17:52
TED2012

James Hansen: Why I must speak out about climate change

ジェームス・ハンセン「なぜ気候変動について叫ばなければならなかったか」

Filmed:

気候科学の第一人者のジェームス・ハンセンが彼自身がどのように地球温暖化の科学や議論に関わってきた話をします。この話のなかで温暖化が起こっている膨大な証拠を見せ、なぜこの証拠から彼が将来を非常に危惧しているのかを示します。

- Climatologist
James Hansen has made key insights into our global climate -- and inspired a generation of activists and scientists. Full bio

What do I know
私はホワイトハウスの前で
00:15
that would cause me,
抗議して逮捕されました
00:17
a reticent, Midwestern scientist,
中西部出身で 控え目な科学者の私が
00:19
to get myself arrested
こうせざるを得ないような
00:21
in front of the White House protesting?
何を知っていたのでしょうか?
00:24
And what would you do
では もしみなさんが私と同じことを
00:27
if you knew what I know?
知っていたらどうしたでしょうか?
00:29
Let's start with how I got to this point.
まずは私がどんな経緯でそんなことをすることになったのかをお話しします
00:31
I was lucky to grow up
恵まれたことに 私が育った時代は
00:35
at a time when it was not difficult
借地で農業を営んでいる家の子供でも
00:37
for the child of a tenant farmer
州立大学に通うのが
00:40
to make his way to the state university.
難しくない時代でした
00:42
And I was really lucky
幸運にも
00:44
to go to the University of Iowa
アイオワ州立大学に通うと
00:47
where I could study under Professor James Van Allen
ジェームズ・ヴァン・アレン教授のもとで勉強できました
00:49
who built instruments
アメリカ最初の衛星の
00:52
for the first U.S. satellites.
装置を作った人物です
00:54
Professor Van Allen told me
ヴァン・アレン教授は 火星では
00:56
about observations of Venus,
強力なマイクロ波が放出されていると
00:59
that there was intense microwave radiation.
教えてくれました
01:02
Did it mean that Venus had an ionosphere?
この放出が意味するのは火星が電離圏で包まれているのか?
01:04
Or was Venus extremely hot?
それとも非常に熱い星なのか?
01:07
The right answer,
この疑問の答えは
01:09
confirmed by the Soviet Venera spacecraft,
ソビエト連邦のベネラ宇宙船に確認されて
01:11
was that Venus was very hot --
火星が非常に熱い星と分かりました
01:16
900 degrees Fahrenheit.
華氏900度という高温です
01:19
And it was kept hot
火星が高温を維持しているのは
01:21
by a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere.
厚い二酸化炭素で覆われた大気層によるものです
01:23
I was fortunate to join NASA
恵まれたことに 私は
01:26
and successfully propose
NASA 職員になり火星への
01:28
an experiment to fly to Venus.
試験探査の提案に成功しました
01:30
Our instrument took this image
探査船の装置がこの画像を撮って
01:32
of the veil of Venus,
火星のベールをとり
01:35
which turned out to be
火星は硫酸の霧で
01:37
a smog of sulfuric acid.
包まれていることが分かりました
01:39
But while our instrument was being built,
この装置の組み立てを待つ間に
01:42
I became involved in calculations
私はこの地球の
01:45
of the greenhouse effect
温室効果の算出にも
01:47
here on Earth,
関わるようになりました
01:49
because we realized
NASA は地球の大気の構成が
01:51
that our atmospheric composition was changing.
変化していることに気が付いたからです
01:53
Eventually, I resigned
結果として 私は
01:56
as principal investigator
火星試験探査の主任研究員の
01:58
on our Venus experiment
職を退きました
02:00
because a planet changing before our eyes
目の前で変わっていく惑星の方に
02:02
is more interesting and important.
より関心があり 重要だからです
02:05
Its changes will affect all of humanity.
地球の様々な変化は人類全体に影響するものです
02:07
The greenhouse effect had been well understood
温室効果は1世紀以上にもわたり
02:10
for more than a century.
十分に理解されています
02:12
British physicist John Tyndall,
1850年代に
02:14
in the 1850's,
英国の物理学者ジョン・チンダルは
02:16
made laboratory measurements
研究室内で赤外線放射を
02:18
of the infrared radiation,
測定する方法を確立しました
02:20
which is heat.
赤外線放射は熱を意味します
02:22
And he showed that gasses such as CO2 absorb heat,
彼は二酸化炭素のような気体が熱を吸収することを示し
02:24
thus acting like a blanket
この吸収が地球の表面を温める布団のように
02:27
warming Earth's surface.
作用していると示しました
02:30
I worked with other scientists
私は他の科学者とも共同研究して
02:32
to analyze Earth climate observations.
地球気候変動の観察結果を分析しました
02:34
In 1981,
そして1981年には
02:38
we published an article in Science magazine
サイエンス誌に研究論文を発表しました
02:40
concluding that observed warming
その結論は 過去1世紀で
02:43
of 0.4 degrees Celsius
気温が摂氏 0.4 度上昇した
02:45
in the prior century
という現象が 増加した二酸化炭素量
02:47
was consistent with the greenhouse effect
が起こすと想定される温室効果の
02:49
of increasing CO2.
計算値と一致するという結論でした
02:51
That Earth would likely warm in the 1980's,
結論では地球は1980年代に恐らく気温上昇を迎えて
02:53
and warming would exceed
20世紀末には この気温上昇が
02:56
the noise level of random weather
天気の変動が確率的誤差を
02:58
by the end of the century.
超えるだろうとしていました
03:00
We also said that the 21st century
これに加えて 私たちの論文は 21世紀には
03:02
would see shifting climate zones,
気候帯の変動が発生し
03:05
creation of drought-prone regions
北米やアジアでは干ばつが―
03:07
in North America and Asia,
頻発する地域ができて
03:09
erosion of ice sheets, rising sea levels
氷床が浸食されて 海水面が上昇して
03:11
and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage.
皆が挑戦した伝説の"北西航路"が開けると伝えていました
03:14
All of these impacts
論文で報告した影響は全て
03:17
have since either happened
もうすでに現実になったか
03:19
or are now well under way.
もしくは進行中です
03:21
That paper was reported on the front page of the New York Times
この論文はニューヨークタイムズに1面で取り上げられました そして―
03:23
and led to me testifying to Congress
1980年代に 環境の状況について
03:27
in the 1980's,
議会で証言することになりました
03:29
testimony in which I emphasized
証言では 私は地球温暖化によって
03:31
that global warming increases both extremes
地球の水分が循環するときの両極の現象の激しさを
03:34
of the Earth's water cycle.
よりに顕著にすると伝えました
03:37
Heatwaves and droughts on one hand,
一方では気温上昇の直接的影響で
03:40
directly from the warming,
熱波と干ばつが発生し 他方では
03:42
but also, because a warmer atmosphere
より高い温度の大気が
03:44
holds more water vapor
水蒸気を蓄積して
03:46
with its latent energy,
より強い潜在エネルギーを持つため
03:48
rainfall will become
降雨がより強烈な
03:50
in more extreme events.
ものになると伝えました
03:52
There will be stronger storms and greater flooding.
より強力な嵐が起こり より深刻な洪水を引き起こします
03:54
Global warming hoopla
地球温暖化の騒動は 私の時間を
03:57
became time-consuming
非常に多く取るものになって
04:00
and distracted me from doing science --
科学に費やす時間を減らされました
04:02
partly because I had complained
私の証言を変えてしまった
04:04
that the White House altered my testimony.
ホワイトハウスに抗議した為でもありました
04:06
So I decided to go back
このため 私自身は科学に専念して
04:09
to strictly doing science
他の人たちに
04:11
and leave the communication to others.
社会へ報告していく活動を任せようと決めました
04:13
By 15 years later,
それから15年たった頃
04:17
evidence of global warming was much stronger.
地球温暖化の証拠はより強力なものとなりました
04:20
Most of the things mentioned in our 1981 paper
1981年の論文で私たちが指摘した多くの点は
04:23
were facts.
事実となっていました
04:26
I had the privilege to speak twice
私は 大統領直轄の気候変動タスクフォースに対して
04:28
to the president's climate task force.
2回ほど話す機会に恵まれました
04:31
But energy policies continued to focus
しかし エネルギー政策は化石燃料資源を
04:33
on finding more fossil fuels.
発見することに力を注ぎ続けました
04:36
By then we had two grandchildren,
その頃には 私には2人の孫ができました
04:39
Sophie and Connor.
ソフィーとコナーという孫です
04:42
I decided
将来この孫たちに「祖父は地球に
04:44
that I did not want them in the future
起こっていることが分かってたのに
04:46
to say, "Opa understood what was happening,
みんなにきちんと伝えなかった」
04:48
but he didn't make it clear."
と言われないように決断しました
04:50
So I decided to give a public talk
そして エネルギー政策による適切な対応ができていないと
04:52
criticizing the lack of an appropriate energy policy.
公の場で批判し主張していくことに決めました
04:55
I gave the talk at the University of Iowa in 2004
2004年にアイオワ州立大学と
04:58
and at the 2005 meeting
2005年の米国地球物理学連合で
05:01
of the American Geophysical Union.
講演しました
05:04
This led to calls
このためホワイトハウスは
05:07
from the White House to NASA headquarters
私がNASA本部の事前承認を得ずに
05:09
and I was told that I could not give any talks or speak with the media
講演したりメディアと話すことを
05:11
without prior explicit approval
禁止させるように
05:14
by NASA headquarters.
NASA 本部に要求してきました
05:17
After I informed the New York Times
これらの禁止事項をニューヨークタイムズに
05:20
about these restrictions,
知らせると
05:22
NASA was forced to end the censorship.
NASA はこの検閲を終了する状況に追い込まれました
05:24
But there were consequences.
しかし それ以外の影響もありました
05:27
I had been using the first line
私はNASA のミッションステートメントの
05:29
of the NASA mission statement,
最初の1文を発表に入れるようにしてました
05:31
"To understand and protect the home planet,"
「私たちの母なる惑星を理解し守るため」という1文で
05:33
to justify my talks.
私の講演に正当性を加えてました
05:36
Soon the first line of the mission statement
すぐに このミッションステートメントは
05:38
was deleted, never to appear again.
削除されて 二度と使われることはありませんでした
05:40
Over the next few years
その後数年で
05:44
I was drawn more and more
私はますます エネルギー政策を
05:46
into trying to communicate the urgency
変更する緊急性を伝えることに
05:48
of a change in energy policies,
引きこまれるようになりました
05:51
while still researching the physics of climate change.
同時に気候変動の物理的側面を研究していました
05:54
Let me describe the most important conclusion from the physics --
物理面から得られた最も重要な結論をお話しします
05:57
first, from Earth's energy balance
まずは 地球のエネルギーの均衡について
06:00
and, second, from Earth's climate history.
次に 地球の気候変動の歴史についてお話しします
06:03
Adding CO2 to the air
二酸化炭素を大気に加えるのは
06:07
is like throwing another blanket on the bed.
ベッドにもう一枚布団をかけるようなものです
06:09
It reduces Earth's heat radiation to space,
この状態では 地球の熱が宇宙に放射される量が縮小します
06:12
so there's a temporary energy imbalance.
この状態は エネルギーが均衡しなくなった状態です
06:15
More energy is coming in
入ってくるエネルギーの方が多くて
06:18
than going out,
放射が追いついていません
06:20
until Earth warms up enough
これは地球が十分に高温になって
06:22
to again radiate to space
太陽からのエネルギー吸収量と
06:24
as much energy as it absorbs from the Sun.
同じ量を放出するようになるまで続きます
06:26
So the key quantity
つまり 鍵となっている数量は
06:28
is Earth's energy imbalance.
地球のエネルギー不均衡の量ということです
06:30
Is there more energy coming in
放出されるよりも多いエネルギーが
06:33
than going out?
入ってきているのか?
06:35
If so, more warming is in the pipeline.
もしそうなら 今後気温上昇するものが蓄積されています
06:37
It will occur without adding any more greenhouse gasses.
温室効果ガスを一切追加しなくてもその状態になる ということです
06:40
Now finally,
不均衡について最後の点です
06:44
we can measure Earth's energy imbalance precisely
私たちは地球のエネルギー不均衡を正確に測ることができます
06:46
by measuring the heat content
地球の熱を貯蔵する箇所の
06:50
in Earth's heat reservoirs.
熱含有量を測ることによって分かります
06:52
The biggest reservoir, the ocean, was the least well measured,
最も巨大な貯蔵池 つまり海は計測されてませんでした
06:55
until more than 3,000 Argo floats
3000機のアルゴフロートを世界の海に
06:58
were distributed around the world's ocean.
配置してから計測され始めました
07:01
These floats reveal
このフロート計測から分かったのは
07:04
that the upper half of the ocean
海の浅い上部では
07:06
is gaining heat at a substantial rate.
非常に高い率で温度が上昇していました
07:08
The deep ocean is also gaining heat at a smaller rate,
深海部では上部よりは緩やかに上昇していました
07:11
and energy is going
そして エネルギーは合わさって
07:14
into the net melting of ice all around the planet.
この惑星のあちこちの氷を溶かす量となっていました
07:16
And the land, to depths of tens of meters,
陸でも 数十メートルの地下の
07:19
is also warming.
温度が上昇しています
07:22
The total energy imbalance now
この不均衡を総計すると
07:24
is about six-tenths of a watt per square meter.
1平米あたり 10 分の6ワットになります
07:27
That may not sound like much,
それほど多く聞こえないかもしれませんが
07:31
but when added up over the whole world, it's enormous.
全世界分となると おびただしい電力量になります
07:33
It's about 20 times greater
これは全人類が利用している電力量
07:36
than the rate of energy use by all of humanity.
よりも20倍も大きいものなのです
07:39
It's equivalent to exploding
これは1日あたり40万個の
07:42
400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs per day
広島型原子爆弾を爆発させたエネルギー量に相当します
07:44
365 days per year.
1年では365日分になります
07:50
That's how much extra energy
これだけのエネルギー量を
07:53
Earth is gaining each day.
地球は毎日蓄積しているのです
07:55
This imbalance,
もし 気候を安定させるとしたら
07:57
if we want to stabilize climate,
現在の不均衡の状態は 二酸化炭素濃度が
07:59
means that we must reduce CO2
391 ppm から350 ppm へと
08:02
from 391 ppm, parts per million,
減らされなければならないことを
08:04
back to 350 ppm.
意味しています
08:07
That is the change needed to restore energy balance
これはエネルギーの均衡を取り戻し 将来の気温上昇を
08:10
and prevent further warming.
防ぐために必要な変化です
08:13
Climate change deniers argue
気候変動否定派は
08:15
that the Sun is the main cause of climate change.
太陽が気候変動の主な要因だと主張します
08:18
But the measured energy imbalance occurred
しかし 測定されたエネルギーの不均衡は
08:21
during the deepest solar minimum in the record,
太陽光が最も極少だった時のものでした
08:24
when the Sun's energy reaching Earth was least.
つまり地球に到達する太陽エネルギーが最も少なかった時です
08:28
Yet, there was more energy coming in than going out.
それでも 入ってくるエネルギーよりも放射される方が多いのです
08:32
This shows that the effect of the Sun's variations on climate
これが示すのは気候に対して太陽の変動が及ぼした影響よりも
08:35
is overwhelmed by the increasing greenhouse gasses,
化石燃料を燃やして増加した温室効果ガスの上昇による―
08:38
mainly from burning fossil fuels.
影響が大幅に上回るということです
08:41
Now consider Earth's climate history.
地球の気候変動の歴史を考えてみましょう
08:44
These curves for global temperature,
この表は 地球全体の温度曲線と
08:47
atmospheric CO2 and sea level
大気中二酸化炭素濃度曲線と海面曲線で
08:49
were derived from ocean cores and Antarctic ice cores,
海や南極圏の氷のボーリングサンプルと
08:52
from ocean sediments and snowflakes
海の堆積物や雪片から割り出しました
08:55
that piled up year after year
これらはこれまで80万年かけて序々に積み重なって
08:57
over 800,000 years
2マイルの厚さの氷床を
09:00
forming a two-mile thick ice sheet.
地球に形成しました
09:02
As you see, there's a high correlation
見て分かるように 温度と二酸化炭素と海面に
09:04
between temperature, CO2 and sea level.
高い相関性があります
09:07
Careful examination shows
詳しく見ると
09:10
that the temperature changes
温度の変動が起こった時は
09:12
slightly lead the CO2 changes
必ず数世紀遅れで
09:14
by a few centuries.
二酸化炭素の変動が起こっています
09:16
Climate change deniers like to use this fact
気候変動否定派はこの事実を使って
09:19
to confuse and trick the public
大衆を混乱させ誤って導こうとします
09:22
by saying, "Look, the temperature causes CO2 to change,
「見てください 温度変動が二酸化炭素変動を起こしました
09:25
not vice versa."
逆ではありません」と言うでしょう
09:28
But that lag
しかしこの遅れは
09:30
is exactly what is expected.
私たちが予測している結果と完全に一致するものです
09:32
Small changes in Earth's orbit
地球公転軌道の小さな変化が
09:35
that occur over tens to hundreds of thousands of years
100万年もの年月の間に起こり 地球上に降り注ぐ―
09:38
alter the distribution
太陽光の当たる面積を
09:41
of sunlight on Earth.
変えたのです
09:43
When there is more sunlight
高い緯度になった地域では
09:45
at high latitudes in summer, ice sheets melt.
夏には太陽光がより多く当たり 氷床が解けるのです
09:47
Shrinking ice sheets
縮小していく氷床が
09:50
make the planet darker,
この惑星を暗くしたことで
09:52
so it absorbs more sunlight
地球はより多くの太陽光を吸収し
09:54
and becomes warmer.
温度が上昇しました
09:56
A warmer ocean releases CO2,
温度がより高くなった海は
09:58
just as a warm Coca-Cola does.
コカコーラのように二酸化炭素を放出しました
10:00
And more CO2 causes more warming.
さらに増加した二酸化炭素が温度をより上昇させました
10:03
So CO2, methane, and ice sheets
気候変動は非常に弱い力によって
10:06
were feedbacks
始まったにもかかわらず
10:09
that amplified global temperature change
二酸化炭素 メタン 氷床の反応には
10:11
causing these ancient climate oscillations to be huge,
地球の温度変化を増幅して再度取り込む作用があり
10:14
even though the climate change was initiated
古代の数ある気候変動の
10:17
by a very weak forcing.
振幅を大きくしたのです
10:20
The important point
ここで重要な点は
10:22
is that these same amplifying feedbacks
この拡大して再度取り込む
10:24
will occur today.
増幅作用は現代でも発生するのです
10:26
The physics does not change.
物理法則は変わりませんから
10:28
As Earth warms,
地球の温度上昇が起こると
10:30
now because of extra CO2 we put in the atmosphere,
私たちが大気に放出する過剰部分の二酸化炭素が原因となって
10:32
ice will melt,
永久凍土や海を温めることで
10:35
and CO2 and methane will be released
氷が解けて
10:37
by warming ocean and melting permafrost.
二酸化炭素やメタンが放出されるのです
10:39
While we can't say exactly how fast
この取り込んで増幅される状況がどれほど早く起こり始めるのか
10:42
these amplifying feedbacks will occur,
私たちは正確には分からないですが
10:45
it is certain they will occur,
温暖化を止めない限り 確実に
10:48
unless we stop the warming.
この増幅される状況が起こります
10:51
There is evidence
この増幅が
10:53
that feedbacks are already beginning.
既に始まっているという証拠があります
10:55
Precise measurements
GRACE観測衛星が測定した
10:58
by GRACE, the gravity satellite,
精密な測定結果によれば
11:00
reveal that both Greenland and Antarctica
グリーンランドと南極は両方とも多量に
11:02
are now losing mass,
氷を失っていて
11:05
several hundred cubic kilometers per year.
700キロ立方メートルが毎年失われています
11:07
And the rate has accelerated
9年前に観測が始まって以来
11:10
since the measurements began
これまでずっと
11:12
nine years ago.
喪失率は加速しています
11:14
Methane is also beginning
メタンも同じように
11:16
to escape from the permafrost.
永久凍土から放出され始めています
11:18
What sea level rise
どの程度の海面上昇が
11:21
can we look forward to?
おこるのでしょうか?
11:23
The last time CO2 was 390 ppm,
前回二酸化炭素が390ppm だったときには
11:25
today's value,
現在の海面と比較して
11:28
sea level was higher
海面は15 メーター(50 フィート)
11:30
by at least 15 meters, 50 feet.
高い位置でした
11:32
Where you are sitting now
今みなさんが座っているところは
11:35
would be under water.
水没してしまっているでしょう
11:37
Most estimates are that, this century,
多くの予測では 今世紀中には海面が最低でも―
11:39
we will get at least one meter.
1メートル上昇すると言っています
11:42
I think it will be more
私はもっと上昇すると考えます
11:44
if we keep burning fossil fuels,
このまま化石燃料を燃やし続けると
11:46
perhaps even five meters, which is 18 feet,
今世紀 もしくはその少し未来には おそらく
11:48
this century or shortly thereafter.
5メートル(18フィート)も上昇するでしょう
11:51
The important point
ここで重要な点は
11:54
is that we will have started a process
このままでは近いうちに人類が制御できないような―
11:56
that is out of humanity's control.
増幅プロセスが始まってしまうということです
11:59
Ice sheets would continue to disintegrate for centuries.
氷床は数世紀に渡って解け続けるでしょうし
12:02
There would be no stable shoreline.
海岸線はもう定まらなくなります
12:05
The economic consequences are almost unthinkable.
経済的な影響は考えても考え切れないほどです
12:07
Hundreds of New Orleans-like devastations
ニューオーリンズで起こったような荒廃が
12:10
around the world.
世界中の何百もの箇所で起こります
12:14
What may be more reprehensible,
気候変動を否定し続ければ
12:16
if climate denial continues,
多くの種が絶滅していくような
12:18
is extermination of species.
もっと非難される出来事が起こります
12:20
The monarch butterfly
気候変動に関する政府間パネルは
12:22
could be one of the 20 to 50 percent of all species
このまま化石燃料を使い続ければ 今世紀末までに
12:24
that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimates
全生命種のうち20から50パーセントが
12:29
will be ticketed for extinction
絶滅すると予測しています
12:32
by the end of the century
オオカバマダラ蝶は
12:34
if we stay on business-as-usual fossil fuel use.
この絶滅種の種のひとつになるでしょう
12:36
Global warming is already affecting people.
地球温暖化は既に人々にも影響を及ぼしています
12:40
The Texas, Oklahoma, Mexico
テキサス オクラホマ メキシコなどで―
12:43
heatwave and drought last year,
去年発生した熱波や干ばつがあります
12:45
Moscow the year before
その前年にはモスクワで
12:48
and Europe in 2003,
2003年にはヨーロッパで―
12:50
were all exceptional events,
起こった全ての例外的な異常は
12:52
more than three standard deviations outside the norm.
通常の天候から3シグマもかけ離れたものです
12:55
Fifty years ago,
50年前に
12:59
such anomalies
このような異常気象は
13:01
covered only two- to three-tenths
陸面積の0.2か0.3パーセントほどの
13:03
of one percent of the land area.
割合しか占めていませんでした
13:05
In recent years,
最近の異常は
13:07
because of global warming,
地球温暖化のせいで
13:09
they now cover about 10 percent --
異常気象が10パーセントを占め
13:11
an increase by a factor of 25 to 50.
この変化は25から50倍の増加です
13:13
So we can say with a high degree of confidence
このことから 私たちはかなりの信頼度を持って
13:16
that the severe Texas and Moscow heatwaves
テキサスやモスクワの熱波は
13:19
were not natural;
通常のものでないと言えます
13:21
they were caused by global warming.
そうです 地球温暖化が引き起こしたものです
13:23
An important impact,
重大な影響としては
13:26
if global warming continues,
地球温暖化が続けば
13:28
will be on the breadbasket of our nation and the world,
この国そして世界の穀倉地帯に影響が出ます
13:30
the Midwest and Great Plains,
アメリカ中西部や大草原地帯の穀倉地帯が
13:33
which are expected to become prone to extreme droughts,
かなり厳しい干ばつの多発地帯となってしまい 1930年代の―
13:35
worse than the Dust Bowl,
ダストボール砂塵嵐の比ではありません
13:38
within just a few decades,
このまま地球温暖化を続ければ
13:40
if we let global warming continue.
たったの 20から30年でそうなってしまいます
13:42
How did I get dragged deeper and deeper
私が過去30年間で溜めてきた休暇を
13:46
into an attempt to communicate,
全て使い尽くしながら
13:49
giving talks in 10 countries, getting arrested,
10ヶ国で講演をし 逮捕されてまで
13:51
burning up the vacation time
どんどんどんどん引きこまれながら
13:54
that I had accumulated over 30 years?
この危機を伝えようとするようになったのでしょうか?
13:56
More grandchildren helped me along.
孫がもっと多くの力をくれて助けてくれました
14:00
Jake is a super-positive,
孫のジェイクは非常に
14:03
enthusiastic boy.
積極的で熱意にあふれた子です
14:05
Here at age two and a half years,
2才半にして この子は
14:08
he thinks he can protect
彼の2才と少しの妹を
14:10
his two and a half-day-old little sister.
守ることができると考えています
14:12
It would be immoral
こんな若い子たちに
14:15
to leave these young people
制御がきかなくなってしまった
14:17
with a climate system
地球の天候システムを
14:19
spiraling out of control.
残したら不道徳です
14:21
Now the tragedy about climate change
気候変動の悲劇的なことは 私たちが
14:23
is that we can solve it
単純で誠実な方法で
14:26
with a simple, honest approach
この問題を解決できることだからです
14:28
of a gradually rising carbon fee
それは化石燃料を使用する企業に対して炭素費を課し
14:30
collected from fossil fuel companies
その額を段階的に引き挙げて
14:33
and distributed 100 percent electronically
集めたお金を 合法的な居住者の人数で割って
14:35
every month to all legal residents
その居住者に電子送金で
14:39
on a per capita basis,
毎月振り込むようにするのです
14:41
with the government not keeping one dime.
また政府には1円も流れないようにします
14:43
Most people would get more in the monthly dividend
ほとんどの人は 価格転嫁の上昇分を支払う額よりも
14:47
than they'd pay in increased prices.
多い配当金額を受け取るでしょう
14:50
This fee and dividend
この費用と配当金によって
14:52
would stimulate the economy
経済と技術革新が
14:54
and innovations,
促進されて 何百万人もの
14:56
creating millions of jobs.
雇用を生むでしょう
14:58
It is the principal requirement
これは 私たちが迅速に
15:00
for moving us rapidly
クリーンエネルギーを使う将来へ向かうために
15:02
to a clean energy future.
欠かすことができない要件です
15:05
Several top economists
何人かの一流の経済学者も
15:07
are coauthors on this proposition.
この提案を一緒に書いてくれました
15:09
Jim DiPeso of Republicans for Environmental Protection
米国共和党系環境保護組織のジム・ディペソは
15:12
describes it thusly:
こう書いています
15:15
"Transparent. Market-based.
「透明性があり市場原則に基づいている
15:17
Does not enlarge government.
大きな政府に導くものではないし
15:19
Leaves energy decisions to individual choices.
エネルギー政策を個人個人の選択にゆだねられる
15:21
Sounds like a conservative climate plan."
実現可能性のある保守的な気候変動への計画のようだ」
15:24
But instead of placing a rising fee on carbon emissions
しかし現実には 上昇する炭素費を課すことで 化石燃料そのものに
15:28
to make fossil fuels pay
社会的な真のコストを負担するように
15:32
their true cost to society,
払わせるような仕組にするのではなく
15:35
our governments are forcing the public
私たちの各国政府は大衆に
15:37
to subsidize fossil fuels
化石燃料を助成することを強いていて
15:40
by 400 to 500 billion dollars
毎年世界中で4000から5000億ドルを
15:43
per year worldwide,
投じています
15:46
thus encouraging extraction of every fossil fuel --
これが利用可能な全ての化石燃料の抽出を促進しています
15:48
mountaintop removal,
山頂の採掘に始まり
15:51
longwall mining, fracking,
長壁式採掘 水圧破砕
15:53
tar sands, tar shale,
タールサンド シェール油
15:55
deep ocean Arctic drilling.
北海深海油田などの抽出を推進しています
15:57
This path, if continued,
現在の方向性を続けてしまうと
16:00
guarantees that we will pass tipping points
私たちは 加速的に崩壊が始まる閾値を超えてしまい
16:02
leading to ice sheet disintegration
氷床が溶解して
16:05
that will accelerate out of control of future generations.
将来の世代が制御できない状態にしてしまうことを確実に引き起こします
16:07
A large fraction of species
生命種の多くの部分が
16:11
will be committed to extinction.
絶滅にひんすることになります
16:13
And increasing intensity of droughts and floods
干ばつや洪水がより激しさを増して
16:15
will severely impact breadbaskets of the world,
世界の食糧供給に重大な影響を及ぼすことで
16:17
causing massive famines
大規模な飢餓や
16:20
and economic decline.
経済的な減速を引き起こします
16:22
Imagine a giant asteroid
地球に激突する方向へ
16:26
on a direct collision course with Earth.
巨大な隕石が迫ってくることを想像してください
16:29
That is the equivalent
私たちが現在直面しているのは
16:33
of what we face now.
まったくこれと同じことなのです
16:35
Yet, we dither,
しかし 私たちはためらっていて
16:37
taking no action
隕石を避ける為の
16:39
to divert the asteroid,
行動を何もおこしていません
16:41
even though the longer we wait,
待てば待つほど
16:43
the more difficult and expensive it becomes.
回避するのは困難になり 支払う代償が大きくなります
16:45
If we had started in 2005,
もし2005年にはじめていれば
16:49
it would have required emission reductions of three percent per year
地球全体のエネルギー均衡を取り戻し
16:51
to restore planetary energy balance
今世紀の気候変動を安定させるのに
16:54
and stabilize climate this century.
毎年3パーセントの排出削減のみですんでいました
16:57
If we start next year,
もし来年始めれば
17:00
it is six percent per year.
毎年6パーセントの排出削減です
17:02
If we wait 10 years, it is 15 percent per year --
もし10年後に始めたら 毎年15パーセントの排出削減が必要で
17:04
extremely difficult and expensive,
これは極めて困難で高い代償で
17:07
perhaps impossible.
おそらくは実現不可能でしょう
17:09
But we aren't even starting.
しかし 私たちは始めようともしていません
17:12
So now you know what I know
さぁ 皆さんは私を警鐘を鳴らすように駆り立てた
17:14
that is moving me to sound this alarm.
私の知っていることを知りました
17:17
Clearly, I haven't gotten this message across.
明らかに これまではこのことを理解してもらえていません
17:20
The science is clear.
科学は明らかに教えてくれています
17:23
I need your help
私を助けてください
17:26
to communicate the gravity and the urgency
より効率的に この解決策を見つけ出し
17:28
of this situation
より効率的に 現在のこの状況が
17:30
and its solutions
重大な意味をもった緊急な課題だと
17:32
more effectively.
伝える手助けをしてください
17:34
We owe it to our children and grandchildren.
子や孫に対して果たす責任があります
17:36
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:40
Translated by Akinori Oyama
Reviewed by Yuki Nakamura

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

James Hansen - Climatologist
James Hansen has made key insights into our global climate -- and inspired a generation of activists and scientists.

Why you should listen

James Hansen is Adjunct Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University’s Earth Institute. He was trained in physics and astronomy in the space science program of James Van Allen at the University of Iowa. His early research on the clouds of Venus helped identify their composition as sulfuric acid. Since the late 1970s, he has focused his research on Earth's climate, especially human-made climate change. From 1981 to 2013, he headed the NASA Godard Institute for Space Studies. He is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hansen is known for his testimony on climate change to congressional committees in the 1980s that helped raise broad awareness of the global warming issue. Hansen is recognized for speaking truth to power, for identifying ineffectual policies as greenwash, and for outlining the actions that the public must take to protect the future of young people and the other species on the planet.

More profile about the speaker
James Hansen | Speaker | TED.com