TEDxUofM

Anne Curzan: What makes a word "real"?

アン・カーザン: 言葉が「本物」になる条件

Filmed:

「hangry」「defriend」「adorkable」 などの俗語は、たとえ辞書に載っていなくても、英語という言語の意味における重大な不足を補っていると言えます。結局のところ、どの語を辞書に収録するか決めているのは誰なのでしょう?歴史言語学者のアン・カーザンは、辞書作りの舞台裏にいる人たちに目を向け、彼らが絶えず行っている選択を魅力的に紹介してくれます。

- Language historian
English professor Anne Curzan actually encourages her students to use slang in class. A language historian, she is fascinated by how people use words—and by how this changes. Full bio

I need to start by telling you a little bit
最初に私の社会生活について
00:12
about my social life,
少しお話しします
00:14
which I know may not seem relevant,
関係ないように見えますが
00:16
but it is.
関係が あるのです
00:19
When people meet me at parties
会合などで会った人に
00:21
and they find out that I'm an English professor
私が英語学の教授で
00:22
who specializes in language,
言語を専門にしていると言うと
00:25
they generally have one of two reactions.
その人たちの反応は2つに分かれます
00:27
One set of people look frightened. (Laughter)
1つ目のグループは恐れをなします
(笑)
00:31
They often say something like,
こんなことを言われます
00:36
"Oh, I'd better be careful what I say.
「言葉に気をつけなくちゃ」
00:37
I'm sure you'll hear every mistake I make."
「私の間違いに 逐一
気づかれるんでしょう」
00:41
And then they stop talking. (Laughter)
そして彼らは話すのを止めてしまいます
(笑)
00:44
And they wait for me to go away
彼らは私が立ち去り
00:48
and talk to someone else.
他の人の所へ行くのを待ちます
00:50
The other set of people,
もう1つのグループは
00:53
their eyes light up,
目を輝かせて
00:55
and they say,
こう言います
00:57
"You are just the person I want to talk to."
「あなたみたいな人と話してみたかった」
00:58
And then they tell me about whatever it is
彼らは英語という言語が間違った方向へ
01:03
they think is going wrong with the English language.
進んでいることについて持論を語ります
01:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:07
A couple of weeks ago, I was at a dinner party
数週間前 ある夕食会で
01:10
and the man to my right
私の右隣にいた男性が
01:12
started telling me about all the ways
インターネットのせいで
01:14
that the Internet is degrading the English language.
英語の質が いかに下がっているか
語ってくれました
01:16
He brought up Facebook, and he said,
フェイスブックを例に こう言いました
01:20
"To defriend? I mean, is that even a real word?"
「『defriend(友達から削除)』なんて
まともな言葉かい?」
01:23
I want to pause on that question:
この質問 ちょっと考えてみましょう
01:29
What makes a word real?
ある言葉が「まとも」になるための
条件とは何でしょう
01:32
My dinner companion and I both know
夕食会の彼も私も
01:36
what the verb "defriend" means,
「defriend」の意味は知っています
01:38
so when does a new word like "defriend"
では「defriend」のような新語が
01:41
become real?
まともになるのは いつでしょう
01:44
Who has the authority to make those kinds
言語に関して
こうした正式な決定権を
01:46
of official decisions about words, anyway?
持っているのは誰なのでしょう
01:49
Those are the questions I want to talk about today.
それが今日のテーマです
01:52
I think most people, when they say a word isn't real,
ほとんどの人が ある言葉に対して
まともじゃないと言う時
01:56
what they mean is, it doesn't appear
それは つまり 標準的な辞書に
02:00
in a standard dictionary.
載っていないということでしょう
02:02
That, of course, raises a host of other questions,
このことは
誰が辞書を作っているのか など
02:03
including, who writes dictionaries?
様々な問題の引き金になります
02:06
Before I go any further,
しかし そこへ行く前に
02:11
let me clarify my role in all of this.
ここで私の立場を説明しておきます
02:12
I do not write dictionaries.
私は辞書の製作には
携わっていませんが
02:15
I do, however, collect new words
新語を集めるという意味では
02:17
much the way dictionary editors do,
辞書編纂者と似たようなことを
しています
02:20
and the great thing about being a historian
英語の歴史学者ですので
02:23
of the English language
ありがたいことに
02:25
is that I get to call this "research."
それを「研究」と
呼ばせてもらっています
02:26
When I teach the history of the English language,
英語の歴史を教えるに当たり
02:30
I require that students teach me
私が学生に課題として出しているのは
02:32
two new slang words before I will begin class.
授業の前に新しい俗語を2語
私に教えるということです
02:35
Over the years, I have learned
長年にわたり 私はこうして
02:38
some great new slang this way,
新しい俗語を覚えてきました
02:41
including "hangry," which --
例えば「hangry」
02:44
(Applause) —
(拍手)
02:48
which is when you are cranky or angry
「hungry(お腹がすいて)
02:52
because you are hungry,
angry(機嫌が悪い)」という意味です
02:54
and "adorkable,"
「adorkable」は
02:58
which is when you are adorable
adorable(魅力的)だけど
03:03
in kind of a dorky way,
ちょっと dorky(抜けている)
ということです
03:05
clearly, terrific words that fill
まさに 英語という言語の重大な穴を
03:08
important gaps in the English language.
埋めてくれる素晴らしい言葉です
03:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:13
But how real are they
しかし私たちが
主に俗語として扱い
03:18
if we use them primarily as slang
まだ辞書にも載っていない場合
03:20
and they don't yet appear in a dictionary?
これらの言葉は どのくらい
「まとも」なのでしょうか?
03:23
With that, let's turn to dictionaries.
これを踏まえ 話を辞書に移しましょう
03:27
I'm going to do this as a show of hands:
挙手をお願いします
03:30
How many of you still regularly
紙でもオンラインでも結構ですが
今も日常的に
03:31
refer to a dictionary, either print or online?
辞書を引くという方は
どのくらい いますか?
03:34
Okay, so that looks like most of you.
ほとんど全員のようですね
03:39
Now, a second question. Again, a show of hands:
では次の質問です
もう一度 挙手をお願いします
03:41
How many of you have ever looked to see
自分の使っている辞書を
誰が編纂したか
03:44
who edited the dictionary you are using?
見たことのある人は?
03:47
Okay, many fewer.
ぐっと減りましたね
03:53
At some level, we know that there are human hands
頭のどこかでは
辞書には人の手が関わっていると
03:57
behind dictionaries,
わかっているのですが
04:01
but we're really not sure who those hands belong to.
誰の手なのかと言われると
よく知りませんよね
04:02
I'm actually fascinated by this.
そこに私は非常に興味があります
04:07
Even the most critical people out there
世間で口うるさいと されている人でも
04:09
tend not to be very critical about dictionaries,
辞書に対しては さほど うるさくなく
04:11
not distinguishing among them
辞書の違いを吟味したり
04:14
and not asking a whole lot of questions
編纂者について疑問を提示したり
04:16
about who edited them.
しない傾向があります
04:18
Just think about the phrase
考えてみてください
04:20
"Look it up in the dictionary,"
「辞書を引け」という表現には
04:22
which suggests that all dictionaries
辞書なら どれでも同じという
04:24
are exactly the same.
意味が含まれています
04:26
Consider the library here on campus,
この大学の図書館を考えてみましょう
04:28
where you go into the reading room,
閲覧室には
04:30
and there is a large, unabridged dictionary
名誉と尊敬を一身に受けて鎮座する
04:32
up on a pedestal in this place of honor and respect
大型の大辞典があって
誰でも手に取ることができますから
04:35
lying open so we can go stand before it
その前に立てば
04:39
to get answers.
答えが見つかるというわけです
04:41
Now, don't get me wrong,
誤解しないでください
04:43
dictionaries are fantastic resources,
辞書は非常に優れた情報源です
04:45
but they are human
ただし辞書は人が作っており
04:49
and they are not timeless.
時の流れの影響を受けます
04:50
I'm struck as a teacher
教師として衝撃的だと思うのは
04:53
that we tell students to critically question
私たちは学生に いつも
読む時も サイトを見る時も
04:54
every text they read, every website they visit,
しっかり問題意識を持ちなさいと
言うくせに
04:58
except dictionaries,
辞書に対しては無防備で
05:01
which we tend to treat as un-authored,
著者の存在を忘れ
辞書は どこからともなく現れて
05:03
as if they came from nowhere to give us answers
言葉の本当の意味を
教えてくれるように
05:06
about what words really mean.
考えてしまいがちだ
ということです
05:09
Here's the thing: If you ask dictionary editors,
実は 辞書の編纂者に尋ねると
05:13
what they'll tell you
彼らの仕事は
05:17
is they're just trying to keep up with us
私たちが生む言語の変化に
05:18
as we change the language.
ついていくことだと言います
05:20
They're watching what we say and what we write
彼らは私たちの話し言葉や
書き言葉を観察し
05:22
and trying to figure out what's going to stick
どれが定着し どれが定着しないか
05:24
and what's not going to stick.
見極めているのです
05:26
They have to gamble,
これは賭けです
05:29
because they want to appear cutting edge
最先端と思われたいし
05:30
and catch the words that are going to make it,
「LOL(爆笑)」のように
後々定着する語を
05:32
such as LOL,
漏らしたくない一方で
05:34
but they don't want to appear faddish
流行に左右され 定着しない語まで
05:37
and include the words that aren't going to make it,
収録していると
思われたくないですからね
05:39
and I think a word that they're watching right now
彼らが今 注目している語は
05:41
is YOLO, you only live once.
「YOLO 人生は一度きり」
だと思います
05:43
Now I get to hang out with dictionary editors,
私は辞書編纂者たちと
付き合いがありますが
05:49
and you might be surprised
私たちが どこで会うか
05:51
by one of the places where we hang out.
聞いたら 皆さんは驚かれるでしょう
05:53
Every January, we go
毎年1月に 私たちは
05:55
to the American Dialect Society annual meeting,
米国方言学会の年次総会に行き
05:57
where among other things,
その中で
06:00
we vote on the word of the year.
「今年の単語」の投票を行います
06:01
There are about 200 or 300 people who come,
200から 300ほどの人が集まり
06:05
some of the best known
linguists in the United States.
中には国内の著名な言語学者もいます
06:08
To give you a sense of the flavor of the meeting,
その場の雰囲気をお伝えすると
06:11
it occurs right before happy hour.
投票は歓談の直前に組まれており
06:13
Anyone who comes can vote.
誰でも参加できます
06:16
The most important rule is
最も重要なルールは
06:18
that you can vote with only one hand.
一度しか挙手できないということです
06:19
In the past, some of the winners have been
過去に選ばれた語には 例えば
06:22
"tweet" in 2009
2009年の「tweet(ツイート)」
06:26
and "hashtag" in 2012.
2012年の「hashtag(ハッシュタグ)」
があります
06:28
"Chad" was the word of the year in the year 2000,
2000年は「chad(投票用紙から出る
パンチ穴の紙くず)」でした
06:32
because who knew what a chad was before 2000,
2000年までは 皆そんな語を
知りませんでしたからね
06:35
and "WMD" in 2002.
2002年は「WMD(大量破壊兵器)」
でした
06:39
Now, we have other categories in which we vote too,
投票には他のカテゴリーもあって
06:43
and my favorite category
私のお気に入りは
06:46
is most creative word of the year.
その年の最もクリエイティブな語を
選ぶものです
06:47
Past winners in this category have included
過去に選ばれた語は 例えば
06:50
"recombobulation area,"
「recombobulation area
(混乱回復エリア)」
06:53
which is at the Milwaukee Airport after security,
ミルウォーキー空港にある
保安検査の後
06:56
where you can recombobulate.
混乱を回復させる場所のことです
06:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:02
You can put your belt back on,
ベルトを締めなおし
07:03
put your computer back in your bag.
パソコンをカバンに戻す場所です
07:05
And then my all-time favorite word at this vote,
この投票で私の歴代
一番のお気に入りは
07:10
which is "multi-slacking."
「multislacking」です
07:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:15
And multi-slacking is the act
パソコン画面に
いくつかのウィンドウを開き
07:18
of having multiple windows up on your screen
仕事をしていると見せかけて
07:20
so it looks like you're working
実はウェブ上で
07:23
when you're actually goofing around on the web.
遊んでいる行為のことです
07:24
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑)(拍手)
07:26
Will all of these words stick? Absolutely not.
勿論 これらの語が すべて
定着するわけでは ありません
07:33
And we have made some questionable choices,
選ばれたこと自体が
おかしいものもあります
07:36
for example in 2006
例えば2006年
07:39
when the word of the year was "Plutoed,"
その年の単語は
「Plutoed(冥王星にされる)」
07:41
to mean demoted.
降格の意味です
07:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:45
But some of the past winners
しかし選ばれた語の中には
07:50
now seem completely unremarkable,
今や まったく当たり前に
感じられるものもあります
07:52
such as "app"
例えば「app(アプリ)」
07:55
and "e" as a prefix,
接頭辞の「e(電子~)」
07:57
and "google" as a verb.
動詞の「google(ググる)」です
07:59
Now, a few weeks before our vote,
方言学会の投票の数週間前に
08:02
Lake Superior State University
レイク・スペリオル州立大学が
08:06
issues its list of banished words for the year.
その年の「追放すべき語」の
一覧を発表します
08:08
What is striking about this
特筆すべきは
08:12
is that there's actually often quite a lot of overlap
その一覧と
私たちが検討している―
08:14
between their list and the list that we are considering
「今年の単語」の候補一覧とが
かなりの確率で
08:17
for words of the year,
重なっているという点です
08:20
and this is because we're noticing the same thing.
見ているところが同じだと
いうことなのでしょう
08:22
We're noticing words that are coming into prominence.
どちらも目立ってきた語に
着目しているのですが
08:26
It's really a question of attitude.
見解が違うというわけです
08:29
Are you bothered by language
fads and language change,
言語的な流行や変化を
疎ましく思うか
08:31
or do you find it fun, interesting,
おもしろく 興味深く
08:35
something worthy of study
現用言語の特徴として
08:38
as part of a living language?
研究に値すると思うかです
08:40
The list by Lake Superior State University
レイク・スペリオル州立大学の一覧は
08:43
continues a fairly long tradition in English
新語への不満という
極めて長い伝統の
08:45
of complaints about new words.
流れを汲んでいます
08:47
So here is Dean Henry Alford in 1875,
こちらはヘンリー・アルフォード大主教の
1875年の言葉です
08:50
who was very concerned that "desirability"
「desirability(望ましさ)」という語は
08:54
is really a terrible word.
実に不快だと 強く懸念しています
08:56
In 1760, Benjamin Franklin
1760年にはベンジャミン・フランクリンが
08:59
wrote a letter to David Hume
デイヴィッド・ヒュームに宛てた手紙で
09:02
giving up the word "colonize" as bad.
「colonize(植民地化する)」は
悪い語だから使わないと書いています
09:03
Over the years, we've also seen worries
新しい発音についての憂慮も
09:07
about new pronunciations.
長年 見受けられます
09:09
Here is Samuel Rogers in 1855
こちらはサミュエル・ロジャーズの
1855年の言葉で
09:11
who is concerned about some
fashionable pronunciations
彼が侮辱的と感じる
頭にアクセントを置く
09:14
that he finds offensive,
流行の発音を懸念しています
09:17
and he says "as if contemplate were not bad enough,
「『contemplate』も不愉快だが
09:19
balcony makes me sick."
『balcony』には吐き気がする」
09:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:24
The word is borrowed in from Italian
「balcony」はイタリア語からの借用で
09:28
and it was pronounced bal-COE-nee.
元の発音では「co」に
アクセントがありました
09:30
These complaints now strike us as quaint,
こうした不満は現代の私たちには
古臭く感じられます
09:34
if not downright adorkable -- (Laughter) --
「adorkable」とまでは言いませんが
(笑)
09:37
but here's the thing:
大事なのは
09:42
we still get quite worked up about language change.
私たちは言語の変化に対し
やはり結構気にするということです
09:44
I have an entire file in my office
私のオフィスには
09:49
of newspaper articles
正統でない語について
09:51
which express concern about illegitimate words
辞書に載せるべきでないと
懸念を表明する
09:54
that should not have been included in the dictionary,
新聞記事がファイル1冊分あります
09:57
including "LOL"
例えば「LOL」が
09:58
when it got into the Oxford English Dictionary
オックスフォード英語辞典に載った時
10:00
and "defriend"
そして「defriend」が
10:02
when it got into the Oxford American Dictionary.
オックスフォード米語辞典に載った時の
記事です
10:04
I also have articles expressing concern
名詞の「invite(招待)」や
10:06
about "invite" as a noun,
動詞の「impact(影響する)」に
対する
10:09
"impact" as a verb,
懸念を表明した記事もあります
10:12
because only teeth can be impacted,
「impacted(埋伏)」は
歯の話に限られるし
10:14
and "incentivize" is described
「incentivize(やる気を起こさせる)」は
10:17
as "boorish, bureaucratic misspeak."
「粗暴で官僚的な失言である」と
言うのです
10:19
Now, it's not that dictionary editors
辞書の編纂者たちは
言語に対する
10:24
ignore these kinds of attitudes about language.
こうした見解を
無視しているわけではありません
10:26
They try to provide us some guidance about words
彼らは大抵は注釈という形で
俗語や略式の語
10:29
that are considered slang or informal
侮辱的と考えられる語について
10:31
or offensive, often through usage labels,
私たちに指針を提供しようと
しているのですが
10:33
but they're in something of a bind,
編纂者として苦しいのは
10:37
because they're trying to describe what we do,
人々の言動を説明するのが
仕事でありながら
10:38
and they know that we often go to dictionaries
人々が辞書を引くのは
だいたい
10:42
to get information about how we should use a word
正しい語法や
適切な表現を調べるのが
10:44
well or appropriately.
目的だと知っているからです
10:47
In response, the American Heritage Dictionaries
これに応え アメリカン・ヘリテージ辞典は
10:49
include usage notes.
使い方の注意を加えています
10:52
Usage notes tend to occur with words
注意書きが添えられるのは
10:54
that are troublesome in one way,
ある意味 厄介な語で
10:56
and one of the ways that they can be troublesome
厄介になる理由の一つが
10:58
is that they're changing meaning.
意味の変化です
11:00
Now usage notes involve very human decisions,
使い方の注意には非常に人間的な
判断が絡んでおり
11:02
and I think, as dictionary users,
私が思うに 辞書を使う人は
11:06
we're often not as aware of those human decisions
こうした人間的な判断を
認識すべきなのに
11:08
as we should be.
ほとんど していません
11:10
To show you what I mean,
例を挙げて
11:11
we'll look at an example, but before we do,
どういうことか説明していきますが
その前に
11:12
I want to explain what the dictionary editors
この注意書きの中で 編纂者が
11:15
are trying to deal with in this usage note.
取り組んでいる内容を解説します
11:17
Think about the word "peruse"
「peruse」という語について
11:20
and how you use that word.
どういう意味で使っているか
考えてみてください
11:23
I would guess many of you are thinking
おそらく多くの方が考えているのは
11:27
of skim, scan, reading quickly.
「ざっと目を通す」「素早く読む」
というところでしょう
11:29
Some of you may even have some walking involved,
歩くことと関連して考える人も
いるでしょう
11:34
because you're perusing grocery store shelves,
食料品店の棚を見て回ることを
11:37
or something like that.
言ったりも しますからね
11:39
You might be surprised to learn
驚かれるでしょうが
11:40
that if you look in most standard dictionaries,
最も標準的な辞書を引くと
11:43
the first definition will be to read carefully,
最初に出てくる語釈は「じっくり読む」
11:45
or pour over.
「熟読する」なんです
11:48
American Heritage has that as the first definition.
それがアメリカン・ヘリテージの
1つ目の語釈です
11:50
They then have, as the second definition, skim,
そして2つ目の語釈が
「ざっと目を通す」
11:53
and next to that, they say "usage problem."
ただし そこには「使用上 問題あり」と
書いてあります
11:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:00
And then they include a usage note,
ここに載っている注意書きは
12:02
which is worth looking at.
一読の価値があります
12:04
So here's the usage note:
これが その注意書きです
12:06
"Peruse has long meant 'to read thoroughly' ...
「『peruse』は ずっと
『精読する』という意味だった
12:07
But the word if often used more loosely,
しかし砕けた使い方をする際に
12:10
to mean simply 'to read.' ...
単に『読む』という意味になり
12:12
Further extension of the word
to mean 'to glance over, skim,'
さらに意味の広がった
『ざっと目を通す』は
12:14
has traditionally been considered an error,
従来は誤用と考えられていたが
12:17
but our ballot results suggest that it is becoming
我々の投票の結果
容認の傾向が やや強く
12:19
somewhat more acceptable.
なってきていることが示唆される
12:21
When asked about the sentence,
『時間がなくて マニュアルを
12:23
'I only had a moment to peruse the manual quickly,'
さっと'peruse' しただけだ』
という文に対し
12:25
66 percent of the [Usage] Panel
容認できないと答えた識者は
12:27
found it unacceptable in 1988,
1988年では66%
12:29
58 percent in 1999,
1999年は58%
12:32
and 48 percent in 2011."
2011年は48%だった」
12:34
Ah, the Usage Panel,
識者の会ですよ
12:38
that trusted body of language authorities
あの信頼できる言語の権威が
12:40
who is getting more lenient about this.
これについて寛容になってきていると
12:42
Now, what I hope you're thinking right now is,
皆さん 疑問を持ってくださいよ
12:45
"Wait, who's on the Usage Panel?
「待って 識者って誰のこと?」
12:47
And what should I do with their pronouncements?"
「彼らの発表に対して
自分はどうすればいい?」
12:51
If you look in the front matter
アメリカン・ヘリテージ辞典の
12:54
of American Heritage Dictionaries,
前付けを見ると
12:56
you can actually find the names
識者の会のメンバーの
12:57
of the people on the Usage Panel.
名前が書いてあるんですが
12:59
But who looks at the front matter of dictionaries?
辞書の前付けなんて
誰も見ませんよね
13:01
There are about 200 people on the Usage Panel.
識者の会には約200人が所属しています
13:03
They include academicians,
アカデミー会員やジャーナリスト
13:06
journalists, creative writers.
文芸作家も入っています
13:08
There's a Supreme Court justice on it
最高裁判事もいますし
13:10
and a few linguists.
言語学者も数名います
13:12
As of 2005, the list includes me.
2005年からは私も入っています
13:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:18
Here's what we can do for you.
私たちが皆さんのために
できることは
13:23
We can give you a sense
揺れている語法について
13:26
of the range of opinions about contested usage.
意味の幅が伝わるように
することです
13:28
That is and should be the extent of our authority.
それが私たちの権限で
そこまでに留めるべきです
13:31
We are not a language academy.
私たちは言語アカデミーではありません
13:35
About once a year, I get a ballot
私のところには 年に一度くらい
13:38
that asks me about whether new uses,
新しい用法 新しい発音
新しい意味が
13:41
new pronunciations, new meanings, are acceptable.
容認できるかどうか
投票するよう依頼が来ます
13:44
Now here's what I do to fill out the ballot.
私の投票基準は こうです
13:48
I listen to what other people are saying and writing.
他の人々の話し言葉 書き言葉に
耳を傾けます
13:50
I do not listen to my own likes
自分の言語的な好き嫌いには
13:54
and dislikes about the English language.
耳を貸しません
13:56
I will be honest with you:
正直に申し上げますと
13:59
I do not like the word "impactful,"
私は「impactful(影響力の強い)」
という語が好きではありません
14:01
but that is neither here nor there
でも それは関係のないことで
14:04
in terms of whether "impactful"
is becoming common usage
問題は「impactful」が一般的に
使われており
14:06
and becoming more acceptable in written prose.
散文で容認されてきているか
ということです
14:09
So to be responsible,
責任を持って
14:12
what I do is go look at usage,
回答するために 私は語法を調べます
14:13
which often involves going to look
Google ブックスのような
14:16
at online databases such as Google Books.
ネット上の資料に あたることも
よくあります
14:18
Well, if you look for "impactful" in Google Books,
Google ブックスで
「impactful」を探すと
14:20
here is what you find.
こういう結果が出ます
14:23
Well, it sure looks like "impactful"
どうやら「impactful」は
14:26
is proving useful
一定数の書き手にとって
14:29
for a certain number of writers,
実用的な語になりつつあり
14:30
and has become more and more useful
その実用性は ここ20年で
14:32
over the last 20 years.
どんどん高まってきているようです
14:34
Now, there are going to be changes
言語が変化していく中には
14:36
that all of us don't like in the language.
誰もが好きになれないものも
出てくるでしょう
14:38
There are going to be changes where you think,
こんな反応をされるものも
出てくるでしょう
14:40
"Really?
「本当に?
14:43
Does the language have to change that way?"
言語って そんな変わり方を
しなくちゃいけないの?」
14:44
What I'm saying is,
私の意見は
14:47
we should be less quick
ある変化について ひどいと
14:49
to decide that that change is terrible,
すぐに決め付けてはいけない
ということです
14:51
we should be less quick to impose
他の人の言葉遣いについて
14:54
our likes and dislikes about words on other people,
自分の好き嫌いを
すぐに押し付けたりせず
14:56
and we should be entirely reluctant
英語が まずい状態に
陥っているという考えを
14:59
to think that the English language is in trouble.
簡単に認めないように すべきです
15:02
It's not. It is rich and vibrant and filled
実際そんな状態ではないのです
英語は豊かで力あふれ
15:05
with the creativity of the speakers who speak it.
英語を使う人たちの創造力で
いっぱいです
15:09
In retrospect, we think it's fascinating
「nice(良い)」が
かつて「愚か」という意味で
15:12
that the word "nice" used to mean silly,
「decimate(破壊する)」が
「10人に1人を殺す」
15:15
and that the word "decimate"
という意味だったなんて
15:18
used to mean to kill one in every 10.
今考えると 興味深いですよね
15:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:23
We think that Ben Franklin was being silly
フランクリンが動詞の
「notice(気づく)」を
15:28
to worry about "notice" as a verb.
気に病んでいたなんて
バカらしいですね
15:34
Well, you know what?
でもね
15:36
We're going to look pretty silly in a hundred years
動詞の「impact」や
名詞の「invite」を
15:38
for worrying about "impact" as a verb
気に病んでいる私たちも
15:40
and "invite" as a noun.
百年後にはバカみたいと
思われるわけですよ
15:43
The language is not going to change so fast
私たちがついて行けないほどの速さで
15:45
that we can't keep up.
言語が変化することは ありません
15:48
Language just doesn't work that way.
言語は そんな風には ならないのです
15:50
I hope that what you can do
皆さんにお願いしたいのは
15:52
is find language change not worrisome
言語の変化を気がかりと思わず
15:54
but fun and fascinating,
辞書の編纂者たちのように
15:56
just the way dictionary editors do.
おもしろくて魅力的だと思ってください
15:58
I hope you can enjoy being part
私たちの言語を絶えずリメイクして
16:01
of the creativity that is continually remaking
活気ある状態に保ってくれる
その創造性の
16:03
our language and keeping it robust.
担い手であることを
楽しんでほしいのです
16:08
So how does a word get into a dictionary?
ある言葉が辞書に載るのは
どういう場合でしょう
16:12
It gets in because we use it
私たちが使い
16:15
and we keep using it,
使い続け
16:17
and dictionary editors are paying attention to us.
私たちが辞書編纂者の注目を
引いた場合です
16:19
If you're thinking, "But that lets all of us decide
「じゃあ 言葉の意味を決めるのは
私たち皆ってことか」
16:23
what words mean,"
と思われたなら
16:26
I would say, "Yes it does,
私の答えは「はい その通り」
16:28
and it always has."
「今までも ずっとそうでしたよ」
16:32
Dictionaries are a wonderful guide and resource,
辞書は素晴らしい指針であり
情報源ですが
16:34
but there is no objective
dictionary authority out there
言葉の意味に関して
最終審判を下すような
16:38
that is the final arbiter about what words mean.
客観性のある辞書の権威は
存在しません
16:42
If a community of speakers is using a word
話者のコミュニティが ある言葉を使い
16:45
and knows what it means, it's real.
皆が意味を知っていたら
その言葉は「まとも」です
16:48
That word might be slangy,
俗語っぽいかもしれないし
16:51
that word might be informal,
略式かもしれないし
16:53
that word might be a word that you think
非論理的で不必要と
16:54
is illogical or unnecessary,
思われるかもしれないけれど
16:56
but that word that we're using,
私たちが使っている言葉なら
16:59
that word is real.
それは「まとも」なのです
17:01
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:06
Translated by Emi Kamiya
Reviewed by Ricky Park

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Anne Curzan - Language historian
English professor Anne Curzan actually encourages her students to use slang in class. A language historian, she is fascinated by how people use words—and by how this changes.

Why you should listen

Anne Curzan is a collector of slang words, a dissector of colloquialisms and a charter of language evolution. To put it most simply, she is a Professor of English at the University of Michigan who studies how the English language works and how it has changed over time. As she puts it in her talk, “The English language is rich, vibrant and filled with the creativity of the people who speak it.”

In addition to sitting on the usage panel for American Heritage dictionary since 2005, Curzan is also an author—her latest book is called Fixing English: Prescriptivism and Language History. She also co-hosts the show “That’s What They Say” on Michigan Radio, all about language and grammar, and writes regularly for The Chronicle of Higher Education’s language blog, Lingua Franca.

More profile about the speaker
Anne Curzan | Speaker | TED.com