21:56
TED2002

Chris Bangle: Great cars are great art

素晴らしい車は芸術である / クリス・バングル

Filmed:

自動車デザインはそれだけで一つの芸術の形になり得ることをアメリカ人デザイナー、クリス・バングル氏がBMWグループで未来のSUVを生み出すための「ディープブループロジェクト」の例を引きながら、愉快にそして時に感動的に説明します。

- Car designer
Car design is a ubiquitous but often overlooked art form. As chief of design for the BMW Group, Chris Bangle has overseen cars that have been seen the world over, including BMW 7 Series and the Z4 roadster. Full bio

What I want to talk about is, as background,
まずはじめにお話ししたいのは
00:26
is the idea that cars are art.
自動車が芸術であることです
00:29
This is actually quite meaningful to me,
実際これは私にとって非常に大切なんですね
00:31
because car designers tend to be a little bit low on the totem pole --
なぜならカーデザイナーは時に
付属的な職種だと思われがちなんです
00:34
we don't do coffee table books with just one lamp inside of it --
我々は車の表面のみ扱うわけではない
00:38
and cars are thought so much as a product
車というのは商品であると同時に思想でもある
00:41
that it's a little bit difficult to get into the aesthetic side
なので芸術を論ずる際に使われる言語で
00:44
under the same sort of terminology that one would discuss art.
その美的魅力について
理解するのは難しいのです
00:47
And so cars, as art, brings it into an emotional plane -- if you accept that --
また 車も芸術と同様に感情移入できるものだとするなら
芸術と同等に扱うべきでしょう
00:50
that you have to deal with on the same level you would with art with a capital A.
また 車も芸術と同様に感情移入できるものだとするなら
芸術と同等に扱うべきでしょう
00:56
Now at this point you're going to see a picture of Michelangelo.
ミケランジェロの作品を見てください
00:59
This is completely different than automobiles.
自動車と全く異なりますよね
01:02
Automobiles are self-moving things, right? Elevators are automobiles.
自動車は「自ら動く」ものです
その意味でエレベータは「自ら動く」
01:05
And they're not very emotional; they solve a purpose;
感情を揺さぶるものではなく
目的を達するものです
01:11
and certainly automobiles have been around for 100 years
自動車が生み出されてから100年ほどですが
01:14
and have made our lives functionally a lot better in many ways;
私たちの生活の多くを便利にしてきました
01:17
they've also been a real pain in the ass,
ただ 同時に頭痛のたねでもあった
01:20
because automobiles are really the thing we have to solve.
公害や渋滞など 解決すべき問題を
たくさん生み出してきましたから
01:22
We have to solve the pollution, we have to solve the congestion --
公害や渋滞など 解決すべき問題を
たくさん生み出してきましたから
01:26
but that's not what interests me in this speech.
けど今日のポイントはそれではありません
01:29
What interests me in this speech is cars. Automobiles may be what you use,
お話しするのはクルマそのもの
あなたの道具であると同時に
01:32
but cars are what we are, in many ways.
色々な意味で私たち自身とも言える自動車
01:37
And as long as we can solve the problems of automobiles,
自動車に伴う様々な困難を解決すれば
01:40
and I believe we can, with fuel cells or hydrogen, like BMW is really hip on,
BMWが取り組んでいるように
燃料電池や水素の技術などでできると思いますが
01:44
and lots of other things, then I think we can look past that
過去から見直し
01:48
and try and understand why this hook is in many of us --
どうして自動車が私たちの多くにとって魅力的であり
01:51
of this car-y-ness -- and what that means, what we can learn from it.
車が何を意味するのか 何を学べるのか
理解することができるでしょう
01:55
That's what I want to get to. Cars are not a suit of clothes;
それについて触れたいのです
車は衣類ではない
01:59
cars are an avatar. Cars are an expansion of yourself:
車はあなたの分身であり
拡張されたあなた自身であり
02:02
they take your thoughts, your ideas, your emotions, and they multiply it --
考え アイディア 感情を表現し
増幅する装置なのです
02:06
your anger, whatever. It's an avatar.
例えば怒りだったり
それこそ分身ですよね
02:10
It's a super-waldo that you happen to be inside of, and if you feel sexy,
心の内側に湧き上がるもの
あなたがセクシーさを重視すれば
02:13
the car is sexy. And if you're full of road rage,
その車はセクシーですし
渋滞にイラつくならば
02:16
you've got a "Chevy: Like a Rock," right?
ワイルドな車に乗るでしょう
02:18
Cars are a sculpture -- did you know this?
車は彫刻品であることを知っていますか?
02:21
That every car you see out there is sculpted by hand.
車は全て手作業で彫刻されています
02:24
Many people think, "Well, it's computers,
多くの人は「コンピュータでデザインして
機械で製造する」と思う
02:27
and it's done by machines and stuff like that."
多くの人は「コンピュータでデザインして
機械で製造する」と思う
02:29
Well, they reproduce it, but the originals are all done by hand.
確かに量産するのは機械ですが
オリジナルは全て手作業です
02:31
It's done by men and women who believe a lot in their craft.
自らの技能に自信を持つ職人の受け持ちです
02:34
And they put that same kind of tension into the sculpting of a car
彼らは まるで美術館に収蔵されている
02:38
that you do in a great sculpture that you would go and look at in a museum.
彫刻の傑作と同じ
絶妙な緊張感を車に与えるのです
02:42
That tension between the need to express, the need to discover,
表現する側と発見する側の緊張感があり
02:45
then you put something new into it,
そして新しい要素を付け加える
02:49
and at the same time you have bounds of craftsmanship.
そして同時に職人技の限界もあります
02:51
Rules that say, this is how you handle surfaces;
一般的に言って これが表面的な見方
02:54
this is what control is all about; this is how you show you're a master of your craft.
意図的に表現できる部分であり
優れた職人であることを示せる部分です
02:57
And that tension, that discovery, that push for something new --
そういった発見や緊張感が新しいものを生み出し
03:01
and at the same time, that sense of obligation
同時に義務感を
03:04
to the regards of craftsmanship --
制作者の誇りに変えていくのです
03:06
that's as strong in cars as it is in anything.
それは自動車においても強力な要素です
03:08
We work in clay, which hasn't changed much
ミケランジェロの時代から変わらず
03:10
since Michelangelo started screwing around with it,
車の制作においても粘土を使って作業します
03:12
and there's a very interesting analogy to that too.
こんな面白いたとえ話もありましたよね
03:15
Real quickly -- Michelangelo once said he's there to "discover the figure within," OK?
「粘土の中に形態を見つける」と
ミケランジェロは言ったとか
03:18
There we go, the automobile.
これを見てください 自動車です
03:24
That was 100 years right there -- did you catch that?
100年間の開き 感じますか?
03:26
Between that one there, and that one there, it changed a lot didn't it?
さっきのものとこれ
結構変わるものでしょう?
03:28
OK, it's not marketing; there's a very interesting car concept here,
マーケティングの分野でも
とても面白い車の要素があります
03:31
but the marketing part is not what I want to talk about here.
けれど ここでは特に触れません
03:35
I want to talk about this.
私が触れたいのは
03:37
Why it means you have to wash a car, what is it, that sensuality
どうして洗車したくなるのか
03:39
you have to touch about it? That's the sculpture that goes into it. That sensuality.
この触れたくなるような官能性は何なのか
それこそ彫刻の本質です 官能性
03:41
And it's done by men and women working just like this, making cars.
そしてそれは自動車を制作する人たちによって
形づくられているのです
03:46
Now this little quote about sculpture from Henry Moore,
ヘンリー・ムーアの彫刻に関する言ですが
03:51
I believe that that "pressure within" that Moore's talking about --
車のデザインを考える際に
03:53
at least when it comes to cars --
彼の言う「内なる力」は
03:56
comes right back to this idea of the mean.
本質的な意味を持ちうると思うのです
03:58
It's that will to live, that need to survive, to express itself,
生きる意志 生き残る必要性 表現力
04:01
that comes in a car, and takes over people like me.
それが自動車に現れて
車好きを魅了する
04:04
And we tell other people, "Do this, do this, do this," until this thing comes alive.
「ここをこうして、ああして」と
それが表現されるまで指示を出し続ける
04:06
We are completely infected. And beauty can be the result
完全に病気ですね
そしてその情熱の結果 美しくなる
04:10
of this infectiousness; it's quite wonderful.
とても素晴らしい
04:14
This sculpture is, of course, at the heart of all of it,
この彫刻はもちろん全ての中心であり
04:16
and it's really what puts the craftsmanship into our cars.
工芸的な心を自動車に吹き込むものなのです
04:19
And it's not a whole lot different, really, when they're working like this,
そんな作業は実際こういうものを
制作するのと大きく変わらないんです
04:22
or when somebody works like this.
そんな作業は実際こういうものを
制作するのと大きく変わらないんです
04:26
It's that same kind of commitment, that same kind of beauty.
同じような取り組みであり
同じような「美」なのです
04:28
Now, now I get to the point. I want to talk about cars as art.
さあ 本題ですが
芸術としての自動車についてです
04:31
Art, in the Platonic sense, is truth; it's beauty, and love.
観念的なレベルでは
芸術とは真実 美 そして愛であります
04:34
Now this is really where designers in car business diverge from the engineers.
これがカー・デザイナーと技術者の
大きな違いなのです
04:38
We don't really have a problem talking about love.
愛について語るのもいいですが
04:42
We don't have a problem talking about truth or beauty in that sense.
同じレベルで真実や美についてもお話出来ます
04:44
That's what we're searching for --
それが追い求めているものです
04:47
when we're working our craft, we are really trying to find that truth out there.
私たちは 作品を手がける際に
真実を探し当てようとしています
04:49
We're not trying to find vanity and beauty.
空虚や美しさではありません
04:52
We're trying to find the beauty in the truth.
真実の美しさを求めているのです
04:54
However, engineers tend to look at things a little bit more Newtonian,
一方 技術者は物事を科学者のように捉えます
04:56
instead of this quantum approach.
そういった定量的な側面ではなく
05:00
We're dealing with irrationalisms,
デザイナーは非合理的な側面を扱い
05:02
and we're dealing with paradoxes that we admit exist,
矛盾をありのまま受け入れようとします
05:04
and the engineers tend to look things a little bit more like
対して 技術者は 2+2は4であり
05:06
two and two is four, and if you get 4.0 it's better, and 4.000 is even better.
その4が4.0なら 更に正確
そのように考えます
05:08
And that sometimes leads to bit of a divergence
このような考え方の違いが
05:13
in why we're doing what we're doing.
些細な行き違いにつながるのです
05:17
We've pretty much accepted the fact, though,
私たちはBMW内で
女性的な役割の部門だということも認めています
05:19
that we are the women in the organization at BMW --
私たちはBMW内で
女性的な役割の部門だということも認めています
05:21
BMW is a very manly type business, -- men, men, men; it's engineers.
BMWはとても男性的な会社なんですね
技術者主導の
05:23
And we're kind of the female side to that. That's OK,
それに対し我々はどちらかというと女性的なんです
05:26
that's cool. You go off and be manly. We're going to be a little bit more female.
大変結構 あなた方は男性的でやってください
05:29
Because what we're interested in is finding form that's more than just a function.
私たちはもっと女性的になります
ただの機能だけではなく形態に興味があるのですから
05:32
We're interested in finding beauty that's more than just an aesthetic;
外見上だけでなく
「美」そのものを見いだしたいのです
05:39
it's really a truth.
真実とも言い切れる
05:42
And I think this idea of soul, as being at the heart of great cars,
そしてこの精神的な深みこそが
素晴らしい車の本質にも
05:44
is very applicable. You all know it. You know a car when you've seen it,
当てはまります ご存知でしょう
ご覧になってきた自動車は
05:47
with soul. You know how strong this is.
みな本質的な強さを持っていましたよね
05:50
Well, this experience of love, and the experience of design, to me,
まあ 私にとって
「愛の経験」と「デザインの経験」は
05:52
are interchangeable. And now I'm coming to my story.
同じようなものだと言っていい
そこで私の話です
05:56
I discovered something about love and design through a project called Deep Blue.
ディープブルーというプロジェクトを通じて
愛とデザインについて気がついたことがあります
05:59
And first of all, you have to go with me for a second, and say,
まず最初におつきあいください
06:04
you know, you could take the word "love" out of a lot of things in our society,
社会の中で様々な形で使われている
「愛」という言葉は
06:08
put the word "design" in, and it still works,
「デザイン」に置き換えることもできます
06:11
like this quote here, you know. It kind of works, you know?
たとえばこの引用と同じように
ほら 大丈夫でしょう?
06:13
You can understand that. It works in truisms.
理解できる 自明のことなんです
06:16
"All is fair in design and war."
「デザインと戦争は手段を選ばない」
06:19
Certainly we live in a competitive society.
確かにこの世界は競争社会ですね
06:21
I think this one here, there's a pop song
こんな歌もありましたね
06:23
that really describes Philippe Starck for me, you know, this is like
これはフィリップ・スタルクについて
表現しているように思えます
06:25
you know, this is like puppy love, you know, this is cool right?
まるで幼い恋物語のようです
これはいけてますよね
06:29
Toothbrush, cool.
歯ブラシ
ん 格好いい
06:32
It really only gets serious when you look at something like this. OK?
皆さんこういうものを見るときだけ真剣になりますよね
06:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:37
This is one substitution that I believe
これは私たちが責任を負うべき
06:39
all of us, in design management, are guilty of.
愛の代用品だと思うのです
06:41
And this idea that there is more to love,
愛すべきもの デザインされるべきものが
もっとある
06:43
more to design, when it gets down to your neighbor, your other,
隣人や知り合いがこんな外見である時
06:47
it can be physical like this, and maybe in the future it will be.
確かに将来そうなるかもしれませんね
06:53
But right now it's in dealing with our own people,
けど今は私たち自身を扱います
06:56
our own teams who are doing the creating. So, to my story.
私が属するクリエーティブチーム
これは私の実話です
06:58
The idea of people-work is what we work with here,
私たちが働く場合についての話ですが
07:03
and I have to make a bond with my designers when we're creating BMWs.
BMWの車を制作する際
デザイン班と心の繋がりを持たなくてはならない
07:06
We have to have a shared intimacy, a shared vision --
親しい関係を保ち 考え方を共有する
07:10
that means we have to work as one family;
家族のように働かなくてはならない
07:13
we have to understand ourselves that way.
そのように解釈するべきなのです
07:15
There's good times; there's interesting times;
良いときもあれば
面白い瞬間もある一方
07:17
and there's some stress times too.
ストレスを感じるようなときもある
07:20
You want to do cars, you've got to go outside.
車の仕事では 時に屋外に出ることもある
07:22
You've got to do cars in the rain; you've got to do cars in the snow.
雨や雪の中 仕事をしなくては
いけない時だってある
07:24
That's, by the way, is a presentation we made to our board of directors.
たとえばこれは経営陣に
プレゼンをした際のものです
07:27
We haul their butts out in the snow, too. You want to know cars outside?
雪の中に経営陣も引っ張り出しました
屋外でどう見えるかを知るには
07:30
Well, you've got to stand outside to do this.
やはり屋外に出なければならない
07:33
And because these are artists, they have very artistic temperaments.
そして彼らは芸術家だからこそ
とても芸術的な気質を持っているものなのです
07:35
All right? Now one thing about art is, art is discovery,
いいですか
さて 芸術とは発見なのです
07:40
and art is discovering yourself through your art. Right?
芸術を通じてあなた自身を発見する
わかります?
07:45
And one thing about cars is we're all a little bit like Pygmalion,
車に関して言えば我らデザイナーは
自らの理想を投影している
07:48
we are completely in love with our own creations.
そして制作物に対して恋しているのです
07:52
This is one of my favorite paintings, it really describes our relationship with cars.
これは大好きな絵なんですが
私たちの車との関係を表現しています
07:55
This is sick beyond belief.
信仰というより病気ですよね
08:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:02
But because of this, the intimacy with which we work together as a team
けれどもお陰で親密なチームが
08:04
takes on a new dimension, a new meaning.
新しい次元 新しい意味を
得ることができるのです
08:08
We have a shared center; we have a shared focus --
デザインする車が関係を仲介して
08:12
that car stays at the middle of all our relationships.
私たちは焦点や議論の軸を
共有するんです
08:15
And it's my job, in the competitive process, to narrow this down.
そして競い合う中で
焦点を絞っていくのが私の役割です
08:19
I heard today about Joseph's death genes
今日 細胞の再生を制御する
遺伝子の話を聞きました
08:24
that have to go in and kill cell reproduction.
今日 細胞の再生を制御する
遺伝子の話を聞きました
08:28
You know, that's what I have to do sometimes.
それと同じ事をする必要が
時にあるのです
08:31
We start out with 10 cars; we narrow it down to five cars,
10台から始め それを5台に絞り
08:34
down to three cars, down to two cars, down to one car,
そして3台 2台 最後に1台のデザインにする
08:37
and I'm in the middle of that killing, basically.
そして私はそのある人の
愛の対象 宝物を
08:40
Someone's love, someone's baby.
捨てて行かなくてはいけない
08:44
This is very difficult, and you have to have a bond with your team
困難ですが スタッフと
強い絆も持たなくてはいけない
08:46
that permits you to do this, because their life is wrapped up in that too.
絆があってこそ許される行為なのです
そのような世界にいるわけですから
08:49
They've got that gene infected in them as well,
彼ら自身もそんな遺伝子を持っています
08:53
and they want that to live, more than anything else.
誰よりも自分のアイディアを生かしたい
08:56
Well, this project, Deep Blue, put me in contact with my team
このディープブルー・プロジェクトは
想像もつかない形で
09:00
in a way that I never expected, and I want to pass it on to you,
チームに関わる経験を与えてくれました
それを伝えたいのです
09:03
because I want you to reflect on this, perhaps in your own relationships.
ぜひ皆さんの人間関係にも活かしてください
09:06
We wanted to a do a car which was a complete leap of faith for BMW.
私たちはBMWの本質を形にしたような車を
デザインしたかったのです
09:08
We wanted to do a team which was so removed from the way we'd done it,
そしてこれまでのやり方とは無縁の
チームを作り出したかった
09:13
that I only had a phone number that connected me to them.
私とチームを結びつけるのは電話番号だけ
09:17
So, what we did was: instead of having a staff of artists that are just your wrist,
美術スタッフを手先として使うのではなく
09:20
we decided to free up a team of creative designers and engineers
創造性豊かなデザイナーやエンジニアの
自由にさせることにしました
09:25
to find out what's the successor to the SUV phenomenon in America.
アメリカでSUVの次に流行る車を
探し当てる為でした
09:29
This is 1996 we did this project. And so we sent them off with this team name,
1996年のプロジェクトです
チームにディープブルーという名をつけ送り出しました
09:33
Deep Blue. Now many people know Deep Blue from IBM --
IBMのディープブルーは
ご存じの方も多いでしょう
09:39
we actually stole it from them because we figured
私たちの文書を盗み見ても
09:41
if anybody read our faxes they'd think we're talking about computers.
コンピュータの話と思い込むかと思い
拝借したのです
09:43
It turned out it was quite clever because Deep Blue,
実際 良い選択でした
09:46
in a company like BMW, has a hook -- "Deep Blue," wow, cool name.
社内でも「ディープ・ブルー へぇ、かっこいいな」
なんて感じでしたから。
09:48
So people get wrapped up in it. And we took a team of designers,
皆夢中になりました
デザイナーのチームを
09:52
and we sent them off to America. And we gave them a budget,
アメリカに送り込み
予算を与えました
09:55
what we thought was a set of deliverables,
予め考えていたのは成果と
09:58
a timetable, and nothing else.
予定表 それだけ
10:00
Like I said, I just had a phone number that connected me to them.
私には彼らの電話番号しか
ありませんでした
10:02
And a group of engineers worked in Germany,
そしてドイツのエンジニア班は
10:04
and the idea was they would work separately
離れて作業させることにしたのです
10:07
on this problem of what's the successor to the SUV.
SUVの後を継ぐべき車は何か
10:09
They would come together, compare notes. Then they would work apart,
アイディアを持ち寄り
メモを見比べ 持ち帰り
10:12
come together, and they would produce together
そしてまた持ち寄り
共に制作作業をする
10:15
a monumental set of diverse opinions that didn't pollute each other's ideas --
お互いのアイディアに影響されない
多様な意見が集まり
10:17
but at the same time came together and resolved the problems.
一方では課題を解決するだろう
10:21
Hopefully, really understand the customer at its heart,
できれば顧客を深く理解するために
10:24
where the customer is, live with them in America. So -- sent the team off,
顧客の住むアメリカで生活をさせたい
だから彼らを送り出しました
10:27
and actually something different happened. They went other places.
すると思いもかけないことが起きました
彼らは違う場所に行ったのです
10:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:37
They disappeared, quite honestly, and all I got was postcards.
彼らを見失った私が手にしたのは葉書でした
10:40
Now, I got some postcards of these guys in Las Vegas,
ラスベガスに行ったスタッフからの葉書
10:47
and I got some postcards of these guys in the Grand Canyon,
グランドキャニオンからも来ました
10:50
and I got these postcards of Niagara Falls,
これはナイアガラの滝からです
10:52
and pretty soon they're in New York, and I don't know where else.
その直後はニューヨークにいたようです
他はどこだったか
10:54
And I'm telling myself, "This is going to be a great car,
これは素晴らしい車になるぞ
と思ったものです
10:57
they're doing research that I've never even thought about before."
彼らは思いもつかなかったような
場所でリサーチしている
11:01
Right? And they decided that instead of, like, having a studio,
そうでしょう 彼らはアトリエや
11:06
and six or seven apartments,
6〜7室のアパートを借りるよりも安く
11:13
it was cheaper to rent Elizabeth Taylor's ex-house in Malibu.
マリブのエリザベス・テイラーの
別荘を借りたんですから
11:16
And -- at least they told me it was her house,
まぁ少なくとも彼女の家だと報告を受けましたが
11:20
I guess it was at one time, she had a party there or something.
一度パーティを開いたことがあるって
程度でしょうね
11:23
But anyway, this was the house, and they all lived there.
とにかくこれがその家です
で スタッフはそこに住んだ
11:26
Now this is 24/7 living, half-a-dozen people who'd left their --
四六時中あいているリビング
半ダースものスタッフが
11:31
some had left their wives behind and families behind,
妻や家族を家に残してここに住んだのです
11:36
and they literally lived in this house
実に6ヶ月の長きにわたって
11:39
for the entire six months the project was in America,
プロジェクトの舞台である
アメリカに住みついたのです
11:41
but the first three months were the most intensive.
中でも最初の3ヶ月は
非常に徹底していました
11:44
And one of the young women in the project,
プロジェクトに参加した若い女性
11:47
she was a fantastic lady, she actually built her room in the bathroom.
非常に熱心な女性で
なんと浴室に自分の部屋を作りました
11:49
The bathroom was so big, she built the bed over the bathtub --
浴室がとても大きかったので
バスタブの上にベッドを作ったのです
11:53
it's quite fascinating.
最高にイカしてますね
11:56
On the other hand, I didn't know anything about this. OK?
ところで私はこれらについて
何も知りませんでした
11:58
Nothing. This is all going on, and all I'm getting is postcards
全く 色々進んでいるけど
手にするのは
12:02
of these guys in Las Vegas, or whatever,
ラスベガスなどの葉書だけ
12:05
saying, "Don't worry Chris, this is really going to be good." OK?
「クリス 心配ご無用 これは成功するよ」って
12:07
So my concept of what a design studio was probably --
私のデザイン事務所のあり方についての考えを
12:10
I wasn't up to speed on where these guys were.
すでに超えたところに彼らはいるらしかった
12:13
However, the engineers back in Munich
一方ミュンヘンの技術者達は
12:16
had taken on this kind of Newtonian solution,
例えばこういった
物理的な解決法を求めていました
12:19
and they were trying to find how many cup holders
一つの軸の上にいくつのカップホルダーを
12:23
can dance on the head of a pin, and, you know,
取り付けることができるのか
12:25
these really serious questions that are confronting the modern consumer.
これは現代的な消費者を相手にするときに
非常に大切な問題なんです
12:27
And one was hoping that these two teams would get together,
この二つのチームが集まれば
12:32
and this collusion of incredible creativity,
素晴らしい想像力が
12:35
under these incredible surroundings,
素晴らしい環境の下
12:37
and these incredibly stressed-out engineers,
ストレスのたまった技術者達と協力し合い
12:39
would create some incredible solutions.
素晴らしい成果をあげると思うでしょう
12:42
Well, what I didn't know was, and what we found out was --
ただ私の知らなかったこと
私たちがわかったのは
12:45
these guys, they can't even like talk to each other under those conditions.
そのような環境下では彼らが
お互いに話すことすらできないことです
12:48
You get a divergence of Newtonian and quantum thinking at that point,
定量的と物理的な考え方との
相違がここに見られます
12:53
you have a split in your dialog that is so deep, and so far,
議論がとても深く
果てしないものだったので
12:57
that they cannot bring this together at all.
彼らはまとめることすら
全くできなかったのです
13:03
And so we had our first meeting, after three months, in Tiburon,
そして3ヶ月の後
初めての会議をチバロンで開きました
13:07
which is just up the road from here -- you know Tiburon?
ここからも近いです
チバロン ご存じですね?
13:11
And the idea was after the first three months of this independent research
そして3ヶ月間の独自調査の結果を
13:14
they would present it all to Dr. Goschel --
プロジェクトの共同メンターであり
13:17
who is now my boss, and at that time he was co-mentor on the project --
現在の私自身のボスであるゴシェル博士に
13:19
and they would present their results.
全てプレゼンする予定でした
13:22
We would see where we were going,
プロジェクトの進行具合 つまり
13:24
we would see the first indication of what could be
何がアメリカのSUVブームを
13:26
the successive phenomenon to the SUV in America.
引き継ぎ得るのか
その最初のヒントを知ろうとしたのです
13:28
And so I had these ideas in my head, that this is going to be great.
素晴らしいものになる
そんな事を考えていました
13:32
I mean, I'm going to see so much work, it's so intense --
成果がたくさん提出され
しかも充実している
13:35
I know probably Las Vegas meant a lot about it,
たぶんラスベガスが
すごく大きな意味を果たしていて
13:37
and I'm not really sure where the Grand Canyon came in either --
グランドキャニオンの出番は不明でしたが
13:40
but somehow all this is going to come together,
こういった全てのものが合わさり
13:42
and I'm going to see some really great product.
素晴らしい成果が見られるだろう と
13:45
So we went to Tiburon, after three months,
3ヶ月後 チバロンに行きました
13:47
and the team had gotten together the week before,
その1週間前 チームは集まったんです
13:49
many days ahead of time.
まだ何日も時間がありました
13:52
The engineers flew over, and designers got together with them,
技術者達もやってきて
デザイナー達と合流しました
13:55
and they put their presentation together.
そして双方のプレゼンを合体させたのです
13:59
Well, it turns out that the engineers hadn't done anything.
それでですね
技術者は何もしていないことがわかったんです
14:02
And they hadn't done anything because --
彼らは何もしなかった
14:08
kind of, like in car business, engineers are there to solve problems,
なぜなら自動車産業において技術者は
課題を解決する側なんですね
14:11
and we were asking them to create a problem.
それが今回は
課題を作り出すよう注文していた
14:16
And the engineers were waiting for the designers to say,
一方技術者はデザイン班が
「こんな課題を作りました
14:19
"This is the problem that we've created, now help us solve it."
さあ解決するのを手伝ってください」
と言いだすのを待っていたのです
14:22
And they couldn't talk about it. So what happened was,
そしてそのことについて
話すことができなかった
14:26
the engineers showed up with nothing.
なので技術者は何もせずに現れたのです
14:30
And the engineers told the designers,
そしてデザイナーにこう言った
14:33
"If you go in with all your stuff, we'll walk out,
「そんなことにつきあわせるなら ストライキするよ
14:35
we'll walk right out of the project."
皆でプロジェクトから降りるつもりだ」
14:39
So I didn't know any of this,
私はそんなことを何も知らないまま
プレゼンを受けました
14:42
and we got a presentation that had an agenda, looked like this.
私はそんなことを何も知らないまま
プレゼンを受けました
14:44
There was a whole lot of dialog.
沢山のやりとりが書いてありました
14:46
We spent four hours being told all about vocabulary
技術者とデザイナーの会話のために必要な
14:49
that needs to be built between engineers and designers.
ボキャブラリーについて
4時間聞かされたのです
14:52
And here I'm expecting at any moment, "OK, they're going to turn the page,
ページをめくるたびに期待していましたよ
14:56
and I'm going to see the cars, I'm going to see the sketches,
次は車の写真か 次はスケッチか
14:59
I'm going to see maybe some idea of where it's going."
または目指すべき目標が書かれているのか
15:01
Dialog kept on going, with mental maps of words, and pretty soon
単語の相関図についての話が続き やがて
15:04
it was becoming obvious that instead of being dazzled with brilliance,
自分が素晴らしさに
目がくらんでいるのではなく
15:09
I was seriously being baffled with bullshit.
くだらなさに困惑しているのだとわかりました
15:12
And if you can imagine what this is like,
想像できますか?
15:16
to have these months of postcard indication of how great this team is working,
数ヶ月間 チームのすばらしさを
葉書が証明していて
15:18
and they're out there spending all this money, and they're learning,
そのために予算を使い
学んでいたはずが
15:22
and they're doing all this stuff.
実際はこの体たらく
15:24
I went fucking ballistic, right? I went nuts.
私はかんかんに怒りました
発狂しました
15:27
You can probably remember Tiburon, it used to look like this.
きっと皆さんもチバロンを忘れないでしょうね
こんな感じだったのです
15:33
After four hours of this, I stood up, and I took this team apart.
4時間の後 立ち上がって
チームと別室にいきました
15:38
I screamed at them, I yelled at them, "What the hell are you doing?
そこで叫び 怒鳴りつけました
「全くなにやってたんだ?
15:43
You're letting me down, you're my designers,
がっかりだ デザイナーだろ?
15:47
you're supposed to be the creative ones,
創り出すことが仕事じゃないのか
15:49
what the hell is going on around here?"
まったく何がどうなってるんだ?」
15:51
It was probably one of my better tirades, I have some good ones,
手厳しい批評でした
部下を叱責することはよくありますが
15:53
but this was probably one of my better ones. And I went into these people;
このときは本当に辛辣に批判しました
こう言ったのです
15:56
how could they take BMW's money,
BMWの予算を使って
15:59
how could they have a holiday for three months and produce nothing, nothing?
3ヶ月間の休暇を楽しんで
何も成果が無い 何も?
16:01
Because of course they didn't tell us that they had three station wagons
実は彼らは私が望んでいた
スケッチや写真 模型を
16:07
full of drawings, model concepts, pictures -- everything I wanted,
3台のステーションワゴンに隠していました
16:12
they'd locked up in the cars, because they had shown solidarity with the engineers --
技術者との団結を示すために
鍵をかけてしまい込んで
16:19
and they'd decided not to show me anything,
私には何も見せないことにしたのです
16:24
in order to give the chance for problem solving a chance to start,
問題解決の糸口を得るためでした
16:27
because they hadn't realized, of course,
もちろん 彼らが課題を作り出すことが
できないことには気がついていませんでしたが
16:30
that they couldn't do problem creating.
もちろん 彼らが課題を作り出すことが
できないことには気がついていませんでしたが
16:32
So we went to lunch --
なので昼食に出ました
16:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:36
And I've got to tell you, this was one seriously quiet lunch.
とても静かなランチだったと言わざるを得ません
16:41
The engineers all sat at one end of the table,
技術者達がテーブルの片方に座り
16:44
the designers and I sat at the other end of the table, really quiet.
私とデザイナーが静かにもう片方に座る
16:46
And I was just fucking furious, furious. OK?
激怒 私は激怒してたんですよ
16:49
Probably because they had all the fun and I didn't, you know.
皆がお楽しみの間
自分は違った
16:56
That's what you get furious about right?
貴方もきっと怒りますよね?
16:58
And somebody asked me about Catherine, my wife, you know,
で 誰かが私の妻について聞きました
17:00
did she fly out with me or something?
一緒に来てるんですか?なんて
17:02
I said, "No," and it triggered a set of thoughts about my wife.
「いいや」と答えた途端
妻について色々と思い浮かんできました
17:04
And I recalled that when Catherine and I were married,
妻と結婚したときに 神父様が
17:08
the priest gave a very nice sermon, and he said something very important.
とても良い説教の中で
大切な事を言ってくれたのを思い出しました
17:12
He said, "Love is not selfish," he said,
「愛は自己中心的ではない」
17:17
"Love does not mean counting how many times I say, 'I love you.'
「何回 ”愛している” と口にするかを
数えることが愛ではない
17:20
It doesn't mean you had sex this many times this month,
今月何回セックスしたかも問題ではない
17:24
and it's two times less than last month,
先月よりも2回少ないから
17:27
so that means you don't love me as much.
前のように愛していないのか
17:29
Love is not selfish." And I thought about this, and I thought,
愛は自己中心的ではない」
これについて考えながら思ったのです
17:31
"You know, I'm not showing love here. I'm seriously not showing love.
「私は愛を示していない
愛情を見せていない
17:36
I'm in the air, I'm in the air without trust.
ここには 私がいる空間には
信頼関係がない
17:44
This cannot be. This cannot be that I'm expecting a certain number of sketches,
相当数のスケッチを期待していたが
それではいけない
17:48
and to me that's my quantification method for qualifying a team.
それがチームを評価する定量化の手法だったが
17:53
This cannot be."
間違えている」
17:58
So I told them this story. I said, "Guys, I'm thinking about something here,
と 皆に今の話をして言いました
「なぁ 思うんだが
18:00
this isn't right. I can't have a relationship with you guys
量ではかれるような関係なんて
正しくないよな
18:03
based on a premise that is a quantifiable one.
量ではかれるような関係なんて
正しくないよな
18:07
Based on a dictate premise that says, 'I'm a boss, you do what I say, without trust.'"
”俺は上司だ 俺が言ったことをやれ 信頼がなくても”
なんて指示の仕方は
18:10
I said "This can't be."
そんなの間違えているよな」
18:18
Actually, we all broke down into tears, to be quite honest about it,
実際正直な話 皆で泣いたんです
18:20
because they still could not tell me how much frustration they had built up
私が望む成果を見せられないことで
18:26
inside of them, not being able to show me what I wanted,
どんなにストレスがたまったか
私に言うこともできなかったのですから
18:31
and merely having to ask me to trust them that it would come.
そして単に私に信頼して待つようにしか
言えなかったのですから
18:35
And I think we felt much closer that day,
お互いにとても深い関係を持てた日でした
18:40
we cut a lot of strings that didn't need to be there,
沢山の必要のないしがらみを振り払い
18:43
and we forged the concept for what real team and creativity is all about.
本当のチームとなり
真の創造性を生み出したのです
18:46
We put the car back at the center of our thoughts, and we put love,
もう一度車を考えの中心に据え
愛情を注ぎました
18:51
I think, truly back into the center of the process.
車をもう一度作業の中心に戻したのです
18:55
By the way, that team went on to create six different concepts
ところで チームは
6つのコンセプトを作り上げました
18:59
for the next model of what would be the proposal
アメリカのSUVブームの後継車となり得る
19:02
for the next generation after SUVs in America.
その試作となるものです
19:05
One of those was the idea of a crossover coupes --
その一つはクロスオーバー・クーペ
19:08
you see it downstairs, the X Coupe -- they had a lot of fun with that.
階下でご覧頂けるXクーペです
みな楽しんでいました
19:12
It was the rendition of our motorcycle,
GSというBMWのバイクを解釈したもので
19:17
the GS, as Carl Magnusson says, "brute-iful,"
カール・マグヌソンに言わせると
「野蛮かつ美的」
19:20
as the idea of what could be a motorcycle, if you add two more wheels.
もしバイクを4輪にしたらどうなるか
というアイディアを表現したものです
19:24
And so, in conclusion, my lesson that I wanted to pass on to you,
結論として
私の教訓を皆さんにお伝えするために
19:29
was this one here. I'm also going to steal a little quote out of "Little Prince."
「星の王子様」からの引用をしようと思います
19:33
There's a lot to be said about trust and love,
信頼と愛について
様々な事が言われてきました
19:37
if you know that those two words are synonymous for design.
その2つの言葉がデザインと同義語であるならば
19:40
I had a very, very meaningful relationship with my team that day,
あの日に私はチームと
とても有意義な関係を持ったことになります
19:43
and it's stayed that way ever since.
その関係は今も続いています
19:47
And I hope that you too find that there's more to design,
皆さんもぜひデザインの対象を見いだして
19:49
and more towards the art of the design, than doing it yourself.
一個人の枠を突き破り
デザインの芸術性に傾倒して欲しいのです
19:53
It's true that the trust and the love, that makes it worthwhile.
信頼と愛がデザインを
価値あるものにしているのです
19:57
Thanks so much.
ありがとうございました
20:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:03
Translated by Ichiro Nishimura
Reviewed by Takeyasu Kanke

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Chris Bangle - Car designer
Car design is a ubiquitous but often overlooked art form. As chief of design for the BMW Group, Chris Bangle has overseen cars that have been seen the world over, including BMW 7 Series and the Z4 roadster.

Why you should listen

American designer Chris Bangle understands that it can be difficult to see a car in terms of Art with a capital A. As such, he separates his work into issues of "automobiles" (unemotional products, causing problems such as pollution and congestion) and "car-iness" (an expansion of the human, and ultimately a truly artistic expression). Satisfying the tensions between these problems -- and the tensions between engineers and designers -- is, for him, the essence of his work.

Offering radical forms and ideas, Bangle has been a polarizing figure within the industry; he has overseen all of the brands within the BMW family, including Mini and Rolls-Royce. In 2009, Bangle left BMW to pursue his own personal design interests and develop his consulting firm, Chris Bangle Associates.

More profile about the speaker
Chris Bangle | Speaker | TED.com