sponsored links
TED2011

Carlo Ratti: Architecture that senses and responds

カルロ・ラッティ: 感知し、応答する建築

March 2, 2011

MIT のカルロ・ラッティと SENSEable City Lab チームは、私たちが作り出すデータを読み取って興味深いものを作り出しています。例えば電話記録や廃棄ゴミといったデータから、都市生活を見事に視覚化しています。またラッティらのチームはセンサでキャプチャした簡単なジェスチャーを基礎とした、動く水や飛ぶ光などで構成されたインタラクティブな建築物を創造しています。

Carlo Ratti - Architect and engineer
Carlo Ratti directs the MIT SENSEable City Lab, which explores the "real-time city" by studying the way sensors and electronics relate to the built environment. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Good afternoon, everybody.
皆さんこんにちは
00:15
I've got something to show you.
今日はあるものをお持ちしました
00:17
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:37
Think about this as a pixel, a flying pixel.
これを空飛ぶピクセルだと考えてください
00:39
This is what we call, in our lab, sensible design.
これが我々のラボでセンシブルデザインと呼んでいるものです
00:42
Let me tell you a bit about it.
まずこれについてお話しします
00:45
Now if you take this picture -- I'm Italian originally,
こちらの写真をご覧ください
00:47
and every boy in Italy grows up
私は元々イタリア人なのですが
00:50
with this picture on the wall of his bedroom --
イタリアの子は寝室にこの絵を飾って育ちます
00:52
but the reason I'm showing you this
この写真をお見せした理由は
00:54
is that something very interesting
この数十年間で
00:56
happened in Formula 1 racing
フォーミュラワンレースに
00:58
over the past couple of decades.
とても興味深いことが起こったからです
01:00
Now some time ago,
少し前までは
01:02
if you wanted to win a Formula 1 race,
もし F1 レースで勝ちたければ
01:04
you take a budget, and you bet your budget
運営費を獲得し それを素晴らしい
01:06
on a good driver and a good car.
ドライバーと車につぎ込めば良かったのです
01:08
And if the car and the driver were good enough, then you'd win the race.
車とドライバーが十分に良ければレースに勝てました
01:11
Now today, if you want to win the race,
今日 レースに勝ちたいと思ったら
01:14
actually you need also something like this --
このようなものが必要になります
01:16
something that monitors the car in real time,
リアルタイムに車をモニタします
01:19
has a few thousand sensors
千個以上のセンサで
01:22
collecting information from the car,
車から情報を収集し
01:24
transmitting this information into the system,
その情報をシステムに送り
01:26
and then processing it
処理します
01:29
and using it in order to go back to the car with decisions
情報収集と並行して
01:31
and changing things in real time
車へ評価を送り返し
01:34
as information is collected.
リアルタイムで変更を加えていくのです
01:36
This is what, in engineering terms,
これは工学用語で
01:38
you would call a real time control system.
リアルタイム制御システムと呼ばれるものです
01:40
And basically, it's a system made of two components --
これは基本的に二つの要素から成っています
01:43
a sensing and an actuating component.
センサとアクチュエータです
01:46
What is interesting today
本日お話しする内容で面白いのは
01:48
is that real time control systems
リアルタイム制御システムが
01:50
are starting to enter into our lives.
我々の生活でも使われ始めているということです
01:52
Our cities, over the past few years,
この数年で我々の都市は
01:55
just have been blanketed
ネットワークや電子機器で
01:58
with networks, electronics.
覆われるようになりました
02:00
They're becoming like computers in open air.
空気中にコンピュータが存在するが如くです
02:02
And, as computers in open air,
そしてこのコンピュータは
02:04
they're starting to respond in a different way
以前とは違う働きをしはじめます
02:06
to be able to be sensed and to be actuated.
センシングおよびアクチュエートされるようにです
02:08
If we fix cities, actually it's a big deal.
全都市を整えるのは大変なことです
02:11
Just as an aside, I wanted to mention,
ちなみに
02:13
cities are only two percent of the Earth's crust,
都市は地球の 2% しか占めていませんが
02:15
but they are 50 percent of the world's population.
そこは世界人口の 50% も占めています
02:19
They are 75 percent of the energy consumption --
また消費エネルギーの 75 % を占め
02:22
up to 80 percent of CO2 emissions.
最大で CO2 排出量の 80% を担います
02:25
So if we're able to do something with cities, that's a big deal.
以上から 都市を変化させるのは大変なことだと分かります
02:28
Beyond cities,
あらゆる都市で
02:31
all of this sensing and actuating
センシングやアクチュエーティングが
02:33
is entering our everyday objects.
私たちの日常に入り込んできています
02:36
That's from an exhibition that
こちらは夏に
02:38
Paola Antonelli is organizing
Paola Antonelli さんが運営している
02:40
at MoMA later this year, during the summer.
MoMA で発表されたものです
02:42
It's called "Talk to Me."
これは”Talk to Me”というものです
02:44
Well our objects, our environment
物や環境が私たちに
02:46
is starting to talk back to us.
語り返し始めてきているのです
02:48
In a certain sense, it's almost as if every atom out there
ある意味 そこに存在する原子全てが
02:50
were becoming both a sensor and an actuator.
センサとアクチュエータへと変化していくかのようです
02:53
And that is radically changing the interaction we have as humans
それは私たち人間と環境との相互作用を
02:56
with the environment out there.
根本的に変えていっています
02:59
In a certain sense,
ある意味でそれは
03:01
it's almost as if the old dream of Michelangelo ...
ミケランジェロの古い夢でのことのようです
03:03
you know, when Michelangelo sculpted the Moses,
ミケランジェロがモーゼスを彫ったとき
03:06
at the end it said that he took the hammer, threw it at the Moses --
ハンマーをモーゼスに投げつけ
03:08
actually you can still see a small chip underneath --
現在でもその時の破片が下に残っているのですが
03:11
and said, shouted,
投げつけてこう叫びました
03:14
"Perché non parli? Why don't you talk?"
「なぜ何も語らない?」
03:16
Well today, for the first time,
そして今日 初めて環境が
03:18
our environment is starting to talk back to us.
私たちに語り返し始めています
03:20
And I'll show just a few examples --
これからお見せする例もまた
03:23
again, with this idea of sensing our environment and actuating it.
環境のセンシングとアクチュエーティングというアイディアです
03:25
Let's starting with sensing.
まずはセンシングについてお話しします
03:28
Well, the first project I wanted to share with you
最初にお見せするプロジェクトは
03:31
is actually one of the first projects by our lab.
実は私たちのラボの最初のプロジェクトです
03:33
It was four and a half years ago in Italy.
4 年半前のイタリアでのことです
03:36
And what we did there
私たちはそこで
03:39
was actually use a new type of network at the time
当時としては新しいタイプのネットワークであり
03:41
that had been deployed all across the world --
世界中に展開されている
03:43
that's a cellphone network --
ケータイネットワークを利用しました
03:45
and use anonymous and aggregated information from that network,
そのネットワークから匿名な統計データを
03:47
that's collected anyway by the operator,
オペレータが収集し
03:49
in order to understand
都市の働きの理解のために
03:51
how the city works.
利用しました
03:53
The summer was a lucky summer -- 2006.
2006 年の夏は幸運でした
03:55
It's when Italy won the soccer World Cup.
イタリアがサッカーワールドカップで勝利した年です
03:58
Some of you might remember, it was Italy and France playing,
覚えている方もおいででしょうが
04:01
and then Zidane at the end, the headbutt.
イタリア対フランス戦でジタンが頭突きをしました
04:04
And anyway, Italy won at the end.
とにかく イタリアが最終的には勝利しました
04:06
(Laughter)
(笑い)
04:08
Now look at what happened that day
ではその日に何が起きたかを
04:10
just by monitoring activity
モニタ記録だけから
04:12
happening on the network.
ネットワークの動きを見ましょう
04:14
Here you see the city.
こちらが都市です
04:16
You see the Colosseum in the middle,
真ん中にコロシアムと
04:18
the river Tiber.
テベレ川があります
04:21
It's morning, before the match.
これは試合前 朝のデータです
04:24
You see the timeline on the top.
上部にタイムラインが表示されています
04:26
Early afternoon,
お昼過ぎ
04:28
people here and there,
人々があちらこちらへ
04:30
making calls and moving.
電話をかけ 移動をしています
04:32
The match begins -- silence.
試合が始まり -- 静寂です
04:34
France scores. Italy scores.
フランスがゴールを決め イタリアがゴールを決め
04:37
Halftime, people make a quick call and go to the bathroom.
ハーフタイムに皆短い電話をかけたりトイレへ行きます
04:40
Second half. End of normal time.
後半戦 そして後半の終わり
04:44
First overtime, second.
延長戦の前半 そして後半
04:46
Zidane, the headbutt in a moment.
ジダンの頭突きの瞬間です
04:48
Italy wins. Yeah.
そしてイタリアの勝利 イェーイ
04:51
(Laughter)
(笑い)
04:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:55
Well, that night, everybody went to celebrate in the center.
その晩は皆が中央でお祝いをしに行きました
04:58
You saw the big peak.
大きなピークがあるのが分かります
05:00
The following day, again everybody went to the center
翌日 皆が中央へ
05:02
to meet the winning team
勝利したチームを見に行きました
05:04
and the prime minister at the time.
時の首相もです
05:07
And then everybody moved down.
その後皆落ち着いていきます
05:09
You see the image of the place called Circo Massimo,
チルコ・マッシモという場所がありますが
05:11
where, since Roman times, people go to celebrate,
ローマの時代より人々はここで盛大なパーティを開きました
05:13
to have a big party, and you see the peak at the end of the day.
そこでその日の終わりにピークがあります
05:16
Well, that's just one example of how we can sense the city today
以上が今日の都市センシングの一例です
05:19
in a way that we couldn't have done
ほんの数年前には
05:21
just a few years ago.
出来なかったことでした
05:23
Another quick example about sensing:
センシングに関してもう一例挙げます
05:25
it's not about people,
今度は人ではなく
05:27
but about things we use and consume.
私たちの消費に関するセンシングです
05:29
Well today, we know everything
今日 私たちは物が
05:31
about where our objects come from.
どこから来るのか全て分かります
05:33
This is a map that shows you
こちらの地図が示すのは
05:36
all the chips that form a Mac computer, how they came together.
マックコンピュータに使われる全ての部品が集まる経路ですが
05:38
But we know very little about where things go.
物がどこへ行くかについて 私たちはあまり知りません
05:41
So in this project,
従って私たちのプロジェクトでは
05:44
we actually developed some small tags
小さなタグを開発し
05:46
to track trash as it moves through the system.
システム内でのゴミの移動を記録しました
05:48
So we actually started with a number of volunteers
私たちは協力してくれた数名のボランティアと共に
05:51
who helped us in Seattle,
シアトルでプロジェクトを開始しました
05:54
just over a year ago,
たった一年前のことです
05:56
to tag what they were throwing away --
人々が何を捨てるかをタグ付けました
05:58
different types of things, as you can see here --
ご覧の通り捨てられる物には
06:01
things they would throw away anyway.
さまざまな物があります
06:04
Then we put a little chip, little tag,
私たちは小さなチップ タグを
06:06
onto the trash
ゴミに付け
06:08
and then started following it.
追跡を開始しました
06:10
Here are the results we just obtained.
こちらはその結果です
06:12
(Music)
(♫ 音楽 ♫)
06:15
From Seattle ...
シアトルから……
06:18
after one week.
一週間後です
06:26
With this information we realized
この情報から私たちは
06:53
there's a lot of inefficiencies in the system.
システムに膨大な無駄があることに気づきました
06:55
We can actually do the same thing with much less energy.
同様のことが より少ないエネルギーで実現できます
06:57
This data was not available before.
これはこれまで参照できなかったデータです
07:00
But there's a lot of wasted transportation and convoluted things happening.
無駄な輸送が沢山あり 複雑なことになっています
07:02
But the other thing is that we believe
それとはまた別に 私たちが信じるのは
07:05
that if we see every day
もし毎日閲覧すると
07:07
that the cup we're throwing away, it doesn't disappear,
例えばカップを捨てたとしてもそれは消えずに
07:09
it's still somewhere on the planet.
この惑星のどこかにまだ存在しているのが見えます
07:11
And the plastic bottle we're throwing away every day still stays there.
そして私たちが毎日捨てる ペットボトルはそこに残ります
07:13
And if we show that to people,
これを人々に提示すれば
07:16
then we can also promote some behavioral change.
行動の変化を促していけるでしょう
07:18
So that was the reason for the project.
こういった理由でプロジェクトを始めました
07:20
My colleague at MIT, Assaf Biderman,
私の同僚である MIT の Assaf Biderman は
07:22
he could tell you much more about sensing
センシングの詳細と それを用いて
07:24
and many other wonderful things we can do with sensing,
実現できる素晴らしいことについて語れますが
07:26
but I wanted to go to the second part we discussed at the beginning,
ここで私は次に進んで 最初にお話しした
07:28
and that's actuating our environment.
環境へのアクチュエーティングについてお話しします
07:31
And the first project
最初のプロジェクトは
07:33
is something we did a couple of years ago in Zaragoza, Spain.
スペインのサラゴサで数年前に行いました
07:35
It started with a question by the mayor of the city,
プロジェクトのきっかけは市長の質問で
07:38
who came to us saying
私たちの所を訪ねて
07:41
that Spain and Southern Europe have a beautiful tradition
スペインや南ヨーロッパは素晴らしい伝統があり
07:43
of using water in public space, in architecture.
公共の建築物に水を用いる 事の話をしている時です
07:46
And the question was: How could technology, new technology,
その時の質問は その伝統にどのように新しいテクノロジーを
07:49
be added to that?
付与できるかというものでした
07:51
And one of the ideas that was developed at MIT in a workshop
MIT のワークショップで開発されたアイデアの一つですが
07:53
was, imagine this pipe, and you've got valves,
このようなパイプとバルブを想像してください
07:56
solenoid valves, taps,
つまみが付いた電磁弁で
07:59
opening and closing.
開閉します
08:01
You create like a water curtain with pixels made of water.
水から成るピクセルを用いたウォーターカーテンを作りました
08:03
If those pixels fall,
ピクセルを降らせ
08:06
you can write on it,
その上に
08:08
you can show patterns, images, text.
パターン 絵 文字などを表現できます
08:10
And even you can approach it, and it will open up
近づくことも可能です すると
08:12
to let you jump through,
ジャンプして通れるように
08:14
as you see in this image.
こちらの写真のように開きます
08:16
Well, we presented this to Mayor Belloch.
こちらをベヨッホ市長にお見せしたところ
08:18
He liked it very much.
大変気に入られ
08:20
And we got a commission to design a building
サラゴサ国際博覧会の入り口の建物のデザインを
08:22
at the entrance of the expo.
受注することになりました
08:24
We called it Digital Water Pavilion.
私たちはデジタルウォーターパビリオンと名付けました
08:26
The whole building is made of water.
建物全体が水で出来ています
08:28
There's no doors or windows,
ドアも窓もありませんが
08:33
but when you approach it,
近づくと
08:35
it will open up to let you in.
入れるように開きます
08:37
(Music)
(♫ 音楽 ♫)
08:39
The roof also is covered with water.
天井も水で覆われています
08:52
And if there's a bit of wind,
また風があるときには
08:57
if you want to minimize splashing, you can actually lower the roof.
水しぶきを減らすために天井を下げることも可能です
08:59
Or you could close the building,
もしくは建物をしまうこともできます
09:04
and the whole architecture will disappear,
するとこのように建物全体が
09:06
like in this case.
消えます
09:08
You know, these days, you always get images during the winter,
知っての通り最近では 冬に持つイメージとして
09:10
when they take the roof down,
建物の屋根を下げていると
09:12
of people who have been there and said, "They demolished the building."
ここ訪れる人たちは「建物が撤去された」といつも言いますが
09:14
No, they didn't demolish it, just when it goes down,
そうではないのです
09:17
the architecture almost disappears.
屋根が下がると建物も消えるだけです
09:19
Here's the building working.
これは建物が動いている様子です
09:21
You see the person puzzled about what was going on inside.
何がおこっているのか不思議そうに見ている人がいます
09:24
And here was myself trying not to get wet,
これは私が濡れないように
09:27
testing the sensors that open the water.
水を開くセンサのテストをしているところです
09:29
Well, I should tell you now what happened one night
さて ある夜の出来事をお話しします
09:32
when all of the sensors stopped working.
全てのセンサが停止しました
09:34
But actually that night, it was even more fun.
しかし その夜はいつもより楽しかったです
09:37
All the kids from Zaragoza came to the building,
サラゴサ中の子供が集まりました
09:40
because the way of engaging with the building became something different.
なぜならこの建物への関わり方が変わったからです
09:42
Not anymore a building that would open up to let you in,
近づいてもウォーターカーテンは開きませんが
09:45
but a building that would still make cuts and holes through the water,
水に切れ目や穴は作りますので
09:48
and you had to jump without getting wet.
濡れずに入るには飛び込むしかありません
09:51
(Video) (Crowd Noise)
(映像) (民衆の声)
09:53
And that was, for us, was very interesting,
それは 私たちにとって非常に興味深いことでした
10:06
because, as architects, as engineers, as designers,
なぜなら 建築家 技術者 設計者として
10:08
we always think about how people will use the things we design.
私たちは常にユーザがどう扱うかを考えていますが
10:11
But then reality's always unpredictable.
現実は常に予想が外れます
10:14
And that's the beauty of doing things
そしてこれこそが人々に関わる
10:17
that are used and interact with people.
物作りの醍醐味です。
10:19
Here is an image then of the building
この画像は建物の様子と
10:21
with the physical pixels, the pixels made of water,
水からできている物質的なピクセルへ
10:23
and then projections on them.
投影している様子です
10:25
And this is what led us to think about
これこそが次にお見せするプロジェクトを
10:28
the following project I'll show you now.
考えるきっかけとなりました
10:30
That's, imagine those pixels could actually start flying.
このピクセルが実際に飛ぶところを想像してください
10:32
Imagine you could have small helicopters
小さなヘリコプターを
10:35
that move in the air,
空中で動き
10:37
and then each of them with a small pixel in changing lights --
それぞれの小さいピクセルが色を変えながら
10:39
almost as a cloud that can move in space.
雲のように移動するのを想像して下さい
10:42
Here is the video.
こちらがそのビデオです
10:45
(Music)
(♫ 音楽 ♫)
10:47
So imagine one helicopter,
先ほど見たような
10:53
like the one we saw before,
ヘリコプターを想像してください
10:56
moving with others,
他のピクセルと動き
11:01
in synchrony.
同期します
11:04
So you can have this cloud.
すると このような雲ができます
11:06
You can have a kind of flexible screen or display, like this --
このような柔軟なディスプレイを作ることも可能です
11:15
a regular configuration in two dimensions.
二次元の通常の構造をしています
11:19
Or in regular, but in three dimensions,
通常の構造を三次元空間で
11:29
where the thing that changes is the light,
光を変化させます
11:32
not the pixels' position.
ピクセルの位置はそのまま
11:34
You can play with a different type.
さまざまな表現が可能です
11:46
Imagine your screen could just appear
スクリーンが現れ
11:48
in different scales or sizes,
異なる比率 サイズ 解像度に
11:50
different types of resolution.
自在に変化するところを想像してください
11:53
But then the whole thing can be
また 全体を
12:05
just a 3D cloud of pixels
3Dピクセルの集まりとして
12:07
that you can approach and move through it
近づき 入り込む事を
12:09
and see from many, many directions.
様々な方向から行う事もできます
12:12
Here is the real Flyfire
これが本物の Flyfire です
12:15
control and going down to form the regular grid as before.
先程の通常のグリッドを作るために下降させています
12:17
When you turn on the light, actually you see this. So the same as we saw before.
照明を付けると実はこうなっています
12:21
And imagine each of them then controlled by people.
これが人々によって制御されるところを想像してください
12:24
You can have each pixel
それぞれのピクセルが
12:26
having an input that comes from people,
入力として人や
12:28
from people's movement, or so and so.
人の行動などから受け取ります
12:30
I want to show you something here for the first time.
ここで初めて見せたい物があります
12:32
We've been working with Roberto Bolle,
私たちは仕事を Roberto Bolle さん
12:35
one of today's top ballet dancers --
当代有名なバレーダンサーで
12:37
the étoile at Metropolitan in New York
ニューヨーク メトロポリタンと
12:39
and La Scala in Milan --
ミラン スカラ座のスター と行い
12:41
and actually captured his movement in 3D
3D キャプチャで彼の動きを捉え
12:43
in order to use it as an input for Flyfire.
フライファイアの入力に用いました
12:45
And here you can see Roberto dancing.
こちらが Roberto が踊っている様子です
12:48
You see on the left the pixels,
左側のピクセルを見ると
12:53
the different resolutions being captured.
異なる解像度でキャプチャしていることが分かります
12:55
It's both 3D scanning in real time
これはリアルタイムの 3D スキャンと
12:57
and motion capture.
モーションキャプチャの両方を用いています
12:59
So you can reconstruct a whole movement.
それによって動きを全て再構成できます
13:03
You can go all the way through.
こういったことまで可能です
13:10
But then, once we have the pixels, then you can play with them
一度ピクセルを作れば 好きなように使えます
13:16
and play with color and movement
色や動きを変更できます
13:18
and gravity and rotation.
重力や回転も利用できます
13:21
So we want to use this as one of the possible inputs
入力の一つの可能性として私たちはこれを
13:24
for Flyfire.
Flyfire に使いたいのです
13:26
I wanted to show you the last project we are working on.
私は直近のプロジェクトをお見せしたいと思います
13:47
It's something we're working on for the London Olympics.
これはロンドンオリンピックに向けて作っているもので
13:49
It's called The Cloud.
The Cloud と呼びます
13:51
And the idea here is, imagine, again,
このアイディアも想像で
13:53
we can involve people
人々の参画と
13:55
in doing something and changing our environment --
それによる環境の変化を取り入れています
13:57
almost to impart what we call cloud raising --
雲上げと呼ぶこの活動は
14:00
like barn raising, but with a cloud.
棟上げを雲で表しています
14:02
Imagine you can have everybody make a small donation for one pixel.
1 ピクセルに対して皆が少額の寄付を行えるのを想像してください
14:04
And I think what is remarkable
私は とても素晴らしく思うのは
14:08
that has happened over the past couple of years
ここ数年間で行われた
14:10
is that, over the past couple of decades,
ここ数十年間で行われていた
14:12
we went from the physical world to the digital one.
アナログ界から物質界への移行だと思います
14:14
This has been digitizing everything, knowledge,
これによって知識など 全てがデジタル化され
14:17
and making that accessible through the Internet.
インターネットを通してアクセス可能になりました
14:19
Now today, for the first time --
今日 史上初めて
14:21
and the Obama campaign showed us this --
オバマキャンペーンでも示されましたが
14:23
we can go from the digital world,
私たちはデジタルの世界から
14:25
from the self-organizing power of networks,
ネットワークの自己組織力を通して
14:27
to the physical one.
物質界へ行けるようになりました
14:29
This can be, in our case,
これは 私達の場合
14:31
we want to use it for designing and doing a symbol.
シンボルの設計と利用に使いたいと思います
14:33
That means something built in a city.
都市に組み込んだ意味としてです
14:35
But tomorrow it can be,
しかし明日には
14:37
in order to tackle today's pressing challenges --
今日迫ってくる挑戦に取り組む事によって
14:39
think about climate change or CO2 emissions --
例えば気候変動や二酸化炭素排出について考える事によって
14:42
how we can go from the digital world to the physical one.
デジタル界から物質界への移行方法が実現します
14:44
So the idea that we can actually involve people
私たちの人々を参画させるアイディアで
14:47
in doing this thing together, collectively.
皆を集合的にまとめ行います
14:49
The cloud is a cloud, again, made of pixels,
The Cloud は雲であり ピクセルで作られています
14:51
in the same way as the real cloud
実際の雲と同様に
14:54
is a cloud made of particles.
粒子から成っています
14:56
And those particles are water,
雲の粒子は水ですが
14:58
where our cloud is a cloud of pixels.
私たちの雲はピクセルの雲です
15:00
It's a physical structure in London, but covered with pixels.
これはロンドンにある物質界の建築物ですが、ピクセルで覆われています
15:02
You can move inside, have different types of experiences.
内部で動き 様々な体験ができます
15:05
You can actually see from underneath,
下部から見上げることもでき
15:07
sharing the main moments
重要な瞬間な共有を
15:09
for the Olympics in 2012 and beyond,
2012のオリンピックとその後もできます
15:11
and really using it as a way to connect with the community.
そしてコミュニティとの繋がりに利用できます
15:14
So both the physical cloud in the sky
なので 空にある物質的な雲に加え
15:18
and something you can go to the top [of],
一番上まで登ることのできる
15:22
like London's new mountaintop.
ロンドンの新たな山頂のようなものとなります
15:25
You can enter inside it.
中に入ることはできます
15:27
And a kind of new digital beacon for the night --
新しいデジタル灯台とも表現できますが
15:29
but most importantly,
最も重要なの事は
15:32
a new type of experience for anybody who will go to the top.
登頂者全員に新しい体験をしてもらうことです
15:34
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
15:37
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:39
Translator:Keiichi Kudo
Reviewer:nn-- nn--

sponsored links

Carlo Ratti - Architect and engineer
Carlo Ratti directs the MIT SENSEable City Lab, which explores the "real-time city" by studying the way sensors and electronics relate to the built environment.

Why you should listen

Carlo Ratti is a civil engineer and architect who teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he directs the SENSEable City Laboratory. This lab studies the built environment of cities -- from street grids to plumbing and garbage systems -- using new kinds of sensors and hand-held electronics that have transformed the way we can describe and understand cities.

Other projects flip this equation -- using data gathered from sensors to actually create dazzling new environments. The Digital Water Pavilion, for instance, reacts to visitors by parting a stream of water to let them visit. And a project for the 2012 Olympics in London turns a pavilion building into a cloud of blinking interactive art. He's opening a research center in Singapore as part of an MIT-led initiative on the Future of Urban Mobility.

For more information on the projects in this talk, visit SENSEable @ TED >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.