English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2006

Cameron Sinclair: My wish: A call for open-source architecture

キャメロン・シンクレア: オープンソース建築

Filmed
Views 1,218,453

2006年のTEDプライズを受けて、キャメロン・シンクレアは情熱的なデザイナーや建築家がいかにして世界の建築危機に対応できるかを示します。彼はTEDプライズで願った、デザインのコラボを通して世界中の生活水準を上げるネットワーク構築の成果を語ります。

- Co-founder, Architecture for Humanity
2006 TED Prize winner Cameron Sinclair is co-founder of Architecture for Humanity, a nonprofit that seeks architecture solutions to global crises -- and acts as a conduit between the design community and the world's humanitarian needs. Full bio

I'm going to take you on a journey very quickly.
急ぎ足で旅にお連れしましょう
00:24
To explain the wish, I'm going to have to take you somewhere
僕のwishを説明するために 世界中にある
00:26
which many people haven't been, and that's around the world.
あまり人の行かない場所にお連れします
00:29
When I was about 24 years old, Kate Store and myself started an organization
僕が24歳のとき ケイト・ストアと一緒に
00:31
to get architects and designers involved in humanitarian work.
人道的な仕事に建築家や設計士が
関われる組織を創りました
00:36
Not only about responding to natural disasters,
天災に対応するのみでなく
00:40
but involved in systemic issues.
構造的な問題に関われるものです
00:42
We believed that where the resources and expertise are scarce,
資源や専門知識が不足している所では
00:45
innovative, sustainable design can really make a difference in people's lives.
革新的で持続可能なデザインが
人の生活を大きく変えることができると思ったのです
00:50
So I started my life as an architect, or training as an architect,
ここからすべてが始まりました --
僕は建築家の卵になったときから
00:56
and I was always interested in socially responsible design,
社会に貢献するデザイン 
そしてどうやって社会に影響を
01:01
and how you can really make an impact.
及ぼせるかに興味がありました
01:04
But when I went to architectural school,
でも私が建築を学んだ頃は
01:06
it seemed that I was the black sheep in the family.
そんな考えが風変わりにも思えました
01:08
Many architects seemed to think that when you design,
多くの建築家は 設計とは自分が欲しい
01:11
you design a jewel, and it's a jewel that you try and crave for.
芸術の一品を作り上げる事のように
考えていましたが
01:14
Whereas I felt that when you design,
一方 僕はデザインとは
01:18
you either improve or you create a detriment
設計を行う地域を良くしたり
01:20
to the community in which you're designing in.
損害を与えたりするものだと感じていました
01:22
So you're not just doing a building for the residents
だから その建物に住む居住者や
01:24
or for the people who are going to use it,
その建物を利用する人のためだけでなく
01:26
but for the community as a whole.
地域社会全体のためにデザインするのです
01:28
And in 1999, we started by responding to the issue of the housing crisis
1999年にコソボへ帰国する難民のための
01:30
for returning refugees in Kosovo
住宅危機問題への対応を始めました
01:37
and I didn't know what I was doing; like I say, mid-20s,
僕は20代半ばで
自分が何をしているかは知りませんでした
01:39
and I'm the, I'm the Internet generation, so we started a website.
僕はインターネット世代なので
ウェブサイトを立ち上げました
01:43
We put a call out there, and to my surprise in a couple of months
そこで呼びかけたところ 驚いたことに二ヵ月で
01:47
we had hundreds of entries from around the world.
世界中から数百人におよぶ参加がありました
01:51
That led to a number of prototypes being built
いくつかのプロトタイプが造られ
01:54
and really experimenting with some ideas.
アイデアのいくつかを実際に試しています
01:56
Two years later we started doing a project
2年後に 蔓延するHIV エイズ対応のため
01:59
on developing mobile health clinics in sub-Saharan Africa,
移動診療所をサハラ以南のアフリカで
02:01
responding to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.
開発するというプロジェクトを始めました
02:05
That led to 550 entries from 53 countries.
これには 53カ国から550の参加がありました
02:10
We also have designers from around the world that participate.
世界中のデザイナーも参加しています
02:16
And we had an exhibit of work that followed that.
続いて仕事の展示会をしました
02:21
2004 was the tipping point for us.
2004年は 僕達にとっては臨界点でした
02:24
We started responding to natural disasters
天災に対応することを始め
02:27
and getting involved in Iran and Bam,
イランのバムでも仕事を始め
02:29
also following up on our work in Africa.
アフリカでの仕事をフォローをしました
02:31
Working within the United States,
米国内で働いていると
02:34
most people look at poverty and they see the face of a foreigner,
貧困というと 外国人の顔を
思い浮かべる人が多いですが
02:36
but go live -- I live in Bozeman, Montana --
僕はモンタナ州のボーズマンに住んでいて
02:39
go up to the north plains on the reservations,
北のインディアン居住地の平野や
02:41
or go down to Alabama or Mississippi
または南へ下りてアラバマやミシシッピーに行くと
02:43
pre-Katrina, and I could have shown you places
カトリーナ以前でも 僕の見た
02:46
that have far worse conditions than many developing countries I've been to.
どの発展途上国より はるかに酷い状況の所があります
02:48
So we got involved in and worked in inner cities and elsewhere.
だから僕達は国内の貧しい都市部や
その他の場所で仕事しました
02:52
And then also I will go into some more projects.
また別のプロジェクトもあります
02:56
2005 Mother Nature kicked our arse.
2005年に母なる自然は僕らの尻を蹴っ飛ばし
02:59
I think we can pretty much assume that 2005 was a horrific year
2005年は天災に関しては
03:02
when it comes to natural disasters.
酷い年だったと言えるでしょう
03:07
And because of the Internet,
インターネットのおかげで
03:09
and because of connections to blogs and so forth,
ブログなどに接続が出来
03:10
within literally hours of the tsunami, we were already raising funds,
文字通り津波後 数時間内に 募金が始まり
03:13
getting involved, working with people on the ground.
参加して 現地の人と共に働き始めました
03:18
We run from a couple of laptops in the first couple of days,
僕達は最初の二日間 二台のノートPCで
03:21
I had 4,000 emails from people needing help.
援助を求める人から
4,000通の電子メールを受け取りました
03:25
So we began to get involved in projects there,
僕達はそこで プロジェクトに参加しました
03:28
and I'll talk about some others.
他にも
03:31
And then of course, this year we've been responding to Katrina,
もちろん 今年はカトリーナに対応しながら
03:32
as well as following up on our reconstruction works.
再建の仕事もフォローしました
03:35
So this is a brief overview.
これが概説です
03:38
In 2004, I really couldn't manage
2004年 助けたい人の数や
03:41
the number of people who wanted to help,
受け取る要望の数への
03:43
or the number of requests that I was getting.
対応が追いつかなくなりました
03:45
It was all coming into my laptop and cell phone.
要望はラップトップや携帯電話に来ていました
03:47
So we decided to embrace
だから 僕達は基本的に
03:50
an open source model of business --
オープンソースモデルの事業を適用することに決め
03:53
that anyone, anywhere in the world, could start a local chapter,
誰もが 世界中の何処にいても
地元の支部を立ち上げ
03:55
and they can get involved in local problems.
地元の問題に参加できるようにしました
03:58
Because I believe there is no such thing as Utopia.
僕はユートピアなんて信じないので
04:00
All problems are local. All solutions are local.
すべての問題や その解決策は地域特有です
04:03
So, and that means, you know,
そう考えると
04:05
somebody who is based in Mississippi
ミシシッピに住んでる人は僕より
04:07
knows more about Mississippi than I do. So what happened is,
ミシシッピについて多く知っていはずです
04:10
we used MeetUp and all these other kind of Internet tools,
ネット上のツールを使った結果
04:14
and we ended up having 40 chapters starting up,
40支部が立ち上がり
04:19
thousands of architects in 104 countries.
104カ国から数千人の建築家が加わりました
04:23
So the bullet point -- sorry, I never do a suit,
主な点は --
すみません 普段スーツ着ないもので
04:27
so I knew that I was going to take this off.
途中で脱いでしまうのはわかってたんですが
04:31
OK, because I'm going to do it very quick.
では 急いで進めます
04:33
So in the past seven years -- this isn't just about nonprofit.
この7年間で もはや非営利の枠を超え
04:35
What it showed me is that there's a grassroots movement going on
社会に貢献するデザイナーの
04:39
of socially responsible designers
草の根運動になりました
04:42
who really believe that this world has got a lot smaller,
参加者は 皆 世界がますます縮まって
04:44
and that we have the opportunity -- not the responsibility,
僕達には変化を起こす
04:47
but the opportunity -- to really get involved in making change.
責任でなく 機会があると信じています
04:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:55
I'm adding that to my time.
これ時間に付け加えてね
05:05
So what you don't know is,
ご存知ないでしょうが
05:09
we've got these thousands of designers working around the world,
世界中で働く 何千というデザイナーと
05:12
connected basically by a website, and we have a staff of three.
ウェブサイトでつながっていて スタッフは3人です
05:14
By doing something, the fact that nobody told us we couldn't do it,
誰からも無理だと言われたことをやり
05:18
we did it. And so there's something to be said about naivete.
やり遂げました だから純真もいいものです
05:22
So seven years later, we've developed so that we've got advocacy,
7年後 支援、盛り立て
実現できるまで発展しました
05:25
instigation and implementation. We advocate for good design,
僕達は優れたデザインを「支援」します
05:29
not only through student workshops and lectures and public forums,
学生のワークショップや講義や市民のフォーラム
05:32
op-eds; we have a book on humanitarian work;
論説 人道的な仕事の本だけでなく
05:36
but also disaster mitigation and dealing with public policy.
災害緩和や公共政策を扱うことも通じてです
05:39
We can talk about FEMA, but that's another talk.
FEMA(米連邦緊急事態管理局)の話もできますが 
それは別の話です
05:42
Instigation, developing ideas with communities
「盛り立て」オープンソースデザインのコンペを行いながら
05:46
and NGOs doing open-source design competitions.
コミュニティやNGOを盛り立てアイデアを発展させ
05:49
Referring, matchmaking with communities
デザインとコミュニティをペアリンクします
05:52
and then implementing -- actually going out there and doing the work,
そして「実行」 --
実際にそこに行って仕事をする
05:55
because when you invent, it's never a reality until it's built.
発明しても それが建つまでは
決して現実ではないからです
05:58
So it's really important that if we're designing
もし変化を起こすためにデザインするなら
06:04
and trying to create change, we build that change.
その変化を実際に作ることが重要です
06:07
So here's a select number of projects.
いくつかの選ばれたプロジェクトをお見せします
06:10
Kosovo. This is Kosovo in '99. We did an open design competition,
コソボ 1999年のコソボです 
僕達はオープンデザインコンペを開催しました
06:13
like I said. It led to a whole variety of ideas,
それは いろんな種類のアイデアにつながりました
06:19
and this wasn't about emergency shelter, but transitional shelter
これは緊急避難所ではなく 仮設住宅で
06:23
that would last five to 10 years,
5年から10年はもち
06:26
that would be placed next to the land the resident lived in,
彼らが家を再建できるよう
06:28
and that they would rebuild their own home.
居住者が住んでいた土地の横に建てます
06:32
This wasn't imposing an architecture on a community;
地域住民に建築物を押し付けるのではなく
06:35
this was giving them the tools and,
彼らに道具や
06:37
and the space to allow them
望むとおりに再建し再成長できる
06:39
to rebuild and regrow the way they want to.
スペースを与えました
06:41
We have from the sublime to the ridiculous, but they worked.
崇高なものからバカバカしいものまで
でもうまく行きました
06:45
This is an inflatable hemp house. It was built; it works.
これは ふくらませる麻の家です 
建てられて 機能しています
06:48
This is a shipping container. Built and works.
これは輸送用コンテナです 
建てられて 機能してます
06:54
And a whole variety of ideas
そして いろんなアイデア
06:58
that not only dealt with architectural building,
建築とは言えないようなものも扱います
07:00
but also the issues of governance
たとえば 自治の問題や
07:03
and the idea of creating communities through complex networks.
複雑なネットワークを通して
コミュニティを構築するというアイデアなどです
07:05
So we've engaged not just designers, but also,
それで 僕達はデザイナーだけでなく
07:08
you know, a whole variety of technology-based professionals.
いろんな種類のテクノロジーに関するプロも雇いました
07:11
Using rubble from destroyed homes to create new homes.
新しい家をつくるために破壊された家の粗石を使い
07:16
Using straw bale construction, creating heat walls.
断熱効果に優れた 藁壁建築法を取り入れます
07:20
And then something remarkable happened in '99.
それから すごい事が 1999年に起こりました
07:26
We went to Africa, originally to look at the housing issue.
住宅問題を見るつもりでアフリカへ行きましたが
07:28
Within three days, we realized the problem was not housing;
3日以内に 問題は住宅ではないと気づきました
07:32
it was the growing pandemic of HIV/AIDS.
それは広がるHIVエイズの蔓延でした
07:35
And it wasn't doctors telling us this;
これは医者から聞いたのではなく
07:38
it was actual villagers that we were staying with.
僕達が滞在した村人から聞きました
07:40
And so we came up with the bright idea that instead of getting people
そこで僕達は
人を10~15キロ歩いて医者に通わせるのでなく
07:43
to walk 10, 15 kilometers to see doctors, you get the doctors to the people.
医者の方を連れて来るという
素晴らしいアイデアを出しました
07:47
And we started engaging the medical community.
僕達は医療界を巻き込みはじめ
07:51
And I thought, you know, we thought we were real bright, you know, sparks --
この閃きに 僕達は天才だと得意になり --
07:54
we've come up with this great idea, mobile health clinics
移動する診療所を サハラ以南アフリカの広範囲に
07:57
widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa.
配置するという素晴らしいアイデアなのですが
08:01
And the community, the medical community there said,
そこで 医療界が こう言いました
08:04
"We've said this for the last decade. We know this.
「知ってるよ 過去10年間 これを言ってきたんだ
08:06
We just don't know how to show this."
ただ 伝え方がわからなかったんだ」
08:10
So in a way, we had taken a pre-existing need and shown solutions.
だから ある意味 僕達はニーズを採り上げ
その解決法を示したのです
08:12
And so again, we had a whole variety of ideas that came in.
そしてまた いろいろな種類のアイデアが提供され
08:18
This one I personally love,
これは個人的に気に入っているものです
08:23
because the idea that architecture is not just about solutions,
このアイデアは建築とは解決法のみでなく
08:25
but about raising awareness.
認識を高めることにあるからです
08:28
This is a kenaf clinic. You get seed and you grow it in a plot of land,
これはケナフ製の診療所です 
種を小区の土地に蒔きます
08:30
and then once -- and it grows 14 feet in a month.
ケナフは1ヵ月で4メートル以上成長します
08:36
And on the fourth week, the doctors come and they mow out an area,
4週目に医者が来て 中央部を刈り取り
08:39
put a tensile structure on the top
テント型の屋根を上に置きます
08:42
and when the doctors have finished treating
医者が患者や村人の
08:44
and seeing patients and villagers,
治療を終えたとき
08:47
you cut down the clinic and you eat it. It's an Eat Your Own Clinic.
診療所を切り落とし 食べるのです 
題して「食べられるクリニック」
08:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:54
So it's dealing with the fact that if you have AIDS,
エイズを患っているなら
08:55
you also need to have nutrition rates,
栄養価を保つ必要があるので
08:58
and the idea that the idea of nutrition is as important
このアイデアは 栄養は
抗レトロウイルスの治療をうけるのと
09:00
as getting anti-retrovirals out there.
同じくらい大切だと言うところにあります
09:03
So you know, this is a serious solution.
これはまじめな解決策です
09:04
This one I love. The idea is it's not just a clinic -- it's a community center.
これも素晴らしいです 
アイデアはただの診療所でなく -- 公民館です
09:08
This looked at setting up trade routes
これは 地域社会における交易路や
09:11
and economic engines within the community,
経済の原動力の仕組みを見据えた
09:14
so it can be a self-sustaining project.
自立したプロジェクトとなりえます
09:16
Every one of these projects is sustainable.
これらのプロジェクトのすべてが持続可能です
09:18
That's not because I'm a tree-hugging green person.
これは僕が環境に配慮する人間だからというのではなく
09:21
It's because when you live on four dollars a day,
1日4ドルで生活するには
09:24
you're living on survival and you have to be sustainable.
生き残りをかけての生活なので
持続可能でなければなりません
09:27
You have to know where your energy is coming from.
利用するエネルギーが
どこから来ているかを知る必要があり
09:30
You have to know where your resource is coming from.
利用する資源が
どこから来ているか知る必要があります
09:32
And you have to keep the maintenance down.
維持費を抑える必要もあります
09:35
So this is about getting an economic engine,
これは経済の原動力を得ることで
09:37
and then at night it turns into a movie theater.
夜は映画館に変わります
09:39
So it's not an AIDS clinic. It's a community center.
だから これはエイズ診療所ではなく 公民館です
09:41
So you can see ideas. And these ideas developed into prototypes,
これらのアイデアが 試作品となり
09:47
and they were eventually built. And currently, as of this year,
実際に建てられるのがご覧いただけます
09:52
there are clinics rolling out in Nigeria and Kenya.
今年からナイジェリアと
ケニヤで始められる診療所があります
09:55
From that we also developed Siyathemba, which was a project --
そこから シヤテンバという
プロジェクトを立ち上げました
10:00
the community came to us and said,
地域社会が女子が教育を受けられないという
10:04
the problem is that the girls don't have education.
問題を提示したことから始まりました
10:06
And we're working in an area
僕達は 16~24歳の若い女性の
10:09
where young women between the ages of 16 and 24
HIV エイズ感染率が50パーセントという
10:11
have a 50 percent HIV/AIDS rate.
地域で働いています
10:13
And that's not because they're promiscuous,
それは彼らが乱れているからではなく
10:16
it's because there's no knowledge.
知識がないからです
10:19
And so we decided to look at the idea of sports and create a youth sports center
そこで 僕達はスポーツという観点から
HIV エイズ援助センターを兼ねた
10:21
that doubled as an HIV/AIDS outreach center,
ユース スポーツセンターをつくることに決めました
10:25
and the coaches of the girls' team were also trained doctors.
女子チームのコーチは訓練された医者です
10:28
So that there would be a very slow way
こうしてゆっくりと
10:32
of developing kind of confidence in health care.
健康管理に関する自信を築きます
10:34
And we picked nine finalists,
僕達は9つのデザインを最終選し
10:39
and then those nine finalists were distributed throughout the entire region,
9つのデザインは地域全体に配布され
10:42
and then the community picked their design.
そして地域社会がデザインを選びます
10:46
They said, this is our design,
彼らは言います これが私達のデザインです
10:48
because it's not only about engaging a community;
地域社会に関わりあうだけでなく
10:50
it's about empowering a community
地域を活気づけます
10:52
and about getting them to be a part of the rebuilding process.
それに 彼らを再建のプロセスに巻き込みます
10:54
So the winning design is here, and then of course,
ここに最終的に選ばれたデザインがあります
10:59
we actually go and work with the community and the clients.
もちろん 僕達は実際にそこへ行って
地域社会や顧客と一緒に働きます
11:03
So this is the designer. He's out there working
これがデザイナーです 彼は実際そこで
11:06
with the first ever women's soccer team in Kwa-Zulu Natal, Siyathemba,
シヤテンバ クワ-ズル-ナタールの
最初の女性サッカーチームをつくっています
11:07
and they can tell it better.
彼女ら僕より上手に語ってくれます
11:13
Video: Well, my name is Sisi, because I work at the African center.
ビデオ:「私の名前はシシです 
アフリカセンターで働いているので
11:38
I'm a consultant and I'm also the national football player
私はコンサルタントだけど南アフリカのサッカーチーム
11:41
for South Africa, Bafana Bafana,
バファナ バファナの選手でもあります
11:46
and I also play in the Vodacom League for the team called Tembisa,
それに ヴォダコムリーグでは
テンビサというチームでもプレイします
11:48
which has now changed to Siyathemba.
今はチーム名はシヤテンバに変わりました
11:55
This is our home ground.
これはホームグラウンドです」
11:58
Cameron Sinclair: So I'm going to show that later because I'm running out of time.
時間がないので これは後で見せましょう
12:01
I can see Chris looking at me slyly.
クリスがこっちを見ているので
12:03
This was a connection,
これはコネで
12:07
just a meeting with somebody who wanted to develop
タンザニアにアフリカで最初の遠隔医療センターを
12:09
Africa's first telemedicine center, in Tanzania.
開発しようとしていた人との出会いでした
12:11
And we met, literally, a couple of months ago. We've already developed a design,
僕達は文字通り2ヶ月ほど前に会い
デザインをすでにつくり
12:15
and the team is over there, working in partnership.
チームはすでにそこにいて
提携を結んで働いています
12:18
This was a matchmaking thanks to a couple of TEDsters:
これは何人かのTED仲間が仲介してくれたおかげです
12:20
[unclear] Cheryl Heller and Andrew Zolli,
シェリル・ヘラー とアンドリュー・ゾリ
12:24
who connected me with this amazing African woman.
彼らがこの素晴らしい
アフリカ女性に会う機会をくれました
12:27
And we start construction in June, and it will be opened by TEDGlobal.
6月には建設を始めて
TEDグローバルの頃には完了です
12:30
So when you come to TEDGlobal, you can check it out.
TEDグローバルに来たら 見てください
12:33
But what we're known probably most for is dealing with disasters and development,
僕達はたぶん災害対策や開発で知られていて
12:36
and we've been involved in a lot of issues,
たくさんの問題に関わってきました
12:40
such as the tsunami and also things like Hurricane Katrina.
例えば津波とかハリケーンカトリーナのような
12:43
This is a 370-dollar shelter that can be easily assembled.
これは組み立てが簡単な370ドルの避難所です
12:49
This is
これは
12:57
a community-designed community center.
地域社会でデザインされた公民館です
12:59
And what that means is we actually live and work with the community,
僕達は実際に 地域社会に住んで
住民と一緒に仕事するので
13:02
and they're part of the design process.
彼らはデザインプロセスの一部です
13:06
The kids actually get involved in mapping out
子供達は実際に何処に公民館を建てるか
13:10
where the community center should be, and then eventually,
綿密に計画し そして最後には
13:13
the community is actually, through skills training,
技術訓練を通して
13:17
end up building the building with us.
建物を僕達と一緒に建てるのです
13:19
Here is another school.
これは他の学校です
13:22
This is what the U.N. gave these guys for six months -- 12 plastic tarps.
これは国連がこれらの人に6ヵ月間与えたものです --
12のプラスチック防水布
13:24
This was in August. This was the replacement,
これは8月です これに取って代わりました
13:29
and it's supposed to last for two years.
2年はもつ見込みです
13:31
When the rain comes down, you can't hear a thing,
雨が降ると 何も聞こえません
13:33
and in the summer it's about 140 degrees inside.
夏の室内温度は約60度です
13:35
So we said, if the rain's coming down, let's get fresh water.
だから雨が降ったら水をためようと
13:38
So every one of our schools have rain water collection systems, very low cost.
すべての学校に 大変安価な雨水収集システムがあります
13:42
A class, three classrooms and rainwater collection is 5,000 dollars.
クラス3つに 雨水収集を設置すると5千ドルです
13:46
This was raised by hot chocolate sales in Atlanta.
これはアトランタでホットチョコレートを売って集めました
13:51
It's built by the parents of the kids.
子供達の親が建てました
13:55
The kids are out there on-site, building the buildings.
子供達は建築物を建てる現場にいて
13:58
And it opened a couple of weeks ago,
数週間前に開設しました
14:01
and there's 600 kids that are now using the schools.
そして600人の子供が通っています
14:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:05
So, disaster hits home.
身近な所でも災害は起こります
14:12
We see the bad stories on CNN and Fox and all that,
ニュースでもいろんな被害報道が流されましたが
14:15
but we don't see the good stories.
良いニュースは流れません
14:20
Here is a community that got together and they said no to waiting.
ここの地域社会は一致団結して ただ待つことを拒否し
14:22
They formed a partnership, a diverse partnership of players
いろいろな団体と提携を組み
14:26
to actually map out East Biloxi,
誰が関わっていくかなど
14:29
to figure out who is getting involved.
東ビロクシ地域を綿密に計画しました
14:31
We've had over 1,500 volunteers rebuilding, rehabbing homes.
1500人を超えるボランティアが
14:33
Figuring out what FEMA regulations are,
FEMAの規則を勉強し
14:38
not waiting for them to dictate to us how you should rebuild.
どう再建するか指示を待たずに
家の再建や修復に参加しました
14:40
Working with residents, getting them out of their homes,
居住者と一緒に働き 彼らが病気にならないよう
14:44
so they don't get ill. This is what they're cleaning up on their own.
彼らを家から出し 
これは 彼らが自分達で清掃したものです
14:47
Designing housing. This house is going to go in in a couple of weeks.
家のデザイン この家は数週間後に建築が始まります
14:52
This is a rehabbed home, done in four days.
これは修復された家 4日で完成しました
14:55
This is a utility room for a woman who is on a walker.
これは歩行補助が必要な女性のユティリティルームです
14:58
She's 70 years old. This is what FEMA gave her.
彼女は70歳です これがFEMAが与えたものです
15:03
600 bucks, happened two days ago.
600ドル 二日前のことです
15:05
We put together very quickly a washroom.
僕達は共同で洗濯部屋をつくりました
15:09
It's built; it's running and she just started a business today,
出来上がって 稼動し
彼女は今日事業を始めたところです
15:12
where she's washing other peoples clothes.
他の人の服を洗います
15:14
This is Shandra and the Calhouns. They're photographers
これはシャンドラとカルフーン一家です 写真家です
15:17
who have documented the Lower Ninth for the last 40 years.
ロウワー・ナインス地区を
過去40年ドキュメントしています
15:21
That was their home, and these are the photographs they took.
彼らの家です これらが彼らの撮った写真
15:25
And we're helping, working with them to create a new building.
僕らは彼らが新しい建物を作るのを助けています
15:28
Projects we've done. Projects we've been a part of, support.
完成したプロジェクト 僕達がサポートしたプロジェクトです
15:31
Why don't aid agencies do this? This is the U.N. tent.
なぜ援助団体がやらないのか? これが国連のテント
15:36
This is the new U.N. tent, just introduced this year.
これが今年導入された新しい国連テント
15:42
Quick to assemble. It's got a flap, that's the invention.
素早く組み立て出来 蓋があって これは発明です
15:45
It took 20 years to design this and get it implemented in the field.
これがデザインされて現場で使われるまで
20年かかっています
15:50
I was 12 years old. There's a problem here.
僕が12歳のときです これは問題です
15:55
Luckily, we're not alone.
幸運なことに僕らは一人ではありません
16:01
There are hundreds and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds
何百人単位で世界中に散らばる
16:03
and hundreds of architects and designers and inventors
建築家やデザイナーや発明家が
16:06
around the world that are getting involved in humanitarian work.
人道的な事業に関わるようになりました
16:10
More hemp houses -- it's a theme in Japan apparently.
もっと多くの麻の家 -- これは日本のテーマだそうです
16:15
I'm not sure what they're smoking.
喫煙するかは知りませんが
16:18
This is a grip clip designed by somebody who said, all you need is some way
これは掴み式クリップで
膜構造を物理的なサポート支柱に
16:24
to attach membrane structures to physical support beams.
取り付ける物さえあれば 良いんだ
と言った人によってデザインされました
16:27
This guy designed for NASA, is now doing housing.
この男性は NASAの設計に関ったことがあり
今は住宅に関っています
16:35
I'm going to whip through this quickly,
これを素早く紹介してしていきます
16:40
because I know I've got only a couple of minutes.
もう二分くらいしか残っていないと思うので
16:42
So this is all done in the last two years.
これはすべて過去2年で行われました
16:46
I showed you something that took 20 years to do.
従来の方法なら20年もかかるものです
16:48
And this is just a selection of things that
これは過去二年に起こった -- 建築された
16:51
were built in the last couple of years.
中から選ばれたものだけです
16:54
From Brazil to India,
ブラジルからインド
16:56
Mexico,
メキシコ
16:59
Alabama,
アラバマ
17:01
China,
中国
17:03
Israel,
イスラエル
17:06
Palestine,
パレスティナ
17:08
Vietnam.
ベトナム
17:11
The average age of a designer
このプロジェクトに参加した
17:12
who gets involved in this project is 32 -- that's how old I am. So it's a young --
デザイナーの平均年齢は32 --
これは僕の年齢です 若い --
17:14
I just have to stop here, because Arup is in the room
ここでちょっと止めます
ここにいるアラップ社が設計した
17:21
and this is the best-designed toilet in the world.
世界最高のトイレです
17:23
If you're ever, ever in India, go use this toilet.
もしインドに行くことがあれば
このトイレを使ってください
17:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
17:29
Chris Luebkeman will tell you why.
アラップのクリス・ルブクマンに聞いてください
17:30
I'm sure that's how he wanted to spend the party.
彼は喜んで教えてくれるでしょう
17:33
But the future is not going to be the sky-scraping cities of New York,
将来はニューヨークのような
摩天楼の街にはならないでしょう
17:40
but this. And when you look at this, you see crisis.
でも これ 人はこれを危機と見ます
17:44
What I see is many, many inventors.
僕にはたくさんの発明家が見えます
17:47
One billion people live in abject poverty.
10億人が 絶望的な貧困で生きています
17:50
We hear about them all the time.
彼らのことは常に耳にします
17:52
Four billion live in growing but fragile economies.
40億人は 発展中の脆弱な経済で生きています
17:54
One in seven live in unplanned settlements.
7人に1人が無計画居住地に住んでいます
17:59
If we do nothing about the housing crisis that's about to happen,
住宅危機に何の対応もしなければ
18:01
in 20 years, one in three people will live in an unplanned settlement
20年後には 1/3の人々が
無計画居住地か難民キャンプで生活するでしょう
18:04
or a refugee camp. Look left, look right: one of you will be there.
左右の人とあなたのうち、誰か1人が
そういうところに住むわけです
18:08
How do we improve the living standards of five billion people?
どうすれば50億人の
生活水準を改善できるでしょう?
18:13
With 10 million solutions.
1000万の解決策を使ってです
18:17
So I wish to develop a community that actively embraces
そこで 僕はすべての人の生活状況を改善する
18:19
innovative and sustainable design
革新的で持続可能なデザインを
18:22
to improve the living conditions for everyone.
積極的に受け入れるコミュニティを開発したいのです
18:24
Chris Anderson: Wait a second. Wait a second. That's your wish?
CA: ちょっとまって これが君のTED wish?
18:28
CS: That's my wish.
CS: これが僕のTED wishです
18:29
CA: That's his wish!
CA: これが彼のTED wishです!
18:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:31
CS: We started Architecture for Humanity with 700 dollars and a website.
僕達は人道的な建築を700ドルと
ウェブサイトで始めました
18:45
So Chris somehow decided to give me 100,000.
なぜかクリスは僕に10万ドル提供してくれました
18:50
So why not this many people?
だからこれだけの人にもできないわけがない?
18:54
Open-source architecture is the way to go.
オープンソース建築がその方法です
18:57
You have a diverse community of participants --
いろんな参加者のコミュニティーがあります
18:59
and we're not just talking about inventors and designers,
僕達は発明家やデザイナーだけでなく
19:02
but we're talking about the funding model.
基金モデルも計画しています
19:05
My role is not as a designer;
僕の役割はデザイナーではなく
19:07
it's as a conduit between the design world and the humanitarian world.
デザイン界と人道的な世界の間のパイプ役です
19:09
And what we need is something that replicates me globally,
僕達に必要なのは世界中に僕を複製すること
19:13
because I haven't slept in seven years.
ここ7年 眠れないほど忙しいので
19:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:20
Secondly, what will this thing be?
第2に これはどうなっていくのか?
19:23
Designers want to respond to issues of humanitarian crisis,
デザイナーは人道的な危機の問題に
応えたいのですが
19:25
but they don't want some company in the West
西側の企業が彼らのアイデアを取り込み
19:29
taking their idea and basically profiting from it.
それで利益を得ることを望みません
19:32
So Creative Commons has developed the developing nations license.
それでクリエイティブ コモンズは
発展途上国ライセンスを開発しました
19:35
And what that means is that a designer can -- the Siyathemba project I showed was the
そしてこの意味はデザイナーが -- お見せした
シヤテンバ プロジェクトは
19:39
first ever building to have a Creative Commons license on it.
クリエイティブ コモンズ 
ライセンスを持つ初めての建物です
19:44
As soon as that is built, anyone in Africa or any developing nation
それが建てられればすぐに アフリカや発展途上国の誰もが
19:47
can take the construction documents and replicate it for free.
実施設計図をとり 無料で複製することができます
19:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:57
So why not allow designers the opportunity to do this,
デザイナーに彼らの権利を守った上で
20:02
but still protecting their rights here?
こういった機会をあたえたらどうか?
20:05
We want to have a community where you can upload ideas,
僕達が望むのは
アイデアをアップロードできるコミュニティー
20:07
and those ideas can be tested in earthquake, in flood,
そしてこれらのアイデアは地震や洪水など
20:11
in all sorts of austere environments. The reason that's important is
あらゆる厳しい環境でテストできます 
これが大切なのは
20:16
I don't want to wait for the next Katrina to find out if my house works.
家が機能するかテストするのに 
次のカトリーナを待ちたくないからです
20:19
That's too late. We need to do it now.
それでは遅すぎます
今やる必要があるのです
20:25
So doing that globally.
これを世界規模でやります
20:27
And I want this whole thing to work multi-lingually.
これが数ヶ国語でされる必要があります
20:29
When you look at the face of an architect, most people think a gray-haired white guy.
建築家と言うと 年配の
白人を思い起こすものですが
20:34
I don't see that. I see the face of the world.
僕にはそうは見えません 
僕には世界中の顔が見えます
20:38
So I want everyone from all over the planet,
ですから地球上すべての人が
20:41
to be able to be a part of this design and development.
このデザインと開発の一部を担うことを望みます
20:43
The idea of needs-based competitions -- X-Prize for the other 98 percent,
必要性を基にするコンペ --
「残り98パーセントの為のX-Prize」
20:47
if you want to call it that.
なんていい名前かもしれません
20:51
We also want to look at ways of matchmaking
僕達はまた 仲介方法や
20:54
and putting funding partners together.
資金提供パートナーの提携のしかたや
20:56
And the idea of integrating manufacturers -- fab labs in every country.
統合生産のアイデア-- ファブラボを
世界に広めることも見ていきたいです
20:58
When I hear about the $100 laptop
僕が100ドルのラップトップがすべての子供の
21:02
and it's going to educate every child --
教育に貢献すると聞いたとき
21:04
educate every designer in the world. Put one in every favela,
世界中のデザイナーも教育できるはずです
すべての貧民街
21:06
every slum settlement, because you know what,
すべてのスラム街に一台づつ置けば
21:10
innovation will happen.
イノベーションが起きるでしょう
21:13
And I need to know that. It's called the leap-back.
途上国のやり方を
21:15
We talk about leapfrog technologies. I write with Worldchanging,
先進国が取り入れる逆飛び式の革新です
Worldchanging にも書いたのですが
21:17
and the one thing we've been talking about is,
ここにいるより現場で学ぶことの方が
はるかに多いのです
21:21
I learn more on the ground than I've ever learned here.
ここにいるより現場で学ぶことの方が
はるかに多いのです
21:22
So let's take those ideas, adapt them and we can use them.
これらのアイデアを応用して 利用しましょう
21:25
These ideas are supposed to have adaptable;
このようなアイデアは適用可能で
21:31
they should have the potential for evolution;
進化可能でもあるべきです
21:35
they should be developed by every nation on the world
それらは世界のあらゆる国で開発されるべきで
21:38
and useful for every nation on the world. What will it take?
世界のあらゆる国に役立たなければなりません
そうするには何が必要でしょう?
21:41
There should be a sheet. I don't have time to read this,
シートがあるはずだけど これを読む時間はありません
21:45
because I'm going to be yanked off.
ここから引きずりおろされるので
21:48
CA: Just leave it up there for a sec.
CA:しばらくそのままにしておいて
21:50
CS: Well, what will it take? You guys are smart.
何が必要ですか? あなた達の知識です
21:53
So it's going to take a lot of computing power, because I want
たくさんのコンピュータ能力が必要です 
なぜならこのアイデアは
21:56
the idea that any laptop anywhere in the world can plug into the system
世界中にあるラップトップから接続して
22:00
and be able to not only participate in developing these designs,
デザインの開発に参加するだけでなく
22:03
but utilize the designs. Also, a process of reviewing the designs.
デザインを利用し 
またデザインのレビューにも参加するというものです
22:07
I want every Arup engineer in the world to check
アラップ社のエンジニアは世界最高です
22:12
and make sure that we're doing stuff that's standing,
だから世界中にいる彼らが接続して
22:15
because those guys are the best in the world. Plug.
僕達が現実化できる方向に向かっていることを
確かめて欲しいのです
22:18
And so you know, I want these -- and I just should note,
だから僕はこれらが -- ちょっと付け加えると
22:21
I have two laptops and one of them there, is there
僕はラップトップを二台持っていて 一つはこれです
22:26
and that has 3000 designs on it. If I drop that laptop, what happens?
ここには3千人のデザイナーが登録されています 
僕がこのラップトップを落としたら どうなりますか?
22:29
So it's important to have these proven ideas put up there,
だからこれらの実証済みのアイデアが使いやすく
22:36
easy to use, easy to get a hold of.
アクセスしやすいようにアップされていることが重要です
22:39
My mom once said, there's nothing worse than being all mouth and no trousers.
母がこう言ったことがあります
口ばっかりで実行に移せないほど悪いことはありません
22:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
22:49
I'm fed up of talking about making change.
変化について話すのはうんざりです
22:50
You only make it by doing it.
行動に移さないと
22:53
We've changed FEMA guidelines. We've changed public policy.
僕達はFEMAのガイドラインを変えました
国の政策を変えました
22:56
We've changed international response -- based on building things.
僕達は国際的な反応を変えました-
ものを建てることを基に
22:59
So for me, it's important that we create a real conduit
僕としては イノベーションの本当のパイプ役を
23:04
for innovation, and that it's free innovation.
作ること が重要で 
それは フリーイノベーションです
23:07
Think of free culture -- this is free innovation.
フリーカルチャーのように
これは フリーイノベーションです
23:10
Somebody said this a couple of years back.
誰かが数年前にこう言いました
23:15
I will give points for those who know it.
これを知っている人には得点をさしあげましょう
23:19
I think the man was maybe 25 years too early, so let's do it.
「1985年までには、全人類は、
誰も犠牲にせず高水準の生活が可能となる」
彼は25年早過ぎました 今がその時です
23:21
Thank you.
ありがとう
23:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
23:31
Translated by Kayo Mizutani
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Cameron Sinclair - Co-founder, Architecture for Humanity
2006 TED Prize winner Cameron Sinclair is co-founder of Architecture for Humanity, a nonprofit that seeks architecture solutions to global crises -- and acts as a conduit between the design community and the world's humanitarian needs.

Why you should listen

After training as an architect, Cameron Sinclair (then age 24) joined Kate Stohr to found Architecture for Humanity, a nonprofit that helps architects apply their skills to humanitarian efforts. Starting with just $700 and a simple web site in 1999, AFH has grown into an international hub for humanitarian design, offering innovative solutions to housing problems in all corners of the globe.

Whether rebuilding earthquake-ravaged Bam in Iran, designing a soccer field doubling as an HIV/AIDS clinic in Africa, housing refugees on the Afghan border, or helping Katrina victims rebuild, Architecture for Humanity works by Sinclair's mantra: "Design like you give a damn." (Sinclair and Stohr cowrote a book by the same name, released in 2006.)

A regular contributor to the sustainability blog Worldchanging.com, Sinclair is now working on the Open Architecture Network, born from the wish he made when he accepted the 2006 TED Prize: to build a global, open-source network where architects, governments and NGOs can share and implement design plans to house the world.

More profile about the speaker
Cameron Sinclair | Speaker | TED.com