17:49
and use that to understand more about the brain.
脳の解明に役立てたいと思います
17:51
JE: Does that mean that some day you could download memories
JE: ではいつか記憶のダウンロードやアップロードが
17:54
and maybe upload them?
できるようになるということですか?
17:57
EB: Well that's something we're starting to work on very hard.
EB: ええ 我々はそれにも頑張って取り組み始めています
17:59
We're now working on some work
我々は現在 情報を外部記録し
18:01
where we're trying to tile the brain with recording elements too.
また取り入れられるように
18:03
So we can record information and then drive information back in --
記録素子を脳に敷き詰めようという研究も進めています
18:05
sort of computing what the brain needs
脳の情報処理を増強するのに必要なものを
18:08
in order to augment its information processing.
計算しているといったところです
18:10
JE: Well, that might change a couple things. Thank you. (EB: Thank you.)
JE: それは色々変化をもたらすかもしれませんね ありがとうございました
18:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:15
Translated by Keiichi Kudo
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Ed Boyden - Neuroengineer
Ed Boyden is a professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at the MIT Media Lab and the MIT McGovern Institute.

Why you should listen

Ed Boyden leads the Synthetic Neurobiology Group, which develops tools for analyzing and repairing complex biological systems such as the brain. His group applies these tools in a systematic way in order to reveal ground truth scientific understandings of biological systems, which in turn reveal radical new approaches for curing diseases and repairing disabilities. These technologies include expansion microscopy, which enables complex biological systems to be imaged with nanoscale precision, and optogenetic tools, which enable the activation and silencing of neural activity with light (TED Talk: A light switch for neurons). Boyden also co-directs the MIT Center for Neurobiological Engineering, which aims to develop new tools to accelerate neuroscience progress.

Amongst other recognitions, Boyden has received the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences (2016), the BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award (2015), the Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences (2015), the Jacob Heskel Gabbay Award (2013), the Grete Lundbeck Brain Prize (2013) and the NIH Director's Pioneer Award (2013). He was also named to the World Economic Forum Young Scientist list (2013) and the Technology Review World's "Top 35 Innovators under Age 35" list (2006). His group has hosted hundreds of visitors to learn how to use new biotechnologies and spun out several companies to bring inventions out of his lab and into the world. Boyden received his Ph.D. in neurosciences from Stanford University as a Hertz Fellow, where he discovered that the molecular mechanisms used to store a memory are determined by the content to be learned. Before that, he received three degrees in electrical engineering, computer science and physics from MIT. He has contributed to over 300 peer-reviewed papers, current or pending patents and articles, and he has given over 300 invited talks on his group's work.

More profile about the speaker
Ed Boyden | Speaker | TED.com