07:48
TEDxAustin

Michael McDaniel: Cheap, effective shelter for disaster relief

マイケル・マクダニエル:災害復旧のための安くて効果的なシェルター

Filmed:

マイケル・マクダニエルは災害地で使われる仮設住宅をデザインしました。費用が掛からず簡単に輸送できて、しかも美しいデザインです。しかし、製造してくれる人はいませんでした。彼は不屈の精神と情熱を持って、1人で造ることを決意しました。マクダニエルは災害対策用EXO仮設住宅を紹介し、次に来る自然災害に備えて、余暇を返上して仕入先や製造業者と取り組んでいる様子について語ります。(TEDxAustinにて撮影)

- Graphic designer
Michael McDaniel is a graphic designer using his skills to help people in meaningful ways. Full bio

So, I'm going to start off with kind of the buzzkill a little bit.
ちょっと盛り下がるような話から
始めさせてもらいます
00:13
Forty-two million people
2010年だけで 4,200万人が
00:17
were displaced by natural disasters in 2010.
自然災害によって
避難を余儀なくされました
00:19
Now, there was nothing particularly special about 2010,
しかし 2010年は
特別な年では ありませんでした
00:22
because, on average, 31 and a half million people
毎年 平均で3,150万の人々が
00:25
are displaced by natural disasters every single year.
自然災害により
避難を余儀なくされています
00:29
Now, usually when people hear statistics or stats like that,
人々が このような統計や
データを耳にした場合
00:32
you start thinking about places like Haiti or other kind of
ハイチや 他のエキゾチックな国々
00:34
exotic or maybe even impoverished areas, but it happens
貧しい地域を 想起すると思いますが
00:37
right here in the United States every single year.
実は ここアメリカでも
毎年起こっています
00:40
Last year alone, 99 federally declared disasters
昨年だけでも 連邦緊急事態管理庁(FEMA)に
00:44
were on file with FEMA,
報告された災害は
99件にも上がりました
00:47
from Joplin, Missouri, and Tuscaloosa, Alabama,
ミズーリ州のジョプリン
アラバマ州のタスカルーサや
00:49
to the Central Texas wildfires that just happened recently.
テキサス州中部で起きた山火事は
つい最近のことです
00:52
Now, how does the most powerful country in the world
では 世界の大国は
住む所がなくなった人々に
00:56
handle these displaced people?
どのような対応を
とっているでしょうか?
00:59
They cram them onto cots, put all your personal belongings
政府は人々を簡易ベットに押し込み
01:01
in a plastic garbage bag, stick it underneath,
すべての所持品をビニールの
01:03
and put you on the floor of an entire sports arena,
ゴミ袋に入れて ベットの下に突っ込み
01:05
or a gymnasium.
スポーツ施設や体育館の
床の上で生活させています
01:08
So obviously there's a massive housing gap,
これによって 
大きな居住格差が出来てしまいます
01:12
and this really upset me, because academia tells you
本当に腹立たしいですが
研究者たちが言うには
01:15
after a major disaster, there's typically about
大きな災害の後
ある程度回復をするには
01:18
an 18-month time frame to -- we kinda recover,
1年半を要して そこから本格的な―
01:20
start the recovery process,
回復の兆しが見えてきます
01:23
but what most people don't realize is that on average
しかし あまり知られていない事実ですが
01:25
it takes 45 to 60 days or more
悪名高いFEMAのトレーラーが
被災地に現れるのに
01:27
for the infamous FEMA trailers to even begin to show up.
平均して45~60日か それ以上
かかります
01:30
Before that time, people are left to their own devices.
それまで 人々は
置き去りにされます
01:33
So I became obsessed with trying to figure out a way
こういったギャップをうめようと
01:37
to actually fill this gap.
私は熱くなりました
01:40
This actually became my creative obsession.
このプロジェクトが
私の創造的こだわりになりました
01:42
I put aside all my freelance work after hours and started
仕事を終えると
フリーランスの仕事は一切 手を付けず
01:45
just focusing particularly on this problem.
この問題だけに集中しました
01:48
So I started sketching.
スケッチから始めました
01:53
Two days after Katrina, I started sketching and sketching
ハリケーン・カトリーナが
通過した 2日後に開始し
01:55
and trying to brainstorm up ideas or solutions for this,
色々考えながら
スケッチを続けました
01:57
and as things started to congeal or ideas started to form,
するとアイデアが
徐々に形になっていき
01:59
I started sketching digitally on the computer,
パソコンでスケッチするようになりました
02:02
but it was an obsession, so I couldn't just stop there.
虜になってしまい
ここで止めることはできませんでした
02:04
I started experimenting, making models,
私は 様々な実験や
模型の製作を始めて
02:07
talking to experts in the field, taking their feedback,
この分野の専門家にも
アドバイスをもらい
02:10
and refining, and I kept on refining and refining
より良いものを 作り上げるために
努力を惜しまず
02:12
for nights and weekends for over five years.
夜と週末を返上して 5年を費やしました
02:15
Now, my obsession ended up driving me to create
この熱意の結果 自分の庭に
02:18
full-size prototypes in my own backyard — (Laughter) —
実物大の模型を建てました― (笑)
02:22
and actually spending my own personal savings on
工具から特許出願まで
02:24
everything from tooling to patents
あらゆる費用は
02:26
and a variety of other costs,
貯金をはたいて 自己負担しました
02:29
but in the end I ended up with this modular housing system
その結果 どんな事態や
災害にも対応できる
02:31
that can react to any situation or disaster.
仮設住宅の
モジュラー構造ができました
02:34
It can be put up in any environment,
複雑な組み立てや
道具は一切要しないため
02:37
from an asphalt parking lot to pastures or fields,
アスファルトの駐車場や
草原など
02:40
because it doesn't require any special setup
どんな環境にでも 使うことができます
02:44
or specialty tools.
どんな環境にでも 使うことができます
02:46
Now, at the foundation and kind of the core
この構造の基盤と核は
02:48
of this whole system is the Exo Housing Unit,
EXO住宅ユニットと呼ばれる
02:50
which is just the individual shelter module.
単一の避難用モジュールです
02:53
And though it's light, light enough that you can actually
とても軽く 持ち上げることも
02:55
lift it by hand and move it around,
持ち運ぶことも可能です
02:57
and it actually sleeps four people.
実は 4人も寝ることができます
02:59
And you can arrange these things as kind of more
いろいろな並べ方ができます
03:03
for encampments and more of a city grid type layout,
野営地風や
都会風の格子状
03:05
or you can circle the wagons, essentially,
開拓時代の荷馬車のように
03:08
and form these circular pods out of them,
円陣を組むこともできます
03:10
which give you this semi-private communal area
すると プライベートに近い
共有スペースが出来て
03:12
for people to actually spill out into so they're not actually
人々はユニットに引きこもらずに
自然と―
03:15
trapped inside these units.
外に出たくなります
03:17
Now this fundamentally changes
この構成は災害対策を
根本的に変えます
03:19
the way we respond to disasters,
この構成は災害対策を
根本的に変えます
03:22
because gone are the horrid conditions
なぜなら スポーツ施設や体育館で
03:24
inside a sports arena or a gymnasium, where people
簡易ベッドで ぎゅうぎゅう詰めになる
03:26
are crammed on these cots inside.
不快な環境に
おさらばできます
03:29
Now we have instant neighborhoods outside.
そして 外に出れば
即席のご近所さんが生まれます
03:31
So the Exo is designed to be simply, basically
EXOユニットは 単純化されたデザインで
基本的に―
03:36
like a coffee cup. They can actually stack together
コーヒーカップのように
重ねることができます
03:39
so we get extremely efficient transportation
輸送と 保管は
非常に効率良く出来ます
03:42
and storage out of them.
輸送と 保管は
非常に効率良く出来ます
03:44
In fact, 15 Exos can fit on a single semi truck by itself.
実は15個のEXOユニットが
トレーラートラックに載せられます
03:47
This means the Exo can actually be transported and set up
つまり従来のどんな仮設住宅よりも
03:51
faster than any other housing option available today.
迅速に輸送され 設置することが出来ます
03:54
But I'm obsessive, so I couldn't just stop there,
でも 私のこだわりは
ここに留まらず
03:59
so I actually started modifying the bunks where you could
寝床を引き出すと 机や棚を
04:01
actually slide out the bunks and slide in desks or shelving,
取り付けられるように
改造にしました
04:03
so the same unit can now be used
すると 同じEXOユニットを
04:06
for an office or storage location.
オフィスや倉庫にも
応用できるようになりました
04:07
The doors can actually swap out, so you can actually put on
ドアが交換できるので
気候の変化に応じて
04:10
a rigid panel with a window unit in it for climate control,
窓が付いた 剛性パネルに
換えられたり
04:14
or a connector module that would allow you to actually
接続モジュールに交換すると
04:17
connect multiple units together, which gives you
複数のユニットを
繋げることができます
04:19
larger and kind of compartmentalized living spaces,
広く 小分けされた
居住空間が出来ます
04:22
so now this same kit of parts, this same unit
同じ部品で出来た 同じユニットが
04:26
can actually serve as a living room, bedroom or bathroom,
実際に リビングになったり
寝室やバスルーム
04:28
or an office, a living space and secure storage.
オフィスや倉庫などに
応用できます
04:32
Sounds like a great idea, but how do you make it real?
名案のようですが
どうやって実現したら良いでしょうか
04:39
So the first idea I had, initially, was just
最初のアイデアは
04:42
to go the federal and state governments and go,
政府や州政府に赴いて
04:44
"Here, take it, for free."
「これはどうだい タダでいいよ」
と言ったんです
04:45
But I was quickly told that, "Boy, our government
即座に断られました
04:48
doesn't really work like that." (Laughter)
「政府はそんなんじゃ通用しないぞ」って (笑)
04:50
Okay. Okay. So maybe I would start a nonprofit
なるほど
だったらNPOを作って
04:52
to kind of help consult and get this idea going
コンサルをして プロジェクトに
勢いをつけようとしたら
04:56
along with the government, but then I was told,
こう言われました
04:59
"Son, our government looks to private sector
「こういうのは
民間企業じゃなきゃダメだよ」って
05:01
for things like this."
「こういうのは
民間企業じゃなきゃダメだよ」って
05:04
Okay. So maybe I would take this whole idea and go
それでは 私が民間企業に
このアイデアを持ち込んだら
05:05
to private corporations that would have this mutually shared
相互にメリットがあるかと
考えましたが
05:08
benefit to it, but I was quickly told by some corporations
また即座に断られました
いくつかの会社は
05:11
that my personal passion project was not a brand fit
いくら情熱を込めたプロジェクトでも
企業ブランドと合わないし
05:14
because they didn't want their logos stamped
ハイチのスラム街には
彼らのブランドが
05:18
across the ghettos of Haiti.
好ましくないと思われたみたいです
05:21
Now, I wasn't just obsessed. I was outraged. (Laughter.)
私はこだわりを超えて
怒りのあまりに噴火しました (笑)
05:23
So I decided, kind of told myself,
そこで決意しました
05:29
"Oh yeah? Watch this. I'll do it myself." (Laughter)
見てみろ 自分でやって見せる (笑)
05:33
Now, this quickly, my day job sent me to work out of
ちょっと話が変わりますが 数か月間
05:39
our Milan office for a few months, so I was like,
ミラノのオフィスへ
出張しました
05:41
what will I do? So I actually scheduled sleep on my calendar,
さてどうしたかというと カレンダーに
05:45
and spent the 8-hour time difference on conference calls
眠る予定を書き込んだ後
8時間の時差を利用して
05:47
with material suppliers, manufacturers and potential customers.
材料・製造業者 見込のある取引先と
電話会議をしました
05:50
And we found through this whole process, we found
やり取りの中で バージニア州の
05:55
this great little manufacturer in Virginia,
優良で小規模の
製造会社と出会いました
05:56
and if his body language is any indication,
こちらが その社長です
05:58
that's the owner — (Laughter) — of what it's like
彼の表情を見れば 良く分かりますが
06:00
for a manufacturer to work directly with a designer,
製造者が 直接デザイナーと組むと
06:03
you've got to see what happens here. (Laughter)
苦労します (笑)
06:05
But G.S. Industries was fantastic.
でも このG.S. Industriesは
素晴らしかったです
06:08
They actually built three prototypes for us by hand.
彼らは手作業で
試作品を3つも造ってくれました
06:10
So now we have prototypes that can show that four people
おかげで4人が テントなんかより
06:15
can actually sleep securely and much more comfortably
ずっと安全で快適に寝ることができる
06:18
than a tent could ever provide.
試作品ができて
06:20
And they actually shipped them here to Texas for us.
テキサス州から
送られました
06:25
Now, a funny thing started happening.
さて 不思議なことに
06:26
Other people started to believe in what we were doing,
私たちのプロジェクトに
賛同してくれる人が現れて
06:28
and actually offered us hangar space, donated hangar
格納庫を無料で
提供してくれました
06:30
space to us. And then the Georgetown Airport Authority
ジョージタウンの
空港公社は
06:32
was bent over backwards to help us with anything we needed.
私たちを全力で
サポートしてくれました
06:34
So now we had a hangar space to work in,
これで 仕事が出来る格納庫と
06:39
and prototypes to demo with.
実演説明が出来る
試作品が揃いました
06:40
So in one year, we've negotiated manufacturing agreements,
この1年で 製造契約を結び
06:43
been awarded one patent, filed our second patent,
特許を1つ獲得し
さらに もう1つは出願中で
06:47
talked to multiple people, demoed this to FEMA
これまで たくさんの人と話し
FEMAや関係者にも―
06:50
and its consultants to rave reviews,
デモを行うと 大好評でした
06:52
and then started talking to some other people who requested
別の小さな組織とも
やり取りを始めています
06:54
information, this little group called the United Nations.
国連とかいう名前でした
06:57
And on top of that, now we have
さらに 様々な
関係者が殺到し
06:59
a whole plethora of other individuals that have come up
鉱業地での使用や
移動可能な―
07:01
and started to talk to us from doing it for mining camps,
ユースホステル
ワールドカップ
07:04
mobile youth hostels, right down to the World Cup
オリンピックで利用する
話までもが
07:07
and the Olympics.
持ち上がりました
07:10
So, in closing, on this whole thing here
最後に 今日お話した―
07:12
is hopefully very soon we will not have to
プロジェクトによって
災害の後に
07:19
respond to these painful phone calls that we get
痛ましい電話を受けても
07:24
after disasters where we don't really have anything
何の提供や援助もできないと言った
07:26
to sell or give you yet.
現状が変わることを期待しています
07:28
Hopefully very soon we will be there,
上手くいけば すぐに変わります
07:30
because we are destined,
なぜなら 私たちは
07:33
obsessed with making it real.
これを実現させたいと
願っているから
07:35
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました (拍手)
07:39
Translated by Jarred Tucker
Reviewed by Mari Arimitsu

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Michael McDaniel - Graphic designer
Michael McDaniel is a graphic designer using his skills to help people in meaningful ways.

Why you should listen

Michael McDaniel has worked on a wide range of projects for clients including MTV, Comcast, AT&T, American Airlines, Best Buy, HP, Sprint and Disney. His designs have been widely recognized; he's received awards from the Society of Environmental Graphic Designers for work at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and from Cooper Union for a conceptual redesign of the interstate highway system.

Prompted by the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina on the city of New Orleans, McDaniel began working in his spare time for five years straight on what would become the Exo Reaction Housing System -- portable, cheap disaster relief shelters. He is a principal designer at frog and the founder and C.E.O. at Reaction Systems, Inc.

More profile about the speaker
Michael McDaniel | Speaker | TED.com