sponsored links
TEDxDelft

Mileha Soneji: Simple hacks for life with Parkinson's

マイルハ・ソネジ: パーキンソン病患者の生活を助けるシンプルなワザ

February 27, 2015

パーキンソン病のような複雑な問題を解決するときも、シンプルな解決策が最良なものとなり得ます。このトークではマイルハ・ソネジが、パーキンソン病患者の日々の生活を少しだけ楽にしてくれるデザインを提案しています。彼女はこう主張しています。「科学技術だけが常に解決策だとは限りません。私たちに必要なのは、人間中心の解決手段なのです。」

Mileha Soneji - Product designer
Mileha Soneji believes that having empathy and being able to put yourself in another person's shoes is what makes for great design. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
In India, we have these huge families.
インド人が大家族であることを
00:12
I bet a lot of you all
must have heard about it.
皆さんは
聞いたことがあると思います
00:15
Which means that there are
a lot of family events.
つまり 親戚の集まりが
沢山あるということです
00:18
So as a child, my parents
used to drag me to these family events.
子供の頃 両親はよく
親戚の集まりに連れて行ってくれましたが
00:21
But the one thing
that I always looked forward to
いつも楽しみにしていたのは
00:26
was playing around with my cousins.
従兄妹たちと遊ぶことでした
00:29
And there was always this one uncle
従兄妹と遊ぶときはいつも
00:31
who used to be there,
そこに叔父がいました
00:34
always ready, jumping around with us,
叔父は私たちと一緒に跳び回り
00:35
having games for us,
一緒にゲームをし
00:37
making us kids have the time of our lives.
子供たちを
楽しませてくれていました
00:38
This man was extremely successful:
叔父は大成功を収めた人で
00:42
he was confident and powerful.
自信に溢れていて 力強い人でした
00:45
But then I saw this hale and hearty person
deteriorate in health.
しかしその後 この頑健で心優しい叔父は
健康を害してしまい
00:47
He was diagnosed with Parkinson's.
パーキンソン病と診断されました
00:53
Parkinson's is a disease that causes
degeneration of the nervous system,
パーキンソン病とは神経組織の
変性を引き起こす疾患で
00:56
which means that this person
who used to be independent
これまで 当然のように
自活していた彼は
01:00
suddenly finds tasks like drinking coffee,
because of tremors, much more difficult.
疾患による震えの為に突然
コーヒーを飲むことさえ 難しくなりました
01:03
My uncle started using a walker to walk,
叔父は 歩いたり方向転換をするために
01:09
and to take a turn,
歩行補助器具を使い始め
01:12
he literally had to take
one step at a time, like this,
文字通り 一歩ずつ こんな感じで
01:13
and it took forever.
長い時間をかけて歩いていました
01:17
So this person, who used to be
the center of attention
こうして 親戚の集まりでは
01:20
in every family gathering,
いつも中心的存在だった叔父は
01:23
was suddenly hiding behind people.
突然 人目を避けるようになりました
01:25
He was hiding from the pitiful look
in people's eyes.
彼は周囲の憐みの視線から
身を隠していました
01:28
And he's not the only one in the world.
彼のような人は他にも沢山います
01:32
Every year, 60,000 people
are newly diagnosed with Parkinson's,
毎年6万人の人たちが
新たにパーキンソン病と診断され
01:35
and this number is only rising.
その数は増加する一方です
01:40
As designers, we dream that our designs
solve these multifaceted problems,
私たちはデザイナーとして
自分たちのデザインが多面的な課題を
01:44
one solution that solves it all,
一挙に解決できれば と願っていますが
01:49
but it need not always be like that.
そうでなくても構いません
01:52
You can also target simple problems
シンプルな課題に絞って
解決策を編み出すと
01:55
and create small solutions for them
and eventually make a big impact.
それが結果的に大きな影響を
与えることもあるんです
01:58
So my aim here was
to not cure Parkinson's,
私の目的はパーキンソン病を
治癒することではなくて
02:02
but to make their everyday tasks
much more simple,
パーキンソン病患者の大変な作業を
簡素化し 世の中に
02:06
and then make an impact.
影響を与えていくことです
02:09
Well, the first thing I targeted
was tremors, right?
まず私が着目したのは震えです
02:11
My uncle told me that he had stopped
drinking coffee or tea in public
叔父は 病気になってからは 恥ずかしくて
人前でコーヒーや紅茶を飲むことを
02:16
just out of embarrassment,
やめてしまったと言っていました
02:20
so, well, I designed the no-spill cup.
そこで私は「こぼれないコップ」を
デザインしました
02:22
It works just purely on its form.
秘密はこの形にあります
02:26
The curve on top deflects the liquid
back inside every time they have tremors,
震えがおこるたびに コップの縁のカーブが
飲み物を内側に戻す働きをするので
02:29
and this keeps the liquid inside
compared to a normal cup.
普通のコップと比べて飲み物が
外へ飛び出さなくなるのです
02:35
But the key here is that it is not tagged
as a Parkinson's patient product.
このコップはパーキンソン病患者のみを
対象としたものではなく
02:38
It looks like a cup that could be used
by you, me, any clumsy person,
私のような不器用な人を含む誰もが
使えることがポイントです
02:43
and that makes it much more comforting
for them to use, to blend in.
周りの皆が使っていれば
患者が目立たず使いやすくなります
02:48
So, well, one problem solved,
こうして課題が一つ解決されましたが
02:53
many more to go.
他にも沢山あります
02:56
All this while, I was interviewing him,
いつも叔父と話をして
02:58
questioning him,
質問しているうちに
03:00
and then I realized that I was getting
very superficial information,
私は表面的な情報か
自分の質問に対する答しか
03:02
or just answers to my questions.
得られていないことに 気づきました
03:06
But I really needed to dig deeper
to get a new perspective.
でも 新たな視点を持つ為には
より掘り下げた情報が必要でした
03:09
So I thought, well,
let's observe him in his daily tasks,
そこで私は彼の日々の行動
つまり食事やテレビを観る様子を
03:12
while he's eating, while he's watching TV.
観察してみようと思いました
03:16
And then, when I was actually
observing him walking to his dining table,
彼が食卓に歩いて 向かっている様子を
見た時 衝撃を受けました
03:19
it struck me, this man who finds it
so difficult to walk on flat land,
彼にとって平らな地面を歩くのが
とても難しいのです
03:23
how does he climb a staircase?
では 階段の昇降は?
03:28
Because in India we do not have
a fancy rail that takes you up a staircase
インドの階段には先進国のような
03:31
like in the developed countries.
手の込んだ手すりはないので
03:34
One actually has to climb the stairs.
自力で階段を
昇り降りをしなけれならない筈です
03:36
So he told me,
すると 叔父は言いました
03:39
"Well, let me show you how I do it."
「どうやっているか見せてあげよう」
03:41
Let's take a look at what I saw.
私が見たものを 皆さんもご覧下さい
03:43
So he took really long
to reach this position,
とても長い時間をかけて
ここにたどり着きました
03:48
and then all this while, I'm thinking,
その間ずっと思っていました
03:51
"Oh my God, is he really going to do it?
「なんてこと 叔父さん本気かしら
03:53
Is he really, really going to do it
without his walker?"
歩行補助器具なしで
階段を降りようとするなんて」
03:55
And then ...
そして・・・
03:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:02
And the turns, he took them so easily.
そして振り返って
いとも簡単に戻ってきました
04:08
So -- shocked?
衝撃的ですよね?
04:13
Well, I was too.
私も衝撃を受けました
04:14
So this person who could not
walk on flat land
平面をまともに歩くことが
出来ない叔父が
04:19
was suddenly a pro at climbing stairs.
階段になると
すいすい歩くのですから
04:22
On researching this, I realized that
it's because it's a continuous motion.
調べてみるとこれは「持続的運動」
によるものであると分かりました
04:25
There's this other man
who also suffers from the same symptoms
叔父以外にも 同じ症状で苦しみ
04:30
and uses a walker,
歩行器を使っていても
04:33
but the moment he's put on a cycle,
自転車に乗ると
04:34
all his symptoms vanish,
「持続的運動」になることで
04:36
because it is a continuous motion.
症状が解消される人がいるようです
04:38
So the key for me was to translate
this feeling of walking on a staircase
そこで私は階段を昇り降りする感覚を
平らな床で
04:41
back to flat land.
再現することに
重点を置きました
04:45
And a lot of ideas
were tested and tried on him,
沢山のアイデアを
叔父と共に試してみて
04:47
but the one that finally worked
was this one. Let's take a look.
やっとうまくいったのがこちらです 
ご覧下さい
04:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:00
He walked faster, right?
前より早く歩けるようになってますよね?
05:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:06
I call this the staircase illusion,
私はこれを「錯覚の階段」と呼んでいます
05:11
and actually when the staircase illusion
abruptly ended, he froze,
「錯覚の階段」が不意に終わると
彼は動けなくなって
05:13
and this is called freezing of gait.
「すくみ足」と呼ばれる状態になります
05:18
So it happens a lot,
「すくみ足」はよくあることです
05:20
so why not have a staircase illusion
flowing through all their rooms,
「錯覚の階段」を部屋中に描いて
05:21
making them feel much more confident?
彼らがより自信を持って
過ごせるようにしてはどうでしょう?
05:25
You know, technology is not always it.
科学技術だけが解決策だとは限りません
05:29
What we need are human-centered solutions.
必要なのは
「人間中心の解決手段」なのです
05:31
I could have easily
made it into a projection,
錯覚の階段を投影式や
05:34
or a Google Glass, or something like that.
Google Glassなどにするのは簡単です
05:36
But I stuck to simple print on the floor.
でも私はシンプルなプリントという手法に
こだわりました
05:39
This print could be taken into hospitals
これが病院に導入されれば
パーキンソン病患者は
05:42
to make them feel much more welcome.
より温かく迎え入れられていると
感じられるでしょう
05:45
What I wish to do
is make every Parkinson's patient
全てのパーキンソン患者に
あの日の叔父と
05:48
feel like my uncle felt that day.
同じ気持ちを 味わってもらいたいのです
05:51
He told me that I made him feel
like his old self again.
彼は 私のおかげで
昔の自分に戻ったようだと言ってくれました
05:54
"Smart" in today's world
has become synonymous to high tech,
今の時代「スマート」という単語は
先端技術と同義語になり
05:58
and the world is only getting
smarter and smarter day by day.
世の中は 日々
より「スマート」になっていますが
06:03
But why can't smart be something
that's simple and yet effective?
「スマート」を シンプルだけど
効果的なものに出来ないでしょうか?
06:07
All we need is a little bit of empathy
and some curiosity,
必要なのはほんの少しの共感の気持ちと
いくらかの好奇心を持って
06:12
to go out there, observe.
現場へ向かい観察することです
06:16
But let's not stop at that.
でもそれだけで止めないで
06:18
Let's find these complex problems.
Don't be scared of them.
入り組んだ課題を見つけ
怖がらずに向き合い
06:20
Break them, boil them down
into much smaller problems,
より小さな課題になるまで分解して
煮詰めてみて それに対し
06:24
and then find simple solutions for them.
シンプルな解決法を 見つけてください
06:27
Test these solutions, fail if needed,
そしてその解決法を試し
必要なら失敗もして
06:30
but with newer insights to make it better.
より良くする為の
新たな洞察力を駆使して下さい
06:33
Imagine what we all could do
if we all came up with simple solutions.
皆がシンプルな解決法を見出せば
何が出来るか想像してください
06:36
What would the world be like
if we combined all our simple solutions?
シンプルな皆の解決法を
結びつければ世界はどうなるでしょうか?
06:40
Let's make a smarter world,
but with simplicity.
シンプルなやり方でよりスマートな世界を
作っていきましょう
06:44
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
06:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:48
Translator:Ayako Narahara
Reviewer:Shoko Takaki

sponsored links

Mileha Soneji - Product designer
Mileha Soneji believes that having empathy and being able to put yourself in another person's shoes is what makes for great design.

Why you should listen

Mileha Soneji is a trained strategic product designer, originally hailing from the city of Pune in India. She currently works in the Netherlands as a strategist. Her work entails combining the fuzzy front-end of the design process with emerging technologies to answer the question of what needs to be designed in the future.

Even as a child, Mileha had a keen interest in (re)designing things around her, even though she had little knowledge about it as a profession. This led her to take up the Bachelor in Product Design at the MIT School of Design. After graduation, she got a couple of years of work experience in India, where she quickly realized that apart from the actual tangible design, a successful product needs a backbone of thorough research in user needs and market analysis. The need to study this further brought Mileha to Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands to study Strategic Product Design for her Masters.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.