18:43
TEDGlobal 2007

Ory Okolloh: How I became an activist

オリ・オコーラ:活動家になること

Filmed:

オリ・オコーラは人生と家族について、そしてケニアの国会でおこなわれていることをレポートするという英雄的な活動を始めるに至った経緯を語ります

- Blogger and activist
Ory Okolloh maintains the blog Mzalendo, providing an unprecedented look at the doings of Kenya's parliament -- information once unavailable to Kenyan citizens. Full bio

So what's image got do with it?
これを見て何を思いますか?
00:18
And I must say, I think Emeka is trying to send
エメカはみなさんに多くのことを
00:21
a lot of subliminal messages,
訴えようとしたようで
00:23
because I'm going to keep harping on some of the issues
私もその話題のいくつかを
00:24
that have come up.
繰り返します
00:26
But I'm going to try and do something different,
ただ私の試みとして
00:28
and try and just close the loop with some of my personal stories,
個人的な体験で肉付けして
00:30
and try and put a face to a lot of the issues
これまで論じてきた課題を
00:35
that we've been talking about.
まとめようと思います
00:37
So, Africa is a complex continent full of contradictions,
アフリカはたくさんの矛盾を
00:39
as you can see.
抱えています
00:42
We're not the only ones.
他の国もそうですが
00:43
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:48
And you know, it's amazing.
驚いたことに アフリカ大陸の
00:54
I mean, we need a whole conference
よい面を語る会議に
00:57
just devoted to telling the good stories about the continent.
こんなにも時間が必要なのです
00:58
Just think about that, you know?
どうしてでしょう?
01:01
And this is typically what we've been talking about,
これはメディアに登場する
01:03
the role that the media plays in focusing
私達の抱える課題の
01:06
just on the negative stuff.
典型例です
01:08
Now, why is that a problem?
これがどうして問題なのか?
01:10
A typical disaster story:
アフリカの惨事といえば
01:13
disease, corruption, poverty.
病気 汚職 貧困です
01:16
And some of you might be standing here thinking,
皆さんは
01:18
saying, "OK, you know, Ory, you're Harvard-educated,
ハーバード大卒の恵まれた私は
01:21
and all you privileged people come here, saying,
貧乏人のことは忘れて
01:25
'Forget the poor people.
お金儲けの
01:28
Let's focus on business and the markets, and whatever.' "
話をすると思うかもしれません
01:29
And they're all, "There's the 80 percent of Africans
アフリカ人の80%が
01:33
who really need help."
支援を必要としています
01:35
And I want to tell you that this is my story, OK?
これは私の体験でもありながら
01:38
And it's the story of many of the Africans who are here.
他のアフリカ人にも共通する話です
01:42
We start with poverty.
貧困については
01:47
I didn't grow up in the slums or anything that dire,
スラム育ちでない私でも
01:48
but I know what it is to grow up without having money,
貧乏生活や家族を支えるのが
01:51
or being able to support family.
どんなに大変な事かは分かります
01:54
Euvin was talking about bellwether signs.
指標の話が先ほどありましたが
01:58
The bellwether for whether our family was broke or not was breakfast.
家庭の経済状況の指標は朝食です
02:00
You know, when things were good, we had eggs and sausages.
卵や肉がでればいいですが
02:05
When things were bad, we had porridge.
苦しいときは おかゆだけ
02:08
And like many African families,
他の家のように
02:11
my parents could never save
私の両親も
02:13
because they supported siblings, cousins, you know, their parents,
身内の暮らしを支えるので 貯金はなく
02:14
and things were always dicey.
経済的に不安定な生活でした
02:20
Now, when I was born, they realized they had a pretty smart kid,
私が賢いと気付いた両親は
02:23
and they didn't want me to go to the neighborhood school,
無料で通える近所の学校へは
02:26
which was free.
行かせなかった
02:29
And they adopted a very interesting
教育熱心だった両親は
02:30
approach to education, which was
興味深いことに
02:33
they were going to take me to a school that they can barely afford.
我が家の家計ではとても許されない
02:35
So they took me to a private, Catholic, elementary school,
カトリック学校へ入学させました
02:39
which set the foundation for what ended up being my career.
それで私の現在があるわけです
02:42
And what happened was,
小学校では
02:47
because they could afford it sometimes, sometimes not,
授業料が払えなくなって
02:49
I got kicked out pretty much every term.
よく追い出されました
02:52
You know, someone would come in with a list
授業料を払えない生徒のリストを持った
02:54
of the people who haven't paid school fees,
職員がやって来て
02:59
and when they started getting pretty strict,
授業料を払うまで
03:01
you had to leave, until your school fees could be paid.
来るなと言われるのです
03:03
And I remember thinking, I mean,
だったら地元の学校に
03:05
why don't these guys just take me to a cheap school?
通えば良いのにと思っていました
03:07
Because you know, as a kid
貧乏だと分かるのは
03:10
you're embarrassed and
恥ずかしかったのです
03:12
you're sensitive, and everyone knows
幼い頃は
03:16
you guys don't have money.
周りを気にしますから
03:17
But they kept at it,
でも両親は家計が苦しくても
03:18
and I now understand why they did what they did.
私を私立校へ通わせたのです
03:22
They talk about corruption.
汚職についてですが
03:25
In Kenya, we have an entrance exam to go into high school.
ケニアで高校に行くには入学試験があり
03:28
And there's national schools, which are like the best schools,
最高レベルの国立高校と
03:34
and provincial schools.
州立の高校とがあります
03:37
My dream school at that time was Kenya High School,
国立のケニア高校を
03:39
a national school.
受けた私は
03:41
I missed the cutoff by one point.
1点差で落ち
03:42
And I was so disappointed, and I was like,
とてもがっかりしました
03:43
"Oh my God, you know, what am I going to do?"
どうしようかと思っていると
03:46
And my father said, "OK, listen.
父親がきて
03:49
Let's go and try and talk to the headmistress.
1点足りないだけなら
03:50
You know, it's just one point. I mean,
校長先生に話せば
03:52
maybe she'll let you in if that slot's still there."
入れるだろうと言いました
03:54
So we went to the school,
父と学校へ行きましたが
03:57
and because we were nobodies, and because we didn't have privilege,
父はごく普通の市民で何の役職もなく
04:00
and because my father didn't have the right last name,
立派な一族の出でもなかったので
04:06
he was treated like dirt.
酷い扱いをされました
04:10
And I sat and listened to the headmistress talk to him, saying,
校長が父親に向かって言うのです
04:12
you know, who do you think you are?
何ですって?
04:16
And, you know, you must be joking if you think
空きがあれば娘さんが入学できると
04:17
you can get a slot.
お考えですか?
04:21
And I had gone to school with other girls, who were kids of politicians,
同級生だった政治家の娘達は
04:22
and who had done much, much worse than I did,
私よりずっと成績が悪くても
04:27
and they had slots there.
国立高校に進学しました
04:29
And there's nothing worse than seeing your parent
親が自分の前で
04:32
being humiliated in front of you, you know?
バカにされるのは 嫌な気分でした
04:34
And we left, and I swore to myself,
それで決心しました
04:37
and I was like, "I'm never, ever going to have
どんな時も 他人に頼ったり
04:39
to beg for anything in my life."
しないとね
04:42
They called me two weeks later, they're like,
後に合格の連絡があっても
04:43
oh, yeah, you can come now. And I told them to stuff it.
「他の人を入れて」と言ってしまいました
04:45
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑い)(拍手)
04:50
Final story, and I sort of have to speak quickly.
次は病気の話を
04:52
Disease.
手短に
04:56
My father, who I've been talking about, died of AIDS in 1999.
父は1999年にエイズで亡くなりました
04:57
He never told anyone that he had AIDS,
不名誉な病気なので
05:04
his fear of the stigma was so strong.
病名をずっと隠していましたが
05:06
And I'm pretty much the one who figured it out, because I was a nerd.
当時アメリカに住んで勉強していた私には
05:09
And I was in the States at the time,
分かりました
05:14
and they called me. He was very sick, the first time he got sick.
最初に発病したとき電話で
05:16
And he had Cryptococcal meningitis.
薬の名前をきいたので
05:19
And so I went on to Google, Cryptococcal meningitis, you know.
オンラインで調べたのです
05:22
Because of doctor-patient privilege,
医者から詳しい説明は
05:25
they couldn't really tell us what was going on.
されませんでしたが
05:28
But they were like, you know, this is a long-term thing.
簡単には直らない感じでした
05:29
And when I went online and looked at the infectious --
インターネットで父の病気についての
05:32
read about the disease,
記事をたくさん読んで
05:36
I pretty much realized what was going on.
その後の経過が分かりました
05:40
The first time he got sick, he recovered.
最初の症状は落ち着いたものの
05:42
But what happened was that he had to be on medication
投薬が必要になりました
05:45
that, at that time -- Diflucan, which in the States
米国の企業が開発した薬は
05:47
is used for yeast infections -- cost 30 dollars a pill.
一錠あたり30ドルもしましたが
05:50
He had to be on that pill for the rest of his life.
飲み続けなければ 命にかかわります
05:54
You know, so money ran out.
お金が続かなくなって
06:00
He got sick again.
病気が再発しました
06:02
And up until that time, he had a friend who used to travel to India,
インドへよく旅行する父の友人に
06:04
and he used to import, bring him, could
安い後発製品を手に入れてもらい
06:08
get him a generic version of it.
それを飲むことで
06:12
And that kept him going.
何とか生きながらえていましたが
06:14
But the money ran out.
それも買えなくなり
06:16
He got sick again. He got sick on a Friday.
金曜日に 症状が出ました
06:18
At that time, there was only one bank that had ATMs in Kenya,
しかし当時はATMもなく
06:21
and we could not get cash. The family couldn't get cash
私たち家族は現金が手元になかったので
06:24
for him to start the treatment until Monday.
月曜日まで治療ができません
06:31
The hospital put him on a water drip for three days.
病院の点滴台で3日間寝かされるだけ
06:34
And finally, we figured, well, OK,
ならば公立の病院に行き
06:39
we'd better just try and take him to a public hospital.
治療してもらおうと
06:42
At least he'll get treated
家族で決めて
06:44
while we try to figure out the money situation.
お金の相談をしました
06:45
And he died when the ambulance was coming
しかし 救急車は間に合わず
06:47
to the hospital to take him.
結局 父は亡くなりました
06:49
And, you know, now, imagine if -- and I could go on and on --
まだまだいくらでも お話できます
06:52
imagine if this is all you know about me.
これを聞いて 皆さんは
06:57
How would you look at me?
私のことを見ながら
07:00
With pity, you know. Sadness.
かわいそうだと同情するでしょう
07:04
And this is how you look at Africa.
アフリカも同情されているのです
07:08
This is the damage it causes.
それで損をしているのは
07:11
You don't see the other side of me.
私がブロガーであるとか
07:13
You don't see the blogger,
ハーバード大卒の弁護士で
07:15
you don't see the Harvard-educated lawyer,
活発な人柄だ
07:16
the vibrant person, you know?
という面が見過ごされることです
07:18
And I just wanted to personalize that.
個人的に考えてみましょう
07:21
Because we talk about it in big terms,
話が大きくなると
07:23
and you wonder, you know, so what?
他人事にしか思えず
07:25
But it's damaging.
いい面も見えません
07:28
And I'm not unique, right?
私だけではなく
07:31
Imagine if all you knew about William
あなたの知人にも
07:33
was the fact that he grew up in a poor village.
貧しい村で育った少年がいる
07:35
And you didn't know about the windmill, you know?
風車のことは知らなくても
07:38
And I was just moved.
話を聞いただけで
07:41
I was actually crying during his presentation.
私は泣いてしまいました
07:43
He was like, I try and I make.
挑戦して成し遂げた彼は
07:46
I was like Nike should hire him, you know, "Just do it!"
ナイキに就職できますね
07:48
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:51
And this is, again, the point I'm trying to make.
要するに人々は
07:54
When you focus just on the disasters --
惨事にばかり目を向け
07:55
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑い)(拍手)
07:57
-- we're ignoring the potential.
可能性を見ようとしないのです
08:08
So, what is to be done?
ではどうすれば良いのか
08:11
First of all,
先ず最初に
08:15
Africans, we need to get better at telling our stories.
自分達の体験を話しましょう
08:16
We heard about that yesterday.
アフリカでいつも
08:19
We had some of them this morning.
見聞きすることを
08:21
And this is an example, you know,
伝えるのです
08:23
blogging is one way of doing that.
ブログも有効です
08:25
Afrigator is an aggregator of African blogs
アフリカ人のブログを集めた
08:27
that was developed in South Africa.
南アのサイトがあります
08:30
So we need to start getting better.
私達の発展のために
08:33
If no one else will tell our stories, let's do it.
自分から現状を話しましょう
08:34
And going back to the point I was trying to make,
これはスワヒリ語の
08:37
this is the Swahili Wikipedia.
ウィキペデイアです
08:38
Swahili is spoken by about 50 million people in East Africa.
アフリカで5000万人が話す言葉なのに
08:42
It only has five contributors.
書いているのは5人だけ
08:46
Four of them are white males -- non-native speakers.
そのうち4人は白人男性です
08:49
The other person is -- Ndesanjo, if you're here, stand up --
もう1人は ここにいるかもしれませんが
08:53
is a Tanzanian, [the] first Swahili blogger.
タンザニア人ブロガーです
08:58
He's the only African who's contributing to this.
アフリカ人は彼だけです
09:01
People, please. We can't whine and complain
しかし西洋人が書いていることを
09:04
the West is doing this.
非難してはいけません
09:08
What are we doing?
スワヒリ語を話す他の人も
09:09
Where are the rest of the Swahili speakers?
声を上げるのです
09:12
Why are we not generating our own content?
自分の国を創るために
09:14
You know, it's not enough to complain. We need to act.
批判ではなく行動するのです
09:16
Reuters now integrates African blogs
ロイターはアフリカ欄の充実のため
09:20
into their coverage of Africa.
アフリカ人のブログを集めています
09:23
So, that's a start,
他にも今までに
09:25
and we've heard of all their other initiatives.
いろいろな活動がありました
09:26
The cheetah generation.
偽の援助をもちかけて
09:29
The aid approach, you know, is flawed.
気を引いた「チーター ジェネレーション」
09:30
And after all the hoopla of Live 8,
ライブ8もありましたね
09:34
we're still not anywhere in the picture.
それでも良い将来は見えません
09:36
No, you're not.
あなたは違いますから
09:39
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:41
But the point I'm trying to make, though,
分かって欲しいのは
09:53
is that it's not enough for us to criticize.
批判だけではダメだということです
09:55
And for those of you in the diaspora
祖国を離れて暮らし
09:59
who are struggling with where should I be,
将来は故郷に戻るか
10:01
should I move back,
外国にとどまるか
10:03
should I stay?
悩んでいるならば
10:04
You know, just jump.
祖国に戻ってください
10:05
The continent needs you.
アフリカにはあなたが必要です
10:07
And I can't emphasize that enough, you know.
いいですか
10:10
I walked away from a job with one of the top firms in D.C.,
私はワシントンDCの一流企業で
10:12
Covington and Burling, six figures.
働いていました
10:17
With two paychecks, or three paychecks,
給料も良かったので
10:19
I could solve a lot of my family's problems.
家族にかなり仕送りしていました
10:21
But I walked away from that, because my passion was here,
しかし私は会社を辞めました
10:24
and because I wanted to do things that were fulfilling.
私が必要とされている場所で
10:28
And because I'm needed here, you know?
役に立つ事をしたかったのです
10:31
I probably can win a prize for the most ways
ハーバード法学部を出て
10:35
to use a Harvard Law School degree
私が今していることは
10:38
because of all the things I'm doing.
とても立派な仕事です
10:40
One is because I'm pretty aggressive,
積極的に
10:42
and I try and find, you know, opportunities.
チャンスを生かし
10:43
But there is such a need, you know?
知識を役立てています
10:46
I'm a corporate lawyer most of the time
普段は
10:49
for an organization called Enablis
顧問弁護士として
10:50
that supports entrepreneurs in South Africa.
南アや東アフリカの
10:52
We're now moving into East Africa.
起業家を支援しています
10:55
And we give them business development services,
融資や株式発行を通じて
10:58
as well as financing loan and equity.
事業の発展を助けているのです
11:01
I've also set up a project in Kenya,
ケニアでは国会議員の
11:05
and what we do is we track the performance
実績追跡プロジェクトを
11:07
of Kenyan MPs.
立ち上げました
11:09
My partner, M, who's a tech guru, hacked WordPress.
仲間のMが用意したサーバー費用に
11:10
It costs us, like, 20 dollars a month just for hosting.
月に20ドルかかりますが
11:14
Everything else on there is a labor of love.
その他の作業はみんな無償で
11:16
We've manually entered all the data there.
ひとつひとつデータを入力しました
11:20
And you can get profiles of each MP,
各人の経歴や国会質問などが
11:22
questions they've asked in parliament.
調べられます
11:25
We have a comment function,
コメント欄に
11:27
where people can ask their MPs questions.
質問を書き込めば
11:29
There are some MPs who participate,
国会で質問してくれる
11:31
and come back and ask.
議員もいます
11:33
And basically, we started this because we were tired
これまでは政治家を批判することに
11:34
of complaining about our politicians.
国民は疲れきっていました
11:36
You know, I believe that accountability stems from demand.
国民が要求しなければ政治家は説明しません
11:39
You're not just going to be accountable
政治家の良心に期待しても
11:42
out of the goodness of your heart.
無駄です
11:44
And we as Africans need to start challenging our leaders.
アフリカ人も議員の行動に
11:45
What are they doing?
注目しましょう
11:48
You know, they're not going to change
今のままでは
11:50
just out of nowhere.
何も変わりません
11:51
So we need new policies, we need --
私達に必要な新しい政策
11:53
where's that coming from, you know?
それは誰が作るのか?
11:55
Another thing is that these leaders
国の指導者達は
11:57
are a reflection of our society.
社会を映す鏡なのです
11:59
We talk about African governments
アフリカの政府で
12:02
like they've been dropped from Mars, you know?
会議をするのは火星人ではなく
12:04
They come from us.
私達と同じ人間です
12:07
And what is it about our society that is generating leaders that we don't like?
国民が嫌う政治家を選ぶ社会を
12:09
And how can we change that?
変えるためには?
12:13
So Mzalendo was one small way we thought we could start
指導者に説明責任を果たさせるように
12:15
inspiring people to start holding their leaders accountable.
「ムザレンド」は国民の教育を始めています
12:19
Where do we go from here?
お集まりのみなさん
12:23
I believe in the power of ideas.
意見を共有するのは
12:25
I believe in the power of sharing knowledge.
素晴らしいことです
12:27
And I'd ask all of you, when you leave here, please just share,
みなさんが帰宅され ここで得た知恵を
12:29
and keep the ideas that you've gotten out of here going,
誰かに話してもらうことで
12:34
because it can make a difference.
将来が変わるかもしれません
12:37
The other thing I want to urge you to do
そしてまたぜひとも
12:40
is take an interest in the individual.
個人の話に耳を傾けてください
12:42
I've had lots of conversations about things I think
アフリカに必要なことを
12:45
need to be happening in Africa.
いろいろ話しましたが
12:48
People are like, "OK, if you don't do aid,
私は援助活動はしない
12:50
I'm a bleeding heart liberal, what can I do?"
血気盛んなリベラル派だと
12:52
And when I talk about my ideas, they're like,
思われそうです
12:55
"BBut it's not scalable, you know.
確かに私の考えを
12:56
Give me something I can do with Paypal."
お金で計るのは
12:58
It's not that easy, you know?
難しいことです
13:00
And sometimes just taking an interest in the individual,
しかしたまには仲間や同僚の意見に
13:02
in the fellows you've met, and the businesspeople you've met,
耳を傾けてください
13:06
it can make a huge difference, especially in Africa,
だいぶ考えが変わるはずです
13:09
because usually the individual in Africa
アフリカの人々は
13:11
carries a lot of people behind them.
支えあって生活しています
13:13
Practically. I mean, when I was a first-year student in law school,
私がロースクールの一年生のとき
13:15
my mom's business had collapsed, so I was supporting her.
母が失業し 私が母を手伝いました
13:20
My sister was struggling to get through undergrad.
私は大学生の妹の
13:24
I was helping her pay her tuition.
学費を払い
13:26
My cousin ran out of school fees, and she's really smart.
貧しかった優秀ないとこの
13:28
I was paying her school fees.
学費を払いました
13:31
A cousin of mine died of AIDS, left an orphan,
いとこがエイズで亡くなると
13:32
so we said, well, what are we going to do with her?
残された子どもを
13:35
You know, she's now my baby sister.
母が引き取りました
13:37
And because of the opportunities that were afforded to me,
私はこれらの人々を
13:39
I am able to lift all those people.
救えたからです
13:41
So, don't underestimate that.
そうした事が大切なのです
13:43
An example. This man changed my life.
私の人生を変えたのは
13:47
He's a professor. He's now at Vanderbilt.
バンダービルト大学の
13:49
He's an undergrad professor, Mitchell Seligson.
ミッチェル教授でした
13:51
And because of him, I got into Harvard Law School,
教授に ハーバード進学を
13:54
because he took an interest.
勧められました
13:56
I was taking a class of his, and he was just like,
とても熱心に授業を聴いていたので
13:57
this is an overeager student,
冷めた態度の米国人の中で
14:01
which we don't normally get in the United States,
目立ってしまい
14:03
because everyone else is cynical and jaded.
個人的に呼び出されました
14:05
He called me to his office and said,
進路をきかれて
14:09
"What do you want to do when you grow up?"
弁護士になりたいと
14:10
I said, "I want to be a lawyer."
私が言うと
14:11
And he was like, "Why? You know,
米国は弁護士が多すぎるのに
14:12
we don't need another lawyer in the United States."
どうしてかと言われ
14:15
And he tried to talk me out of it,
理由を話しました
14:17
but it was like, "OK, I know nothing about applying to law school,
教授は政治学専攻で法学部は
14:19
I'm poli-sci Ph.D.
分からないが
14:22
But, you know, let's figure out what I need you to do,
できる限りの協力を
14:23
what I need to do to help you out."
約束してくれました
14:27
It was like, "Where do you want to go?"
どの学校が良いか
14:28
And to me at that time university --
尋ねられた私は
14:30
I was at University of Pitts for undergrad,
当時通っていた大学は
14:31
and that was like heaven, OK,
ケニアの大学に比べれば
14:33
because compared to what could have been in Kenya.
天国のようだったので
14:35
So I'm like, "Yeah, I'm just applying to Pitt for law school."
そこの名前を言いました
14:37
He was like, "Why? You know, you're smart,
すると教授は
14:40
you have all these things going for you."
君はもっと賢いのにと言ったのです
14:42
And I'm like, "Because I'm here and it's cheap,
でも 学費も安いし
14:44
and you know, I kind of like Pittsburgh."
土地柄も好きだと言うと
14:46
Like, that's the dumbest reason I've ever heard
そんな受験生なんて
14:49
for applying to law school.
聞いたことがないと言われました
14:51
And, you know, so he took me under his wing, and he encouraged me.
そして教授は私をこう励ましてくれました
14:53
And he said, "Look, you can get into Harvard,
「あなたほど優秀なら
14:57
you're that good, OK?
ハーバードに入れる
14:59
And if they don't admit you, they're the ones who are messed up."
君を入学させないなら 向こうが間違っている」
15:00
And he built me up, you know?
それでその気になりました
15:05
And this is just an illustration.
これは ほんの一例で
15:07
You can meet other individuals here.
ここにいる他の人も
15:09
We just need a push.
ほんの一歩
15:11
That's all I needed was a push to go to the next level.
踏み出せば 次の段階に進めるのです
15:12
Basically, I want to end with my vision for Africa, you know?
最後に私が描くアフリカ像をお話します
15:18
A gentleman spoke yesterday about the indignity
昨日 一人の紳士が
15:25
of us having to leave the continent
アフリカ大陸を離れざるを得なかったことで
15:27
so that we can fulfill our potential.
才能を発揮できたと言いました
15:32
You know, my vision is that my daughter,
私は娘を含めた
15:35
and any other African child being born today,
アフリカ人の子ども達に
15:37
can be whoever they want to be here,
アフリカを離れることなく
15:41
without having to leave.
やりたい仕事をし
15:45
And they can have the possibility of transcending
生まれた環境から抜け出して
15:47
the circumstances under which they were born.
上のレベルに行って欲しい
15:51
That's one thing you Americans take for granted, you know?
米国人なら誰でも
15:54
That you can grow up, you know, not so good circumstances,
生まれた環境が悪ければ
15:57
and you can move.
引っ越せばいいと考えます
16:01
Just because you are born in rural Arkansas, whatever,
アーカンサス生まれと言うことに
16:04
that doesn't define who you are.
深い意味はない
16:08
For most Africans today, where you live, or where you were born,
しかし多くのアフリカ人にとっては
16:09
and the circumstances under which you were born,
生まれた環境によって人生が
16:15
determine the rest of your life.
決まってしまうのです
16:18
I would like to see that change,
この状況を変えて下さい
16:20
and the change starts with us.
私達が変えるのです
16:22
And as Africans, we need to take responsibility for our continent.
アフリカ人として責任を持ちましょう
16:24
Thank you.
ありがとう
16:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:29
Translated by Chieko Tamakawa
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

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About the Speaker:

Ory Okolloh - Blogger and activist
Ory Okolloh maintains the blog Mzalendo, providing an unprecedented look at the doings of Kenya's parliament -- information once unavailable to Kenyan citizens.

Why you should listen

Ory Okolloh is a blogger and open-government activist. She runs Mzalendo, a pioneering civic website that tracks the performance of Kenya's Parliament and its Parliamentarians. With a vote tracker, articles and opinion pieces, the site connects Kenyans to their leaders and opens the lid on this powerful and once-secretive body. (This is a Parliament that finally agreed to have its procedings televised in August 2008.)

Okolloh's own blog is called Kenyan Pundit, and it tracks her work with Mzalendo and her other efforts as part of the rebuilding of Kenya, following the post-election violence in late 2007 (she collected a powerful series of diaries of the violence, dozens of essays from Kenyans and others -- well worth a read).

Okolloh is part of a wave of young Africans who are using the power of blogging, SMS and web-enabled openness to push their countries forward and help Africans to truly connect. Tools like Ushahidi help to link a people whose tribal differences, as Okolloh points out again and again, are often cynically exploited by a small group of leaders. Only by connecting Africans can this cycle be broken.

More profile about the speaker
Ory Okolloh | Speaker | TED.com