14:42
TEDMED 2015

Russ Altman: What really happens when you mix medications?

ラス・オルトマン: 薬を併用したときに何が起きるか?

Filmed:

2つの薬を別々の理由で飲んでいるのなら、1つ怖いことをお教えしましょう。薬の相互作用は研究が極めて難しいため、医者は薬を組み合わせたとき何が起こるかすっかり理解しているわけではないということです。ラス・オルトマンがこの大変刺激的かつ分かりやすい講演で聞かせてくれるのは、薬の予期せぬ相互作用を見つけるために、ちょっと意外な方法—検索語を使うという話です。

- Big data techno-­optimist and internist
Russ Altman uses machine learning to better understand adverse effects of medication. Full bio

So you go to the doctor
and get some tests.
病院に行って
検査を受けたところ
00:12
The doctor determines
that you have high cholesterol
コレステロールが高いので
00:16
and you would benefit
from medication to treat it.
薬で下げた方が良いと
診断されました
00:19
So you get a pillbox.
それで薬の瓶を
1つ手にします
00:22
You have some confidence,
患者も医者も
00:25
your physician has some confidence
that this is going to work.
薬は効くはずだと
信じています
00:26
The company that invented it did
a lot of studies, submitted it to the FDA.
薬を作った会社は 多くの研究を
重ねた上で 薬の認可を申請し
00:29
They studied it very carefully,
skeptically, they approved it.
FDAは細心の注意を払って
批判的に審査した上で認可を出しています
00:33
They have a rough idea of how it works,
薬がどのように働き
00:36
they have a rough idea
of what the side effects are.
どんな副作用があるかは
おおよそ分かっていて
00:38
It should be OK.
大丈夫なはずだと
00:40
You have a little more
of a conversation with your physician
さらに話していると
医者が少し懸念を持ちます
00:42
and the physician is a little worried
because you've been blue,
どうも少し ふさぎ気味だ
00:45
haven't felt like yourself,
何か違和感がある
00:48
you haven't been able to enjoy things
in life quite as much as you usually do.
以前のように
物事を楽しめない
00:50
Your physician says, "You know,
I think you have some depression.
医者が言います
「少しうつの傾向があるようです
00:53
I'm going to have to give
you another pill."
薬をもう1つ
飲んだほうがいいですね」
00:57
So now we're talking
about two medications.
これで薬が2つになりました
01:00
This pill also -- millions
of people have taken it,
こちらの薬も
何百万という人が使っていて
01:03
the company did studies,
the FDA looked at it -- all good.
製薬会社が研究をし FDAが
チェックしていて 問題のないものです
01:06
Think things should go OK.
こっちは大丈夫なはずです
01:10
Think things should go OK.
こっちは大丈夫なはずです
01:12
Well, wait a minute.
でも 待ってください
01:15
How much have we studied
these two together?
両方同時に使った場合については
どれほど研究されているのでしょう?
01:16
Well, it's very hard to do that.
それは 実際 行うのが難しく
01:20
In fact, it's not traditionally done.
通常は行われていません
01:22
We totally depend on what we call
"post-marketing surveillance,"
私たちはもっぱら
01:25
after the drugs hit the market.
「市販後調査」と呼ばれるものに
頼っています
01:30
How can we figure out
if bad things are happening
2つの薬の併用で
問題が生じているかは
01:32
between two medications?
どうすれば
わかるのでしょう?
01:35
Three? Five? Seven?
併用が 3つ 5つ 7つの場合は?
01:37
Ask your favorite person
who has several diagnoses
病気をいくつも抱えた人に
01:39
how many medications they're on.
薬をいったい何種飲んでいるのか
聞いてご覧なさい
01:42
Why do I care about this problem?
私はこの問題に
とても関心があります
01:44
I care about it deeply.
なぜかというと
01:46
I'm an informatics and data science guy
and really, in my opinion,
私はインフォマティクスとデータサイエンスを
専門とする人間ですが 私の考えでは
01:47
the only hope -- only hope --
to understand these interactions
そのような薬の相互作用について理解する
唯一見込みのある方法は
01:51
is to leverage lots
of different sources of data
様々な異なる情報源のデータを
活用することなんです
01:55
in order to figure out
when drugs can be used together safely
それによって薬が併用して
安全か安全でないか
01:58
and when it's not so safe.
分かるようになります
02:02
So let me tell you a data science story.
データサイエンスの方法を
お聞かせしましょう
02:04
And it begins with my student Nick.
話は私の教え子から
始まります
02:06
Let's call him "Nick,"
because that's his name.
彼を「ニック」と呼ぶことにしましょう
それが彼の名前なので
02:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:11
Nick was a young student.
若い学生のニックに
私は言いました
02:12
I said, "You know, Nick, we have
to understand how drugs work
「薬は単独で
あるいは併用したとき
02:14
and how they work together
and how they work separately,
どう働くのか
理解する必要があるが
02:17
and we don't have a great understanding.
我々はあまり良く
理解しているとは言えない
02:19
But the FDA has made available
an amazing database.
しかしFDAが作った
素晴らしいデータベースがある
02:21
It's a database of adverse events.
有害事象のデータベースだ」
02:24
They literally put on the web --
文字通りWebサイトで
公開されていて
02:26
publicly available, you could all
download it right now --
誰でもすぐダウンロードできます
02:27
hundreds of thousands
of adverse event reports
そこには患者 医者 企業
薬剤師から寄せられた
02:31
from patients, doctors,
companies, pharmacists.
何十万という有害事象の報告が
集められています
02:34
And these reports are pretty simple:
このデータはとても
シンプルなもので
02:38
it has all the diseases
that the patient has,
その患者が抱える
すべての病気
02:40
all the drugs that they're on,
処方されている
すべての薬
02:43
and all the adverse events,
or side effects, that they experience.
そして経験されたすべての有害事象
ないしは副作用が書かれています
02:44
It is not all of the adverse events
that are occurring in America today,
米国で発生している有害事象が
網羅されているわけではありませんが
02:48
but it's hundreds and hundreds
of thousands of drugs.
何百何千という薬の
データがあります
02:52
So I said to Nick,
それでニックに言いました
02:54
"Let's think about glucose.
「血糖を検討してみよう
02:56
Glucose is very important,
and we know it's involved with diabetes.
血糖はとても重要で
糖尿病に関与していることが分かっている
02:57
Let's see if we can understand
glucose response.
薬による血糖の変化について
何か分かるかやってみよう」
03:01
I sent Nick off. Nick came back.
そしてニックを送り出し
ニックが戻ってきました
03:05
"Russ," he said,
「先生 このデータベースの
データに基づいて
03:08
"I've created a classifier that can
look at the side effects of a drug
副作用による
薬の分類を作りました
03:10
based on looking at this database,
これを使うと
03:15
and can tell you whether that drug
is likely to change glucose or not."
薬で血糖が変わるか
どうか分かります」
03:17
He did it. It was very simple, in a way.
彼のやったことは
ごく単純です
03:21
He took all the drugs
that were known to change glucose
血糖を変えることが
分かっている薬のグループと
03:23
and a bunch of drugs
that don't change glucose,
血糖を変えない薬のグループを
比較したんです
03:26
and said, "What's the difference
in their side effects?
「両者の副作用に
どんな違いがあるのか?
03:28
Differences in fatigue? In appetite?
In urination habits?"
倦怠感は? 食欲は? 排尿習慣は?」
03:31
All those things conspired
to give him a really good predictor.
これらを合わせると
とても良い指標になります
03:36
He said, "Russ, I can predict
with 93 percent accuracy
「薬が血糖を変えるかどうか
03:39
when a drug will change glucose."
93%の精度で当てられます」と
03:42
I said, "Nick, that's great."
「すごいじゃないか」
03:43
He's a young student,
you have to build his confidence.
若い学生です 自信を付けて
やらなきゃいけません (笑)
03:45
"But Nick, there's a problem.
「問題は
03:48
It's that every physician in the world
knows all the drugs that change glucose,
どの薬が血糖に影響するか
医者ならみんな知っているということだ
03:49
because it's core to our practice.
とても重要なことだからね
03:53
So it's great, good job,
but not really that interesting,
良い成果だが
本当に興味深いとは言えず
03:55
definitely not publishable."
論文にはならないな」
03:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:01
He said, "I know, Russ.
I thought you might say that."
「先生がそう言うのは
分かっていました」
04:02
Nick is smart.
ニックは頭の良い学生です
04:04
"I thought you might say that,
so I did one other experiment.
「そうくると思って
もう1つ実験をしました
04:06
I looked at people in this database
who were on two drugs,
データベースで薬を
2つ併用している患者に
04:09
and I looked for signals similar,
glucose-changing signals,
血糖が変化している
兆候がないか探したんです
04:11
for people taking two drugs,
服用している2つの薬が
04:16
where each drug alone
did not change glucose,
単独では血糖を
変えないけれど
04:18
but together I saw a strong signal."
併用すると 変化する見込みが
高いケースです」
04:23
And I said, "Oh! You're clever.
Good idea. Show me the list."
「なるほど いいアイデアだ
リストを見せてご覧」
04:26
And there's a bunch of drugs,
not very exciting.
そこには あまり興味を引かない薬が
たくさん並んでいましたが
04:29
But what caught my eye
was, on the list there were two drugs:
目を引く薬が
2つありました
04:31
paroxetine, or Paxil, an antidepressant;
パロキセチン 別名パキシルという
抗うつ薬と
04:35
and pravastatin, or Pravachol,
a cholesterol medication.
プラバスタチン 別名プラバコールという
高コレステロール血症治療薬です
04:39
And I said, "Huh. There are millions
of Americans on those two drugs."
「おや この2つを飲んでいる患者なら
アメリカに何百万人もいるぞ」
04:43
In fact, we learned later,
実際後で分かったことですが
04:48
15 million Americans on paroxetine
at the time, 15 million on pravastatin,
その当時でパロキセチンは1500万人
プラバスタチンも1500万人のアメリカ人が服用しており
04:49
and a million, we estimated, on both.
両方服用している人が
百万人ほどいると推定されました
04:55
So that's a million people
つまり百万人もの人が
薬のせいで
04:58
who might be having some problems
with their glucose
血糖の問題を抱えている
かもしれないのです
05:00
if this machine-learning mumbo jumbo
that he did in the FDA database
ニックがFDAのデータを
機械学習にかけて
05:02
actually holds up.
ごちゃごちゃやった結果が
もし正しいのであれば
05:05
But I said, "It's still not publishable,
「でもまだ論文にはできないな
05:07
because I love what you did
with the mumbo jumbo,
君のやっている
機械学習とか言うやつを
05:08
with the machine learning,
私は面白いと思うが
05:11
but it's not really standard-of-proof
evidence that we have."
我々の分野で確立した
実証方法とは言えない」
05:12
So we have to do something else.
もっと何かやる
必要があります
05:17
Let's go into the Stanford
electronic medical record.
スタンフォードの電子医療記録に
あたってみることにしました
05:19
We have a copy of it
that's OK for research,
研究室にコピーがあって
05:22
we removed identifying information.
個人情報を取り除けば
研究目的に使えました
05:24
And I said, "Let's see if people
on these two drugs
「この2つの薬を
使っている患者に
05:26
have problems with their glucose."
血糖の問題がないか
見てみよう」
05:29
Now there are thousands
and thousands of people
パロキセチンとプラバスタチンを
使っている患者なら
05:31
in the Stanford medical records
that take paroxetine and pravastatin.
スタンフォードの医療記録に
何千人もいましたが
05:33
But we needed special patients.
私たちは特別な患者を
必要としていました
05:36
We needed patients who were on one of them
and had a glucose measurement,
最初一方を服用していて
血糖値を測定し
05:38
then got the second one and had
another glucose measurement,
それからもう一方を服用し
また血糖値を測定するというのを
05:43
all within a reasonable period of time --
something like two months.
2ヶ月というような
適当な期間内に行った患者です
05:46
And when we did that,
we found 10 patients.
探してみたら
10人見つかりました
05:50
However, eight out of the 10
had a bump in their glucose
そして10人中 8人で
血糖の増加が
05:54
when they got the second P --
we call this P and P --
2番目のPの後 — 2つの薬を
P & P と呼んでいるんですが —
05:59
when they got the second P.
見られました
06:01
Either one could be first,
the second one comes up,
どちらが先でも同じで
2番目の薬を服用したとたんに
06:03
glucose went up
20 milligrams per deciliter.
血糖が 20mg/dl 上昇したんです
06:05
Just as a reminder,
参考までに
06:08
you walk around normally,
if you're not diabetic,
普通に生活している人は
糖尿病でなければ
06:09
with a glucose of around 90.
血糖値は90程度です
06:12
And if it gets up to 120, 125,
それが120とか125になったら
06:13
your doctor begins to think
about a potential diagnosis of diabetes.
医者は糖尿病の可能性を
疑い始めます
06:15
So a 20 bump -- pretty significant.
だから20の上昇というのは
見過ごせないものです
06:19
I said, "Nick, this is very cool.
「ニック これはすごいぞ
06:22
But, I'm sorry, we still
don't have a paper,
だが残念ながら
まだ論文にはできない
06:25
because this is 10 patients
and -- give me a break --
たった10人では
06:27
it's not enough patients."
どう見ても少なすぎる」
06:30
So we said, what can we do?
どうしたらいいか?
06:31
And we said, let's call our friends
at Harvard and Vanderbilt,
ボストンにあるハーバード大と
ナッシュビルにあるヴァンダービルト大の
06:32
who also -- Harvard in Boston,
Vanderbilt in Nashville,
知り合いに電話する
ことにしました
06:35
who also have electronic
medical records similar to ours.
両大学にもスタンフォードと同様の
電子医療記録があります
06:38
Let's see if they can find
similar patients
最初のPと
次のPの服用と
06:41
with the one P, the other P,
the glucose measurements
血糖値測定を
必要な期間内に行っている患者を
06:43
in that range that we need.
探してもらうことにしました
06:46
God bless them, Vanderbilt
in one week found 40 such patients,
ありがたいことに ヴァンダービルト大からは
1週間で そのような患者が40人見つかり
06:48
same trend.
同じ傾向が見られました
06:53
Harvard found 100 patients, same trend.
ハーバード大からは100人の患者が見つかり
同じ傾向が見られました
06:55
So at the end, we had 150 patients
from three diverse medical centers
最終的に3つの異なる医療センターで
150人の患者が見つかり
06:59
that were telling us that patients
getting these two drugs
これら2つの薬を
併用すると
07:03
were having their glucose bump
somewhat significantly.
血糖が有意に上昇することを
示していました
07:07
More interestingly,
we had left out diabetics,
さらに興味深いのは
07:10
because diabetics already
have messed up glucose.
血糖にすでに異常のある
糖尿病患者は当初除外していたんですが
07:13
When we looked
at the glucose of diabetics,
糖尿病患者の場合には
07:15
it was going up 60 milligrams
per deciliter, not just 20.
20mgではなく60mgも
上昇することが分かりました
07:17
This was a big deal, and we said,
"We've got to publish this."
これは重大なことです
07:21
We submitted the paper.
「これは発表しなきゃいけない」となって
論文を提出しました
07:25
It was all data evidence,
証拠はすべてデータです
07:26
data from the FDA, data from Stanford,
FDAのデータ
スタンフォード大のデータ
07:28
data from Vanderbilt, data from Harvard.
ヴァンダービルト大のデータ
ハーバード大のデータ
07:31
We had not done a single real experiment.
自分で実験は
1つもしていません
07:33
But we were nervous.
でも少し不安になったので
07:36
So Nick, while the paper
was in review, went to the lab.
論文が査読を受けている間に
07:38
We found somebody
who knew about lab stuff.
実験ができる人間を探しました
07:41
I don't do that.
私はやりませんので
07:44
I take care of patients,
but I don't do pipettes.
患者は診ますが
ピペットは使いません
07:45
They taught us how to feed mice drugs.
マウスに薬を与える
やり方を習いました
07:49
We took mice and we gave them
one P, paroxetine.
あるマウスのグループには
パロキセチンを与え
07:52
We gave some other mice pravastatin.
別のグループには
プラバスタチンを与え
07:55
And we gave a third group
of mice both of them.
第3のグループには
両方与えました
07:57
And lo and behold, glucose went up
20 to 60 milligrams per deciliter
するとマウスでも
20〜60mg/dlの
08:01
in the mice.
血糖上昇が見られました
08:05
So the paper was accepted
based on the informatics evidence alone,
論文はインフォマティクス的な
証拠だけで受理されましたが
08:07
but we added a little note at the end,
最後に注釈を
追加しておきました
08:10
saying, oh by the way,
if you give these to mice, it goes up.
「ちなみに マウスに投与したところ
上昇が見られた」
08:12
That was great, and the story
could have ended there.
素晴らしい結果です
話はここで終わりにしてもいいんですが
08:15
But I still have six and a half minutes.
まだ6分半残っています
08:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:19
So we were sitting around
thinking about all of this,
この件について考えていて
08:22
and I don't remember who thought
of it, but somebody said,
誰だったのか覚えていませんが
こう言いました
08:25
"I wonder if patients
who are taking these two drugs
「この2つの薬を
服用した患者の中に
08:28
are noticing side effects
of hyperglycemia.
高血糖の副作用に気付いた人は
いなかったのかな?
08:31
They could and they should.
気付いて良さそうなものだけど
08:34
How would we ever determine that?"
どうすればわかるだろう?」
08:36
We said, well, what do you do?
「患者はどうするだろう?
08:39
You're taking a medication,
one new medication or two,
薬を1つか2つ
新たに服用し始めて
08:41
and you get a funny feeling.
何か具合が
悪くなったとしたら
08:43
What do you do?
どうするか?
08:45
You go to Google
飲んでいる薬の名前に
08:46
and type in the two drugs you're taking
or the one drug you're taking,
「副作用」という
キーワードを追加して
08:47
and you type in "side effects."
Googleで検索し
08:50
What are you experiencing?
自分の症状を
探してみるんじゃないかな?」
08:52
So we said OK,
それでGoogleに
08:54
let's ask Google if they will share
their search logs with us,
検索ログを見せてくれるよう
頼んでみよう
08:55
so that we can look at the search logs
ということになりました
08:58
and see if patients are doing
these kinds of searches.
患者がそのような検索をしていないか
調べようというわけです
09:00
Google, I am sorry to say,
denied our request.
あいにく我々の依頼は
Googleに断られ
09:02
So I was bummed.
とてもがっかりしました
09:06
I was at a dinner with a colleague
who works at Microsoft Research
Microsoftリサーチで働く仕事仲間と
食事していた時に
09:07
and I said, "We wanted to do this study,
こういう研究を
したいんだけど
09:11
Google said no, it's kind of a bummer."
Googleに断られて
参ったという話をすると
09:13
He said, "Well, we have
the Bing searches."
彼が言いました
「うちにBing検索というのがあるけど・・・」
09:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:18
Yeah.
ほう
09:22
That's great.
そりゃいいね
09:24
Now I felt like I was --
私は内心もう —
09:25
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:26
I felt like I was talking to Nick again.
またニックと話しているような
感じになりました
09:27
He works for one of the largest
companies in the world,
世界最大の企業の1つで
働いている男です
09:30
and I'm already trying
to make him feel better.
私はもう おだてる姿勢に
入っていました
09:33
But he said, "No, Russ --
you might not understand.
すると彼が言います
「誤解したかもしれませんが
09:35
We not only have Bing searches,
うちにはBing検索がある
というだけじゃなくて
09:37
but if you use Internet Explorer
to do searches at Google,
Internet Explorerで検索していれば
Googleだろうと
09:39
Yahoo, Bing, any ...
Yahooだろうと
Bingだろうと
09:42
Then, for 18 months, we keep that data
for research purposes only."
研究目的限定でデータを
18ヶ月分保持してあるんです」
09:44
I said, "Now you're talking!"
「そりゃ願ってもない!」
09:48
This was Eric Horvitz,
my friend at Microsoft.
彼はエリック・ホーヴィッツという
Microsoftにいる友人です
09:50
So we did a study
それで研究に取りかかり
09:52
where we defined 50 words
that a regular person might type in
高血糖の一般の人が
検索に使いそうな言葉を
09:54
if they're having hyperglycemia,
50個リストアップしました
09:58
like "fatigue," "loss of appetite,"
"urinating a lot," "peeing a lot" --
「疲れる」「食欲がない」
「尿の量が多い」「おしっこが多い」
10:00
forgive me, but that's one
of the things you might type in.
そういった みんなの
使いそうな言葉です
10:05
So we had 50 phrases
that we called the "diabetes words."
これで「糖尿病言葉」と私たちの呼ぶ
50のフレーズができました
10:08
And we did first a baseline.
まず基準となる
値を調べたところ
10:10
And it turns out
that about .5 to one percent
インターネット検索全体のうちの
0.5〜1%は
10:12
of all searches on the Internet
involve one of those words.
糖尿病言葉を含むことが
分かりました
10:15
So that's our baseline rate.
これが基準になります
10:18
If people type in "paroxetine"
or "Paxil" -- those are synonyms --
パロキセチンないしはパキシル —
10:20
and one of those words,
この2つは同じですが —
10:24
the rate goes up to about two percent
of diabetes-type words,
その一方の言葉があるとき
糖尿病言葉が現れる率は2%ほどに上がります
10:25
if you already know
that there's that "paroxetine" word.
パロキセチン言葉が
ある場合です
10:30
If it's "pravastatin," the rate goes up
to about three percent from the baseline.
プラバスタチンがある場合は
基準から上がって3%ほどになります
10:34
If both "paroxetine" and "pravastatin"
are present in the query,
検索語にパロキセチンとプラバスタチンが
両方ある場合は
10:39
it goes up to 10 percent,
10%に上がります
10:43
a huge three- to four-fold increase
3倍から4倍という
大きな上昇です
10:45
in those searches with the two drugs
that we were interested in,
この2つの薬の名を
両方含んだ検索では
10:48
and diabetes-type words
or hyperglycemia-type words.
糖尿病言葉ないしは高血糖言葉が
よく現れるということです
10:52
We published this,
この結果を
発表すると
10:56
and it got some attention.
注目を集めました
10:57
The reason it deserves attention
これが注目に値するのは
10:58
is that patients are telling us
their side effects indirectly
患者が検索を通して
間接的に
11:00
through their searches.
副作用について
語っているからです
11:05
We brought this
to the attention of the FDA.
我々がこれをFDAに示すと
11:06
They were interested.
彼らは興味を示し
11:08
They have set up social media
surveillance programs
Microsoftその他の企業と協力して
11:09
to collaborate with Microsoft,
ソーシャルメディア監視プログラムを
立ち上げました
11:13
which had a nice infrastructure
for doing this, and others,
Microsoftはそのための
良いインフラを持っています
11:15
to look at Twitter feeds,
Twitterフィード
11:17
to look at Facebook feeds,
Facebookフィード
11:19
to look at search logs,
検索ログを見て
11:21
to try to see early signs that drugs,
either individually or together,
薬を単独使用ないしは
併用したときに
11:22
are causing problems.
問題を起こす兆候を
見つけようとしています
11:27
What do I take from this?
Why tell this story?
ここから得られることは何か?
なぜこの話をしたのか?
11:28
Well, first of all,
まず 我々は今や
11:31
we have now the promise
of big data and medium-sized data
薬の相互作用や 薬の効果そのもの
についての理解を助ける
11:32
to help us understand drug interactions
有望なビッグテータや
中規模データを
11:36
and really, fundamentally, drug actions.
手にしているということ
11:39
How do drugs work?
薬がどう効き
11:41
This will create and has created
a new ecosystem
薬の使用をどう最適化できるか
理解するための
11:43
for understanding how drugs work
and to optimize their use.
新しいエコシステムが
できつつあるということです
11:46
Nick went on; he's a professor
at Columbia now.
ニックは研究を続け
今ではコロンビア大学の教授です
11:50
He did this in his PhD
for hundreds of pairs of drugs.
彼は博士論文で何百という
薬の組み合わせについて調べ
11:52
He found several
very important interactions,
非常に重要な薬の相互作用を
いくつも見つけました
11:57
and so we replicated this
我々は同じ方法を適用して
11:59
and we showed that this
is a way that really works
これが 薬の
相互作用を見つける
12:00
for finding drug-drug interactions.
有効な方法であることを
示したんです
12:03
However, there's a couple of things.
いくつか考えるべき
ことがあります
12:06
We don't just use pairs
of drugs at a time.
薬というのは 1度に2種類までしか
使わないわけではありません
12:08
As I said before, there are patients
on three, five, seven, nine drugs.
前に言ったように 薬を
3種 5種 7種 9種 使う患者がいます
12:11
Have they been studied with respect
to their nine-way interaction?
9種の薬の相互作用について
研究されているのでしょうか?
12:15
Yes, we can do pair-wise,
A and B, A and C, A and D,
2つずつ組にして研究することはできます
AとB AとC AとD というように
12:19
but what about A, B, C,
D, E, F, G all together,
しかし 同じ患者が飲む薬
A B C D E F G
12:23
being taken by the same patient,
全部一緒にはどうでしょう?
12:28
perhaps interacting with each other
相互作用によって
12:29
in ways that either makes them
more effective or less effective
効果が増減したり
12:32
or causes side effects
that are unexpected?
予期しない副作用が
出たりするかもしれません
12:35
We really have no idea.
まったく分かっていません
12:38
It's a blue sky, open field
for us to use data
データを使って薬の相互作用を
理解するといのうは
12:40
to try to understand
the interaction of drugs.
手つかずで開かれた
研究領域なんです
12:43
Two more lessons:
教訓がもう2つあります
12:46
I want you to think about the power
that we were able to generate
私たちがデータによって得た力について
考えてほしいのです
12:48
with the data from people who had
volunteered their adverse reactions
薬剤師や医師を通し
あるいは患者自ら
12:52
through their pharmacists,
through themselves, through their doctors,
薬害反応について
進んで情報提供し
12:57
the people who allowed the databases
at Stanford, Harvard, Vanderbilt,
スタンフォード大 ハーバード大
ヴァンダービルト大のデータベースで
13:00
to be used for research.
研究利用できるようにしてくれた
人々のデータです
13:04
People are worried about data.
みんなデータについては
懸念を持っています
13:05
They're worried about their privacy
and security -- they should be.
プライバシーやセキュリティについて
心配しているし そうあるべきです
13:07
We need secure systems.
安全なシステムが必要です
13:10
But we can't have a system
that closes that data off,
しかしデータを封印してしまう
わけにはいきません
13:11
because it is too rich of a source
医学において
新しいことを発見し
13:15
of inspiration, innovation and discovery
革新し インスピレーションを
得るための
13:17
for new things in medicine.
非常に豊かな源なんです
13:21
And the final thing I want to say is,
最後に言いたいのは
13:24
in this case we found two drugs
and it was a little bit of a sad story.
今回のケースで2つの薬について
発見したのは 少し残念な結果でした
13:26
The two drugs actually caused problems.
一緒に使うと問題があって
13:29
They increased glucose.
血糖が上がります
13:31
They could throw somebody into diabetes
誰か糖尿病でなかった人を
13:33
who would otherwise not be in diabetes,
糖尿病にしてしまう
かもしれません
13:35
and so you would want to use
the two drugs very carefully together,
2つの薬を併用する場合には
注意が必要で
13:37
perhaps not together,
一緒には使わないよう
13:41
make different choices
when you're prescribing.
処方を変えた方が
良いかもしれません
13:42
But there was another possibility.
しかし別の
可能性もあります
13:44
We could have found
two drugs or three drugs
2つないしは3つの薬が
良い方向に相互作用することを
13:46
that were interacting in a beneficial way.
発見していたかも
しれないのです
13:48
We could have found new effects of drugs
単独の薬では現れないけれど
一緒にすると現れるような
13:51
that neither of them has alone,
新しい薬効が見つかる
かもしれません
13:54
but together, instead
of causing a side effect,
副作用を起こすのではなく
13:56
they could be a new and novel treatment
現在 治療法のない病気
13:59
for diseases that don't have treatments
治療法が効果的でない
病気への
14:01
or where the treatments are not effective.
新しい治療法が
できるかもしれません
14:03
If we think about drug treatment today,
現在ある薬物療法を
考えてみると
14:05
all the major breakthroughs --
大きな飛躍は
14:07
for HIV, for tuberculosis,
for depression, for diabetes --
HIVにせよ 結核にせよ
うつ病にせよ 糖尿病にせよ
14:09
it's always a cocktail of drugs.
みんな薬の混合から
生まれているのです
14:13
And so the upside here,
だからこれの
明るい面は
14:16
and the subject for a different
TED Talk on a different day,
そして次のTEDトークの
テーマになるのは
14:18
is how can we use the same data sources
同じデータを使って
14:21
to find good effects
of drugs in combination
好ましい効果を生む薬の組み合わせは
いかに見つけられるかということです
14:24
that will provide us new treatments,
それが新しい治療法や
14:27
new insights into how drugs work
薬の働きについての
新たな洞察を与えてくれ
14:29
and enable us to take care
of our patients even better?
患者をもっとうまく治療できる
ようにしてくれるはずです
14:31
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
14:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:36
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Russ Altman - Big data techno-­optimist and internist
Russ Altman uses machine learning to better understand adverse effects of medication.

Why you should listen

Professor of bioengineering, genetics, medicine and computer science at Stanford University, Russ Altman's primary research interests are in the application of computing and informatics technologies to problems relevant to medicine. He is particularly interested in methods for understanding drug actions at molecular, cellular, organism and population levels, including how genetic variation impacts drug response.

Altman received the U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and Stanford Medical School's graduate teaching award. He has chaired the Science Board advising the FDA Commissioner and currently serves on the NIH Director’s Advisory Committee. He is a clinically active internist, the founder of the PharmGKB knowledge base, and advisor to pharmacogenomics companies.

More profile about the speaker
Russ Altman | Speaker | TED.com