18:16
TED2011

Béatrice Coron: Stories cut from paper

ベアトリス・コロン「紙から切り取る物語」

Filmed:

芸術家のベアトリス・コロンは、はさみと紙を使って、入り組んだ世界や街、国、天国や地獄を作ります。タイベックという素材を切って作った華やかなケープに身を包み、ステージを歩き回りながら、自身の創造の過程や、物語が断片からいかに成長していくのかを語ります。

- Papercutter artist
Béatrice Coron has developed a language of storytelling by papercutting multi-layered stories. Full bio

(Applause)
(拍手)
00:18
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:32
I am a papercutter.
私は切り絵師です
00:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:45
I cut stories.
物語を切り取ります
00:47
So my process is very straightforward.
行うことはとても単純です
00:50
I take a piece of paper,
紙を手に取って
00:53
I visualize my story,
物語を思い浮かべます
00:55
sometimes I sketch, sometimes I don't.
スケッチをする時もあれば しない時もあります
00:58
And as my image
イメージは
01:01
is already inside the paper,
もう紙の中にあるので
01:03
I just have to remove
私がすべきことは
01:06
what's not from that story.
物語に含まれない部分を切り落とすだけです
01:08
So I didn't come to papercutting
私はすんなりと切り絵の世界に
01:11
in a straight line.
入った訳ではありません
01:14
In fact,
実のところ
01:16
I see it more as a spiral.
紆余曲折がありました
01:18
I was not born
私は 生まれながらの
01:20
with a blade in my hand.
切り絵師ではありません
01:22
And I don't remember papercutting as a child.
子どもの頃に切り絵をした記憶もありません
01:25
As a teenager,
10代の時には
01:28
I was sketching, drawing,
デッサンをしたり絵を描いたりして
01:30
and I wanted to be an artist.
芸術家になりたいと思っていました
01:32
But I was also a rebel.
でも人並みな暮らしに対する反抗心もあり
01:34
And I left everything
全てを捨てて 長いこと
01:38
and went for a long series of odd jobs.
いろいろと風変わりな仕事をしてきました
01:40
So among them,
例えば
01:44
I have been a shepherdess,
羊飼いや
01:46
a truck driver,
トラックの運転手
01:49
a factory worker,
工場の労働者に
01:51
a cleaning lady.
清掃員などもしました
01:53
I worked in tourism for one year
旅行業界にも身を置いて
01:55
in Mexico,
メキシコで1年
01:57
one year in Egypt.
エジプトにも1年
01:59
I moved for two years
台湾には
02:02
in Taiwan.
2年住みました
02:04
And then I settled in New York
その後ニューヨークを拠点に
02:06
where I became a tour guide.
ツアーガイドになりました
02:08
And I still worked as a tour leader,
また ツアーリーダーとして
02:10
traveled back and forth
中国やチベット 中央アジアなどを
02:13
in China, Tibet and Central Asia.
行ったり来たりしていました
02:15
So of course, it took time, and I was nearly 40,
そしていつの間にか40歳近くになり
02:18
and I decided it's time
アーティストとしての活動を
02:21
to start as an artist.
始めるべき時が来たと決意しました
02:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:27
I chose papercutting
切り絵を選んだのは
02:32
because paper is cheap,
紙は安価だし
02:34
it's light,
軽くて
02:36
and you can use it
いろいろな方法で
02:38
in a lot of different ways.
使うことができるからです
02:40
And I chose the language of silhouette
また私がシルエットという表現法を選んだのは
02:42
because graphically it's very efficient.
それが視覚的にとても効果的だからです
02:46
And it's also just getting to the essential of things.
それに シルエットは物事の本質を表すことができます
02:49
So the word "silhouette"
「シルエット」という言葉は
02:55
comes from a minister of finance,
18世紀のフランスの財務大臣
02:57
Etienne de Silhouette.
エティエンヌ・ド・シルエットに由来します
03:00
And he slashed so many budgets
彼が財政を大幅に削ったため
03:03
that people said they couldn't afford
人々は
03:07
paintings anymore,
油絵を買う余裕がなくなり
03:09
and they needed to have their portrait
肖像画は影絵 つまり”シルエット"で
03:11
"a la silhouette."
済ませるようになったのです
03:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:15
So I made series of images, cuttings,
私はさまざまなイメージを作り 編集し
03:17
and I assembled them in portfolios.
それらを組み合わせて作品を作ります
03:23
And people told me --
私の作品を見た人は -
03:28
like these 36 views of the Empire State building --
例えばこの「エンパイア・ステート・ビルの36景」などです -
03:30
they told me, "You're making artist books."
「作品集を作っているのですね」と言います
03:33
So artist books have a lot of definitions.
作品集にはさまざまな定義があり
03:37
They come in a lot of different shapes.
いろいろな形を取ります
03:40
But to me,
でも私にとって作品集とは
03:43
they are fascinating objects
物語を視覚的に語るための
03:45
to visually narrate a story.
魅力的な成果物なのです
03:47
They can be with words
言葉は
03:50
or without words.
あってもなくても構いません
03:52
And I have a passion
私は イメージも言葉も
03:55
for images and for words.
大好きです
03:57
I love pun
駄洒落が好きですし
04:00
and the relation to the unconscious.
無意識との関わりや
04:02
I love oddities of languages.
様々な言語の持つおかしさも好きです
04:05
And everywhere I lived, I learned the languages,
引っ越す度に現地の言葉を学びましたが
04:08
but never mastered them.
どれもマスターするには至りませんでした
04:10
So I'm always looking
私はいつも
04:12
for the false cognates
別の言語で偶然似ている言葉や
04:14
or identical words in different languages.
同一の意味を持つ言葉を探しています
04:16
So as you can guess, my mother tongue is French.
おわかりのように 私の母国語はフランス語です
04:19
And my daily language is English.
日常では英語を使っています
04:22
So I did a series of work
だから フランス語と英語で
04:26
where it was identical words
同じ言葉を素材に
04:28
in French and in English.
いろんな作品を作って来ました
04:31
So one of these works
その一つが
04:34
is the "Spelling Spider."
「つづりの蜘蛛」です
04:36
So the Spelling Spider
つづりの蜘蛛は
04:38
is a cousin of the spelling bee.
spelling bee (つづりコンテスト) の親戚です
04:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:43
But it's much more connected to the Web.
でも もっとずっとウェブとつながっています
04:45
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:48
And this spider
この蜘蛛は
04:50
spins a bilingual alphabet.
二ヶ国語でアルファベットを紡ぎます
04:52
So you can read "architecture active"
”活動的な建築” という言葉の単語を並べ替えれば
04:55
or "active architecture."
英語風にもフランス語風にも読むことができます
04:59
So this spider goes through the whole alphabet
AからZまでのアルファベットを使って
05:02
with identical adjectives and substantives.
両方の言葉で形容詞 名詞の同一なものを紡いでいきます
05:05
So if you don't know one of these languages,
片方の言葉がわからない人にとっては
05:09
it's instant learning.
気軽な学習になります
05:12
And one ancient form of the book
昔の本には
05:16
is scrolls.
巻物という形をとるものがあります
05:19
So scrolls are very convenient,
巻物が便利なのは
05:21
because you can create a large image
大きな絵を
05:24
on a very small table.
小さな机の上で描けるところです
05:27
So the unexpected consequences of that
そこから予期せぬ結果が生まれます
05:31
is that you only see one part of your image,
絵の一部しか見えないので
05:35
so it makes a very freestyle architecture.
とても自由な構造になるのです
05:40
And I'm making all those kinds of windows.
私は このような窓もよく作品に取り入れます
05:44
So it's to look beyond the surface.
表面的なところを超えてものを見るため
05:48
It's to have a look
そして 異なる世界を
05:51
at different worlds.
見るためです
05:53
And very often I've been an outsider.
私はしばしば部外者でした
05:55
So I want to see how things work
だから 物事の仕組みや何が起きているのか
05:57
and what's happening.
ということを知りたいのです
06:00
So each window
一つ一つの窓が
06:02
is an image
イメージであり
06:04
and is a world
私がしばしば再訪する
06:06
that I often revisit.
世界なのです
06:08
And I revisit this world
再訪するときに考えるのは
06:10
thinking about the image
自分たちは何をしたいのか
06:12
or cliché about what we want to do,
自分たちは表現手法として
06:14
and what are the words, colloquialisms,
どのような言葉を持っているのかという
06:17
that we have with the expressions.
イメージや決まり文句のことです
06:19
It's all if.
すべては仮定です
06:22
So what if we were living in balloon houses?
もし私たちが風船の家に住んでいたら?
06:25
It would make a very uplifting world.
とても高揚感がある世界になるでしょう
06:30
And we would leave a very low footprint on the planet.
地球への負担も大きく減って
06:34
It would be so light.
軽い世界になるはずです
06:39
So sometimes I view from the inside,
時に私は内側から物事を見ます
06:42
like EgoCentriCity
それがこの自己中心の街と
06:47
and the inner circles.
その内側の輪です
06:49
Sometimes it's a global view,
別の機会には グローバルな視点を持ち
06:52
to see our common roots
私たちの共通のルーツや それを
06:55
and how we can use them to catch dreams.
夢をつかむためにどのように使えるのかを探ります
06:58
And we can use them also
共通のルーツはまた
07:02
as a safety net.
セーフティ・ネットとしても使えます
07:04
And my inspirations
私はさまざまなものから
07:06
are very eclectic.
ひらめきを受けます
07:09
I'm influenced by everything I read,
読むもの全て 見るもの全てから
07:13
everything I see.
影響を受けています
07:16
I have some stories that are humorous,
「死のビート」のような
07:19
like "Dead Beats."
ユーモラスな物語も作っています
07:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:25
Other ones are historical.
歴史的な物語もあります
07:28
Here it's "CandyCity."
これは「キャンディ・シティ」です
07:30
It's a non-sugar-coated
ありのままの
07:32
history of sugar.
砂糖の歴史です
07:34
It goes from slave trade
奴隷貿易から
07:36
to over-consumption of sugar
砂糖の過剰消費まで取り上げています
07:39
with some sweet moments in between.
中には甘美な話も含まれています
07:42
And sometimes I have an emotional response to news,
2010年のハイチ大地震のように
07:46
such as the 2010 Haitian earthquake.
ニュースを見て感情的になることもあります
07:49
Other times, it's not even my stories.
自分の物語ではないことを作品化することさえあります
07:55
People tell me their lives,
人々の暮らしや思い出
07:58
their memories, their aspirations,
憧れについての話を聴き
08:00
and I create a mindscape.
心象風景を作品にするのです
08:03
I channel their history
彼らの歴史を作品につなぐことで
08:06
[so that] they have a place to go back
人生とその可能性に目を向けるための
08:09
to look at their life and its possibilities.
場所を提供するのです
08:12
I call them Freudian cities.
それらをフロイトの街と読んでいます
08:16
I cannot speak for all my images,
作品全てについて話すことはできないので
08:20
so I'll just go through a few of my worlds
いくつかの作品を
08:22
just with the title.
タイトルだけ紹介していきます
08:26
"ModiCity."
「慎みの街」
08:28
"ElectriCity."
「電気の街」
08:32
"MAD Growth on Columbus Circle."
「コロンバスサークルの上の狂気の成長」
08:37
"ReefCity."
「サンゴ礁の街」
08:45
"A Web of Time."
「時の織物」
08:49
"Chaos City."
「混沌の街」
08:55
"Daily Battles."
「日々の戦い」
09:00
"FeliCity."
「至福の街」
09:05
"Floating Islands."
「浮遊島」
09:09
And at one point,
ある時 私が取り組んだ作品は
09:13
I had to do "The Whole Nine Yards."
「Whole Nine Yards (彼方まで続く街) 」
09:15
So it's actually a papercut that's nine yards long.
その表現通り 9ヤード(約8メートル)の長さの切り絵です
09:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:21
So in life and in papercutting,
人生でも切り絵でも
09:23
everything is connected.
全てはつながっています
09:25
One story leads to another.
一つの物語が次の物語につながります
09:27
I was also interested
私はこの作品の物理的な
09:30
in the physicality of this format,
フォーマットにも興味がありました
09:32
because you have to walk to see it.
歩いて見なければならないからです
09:34
And parallel to my cutting
私が切り絵と並行して行ってきたのが
09:37
is my running.
ランニングです
09:39
I started with small images,
切り絵を始めた頃は作品が小さく
09:41
I started with a few miles.
走るのも2,3マイルでした
09:43
Larger images, I started to run marathons.
大きな作品を作るようになると マラソンを走るようになり
09:45
Then I went to run 50K, then 60K.
それから50キロ 60キロを走り
09:48
Then I ran 50 miles -- ultramarathons.
80キロを走るようになりました ウルトラマラソンです
09:51
And I still feel I'm running,
今でも走っている気がします
09:56
it's just the training
長距離切り絵師になるための
09:59
to become a long-distance papercutter.
トレーニングなのです
10:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:04
And running gives me a lot of energy.
走ることは大きなエネルギー源になります
10:06
Here is a three-week papercutting marathon
これはニューヨークの
10:10
at the Museum of Arts and Design
ミュージアム・オブ・アーツ&デザインで行った
10:13
in New York City.
3週間の切り絵マラソンです
10:16
The result is "Hells and Heavens."
完成したのは「地獄と天国」です
10:18
It's two panels 13 ft. high.
2枚組の4メートルのパネルです
10:22
They were installed in the museum on two floors,
美術館では階を分けて設置されましたが
10:25
but in fact, it's a continuous image.
実際には連続した作品です
10:28
And I call it "Hells and Heavens"
「地獄と天国」と名付けたのは
10:30
because it's daily hells and daily heavens.
日々の地獄と日々の天国を表しているからです
10:33
There is no border in between.
その間に境界はありません
10:37
Some people are born in hells,
地獄に生まれ 大きな困難を乗り越えて
10:39
and against all odds, they make it to heavens.
天国に行く人もいますし
10:41
Other people make the opposite trip.
その逆ルートをたどる人もいます
10:44
That's the border.
それが境界というものです
10:46
You have sweatshops in hells.
地獄では無理やりに働かされ
10:48
You have people renting their wings in the heavens.
天国に行けば翼をつけてもらえます
10:50
And then you have all those individual stories
場合によっては
10:53
where sometimes we even have the same action,
同じ行動をしても
10:56
and the result puts you in hells or in heavens.
天国に行くことも地獄に行くこともあります
11:00
So the whole "Hells and Heavens"
つまり「地獄と天国」は
11:05
is about free will
自由意志論と決定論についての
11:07
and determinism.
作品なのです
11:10
And in papercutting,
切り絵では
11:12
you have the drawing as the structure itself.
描いた作品が構造物となるので
11:14
So you can take it off the wall.
壁に縛られることがありません
11:18
Here it's an artist book installation
これは「アイデンティティ・プロジェクト」という
11:22
called "Identity Project."
作品集の展示です
11:25
It's not autobiographical identities.
自伝的なアイデンティティではなく
11:28
They are more our social identities.
もっと社会的なアイデンティティです
11:32
And then you can just walk behind them
歩いて後ろに回り
11:36
and try them on.
自分に重ねてみることもできます
11:38
So it's like the different layers
これらは 私たちの素性や
11:40
of what we are made of
私たちが外向けに見せる
11:42
and what we present to the world
アイデンティティの
11:44
as an identity.
異なる層のようなものです
11:46
That's another artist book project.
これがもう一つの作品集プロジェクトです
11:48
In fact, in the picture, you have two of them.
実のところ この写真の中に2つあります
11:51
It's one I'm wearing
一つは私が身につけているもので
11:55
and one that's on exhibition
もう一つはニューヨークの
11:57
at the Center for Books Arts in New York City.
センター・フォー・ブック・アートにあります
11:59
Why do I call it a book?
なぜ私はこれを本と呼ぶのでしょう?
12:01
It's called "Fashion Statement,"
この作品は「ファッション宣言」という題で
12:03
and there are quotes about fashion,
ファッションについての言葉を
12:05
so you can read it,
読むことができるからです
12:07
and also,
それに
12:09
because the definition of artist book
作品集というのは
12:11
is very generous.
定義がとても幅広いものなので
12:14
So artist books, you take them off the wall.
展示場所から取り出して
12:17
You take them for a walk.
散歩に持ち出してもよいのです
12:19
You can also install them as public art.
パブリックアートとして展示することもできます
12:21
Here it's in Scottsdale, Arizona,
アリゾナ州スコッツデールに展示されている
12:24
and it's called "Floating Memories."
「浮遊する記憶」です
12:27
So it's regional memories,
地域の記憶が
12:30
and they are just randomly moved by the wind.
風に吹かれてランダムに動きます
12:33
I love public art.
私はパブリックアートが大好きです
12:38
And I entered competitions
ずっと昔から
12:40
for a long time.
コンペに参加しています
12:43
After eight years of rejection,
8年間落選が続いた後に
12:45
I was thrilled to get my first commission
ニューヨークの「芸術への1%」プログラムで
12:48
with the Percent for Art in New York City.
初めての制作委託を受けて感激しました
12:51
It was for a merger station
救急隊員や消防隊員の
12:54
for emergency workers and firemen.
基地に設置するための作品でした
12:57
I made an artist book
紙の代わりにステンレスに入った
13:00
that's in stainless steel
作品集を
13:03
instead of paper.
作りました
13:05
I called it "Working in the Same Direction."
「同じ方向を目指して」という題をつけましたが
13:07
But I added weathervanes on both sides
両側に隊員の形の風向計を取り付けて
13:11
to show that they cover all directions.
彼らが全ての方向を守っていることを表現しました
13:13
With public art,
パブリックアートでは
13:17
I could also make cut glass.
カットガラスを作ることもできます
13:19
Here it's faceted glass in the Bronx.
ブロンクスにあるカットガラスです
13:22
And each time I make public art,
パブリックアートを作る時はいつも
13:25
I want something that's really relevant
設置する場所と関係の深い何かを
13:27
to the place it's installed.
取り入れたいと思っています
13:29
So for the subway in New York,
ニューヨークの地下鉄では
13:31
I saw a correspondence
電車に乗ることと
13:33
between riding the subway
本を読むことを対比させました
13:36
and reading.
時間に間に合うよう旅行することと
13:39
It is travel in time, travel on time.
時間旅行をすること という意味です
13:41
And Bronx literature,
ブロンクスの文学を語る上で
13:44
it's all about Bronx writers
一番大切なのはブロンクスの作家と
13:46
and their stories.
彼らの物語です
13:48
Another glass project
ガラスを使った別のプロジェクトは
13:52
is in a public library
カリフォルニア州サンノゼの
13:54
in San Jose, California.
公共図書館にあります
13:56
So I made a vegetable point of view
サンノゼの成長を
13:59
of the growth of San Jose.
野菜に例えてみました
14:02
So I started in the center
真ん中に
14:04
with the acorn
ドングリを置き
14:06
for the Ohlone Indian civilization.
オローニ・インディアンの文明を表しました
14:08
Then I have the fruit from Europe
牧場主を表しているのが
14:12
for the ranchers.
ヨーロッパからの果実で
14:14
And then the fruit of the world for Silicon Valley today.
世界の果実は現代のシリコンバレーです
14:16
And it's still growing.
今も成長を続けています
14:19
So the technique, it's cut,
技法としては 切断しサンドブラストをかけ
14:21
sandblasted, etched
エッチング処理と印刷をしたガラスを
14:24
and printed glass into architectural glass.
建物のガラスに仕立てました
14:26
And outside the library,
図書館の外にも
14:30
I wanted to make a place to cultivate your mind.
心の糧となるような場所が欲しかったので
14:32
I took library material
題名に果実という言葉を含む
14:36
that had fruit in their title
図書館の蔵書を持ちだして
14:39
and I used them to make an orchard walk
そうした知識の果実とともに
14:42
with these fruits of knowledge.
実際の果樹園を歩けるようにしました
14:45
I also planted the bibliotree.
そして 「本の木」を植えました
14:47
So it's a tree,
木ですから
14:50
and in its trunk you have the roots of languages.
幹には言葉の根となるものがあります
14:52
And it's all about international writing systems.
つまり言葉を表示する世界各国の文字のことです
14:55
And on the branches
枝には
14:59
you have library material growing.
図書館の蔵書が実っています
15:01
You can also have function and form
パブリックアートは 機能と様式を備えた
15:05
with public art.
ものにすることもできます
15:08
So in Aurora, Colorado it's a bench.
コロラド州オーロラにあるベンチには
15:10
But you have a bonus with this bench.
特別なおまけがついています
15:12
Because if you sit a long time in summer in shorts,
夏に長いこと短パンで座っていると
15:15
you will walk away
立ち去る時には
15:18
with temporary branding of
物語の一場面が
15:20
the story element on your thighs.
太ももに刻印されているのです
15:23
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:25
Another functional work,
もう一つの機能的な作品は
15:30
it's in the south side of Chicago
シカゴの南に位置する
15:32
for a subway station.
地下鉄の駅にあります
15:34
And it's called "Seeds of the Future are Planted Today."
「未来の種は今日植えられる」という作品です
15:36
It's a story about transformation
変化とつながりについての
15:40
and connections.
物語です
15:43
So it acts as a screen
線路と通勤客を保護し
15:45
to protect the rail and the commuter,
線路の上に物が落ちないようにするための
15:47
and not to have objects falling on the rails.
覆いとしての機能を持っています
15:50
To be able to change fences
フェンスや窓の柵を
15:53
and window guards into flowers,
花で代用することができるというのは
15:56
it's fantastic.
素晴らしいことです
15:59
And here I've been working for the last three years
この3年間 サウスブロンクスの
16:01
with a South Bronx developer
住宅開発業者とともに
16:04
to bring art to life
低所得者層向けの住居や
16:06
to low-income buildings
手ごろな価格の住宅に
16:08
and affordable housing.
アートを取り入れる活動をしています
16:10
So each building has its own personality.
一つひとつの建物に個性があります
16:13
And sometimes it's about a legacy of the neighborhood,
時には地域伝来の遺産が反映されます
16:16
like in Morrisania, about the jazz history.
モーリサニアの場合はジャズの歴史です
16:20
And for other projects, like in Paris,
パリでのプロジェクトの場合は
16:24
it's about the name of the street.
通りの名前に関することです
16:27
It's called Rue des Prairies -- Prairie Street.
プレーリー(大草原)通りという名前なので
16:29
So I brought back the rabbit,
ウサギやトンボを放し
16:32
the dragonfly,
そこで人間とともに
16:34
to stay in that street.
暮らせるようにしました
16:36
And in 2009,
2009年に
16:38
I was asked to make a poster
ニューヨークの地下鉄の
16:40
to be placed in the subway cars in New York City
車内に1年間掲示するポスターの
16:43
for a year.
制作依頼を受けました
16:46
So that was a very captive audience.
身動きのできない人たちが観客なので
16:48
And I wanted to give them an escape.
彼らに逃げ道を与えられるようなものにしたいと思いました
16:52
I created "All Around Town."
そして作ったのが「街の至る所で」です
16:56
It is a papercutting,
切り絵の作品に
16:59
and then after, I added color on the computer.
コンピュータで色付けしました
17:01
So I can call it techno-crafted.
テクノロジーを生かした工芸だと言えます
17:04
And along the way,
私はこのようにいつも
17:07
I'm kind of making papercuttings
切り絵の作品を作る過程で
17:09
and adding other techniques.
他の技法も取り入れています
17:12
But the result is always to have stories.
でも目的はいつも 物語を伝えるということです
17:14
So the stories, they have a lot of possibilities.
物語にはたくさんの可能性があります
17:17
They have a lot of scenarios.
数多くのシナリオがあります
17:20
I don't know the stories.
どんな物語になるのか 私にはわかりません
17:22
I take images from our global imagination,
私は世界の想像力や決まり文句
17:24
from cliché, from things we are thinking about,
私たちが考えることや歴史から
17:28
from history.
イメージを切り取ります
17:30
And everybody's a narrator,
誰もが語り手なのです
17:32
because everybody has a story to tell.
全ての人が 語るべき物語を持っているのですから
17:34
But more important
でもより重要なことは
17:37
is everybody has to make a story
人は皆 世界を理解するために
17:39
to make sense of the world.
物語を作る必要があるということです
17:41
And in all these universes,
あらゆる宇宙において
17:43
it's like imagination is the vehicle
想像力が動力源になるように
17:45
to be transported with,
思えますが
17:48
but the destination is our minds
目指すべきは私たちの心であり
17:50
and how we can reconnect
私たちがいかに本質的なものや魔法との
17:53
with the essential and with the magic.
関わりを取り戻せるかということです
17:55
And it's what story cutting is all about.
物語を切り取るとはそういうことなのです
17:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:01
Translated by Wataru Narita
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Béatrice Coron - Papercutter artist
Béatrice Coron has developed a language of storytelling by papercutting multi-layered stories.

Why you should listen

Béatrice Coron tells stories informed by life. Her own life colors her work: after briefly studying art at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts of Lyon, and Mandarin Chinese at the Université of Lyon III, Coron experienced life with a series of odd jobs. She has been, among others, a shepherdess, truck driver, factory worker, cleaning lady and New York City tour guide. She has lived in France (her native country) , Egypt and Mexico for one year each, and China for two years. She moved to New York in 1985, where she reinvented herself as an artist.

Coron's oeuvre includes illustration, book arts, fine art and public art. She cuts her characteristic silhouette designs in paper and Tyvek. She also creates works in stone, glass, metal, rubber, stained glass and digital media. Her work has been purchased by major museum collections, such as the Metropolitan Museum, the Walker Art Center and The Getty. Her public art can be seen in subways, airport and sports facilities among others.

More profile about the speaker
Béatrice Coron | Speaker | TED.com